chơi xổ số keno trực tuyến

{"appState":{"pageLoadApiCallsStatus":true},"categoryState":{"relatedCategories":{"headers":{"timestamp":"2025-01-31T04:01:08+00:00"},"categoryId":33709,"data":{"title":"Literature","slug":"literature","image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"},"slug":"literature","categoryId":33709}],"parentCategory":{"categoryId":33687,"title":"Language & Language Arts","slug":"language-language-arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"}},"childCategories":[],"description":"Learn what makes the work of the world's greatest writers stand out and endure through the ages.","relatedArticles":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles?category=33709&offset=0&size=5"},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":38,"bookCount":3},"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"}},"relatedCategoriesLoadedStatus":"success"},"listState":{"list":{"count":10,"total":38,"items":[{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T22:51:24+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-05-03T18:49:18+00:00","timestamp":"2024-05-03T21:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"},"slug":"literature","categoryId":33709}],"title":"What To Expect in an AP English Literature Class","strippedTitle":"what to expect in an ap english literature class","slug":"considering-an-ap-english-literature-and-composition-class","canonicalUrl":"","搜素游戏引挚SEO提升":{"metaDescription":"Whether or not to enroll in that AP English Literature and Composition class can be a difficult decision. An AP English class can be a lot of work, but it can y","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Whether or not to enroll in that AP English Literature and Composition class can be a difficult decision. An AP English class can be a lot of work, but it can yield great rewards. Here is some information to help you make that choice.\r\n\r\nEach AP English teacher has a degree of freedom in designing the course. (Getting English teachers to agree on something is a little harder than herding cats, so this is probably a good idea.) Though the classes vary, some things remain the same:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>An AP English Literature course must, according to College Board rules, throw college-level work at you. In other words, the course material must be difficult.</li>\r\n \t<li>The College Board doesn't mandate a particular reading list, but it does ask that students read a wide variety of literature in the AP class. By the time you finish your course, the College Board wants you to have read something from every genre and every time period from the 16th century through the present day. Both British and American writers must be on the reading list, as well as some translated works. (You don't have to read everything in your AP year; you just have to read it sometime.)</li>\r\n \t<li>All the material is supposed to be of good literary quality, which means writing that rewards close reading. If you \"get\" a book in one reading, it isn't AP material.</li>\r\n \t<li>Expect the amount of reading to equal or surpass the amount you read in an honors English class: 10 or 12 full-length works and a good fistful of poetry.</li>\r\n \t<li>Some AP English teachers start you off with homework for the summer. You may have to read a couple books or write something to hand in on the first day of school.</li>\r\n \t<li>Expect to write <i>a lot</i> — everything from informal journal entries to polished essays.</li>\r\n \t<li>The grading may be tougher in an AP class than in a regular English section because teachers apply college-level standards to your work in an AP class.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Facing the AP English exam</h2>\r\nThe purpose of the AP class is, of course, to prepare you for the AP exam. When you walk into the test room in May, what kind of questions will you face? The College Board hits you with two sections:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><b>Multiple-choice section:</b> Each question has five potential answers; you interpret five or six pieces of literature that are printed on the exam. Selections include poems, maybe a dramatic scene or a slice of memoir, and one or two novel excerpts.</li>\r\n \t<li><b>Essay section:</b> Two essay questions are based on a piece of literature that's provided on the exam; the third is an open-ended essay based on a work of literary quality that you choose.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nLiterary selections on the exam may include anything from Tudor times (16th century) onward. The selections will most likely be American or British, though works from other English-speaking countries may pop up, as well. Literature translated into English from another language is also fair game. Usually, one-third to slightly less than half of the literature is poetry.","description":"Whether or not to enroll in that AP English Literature and Composition class can be a difficult decision. An AP English class can be a lot of work, but it can yield great rewards. Here is some information to help you make that choice.\r\n\r\nEach AP English teacher has a degree of freedom in designing the course. (Getting English teachers to agree on something is a little harder than herding cats, so this is probably a good idea.) Though the classes vary, some things remain the same:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>An AP English Literature course must, according to College Board rules, throw college-level work at you. In other words, the course material must be difficult.</li>\r\n \t<li>The College Board doesn't mandate a particular reading list, but it does ask that students read a wide variety of literature in the AP class. By the time you finish your course, the College Board wants you to have read something from every genre and every time period from the 16th century through the present day. Both British and American writers must be on the reading list, as well as some translated works. (You don't have to read everything in your AP year; you just have to read it sometime.)</li>\r\n \t<li>All the material is supposed to be of good literary quality, which means writing that rewards close reading. If you \"get\" a book in one reading, it isn't AP material.</li>\r\n \t<li>Expect the amount of reading to equal or surpass the amount you read in an honors English class: 10 or 12 full-length works and a good fistful of poetry.</li>\r\n \t<li>Some AP English teachers start you off with homework for the summer. You may have to read a couple books or write something to hand in on the first day of school.</li>\r\n \t<li>Expect to write <i>a lot</i> — everything from informal journal entries to polished essays.</li>\r\n \t<li>The grading may be tougher in an AP class than in a regular English section because teachers apply college-level standards to your work in an AP class.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Facing the AP English exam</h2>\r\nThe purpose of the AP class is, of course, to prepare you for the AP exam. When you walk into the test room in May, what kind of questions will you face? The College Board hits you with two sections:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><b>Multiple-choice section:</b> Each question has five potential answers; you interpret five or six pieces of literature that are printed on the exam. Selections include poems, maybe a dramatic scene or a slice of memoir, and one or two novel excerpts.</li>\r\n \t<li><b>Essay section:</b> Two essay questions are based on a piece of literature that's provided on the exam; the third is an open-ended essay based on a work of literary quality that you choose.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nLiterary selections on the exam may include anything from Tudor times (16th century) onward. The selections will most likely be American or British, though works from other English-speaking countries may pop up, as well. Literature translated into English from another language is also fair game. Usually, one-third to slightly less than half of the literature is poetry.","blurb":"","authors":[],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33709,"title":"Literature","slug":"literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Facing the AP English exam","target":"#tab1"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":209243,"title":"Poetry For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"poetry-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209243"}},{"articleId":209223,"title":"Shakespeare For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"shakespeare-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209223"}},{"articleId":209204,"title":"Sherlock Holmes For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sherlock-holmes-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209204"}},{"articleId":207889,"title":"Jane Austen For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"jane-austen-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207889"}},{"articleId":207831,"title":"The Origins of Tolkien's Middle-earth For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"the-origins-of-tolkiens-middle-earth-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207831"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6452cb8f31615\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6452cb8f31cf1\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-05-03T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":200660},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T22:51:26+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-04-25T16:39:12+00:00","timestamp":"2024-04-25T18:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"},"slug":"literature","categoryId":33709}],"title":"What the Hobbits Represent in Tolkien's Books","strippedTitle":"what the hobbits represent in tolkien's books","slug":"concerning-the-nature-of-hobbits-in-tolkiens-middle-earth","canonicalUrl":"","搜素游戏引挚SEO提升":{"metaDescription":"Tolkien seems to have regarded the Elves as his favorite creatures of Middle-earth, but most of his readers seem to be hobbit-lovers at heart. They find hobbits","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Tolkien seems to have regarded the Elves as his favorite creatures of Middle-earth, but most of his readers seem to be hobbit-lovers at heart. They find hobbits to be the most likeable and also to be the most like themselves, despite some obvious differences (for most people) in the height and furry-footedness departments.\r\n\r\nEven Tolkien referred to himself as a hobbit (\"in all but size\") for his love of pipe-smoking, gardens, plain and simple food, peace and quiet, his dislike of mechanized farmlands and traveling, and his fondness for wearing ornamental waistcoats on particularly dull days.\r\n\r\nBefore considering what hobbits really meant to Tolkien, you need to picture them as Tolkien designed them. In the Prologue to <i>The Lord of the Rings,</i> Tolkien asserts that hobbits are distantly related to humans and acquaints readers with all their vital statistics. According to this Prologue, hobbit characteristics include the following:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>A height of between two and four feet</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Feet with tough, leathery soles covered in hair (they seldom wear shoes)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Long skillful fingers</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>A tendency towards chubbiness</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Little or no facial hair</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>An ability to disappear swiftly and silently</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Excellent hearing and sharp eyesight</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>No understanding of machinery more complicated than the watermill, forge bellows, and the hand loom</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>A delight in wearing bright colors, particularly yellow and green</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>A love of food and drink (especially ale), eating a mere six times a day on average</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>A love of laughter, jests, games, and celebrations</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>A love of peace and quiet and \"good tilled\" earth</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>A particular love for the smoking of tobacco in small clay pipes</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nFor many readers, one of the more important hobbit characteristics is missing from this list — namely, their tendency to live in burrows or what Tolkien so ignobly calls a hole.\r\n\r\nIn fact, Tolkien is quite clear that only extremely rich or poor hobbits live in burrows (sometimes referred to in <i>The Lord of the Rings</i> as <i>smials</i> from the Old English <i>smygel,</i> meaning a \"burrow\" or \"place to crawl into\"). Because Bilbo and Frodo are such major characters in <i>The Hobbit</i> and <i>The Lord of the Rings,</i> and are fairly well-to-do, you are probably more accustomed to hobbits dwelling in very well-appointed holes (none of your wet, smelly rabbit holes, mind you). The more middle-class hobbits, Tolkien assures you, dwell above ground in houses of wood, brick, or stone.\r\n\r\nHobbits are deeply contented with their way of life. Understanding the level of this contentment is important to comprehending their central role in <i>The Lord of the Rings</i> and <i>The Hobbit.</i> Tolkien therefore spends a good deal of time introducing the reader to the way hobbits party and hang out together, thus ensuring that his readers understand the depth of this contentment.\r\n\r\nA great part of the overall contentment with the hobbit way of life comes from their deep love of the Shire (from Old English <i>scir</i> meaning a \"district\"). The Shire is the region where most hobbits live, in the northwest section of the land of Eriador. Tolkien, like many English authors before him, is in love with his own \"shire\" (the Midlands in his case) and therefore naturally fosters in his hobbit characters a parallel love for their homeland.\r\n\r\nIn the tradition of English villagers at the turn of the nineteenth century, the hobbits of the Shire are very distrustful of any kind of stranger. They think it quite \"queer\" when they run into hobbits such as Bilbo and Frodo who go off on foreign adventures.\r\n\r\nBecause everything any hobbit could desire is found right in the Shire, why would any hobbit <i>in his right mind</i> want to go off to some strange, far-off land in search of adventure, of all things! They often say that this isn't natural and trouble will come of it. And it often does.\r\n\r\nSo hobbits are Tolkien's \"Everyman\" in Middle-earth — creatures who just want to mind their own business and live a simple life. But the hobbits' simple life, just the like the one that Tolkien knew as a boy in the village of Sarehole (a hamlet just outside Birmingham), is being threatened by the outside world.\r\n\r\nJust as Tolkien saw the urban sprawl from Birmingham threaten the isolation and idyllic rural existence of Sarehole, the Shire in the Third Age faces its own menace from without that threatens to end its isolation from the rest of Middle-earth and endanger the hobbits' very way of life.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Hobbits and their homespun wisdom</h2>\r\nAmong the many delightful aspects of hobbits is their great homespun wisdom. Tolkien puts a number of pithy sayings, proverbs, and aphorisms into the mouths of the hobbits of the Shire.\r\n\r\nOn the surface, the wisdom of these sayings appears commonsensical, but becomes a bit more complex when examined further. In Middle-earth, hobbits could write the equivalent of Ben Franklin's <i>Poor Richard's Almanac </i>—they achieve contentment by living their lives according to truisms.\r\n\r\nOne of the first of these sayings comes from the Gaffer, Sam's dad. At one point, the Gaffer warns his son about queer folk such as Bilbo Baggins by telling him not to get mixed up in the affairs of <i>\"your betters\" </i>or<i> \"you'll land in trouble too big for you.\"</i>\r\n\r\nWhen the hobbit fellowship of Frodo, Sam, Merry, and Pippin are making their way to the Bucklebury Ferry, Frodo suggests cutting across country to save time and avoid the roads (and the Black Riders who are following them). Pippin responds, <i>\"Short cuts make long delays.\"</i>\r\n\r\nA couple of favorite aphorisms come from the incident in which Frodo finally gets Gandalf's letter at the inn of the Prancing Pony in Bree, warning him to make sure that he's dealing with the \"real\" Strider.\r\n\r\nFrodo tells Strider that if he (Strider) were a spy of the Enemy, he would somehow <i>\"seem fairer and feel fouler</i>.<i>\"</i> Then, after Strider wryly observes that his looks are against him, Pippin quotes the old saying of the Shire, <i>\"handsome is as handsome does\"</i> — words of wisdom that many a mother tries to pass on to her daughters.\r\n\r\nAs you can see, these commonsensical hobbit sayings are cautions when making judgments about the truth of a situation. They are forewarnings of the troubles that come your way when you can't effectively make these determinations. This makes them typical of the kind \"folk\" wisdom and truisms that that abound not only in faraway legends but also in today's small communities all around the world.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Hobbit-sized heroes</h2>\r\nDespite their short stature and relatively conservative nature, at least when it comes to traveling and going on adventures, hobbits are the heroes of <i>The Hobbit</i> and <i>The Lord of the Rings</i>. In the case of <i>The Hobbit</i>, Bilbo Baggins saves the day for the Dwarves of the Lonely Mountain, even though it is a Man, Bard the Bowman, who slays Smaug the dragon, and even though it takes a host of Men, Elves, Dwarves, eagles, plus Gandalf to defeat the army of goblins and wolves.\r\n\r\nIn the case of <i>The Lord of the Rings</i>, it's the hobbits Frodo, Sam, Pippin, Merry, and yes, even Sméagol/Gollum, who save Middle-earth from the domination of Sauron.\r\n\r\nOn the one hand, you may find it strange that Tolkien calls upon the \"wee\" folk of his fantasy world to carry the day. On the other hand, if you consider the hobbits' diminutive stature as a sign not of a lack of courage or steadfastness, but rather as a lack of towering ambition and desire, their heroic role makes perfect sense.\r\n\r\nIn <i>The Lord of the Rings</i>, the Men, Elves, Dwarves, and wizards in the story, for all their might, are not able to handle the One Ring. Only Bilbo, Frodo, Sam, and Gollum are able to bear it, each with differing amounts of harm to their personalities.\r\n\r\nAll those \"greater\" in stature than the hobbits, including the Dwarves because of their greater stoutness, are hampered by their high aspirations and the great purposes to which they would put the One Ring. To be sure, those purposes are noble ones, such as defending their people and defeating the Enemy. But most hobbits lack any overarching goals (other than a pint of beer and a good meal) that the One Ring could amplify and distort and in turn use to control them.\r\n\r\nThe hobbit who suffers the most in bearing the Ring is Frodo, because he carries the ambition of destroying the Ring in the fires of Mount Doom — a noble goal but one that the Ring itself naturally resists.\r\n\r\nThe hobbits' way of life also suggests the \"common person\" who does his or her duty without any greater goal than a job well done and seeing the matter through to its conclusion — the ideal of any good infantryman, as Tolkien's experience on the front in World War I confirmed.\r\n\r\nBy contrast, the high and the mighty seldom, if ever, do anything for its own sake. They are always working for a \"greater\" goal that inevitably colors the endeavor and that often can work against the very thing they want so badly to accomplish.\r\n\r\nViewed in this light, Tolkien's selection of hobbits as the true heroes of <i>The Lord of the Rings</i> and <i>The Hobbit</i> marks these works as very contemporary in outlook. For it seems that in contemporary history — the modern democratic age — the common man is the hero. This was especially true in the two World Wars (Tolkien fought in the first one, and his son Christopher fought in the second).\r\n\r\nIn Tolkien's opinion, it wasn't the lieutenants, colonels, and commanders who were the true heroes of the war, but rather the common soldier — especially the foot soldier, the nameless infantryman.","description":"Tolkien seems to have regarded the Elves as his favorite creatures of Middle-earth, but most of his readers seem to be hobbit-lovers at heart. They find hobbits to be the most likeable and also to be the most like themselves, despite some obvious differences (for most people) in the height and furry-footedness departments.\r\n\r\nEven Tolkien referred to himself as a hobbit (\"in all but size\") for his love of pipe-smoking, gardens, plain and simple food, peace and quiet, his dislike of mechanized farmlands and traveling, and his fondness for wearing ornamental waistcoats on particularly dull days.\r\n\r\nBefore considering what hobbits really meant to Tolkien, you need to picture them as Tolkien designed them. In the Prologue to <i>The Lord of the Rings,</i> Tolkien asserts that hobbits are distantly related to humans and acquaints readers with all their vital statistics. According to this Prologue, hobbit characteristics include the following:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>A height of between two and four feet</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Feet with tough, leathery soles covered in hair (they seldom wear shoes)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Long skillful fingers</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>A tendency towards chubbiness</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Little or no facial hair</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>An ability to disappear swiftly and silently</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Excellent hearing and sharp eyesight</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>No understanding of machinery more complicated than the watermill, forge bellows, and the hand loom</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>A delight in wearing bright colors, particularly yellow and green</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>A love of food and drink (especially ale), eating a mere six times a day on average</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>A love of laughter, jests, games, and celebrations</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>A love of peace and quiet and \"good tilled\" earth</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>A particular love for the smoking of tobacco in small clay pipes</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nFor many readers, one of the more important hobbit characteristics is missing from this list — namely, their tendency to live in burrows or what Tolkien so ignobly calls a hole.\r\n\r\nIn fact, Tolkien is quite clear that only extremely rich or poor hobbits live in burrows (sometimes referred to in <i>The Lord of the Rings</i> as <i>smials</i> from the Old English <i>smygel,</i> meaning a \"burrow\" or \"place to crawl into\"). Because Bilbo and Frodo are such major characters in <i>The Hobbit</i> and <i>The Lord of the Rings,</i> and are fairly well-to-do, you are probably more accustomed to hobbits dwelling in very well-appointed holes (none of your wet, smelly rabbit holes, mind you). The more middle-class hobbits, Tolkien assures you, dwell above ground in houses of wood, brick, or stone.\r\n\r\nHobbits are deeply contented with their way of life. Understanding the level of this contentment is important to comprehending their central role in <i>The Lord of the Rings</i> and <i>The Hobbit.</i> Tolkien therefore spends a good deal of time introducing the reader to the way hobbits party and hang out together, thus ensuring that his readers understand the depth of this contentment.\r\n\r\nA great part of the overall contentment with the hobbit way of life comes from their deep love of the Shire (from Old English <i>scir</i> meaning a \"district\"). The Shire is the region where most hobbits live, in the northwest section of the land of Eriador. Tolkien, like many English authors before him, is in love with his own \"shire\" (the Midlands in his case) and therefore naturally fosters in his hobbit characters a parallel love for their homeland.\r\n\r\nIn the tradition of English villagers at the turn of the nineteenth century, the hobbits of the Shire are very distrustful of any kind of stranger. They think it quite \"queer\" when they run into hobbits such as Bilbo and Frodo who go off on foreign adventures.\r\n\r\nBecause everything any hobbit could desire is found right in the Shire, why would any hobbit <i>in his right mind</i> want to go off to some strange, far-off land in search of adventure, of all things! They often say that this isn't natural and trouble will come of it. And it often does.\r\n\r\nSo hobbits are Tolkien's \"Everyman\" in Middle-earth — creatures who just want to mind their own business and live a simple life. But the hobbits' simple life, just the like the one that Tolkien knew as a boy in the village of Sarehole (a hamlet just outside Birmingham), is being threatened by the outside world.\r\n\r\nJust as Tolkien saw the urban sprawl from Birmingham threaten the isolation and idyllic rural existence of Sarehole, the Shire in the Third Age faces its own menace from without that threatens to end its isolation from the rest of Middle-earth and endanger the hobbits' very way of life.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Hobbits and their homespun wisdom</h2>\r\nAmong the many delightful aspects of hobbits is their great homespun wisdom. Tolkien puts a number of pithy sayings, proverbs, and aphorisms into the mouths of the hobbits of the Shire.\r\n\r\nOn the surface, the wisdom of these sayings appears commonsensical, but becomes a bit more complex when examined further. In Middle-earth, hobbits could write the equivalent of Ben Franklin's <i>Poor Richard's Almanac </i>—they achieve contentment by living their lives according to truisms.\r\n\r\nOne of the first of these sayings comes from the Gaffer, Sam's dad. At one point, the Gaffer warns his son about queer folk such as Bilbo Baggins by telling him not to get mixed up in the affairs of <i>\"your betters\" </i>or<i> \"you'll land in trouble too big for you.\"</i>\r\n\r\nWhen the hobbit fellowship of Frodo, Sam, Merry, and Pippin are making their way to the Bucklebury Ferry, Frodo suggests cutting across country to save time and avoid the roads (and the Black Riders who are following them). Pippin responds, <i>\"Short cuts make long delays.\"</i>\r\n\r\nA couple of favorite aphorisms come from the incident in which Frodo finally gets Gandalf's letter at the inn of the Prancing Pony in Bree, warning him to make sure that he's dealing with the \"real\" Strider.\r\n\r\nFrodo tells Strider that if he (Strider) were a spy of the Enemy, he would somehow <i>\"seem fairer and feel fouler</i>.<i>\"</i> Then, after Strider wryly observes that his looks are against him, Pippin quotes the old saying of the Shire, <i>\"handsome is as handsome does\"</i> — words of wisdom that many a mother tries to pass on to her daughters.\r\n\r\nAs you can see, these commonsensical hobbit sayings are cautions when making judgments about the truth of a situation. They are forewarnings of the troubles that come your way when you can't effectively make these determinations. This makes them typical of the kind \"folk\" wisdom and truisms that that abound not only in faraway legends but also in today's small communities all around the world.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Hobbit-sized heroes</h2>\r\nDespite their short stature and relatively conservative nature, at least when it comes to traveling and going on adventures, hobbits are the heroes of <i>The Hobbit</i> and <i>The Lord of the Rings</i>. In the case of <i>The Hobbit</i>, Bilbo Baggins saves the day for the Dwarves of the Lonely Mountain, even though it is a Man, Bard the Bowman, who slays Smaug the dragon, and even though it takes a host of Men, Elves, Dwarves, eagles, plus Gandalf to defeat the army of goblins and wolves.\r\n\r\nIn the case of <i>The Lord of the Rings</i>, it's the hobbits Frodo, Sam, Pippin, Merry, and yes, even Sméagol/Gollum, who save Middle-earth from the domination of Sauron.\r\n\r\nOn the one hand, you may find it strange that Tolkien calls upon the \"wee\" folk of his fantasy world to carry the day. On the other hand, if you consider the hobbits' diminutive stature as a sign not of a lack of courage or steadfastness, but rather as a lack of towering ambition and desire, their heroic role makes perfect sense.\r\n\r\nIn <i>The Lord of the Rings</i>, the Men, Elves, Dwarves, and wizards in the story, for all their might, are not able to handle the One Ring. Only Bilbo, Frodo, Sam, and Gollum are able to bear it, each with differing amounts of harm to their personalities.\r\n\r\nAll those \"greater\" in stature than the hobbits, including the Dwarves because of their greater stoutness, are hampered by their high aspirations and the great purposes to which they would put the One Ring. To be sure, those purposes are noble ones, such as defending their people and defeating the Enemy. But most hobbits lack any overarching goals (other than a pint of beer and a good meal) that the One Ring could amplify and distort and in turn use to control them.\r\n\r\nThe hobbit who suffers the most in bearing the Ring is Frodo, because he carries the ambition of destroying the Ring in the fires of Mount Doom — a noble goal but one that the Ring itself naturally resists.\r\n\r\nThe hobbits' way of life also suggests the \"common person\" who does his or her duty without any greater goal than a job well done and seeing the matter through to its conclusion — the ideal of any good infantryman, as Tolkien's experience on the front in World War I confirmed.\r\n\r\nBy contrast, the high and the mighty seldom, if ever, do anything for its own sake. They are always working for a \"greater\" goal that inevitably colors the endeavor and that often can work against the very thing they want so badly to accomplish.\r\n\r\nViewed in this light, Tolkien's selection of hobbits as the true heroes of <i>The Lord of the Rings</i> and <i>The Hobbit</i> marks these works as very contemporary in outlook. For it seems that in contemporary history — the modern democratic age — the common man is the hero. This was especially true in the two World Wars (Tolkien fought in the first one, and his son Christopher fought in the second).\r\n\r\nIn Tolkien's opinion, it wasn't the lieutenants, colonels, and commanders who were the true heroes of the war, but rather the common soldier — especially the foot soldier, the nameless infantryman.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9027,"name":"Greg Harvey","slug":"greg-harvey","description":" Greg Harvey is a language scholar who has traced the roots of Tolkien&#146;s work in European folklore and pre-Christian religious beliefs. He has studied 12 languages, including Elvish, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9027"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33709,"title":"Literature","slug":"literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Hobbits and their homespun wisdom","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Hobbit-sized heroes","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":209243,"title":"Poetry For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"poetry-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209243"}},{"articleId":209223,"title":"Shakespeare For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"shakespeare-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209223"}},{"articleId":209204,"title":"Sherlock Holmes For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sherlock-holmes-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209204"}},{"articleId":207889,"title":"Jane Austen For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"jane-austen-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207889"}},{"articleId":207831,"title":"The Origins of Tolkien's Middle-earth For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"the-origins-of-tolkiens-middle-earth-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207831"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6448155f0f952\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6448155f1009c\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-04-25T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":200665},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-27T16:57:07+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-04-12T19:49:28+00:00","timestamp":"2024-04-12T21:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"},"slug":"literature","categoryId":33709}],"title":"Sherlock Holmes For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"sherlock holmes for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"sherlock-holmes-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","搜素游戏引挚SEO提升":{"metaDescription":"Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of the characters Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John H. Watson, wrote 56 short stories and 4 novels featuring the great private detect","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"<p>Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of the characters Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John H. Watson, wrote 56 short stories and 4 novels featuring the great private detective and his loyal sidekick. Sherlock Holmes fans and scholars refer to these 60 stories <i>the canon.</i> All of the novels and almost all of the short stories are narrated by Dr. Watson. Sherlock Holmes himself narrates two of the later short stories.</p>\r\n","description":"<p>Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of the characters Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John H. Watson, wrote 56 short stories and 4 novels featuring the great private detective and his loyal sidekick. Sherlock Holmes fans and scholars refer to these 60 stories <i>the canon.</i> All of the novels and almost all of the short stories are narrated by Dr. Watson. Sherlock Holmes himself narrates two of the later short stories.</p>\r\n","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10476,"name":"Steven Doyle","slug":"steven-doyle","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10476"}},{"authorId":10370,"name":"David A. Crowder","slug":"david-a-crowder","description":" <p><b>David A. Crowder</b> is a professor in the School of Languages at the University of Antioquia in Colombia. He has authored or coauthored more than 25 books, including <i>Google Earth For Dummies</i> and previous editions of <i>Building a Web Site For Dummies</i>. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10370"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33709,"title":"Literature","slug":"literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":209243,"title":"Poetry For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"poetry-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209243"}},{"articleId":209223,"title":"Shakespeare For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"shakespeare-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209223"}},{"articleId":207889,"title":"Jane Austen For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"jane-austen-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207889"}},{"articleId":207831,"title":"The Origins of Tolkien's Middle-earth For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"the-origins-of-tolkiens-middle-earth-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207831"}},{"articleId":201347,"title":"Exploring the Diverse Lands of Middle-earth","slug":"exploring-the-diverse-lands-of-middle-earth","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/201347"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64371c0fdb7d8\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64371c0fdc102\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":193650,"title":"Sherlock Holmes Novels","slug":"sherlock-holmes-novels","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193650"}},{"articleId":193646,"title":"Sherlock Holmes Short Stories","slug":"sherlock-holmes-short-stories","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193646"}}],"content":[{"title":"Sherlock Holmes Novels","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>The Sherlock Holmes canon, authored by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, contains 4 novels and 56 short stories. Three of the four novels have a lengthy flashback that explains the back story and motivation of the adventure at hand. <i>The Hound of the Baskervilles </i>is considered by many to be the greatest Sherlock Holmes adventure.</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>A Study in Scarlet </i>(1887): In this landmark adventure, Dr. John H. Watson is looking for a roommate, and when he&#8217;s introduced to Sherlock Holmes, their immortal partnership begins. As they take up residence together, Watson begins to wonder about the weirdo he has moved in with. What&#8217;s with the mysterious chemical experiments? The endless parade of unusual visitors? What is his line of work? The mystery involves a case of revenge, murder, and obsession that dates back 30 years to the Mormons in Salt Lake City, Utah. Not a bad start!</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>The Sign of the Four</i> (1889): In Doyle&#8217;s sophomore effort, readers discover Holmes&#8217;s drug abuse, meet the Baker Street Irregulars, and head off on a treasure hunt featuring bloodhounds, savage natives, blowguns, and a boat chase on the Thames. Great stuff!</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>The Hound of the Baskervilles</i> (1902): This novel is a Gothic masterpiece of suspense, atmosphere, and horror. It tells the tale of the Baskervilles, who live on the moor and are haunted by a spectral hound, the hound from hell. With mysterious neighbors, an escaped convict on the loose, and a glowing hellhound, <i>The Hound of the Baskervilles</i> is consistently named by fans as their favorite Holmes story of all.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>The Valley of Fear </i>(1915): The fourth and final Sherlock Holmes novel, its story is centered around a classic locked-room mystery: How did someone get into John Douglas&#8217;s room and kill him, especially when the drawbridge across his moat was up?</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Sherlock Holmes Short Stories","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>The Sherlock Holmes canon, authored by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, contains 4 novels and 56 short stories. The short stories are grouped in 5 collections. Doyle generally excelled at the short story format. He once explained that it took as much effort to concoct the plot of a short story as it did a novel.</p>\n<h2>The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes</h2>\n<p><i>The Adventures</i> <i>of Sherlock Holmes</i> collects the first 12 Sherlock Holmes short stories into 1 volume. These tales were originally published serially in<i> The Strand Magazine</i> from July 1891 to June 1892. <i>The Adventures</i> was published in book form in 1892. Here are the 12 stories in this collection:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">A Scandal in Bohemia </p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Red-Headed League</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">A Case of Identity</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Boscombe Valley Mystery</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Five Orange Pips</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Man with the Twisted Lip</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Speckled Band</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Engineer&#8217;s Thumb</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Copper Beeches</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<h2>The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes</h2>\n<p><i>The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes</i> is the second collection of Holmes short stories, originally published in 1894 in<i> The Strand Magazine</i><i>. </i>This collection features the death of Sherlock Holmes in the story &#8220;The Final Problem.&#8221;</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Silver Blaze</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Cardboard Box</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Yellow Face</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Stockbroker&#8217;s Clerk</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Gloria Scott</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Musgrave Ritual</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Reigate Squire</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Crooked Man</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Resident Patient</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Greek Interpreter</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Naval Treaty</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Final Problem</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<h2>The Return of Sherlock Holmes</h2>\n<p><i>The Return of Sherlock Holmes</i> is the collected short-story adventures published after the Holmes&#8217; return from the dead. It appeared in 1905. The stories in this volume include the following:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Empty House</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Norwood Builder</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Dancing Men</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Priory School</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of Black Peter</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Six Napoleons</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Three Students</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Abbey Grange</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Second Stain</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<h2>His Last Bow </h2>\n<p>Originally published in 1917 during World War I, <i>His Last Bow</i> collects into one volume the Sherlock Holmes stories published between 1908 and 1913, plus the title story, &#8220;His Last Bow,&#8221; which was published in 1917. The American edition of this collection had an additional tale, &#8220;The Adventure of the Cardboard Box,&#8221; which had been suppressed years before.</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Red Circle</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Dying Detective</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Disappearance of Lady Francis Carfax</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Devil&#8217;s Foot</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">His Last Bow</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<h2>The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes</h2>\n<p>The last volume of Sherlock Holmes adventures, <i>The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes,</i> was published in 1927. It collects the final 12 short stories, which Arthur Conan Doyle sporadically wrote over the last decade of his life. Here are the final adventures of Sherlock Holmes:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Problem of Thor Bridge</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Creeping Man</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Three Garridebs</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Illustrious Client</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Three Gables</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Lion&#8217;s Mane</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Retired Colourman</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-04-12T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":209204},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-27T16:48:47+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-04-27T16:02:23+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:19:41+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"},"slug":"literature","categoryId":33709}],"title":"The Origins of Tolkien's Middle-earth For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"the origins of tolkien's middle-earth for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"the-origins-of-tolkiens-middle-earth-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","搜素游戏引挚SEO提升":{"metaDescription":"Explore Tolkien's origins, check out his list of notable works, and meet a cast of beings that comprise Middle-earth.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"J.R.R. Tolkien made his literary mark on 20th century readers and contemporary audiences with the rich characters, language, geography, and history of his fascinating world of Middle-earth. Explore the author's own origins, check out his list of notable works, and meet a cast of beings that abound in masterful fantasy storytelling.","description":"J.R.R. Tolkien made his literary mark on 20th century readers and contemporary audiences with the rich characters, language, geography, and history of his fascinating world of Middle-earth. Explore the author's own origins, check out his list of notable works, and meet a cast of beings that abound in masterful fantasy storytelling.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9027,"name":"Greg Harvey","slug":"greg-harvey","description":" <b>Greg Harvey</b> has authored tons of computer books, the most recent being <i>Excel 2007 For Dummies, Windows Vista For Dummies Quick Reference,</i> and <i>Excel Workbook For Dummies.</i> He started out training business users on how to use IBM personal computers and their attendant computer software in the rough-and-tumble days of DOS, WordStar, and Lotus 1-2-3 in the mid-80s of the last century. After working for a number of independent training firms, he went on to teaching semester-long courses in spreadsheet and database management software at Golden Gate University in San Francisco.<br /> His love of teaching has translated into an equal love of writing. <i>For Dummies</i> books are, of course, his all-time favorites to write because they enable him to write to his favorite audience, the beginner. They also enable him to use humor (a key element to success in the training room) and, most delightful of all, to express an opinion or two about the subject matter at hand.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9027"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33709,"title":"Literature","slug":"literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":209243,"title":"Poetry For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"poetry-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209243"}},{"articleId":209223,"title":"Shakespeare For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"shakespeare-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209223"}},{"articleId":209204,"title":"Sherlock Holmes For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sherlock-holmes-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209204"}},{"articleId":207889,"title":"Jane Austen For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"jane-austen-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207889"}},{"articleId":201347,"title":"Exploring the Diverse Lands of Middle-earth","slug":"exploring-the-diverse-lands-of-middle-earth","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/201347"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b3d52bf5\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b3d53662\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":162300,"title":"Background on J.R.R. Tolkien","slug":"background-on-j-r-r-tolkien","categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/162300"}},{"articleId":162305,"title":"Works of Literature by J.R.R. Tolkien","slug":"works-of-literature-by-j-r-r-tolkien","categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/162305"}},{"articleId":162301,"title":"Who Lives in Tolkien's Middle-earth?","slug":"who-lives-in-tolkiens-middle-earth","categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/162301"}}],"content":[{"title":"Background on J.R.R. Tolkien","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>John Ronald Reuel Tolkien was one of the most beloved authors of the 20th century. He was born in South Africa in 1892 of British parents. When he was 2, his mother brought him and his brother back to England, to a village named Sarehole. The idyllic landscape there later inspired his vision of the Shire, home of the hobbits in Middle-earth.</p>\n<p>By the time he was 12, both of his parents had died, and he was raised under the guardianship of a priest. He remained a devout Catholic the rest of his life. After graduating from Exeter College at Oxford, Tolkien entered the military and served as a lieutenant in World War I, where he took part in the Battle of the Somme.</p>\n<p>During this time he began working on an invented mythology that later became <i>The Silmarillion</i>. After the war, he helped edit the <i>Oxford English Dictionary </i>and taught English literature at the University of Leeds. He joined the faculty of Oxford University in 1925, where he was a professor first of Anglo-Saxon and then of English Language and Literature until 1959.</p>\n<p>He studied and spoke more than a dozen languages, and invented several more for his fantasy world of Middle-earth. In 1937, he published <i>The Hobbit</i>. He continued the story of hobbits and other Middle-earth beings in the much larger and more complex <i>The Lord of the Rings</i>, which became a best-seller in the decades that followed and is now recognized as a brilliant literary classic. After a long and successful career of writing, scholarship, and teaching, he died in 1973.</p>\n"},{"title":"Works of literature by J.R.R. Tolkien","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Best known for his epic fantasy works <i>The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings,</i> and <i>The Silmarillion,</i> John Ronald Reuel Tolkien earned rank in 2009 as Forbes 5<sup>th</sup> among the magazine&#8217;s selected &#8220;top-earning dead celebrities.&#8221; Tolkien&#8217;s literary accomplishments during his 1892–1973 lifetime include the following:</p>\n<blockquote><p><i>The Adventures of Tom Bombadil</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>Farmer Giles of Ham</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>The Father Christmas Letters*</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>Finn and </i><i>H</i><i>e</i><i>ngest</i><i>*</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>The History of Middle-earth </i>(12 volumes, edited by Christopher Tolkien)</p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>The Hobbit</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>Leaf by Niggle</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien*</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>The Lord of the Rings (The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, The Return of the King)</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>Mr. Bliss*</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>The Monsters and the Critics &amp; Other Essays*</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>On Fairy Stories</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>Pictures by J.R.R. Tolkien*</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>The Road Goes Ever On (with Donald Swann)</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>Roverandom*</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>The Silmarillion*</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, and Sir Orfeo*</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>Smith of Wootton Major</i></p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><i>Unfinished Tales*</i></p></blockquote>\n<p>* Published posthumously</p>\n<p>Houghton Mifflin is Tolkien’s authorized publisher; paperback editions are also available from Ballantine Books.</p>\n"},{"title":"Who lives in Tolkien's Middle-earth?","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>From heart-warming hobbits to chilling Ringwraiths, the diverse and wonderful characters that populate the many lands and worlds of Middle-earth reveal J.R.R. Tolkien&#8217;s genius at its finest. <b><i>Note:</i></b> Characters in bold type are members of the Fellowship of the Ring.</p>\n<h2>Hobbits</h2>\n<p>Bilbo Baggins: &#8220;Uncle&#8221; to Frodo, finds Sauron&#8217;s One Ring of Power in Gollum&#8217;s lair under Misty Mountains</p>\n<p><b>Frodo Baggins:</b> &#8220;Nephew&#8221; and heir to Bilbo, bearer of the Sauron&#8217;s One Ring of Power, takes up quest to destroy the Ring at Mount Doom</p>\n<p>Gollum/Sméagol: Murdered friend to gain One Ring of Power, leads Frodo and Sam to Mordor, perishes with the Ring</p>\n<p><b>Merry Brandybuck:</b> Friend to Frodo, squire to King Théoden, slays the Lord of the Ringwraiths</p>\n<p><b>Pippin Took:</b> Second cousin to Frodo, serves in court of Denethor (Steward of Gondor), becomes Thain of the Shire</p>\n<p><b>Samwise Gamgee:</b> Faithful servant and friend to Frodo all the way to Mount Doom, becomes Mayor of the Shire</p>\n<h2>Men</h2>\n<p><b>Aragorn:</b> Heir to throne of Gondor and Arnor, raised by Elrond, wed to Arwen, also known as Strider and Elessar</p>\n<p><b>Boromir:</b> Son of Denethor (Steward of Gondor), headstrong brother of Faramir</p>\n<p>Éowyn: Niece of Théoden, Shield-Maiden of Rohan, wed to Faramir</p>\n<p>Faramir: Brother of Boromir, Ranger of Ithilien, wed to Éowyn</p>\n<p>Théoden: King of Rohan, uncle of Éowyn, leads Battle of Helm&#8217;s Deep</p>\n<h2>Elves</h2>\n<p>Arwen: Daughter of Elrond, wed to Aragorn, Queen of Reunited Kingdom, gives up immortality</p>\n<p>Elrond: Father of Arwen, Master of Rivendell, chooses immortality</p>\n<p>Fëanor: Legendary creator of Tengwar writing script, the palantíri, and the Silmaril jewels</p>\n<p>Galadriel: Queen of Lothlorien, keeper of Nenya, the Elven-Ring of Water</p>\n<p><strong>Legolas:</strong> Son of Thranduil (king of the Woodland Realm in Mirkwood Forest), friend to Gimli the Dwarf</p>\n<h2>Dwarves</h2>\n<p><strong>Gimli:</strong> Son of Glóin, friend to Legolas the Elf, preserves Glittering Caves</p>\n<p>Thorin Oakenshield: Leader of Dwarves in retrieving rightful treasure from Smaug the dragon</p>\n<h2>Wizards and Divinities</h2>\n<p>Ainur: &#8220;The Holy Ones,&#8221; powerful angelic beings who live in the Blessed Realm of Aman</p>\n<p>Eru Ilúvatar: &#8220;The One All-father,&#8221; Creator of Middle-earth and rest of Arda</p>\n<p><b>Gandalf the Grey:</b> One of the Maiar, sent as wizard to Middle-earth to help the free peoples in struggle against Sauron, becomes Gandalf the White</p>\n<p>Maiar: The &#8220;Lesser&#8221; of the Holy Ones, deities who serve higher deities</p>\n<p>Saruman the White: Wizard and once leader of Gandalf&#8217;s order, betrays free peoples of Middle-earth, enters into allegiance with Sauron</p>\n<h2>Villains</h2>\n<p>Balrog: Powerful demon of fire, battles Gandalf in Moria</p>\n<p>Melkor/Morgoth: Most powerful of the Ainur, destroyed the Two Lamps and the Two Trees, tutored Sauron in evil</p>\n<p>Ringwraiths: Ghouls who serve Sauron, once lords of Men, also called Nazgûl</p>\n<p>Sauron: One of the Maiar, Enemy of Middle-earth, served Melkor, forges One Ring of Power to rule over free peoples</p>\n<p>Smaug: Last of the fire-breathing dragons of Middle-earth, jealously hoards the Dwarves&#8217; treasure under the Lonely Mountain</p>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-04-27T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":207831},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-27T16:57:19+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-03-08T15:18:35+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:19:21+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"},"slug":"literature","categoryId":33709}],"title":"Poetry For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"poetry for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"poetry-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","搜素游戏引挚SEO提升":{"metaDescription":"It's way more than \"Roses are red, violets are blue.\" Dive into the history of poetry, and discover tips on how to read it aloud.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Poetry is the practice of creating works of art through language. The study of poetry should include important works that display a bit of the history and evolution of poetry. Poems are written to be read aloud, so follow the helpful reading guidelines offered in this Cheat Sheet. Then, take a poetry pop quiz to test your knowledge and discover some fun facts.","description":"Poetry is the practice of creating works of art through language. The study of poetry should include important works that display a bit of the history and evolution of poetry. Poems are written to be read aloud, so follow the helpful reading guidelines offered in this Cheat Sheet. Then, take a poetry pop quiz to test your knowledge and discover some fun facts.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9912,"name":"The Poetry Center","slug":"the-poetry-center","description":"The Poetry Center in San Francisco sponsors readings and awards, and houses a renowned poetry archive.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9912"}},{"authorId":9913,"name":"John Timpane","slug":"john-timpane","description":" <p><b>The Poetry Center</b> in San Francisco sponsors readings and awards and houses a renowned poetry archive. <b>John Timpane, Ph.D.,</b> is the author of <i>It Could Be Verse: Anybody&#39;s Guide to Poetry</i>. <b>Maureen Watts</b> is a writer and longtime poetry activist who serves on the board of the National Poetry Association ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9913"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33709,"title":"Literature","slug":"literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":199175,"title":"Snuggling Up to the Language of Poetry","slug":"snuggling-up-to-the-language-of-poetry","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/199175"}},{"articleId":194024,"title":"Quick Poetry Quiz","slug":"quick-poetry-quiz","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/194024"}},{"articleId":194018,"title":"A Crash Course in Poetic History","slug":"a-crash-course-in-poetic-history","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/194018"}},{"articleId":194019,"title":"How to Read a Poem Aloud","slug":"how-to-read-a-poem-aloud","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/194019"}},{"articleId":193965,"title":"How to Figure Out the Narrative of a Poem","slug":"how-to-figure-out-the-narrative-of-a-poem","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193965"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":209223,"title":"Shakespeare For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"shakespeare-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209223"}},{"articleId":209204,"title":"Sherlock Holmes For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sherlock-holmes-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209204"}},{"articleId":207889,"title":"Jane Austen For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"jane-austen-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207889"}},{"articleId":207831,"title":"The Origins of Tolkien's Middle-earth For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"the-origins-of-tolkiens-middle-earth-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207831"}},{"articleId":201347,"title":"Exploring the Diverse Lands of Middle-earth","slug":"exploring-the-diverse-lands-of-middle-earth","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/201347"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282478,"slug":"poetry-for-dummies","isbn":"9780764552724","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/0764552724/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/0764552724/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/0764552724-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0764552724/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/0764552724/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/poetry-for-dummies-cover-9780764552724-204x255.jpg","width":204,"height":255},"title":"Poetry For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":"<p><b data-author-id=\"34784\">The Poetry Center</b> in San Francisco sponsors readings and awards and houses a renowned poetry archive. <b data-author-id=\"34784\">John Timpane, Ph.D.,</b> is the author of <i>It Could Be Verse: Anybody's Guide to Poetry</i>. <b data-author-id=\"34784\">Maureen Watts</b> is a writer and longtime poetry activist who serves on the board of the National Poetry Association </p>","authors":[{"authorId":34784,"name":"","slug":"","description":" <p><b> Joseph A. Allen, PhD</b> is a professor of industrial and organizational (I/O) psychology at the University of Utah. His articles have appeared in <i>Human Relations, Journal of Business Psychology</i>, and more.</p> <p><b>Karin M. Reed</b> is CEO of Speaker Dynamics, a corporate communications training firm. She is an Emmy award-winning broadcast journalist. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/34784"}},{"authorId":9913,"name":"John Timpane","slug":"john-timpane","description":" <p><b>The Poetry Center</b> in San Francisco sponsors readings and awards and houses a renowned poetry archive. <b>John Timpane, Ph.D.,</b> is the author of <i>It Could Be Verse: Anybody&#39;s Guide to Poetry</i>. <b>Maureen Watts</b> is a writer and longtime poetry activist who serves on the board of the National Poetry Association ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9913"}},{"authorId":34613,"name":"Maureen Watts","slug":"maureen-watts","description":" <p><b>The Poetry Center</b> in San Francisco sponsors readings and awards and houses a renowned poetry archive. <b>John Timpane, Ph.D.,</b> is the author of <i>It Could Be Verse: Anybody&#39;s Guide to Poetry</i>. <b>Maureen Watts</b> is a writer and longtime poetry activist who serves on the board of the National Poetry Association ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/34613"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9780764552724&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b2981281\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9780764552724&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b2981d0a\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":194024,"title":"Quick Poetry Quiz","slug":"quick-poetry-quiz","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/194024"}},{"articleId":194019,"title":"How to Read a Poem Aloud","slug":"how-to-read-a-poem-aloud","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/194019"}},{"articleId":194018,"title":"A Crash Course in Poetic History","slug":"a-crash-course-in-poetic-history","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/194018"}}],"content":[{"title":"A crash course in poetic history","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Poems represent some of the greatest works of literature assembled. Peruse these noteworthy poems to see some of the early creations and how poetry evolved:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Odyssey by Homer</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Rubaiyat XII by Omar Khayyam</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">&#8220;Farewell&#8221; by Chao Li-hua</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Sonnet 73 by William Shakespeare</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The Inferno by Dante</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Eugene Onegin by Alexander Pushkin</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">&#8220;Crossing Brooklyn Ferry&#8221; by Walt Whitman</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">&#8220;A Narrow Fellow in the Grass&#8221; by Emily Dickinson</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">&#8220;The Second Coming&#8221; by William Butler Yeats</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">&#8220;Walking Around&#8221; by Pablo Neruda</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">&#8220;Requiem: 1935–1940&#8221; by Anna Akhmatova</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">&#8220;Song of the Initiate&#8221; by Léopold Sédar Senghor</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">&#8220;Daddy&#8221; by Sylvia Plath</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">&#8220;Under a Certain Little Star&#8221; by Wislawa Szymborska</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">&#8220;Monster Mash&#8221; by David Trinidad</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"How to read a poem aloud","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Poems are designed to be read aloud — you&#8217;ll get a better experience and understanding of the whole poem. Try these tips for reading poetry out loud:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Read silently first.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Note surprises and unfamiliar words.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Establish a positive, conversational tone.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Follow the music.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Don&#8217;t rush.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Pause for emphasis.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Treat line endings with care, pausing briefly or raising your tone of voice.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Repeat for best results.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Quick poetry quiz","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Test your knowledge of poetry by taking this quick quiz. You can learn some cool facts about poets and their works — and impress your friends the next time you get together.</p>\n<p><strong>1.</strong> <strong>Who was the first official U.S. Poet Laureate</strong> — Robert Penn Warren, Muriel Rukeyser, Ezra Pound, or Russell Edson?</p>\n<p><strong>2.</strong> <strong>Who was the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for poetry</strong> — Edna St. Vincent Millay, Sara Teasdale, or Mona Van Duyn?</p>\n<p><strong>3.</strong> <strong>What is said to be the longest poem in world history</strong> — <em>The Mahabharata; Howl</em> by Allen Ginsberg; <em>Paradise Lost</em> by John Milton; or &#8220;Poem #312&#8221; by Emily Dickinson?</p>\n<p><strong>4.</strong> <strong>Who wrote the poem &#8220;Funeral Blues,&#8221; which was recited in the movie <em>Four Weddings and A Funeral</em></strong> — Victor Hugo, Amy Clampitt, Pablo Neruda, or W.H. Auden?</p>\n<p><strong>5.</strong> <strong>Which statement about Emily Dickinson is not true?</strong></p>\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">a. She lived at her parents&#8217; house her entire life.</p>\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">b. She published fewer than a dozen poems during her lifetime.</p>\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">c. She was left at the altar.</p>\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">d. She was a bread judge at the local cattle show.</p>\n<p><strong>6.</strong> <strong>What did Robert Bridges, Thomas Campion, William Carlos Williams, and Henry Vaughan have in common?</strong></p>\n<p><strong>7.</strong> <strong>Which one of these poets doesn&#8217;t belong in this group and why?</strong></p>\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">a. Amenhotep</p>\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">b. Léopold Sédar Senghor</p>\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">c. Jimmy Carter</p>\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">d. William Shakespeare</p>\n<p><strong>8.</strong> <strong>True or False: A line of iambic pentameter must have ten syllables.</strong></p>\n<p><strong>9.</strong> <strong>Name the popular film from 1961 starring Natalie Wood and Warren Beatty that took its title from William Wordsworth&#8217;s &#8220;Ode: Intimations of Immortality.&#8221;</strong> Was it <em>Leaves of Grass, Love Canal, Splendor in the Grass, </em>or<em> The Grapes of Wrath?</em></p>\n<p><strong>10.</strong> <strong>Connect the place on the left with the poet associated with that place on the right:</strong></p>\n<table border=\"0\">\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td>Lesbos</td>\n<td>Charles Baudelaire</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Martinique</td>\n<td>Lorine Niedecker</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>New Hampshire</td>\n<td>Sappho</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Paris</td>\n<td>Robert Frost</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Wisconsin</td>\n<td>Lawrence Ferlinghetti</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Chicago</td>\n<td>Aimé Césaire</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>San Francisco</td>\n<td>Carl Sandburg</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n<p><strong><em>Answers: </em></strong>1. Robert Penn Warren, in 1986; 2. Sara Teasdale, in 1918; 3. <em>The Mahab</em><em>harata</em>; 4. W.H. Auden; 5. c; 6. They were all physicians; 7. d (Shakespeare was not a head of state); 8. False; 9. <em>Splendor in the Grass</em>; 10. Lesbos, Sappho; Martinique, Césaire; New Hampshire, Frost; Paris, Baudelaire; Wisconsin, Niedecker; Chicago, Sandburg; San Francisco, Ferlinghetti.</p>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Two years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-03-08T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":209243},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-27T16:57:13+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-02-25T17:40:33+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:19:16+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"},"slug":"literature","categoryId":33709}],"title":"Shakespeare For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"shakespeare for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"shakespeare-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","搜素游戏引挚SEO提升":{"metaDescription":"Zounds! Find out all you've ever wanted to know about the Bard himself, William Shakespeare, including his greatest works.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"These lists break down William Shakespeare's works by type and provide you a brief summary of each play. Also find terms commonly used in relation to Shakespeare's writing, covering styles of poetry, types of plays, and stage direction.","description":"These lists break down William Shakespeare's works by type and provide you a brief summary of each play. Also find terms commonly used in relation to Shakespeare's writing, covering styles of poetry, types of plays, and stage direction.","blurb":"","authors":[],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33709,"title":"Literature","slug":"literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":209243,"title":"Poetry For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"poetry-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209243"}},{"articleId":209204,"title":"Sherlock Holmes For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sherlock-holmes-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209204"}},{"articleId":207889,"title":"Jane Austen For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"jane-austen-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207889"}},{"articleId":207831,"title":"The Origins of Tolkien's Middle-earth For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"the-origins-of-tolkiens-middle-earth-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207831"}},{"articleId":201347,"title":"Exploring the Diverse Lands of Middle-earth","slug":"exploring-the-diverse-lands-of-middle-earth","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/201347"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b24af653\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b24affe0\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":193834,"title":"A Shakespeare Mini Glossary","slug":"a-shakespeare-mini-glossary","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193834"}},{"articleId":193833,"title":"Shakespeare’s Plays","slug":"shakespeares-plays","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193833"}}],"content":[{"title":"A Shakespeare mini glossary","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>These terms help when you&#8217;re reading Shakespeare&#8217;s works to keep track of different types and parts of plays, the poetry styles Shakespeare often employed, and stage direction.</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>blank verse</b>: Poetry in which the lines do not rhyme. Shakespeare used a mixture of prose, rhymed verse, and blank verse in his plays, but mostly he used blank verse.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>comedy</b>: A play in which the heroes do not die, but usually get married. Most comedies are lighthearted, but a few are somber until the final scene, when everyone is reconciled.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>couplet</b>: A pair of lines that rhyme. A couplet often marks the end of a scene or act.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>exeunt</b> (“eg-ZOONT”): Plural form of exit, used in stage directions when many people leave the stage at once.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>flourish</b>: A stage direction for a fanfare of drums and trumpets, usually announcing the entrance or exit of a king or queen.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>history</b>: A play that recounts historical events. Shakespeare’s history plays are historical fiction. He altered time, people, and events.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>iambic pentameter</b>: A form of verse in which every other syllable is stressed (as in “dah-DUM”) and each line contains five stressed syllables.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>quatrain</b>: A stanza of four lines, usually rhyming on alternate lines.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>rhyme royal</b>: A verse form of seven-line stanzas rhyming in the pattern ababbcc.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>sennet</b>: A stage direction for a trumpet fanfare, like a flourish.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>soliloquy</b>: A monologue that reveals a character’s inner thoughts and feelings.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>sonnet</b>: A poem of 14 lines that follows a particular rhyme scheme. Shakespeare included sonnets in a few of his plays, and he wrote 154 sonnets as a series. Most of Shakespeare’s sonnets rhyme in the pattern abab cdcd efef gg.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>tragedy</b>: A play in which the hero has a character flaw, such as pride, that leads to his death.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Shakespeare's plays","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>This list breaks down Shakespeare&#8217;s plays by type. You&#8217;ll also get a brief summary of each play by Shakespeare, if you need help remembering what a specific play is about.</p>\n<h2>Comedies</h2>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>All’s Well That Ends Well</i>: Bertie runs away to avoid his new wife, Helena, but she follows him and tricks him into being her faithful husband.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>As You Like It</i>: A romp in the Forest of Arden, where everyone falls in love.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>The Comedy of Errors</i>: Two sets of twins turn the town of Ephesus upside down.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Cymbeline</i>: A jealous husband believes a false story about his wife. She runs away and meets her long-lost brothers.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Love’s Labour’s Lost</i>: The King of Navarre and his court try to study in seclusion but succumb to the temptations of love.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Measure for Measure</i>: Power corrupts Angelo, the substitute duke, who tries to seduce the sister of a condemned man.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>The Merchant of Venice</i>: Moneylender Shylock tries to recover his “pound of flesh” collateral for a loan.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>The Merry Wives of Windsor</i>: Sir John Falstaff puts the moves on the Merry Wives, who turn the tables on him.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>A Midsummer Night’s Dream</i>: Mix-and-match couples in the woods near Athens. “Lord, what fools these mortals be!”</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Much Ado About Nothing</i>: Claudio loves Hero. Benedick doesn’t like Beatrice. Then Claudio hates Hero, and Benedick loves Beatrice. Eventually, everyone gets married.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Pericles</i>: Pericles lives, loves, loses, and regains his family while touring the Mediterranean Sea.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>The Taming of the Shrew</i>: Petruchio “tames” his wife, Katherina.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>The Tempest</i>: Prospero uses magic to reclaim his dukedom and find a husband for his daughter, Miranda.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Troilus and Cressida</i>: In ancient Troy, Troilus and Cressida vow undying love, which dies all too quickly.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Twelfth Night</i>: Orsino loves Olivia. Olivia loves Cesario. Cesario is really Viola, who loves Orsino.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>The Two Ge</i><i>ntlemen of Verona</i>: Nothing can come between best friends Valentine and Proteus, except a girl, Sylvia.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>The Two Noble Kinsmen</i>: Two brothers fight for love in ancient Greece.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>The Winter’s Tale</i>: Jealous husband Leontes drives away his wife, children, and best friend.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<h2>Histories</h2>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>King John</i>: John turns over England to the Pope.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>King Richard II</i>: Henry Bolingbroke deposes King Richard and becomes King Henry IV.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>King Henry IV, Part 1</i>: Henry wonders why his son can’t be more like that nice Hotspur boy, until Hotspur rebels against the king.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>King Henry IV, Part 2</i>: Henry’s son Hal continues to act up, and rebels still threaten the throne, but Hal comes out all right in the end and becomes King Henry V.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>King Henry V</i>: Henry invades France.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>King Henry VI, Part 1</i>: Joan of Arc leads the French army against England. The Houses of York and Lancaster start a spat that lasts through the next three plays.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>King Henry VI, Part 2</i>: Peasants and the House of York rebel against King Henry.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>King Henry VI, Part 3</i>: The House of York deposes King Henry, despite help from France. Edward, son of the Duke of York, takes the throne as King Edward IV.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>King Richard III</i>: Edward’s brother, Richard, kills everyone in his way and seizes the throne, only to lose it and his life.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>King Henry VIII</i>: King Henry divorces his wife, starts a new church, remarries, and fathers a daughter who becomes Queen Elizabeth I.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<h2>Tragedies</h2>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Antony and Cleopatra</i>: Antony tries to balance love and war but sacrifices everything for love.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Coriolanus</i>: Rome’s best general feels slighted, so he switches sides.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Hamlet</i>: A young prince plans revenge against his murdering uncle.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Julius Caesar</i>: Brutus and others kill Caesar to prevent him from becoming king.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>King Lear</i>: Lear gives up his kingdom to his daughters and then gives up his mind.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Macbeth</i>: Witches’ prophecies prompt Macbeth to seize the throne of Scotland.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Othello</i>: Iago preys on Othello’s jealousy and drives him to murder.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Romeo and Juliet</i>: Forbidden love tempts and destroys a young couple.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Timon of Athens</i>: Overgenerous Timon learns who his true friends are when he runs out of money.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Titus Andronicus</i>: Bloody revenge in ancient Rome, with the emphasis on bloody.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-02-25T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":209223},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T17:20:39+00:00","modifiedTime":"2022-10-04T13:42:45+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:18:40+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"},"slug":"literature","categoryId":33709}],"title":"How to Write a Sonnet","strippedTitle":"how to write a sonnet","slug":"writing-a-sonnet","canonicalUrl":"","搜素游戏引挚SEO提升":{"metaDescription":"Learn how to write a sonnet in a few easy steps to help you better understand poetry concepts like iambic pentameter and proper rhyme scheme.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Learn <strong>how to write a sonnet</strong> in iambic pentameter, just like <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/education/literature/shakespeare-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Shakespeare</a> did. Discover the rhythm and rhyme scheme of the quatrains and couplets that make up a Shakespearean sonnet.\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 400px;\">\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_238500\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"400\"]<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/example-shakespearean-sonnet.jpg\"><img class=\"wp-image-238500 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/example-shakespearean-sonnet.jpg\" alt=\"example-shakespearean-sonnet\" width=\"400\" height=\"250\" /></a> © 2008 Jinx! Licensed for use by Creative Commons[/caption]\r\n\r\n</div>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >How to write a sonnet</h2>\r\nWhen writing a Shakespearean-style sonnet, there are various rules you need to keep in mind. This form of poetry is required to follow a specific format including length, rhythm, and rhyme scheme. To write a sonnet properly, follow this process:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li>Select a subject to write your poem about (Shakespearean sonnets are traditionally grounded as love poems).</li>\r\n \t<li>Write your lines in iambic pentameter (duh-DUH-duh-DUH-duh-DUH-duh-DUH-duh-DUH.</li>\r\n \t<li>Write in one of various standard rhyme schemes (Shakespearean, Petrarchan, or Spenserian).</li>\r\n \t<li>Format the sonnet using 3 quatrains followed by 1 couplet.</li>\r\n \t<li>Compose your sonnet as an argument that builds up as it moves from one metaphor to the next.</li>\r\n \t<li>Ensure your poem is exactly 14 lines.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >The Shakespearean rhyme scheme</h2>\r\nIf you're writing the most familiar kind of sonnet, the Shakespearean, the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/education/language-arts/poetry/looking-at-rhythm-and-meter-in-poetry/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">rhyme scheme</a> is as follows:\r\n\r\nA\r\nB\r\nA\r\nB\r\n\r\nC\r\nD\r\nC\r\nD\r\n\r\nE\r\nF\r\nE\r\nF\r\n\r\nG\r\nG\r\n\r\nEvery A rhymes with every A, every B rhymes with every B, and so forth. You'll notice this type of sonnet consists of three quatrains (that is, four consecutive lines of verse that make up a stanza or division of lines in a poem) and one couplet (two consecutive rhyming lines of verse).\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >How a sonnet tells a story</h2>\r\nAh, but there's more to a sonnet than just the structure of it. A sonnet is also an argument — it builds up a certain way. And how it builds up is related to its metaphors and how it moves from one metaphor to the next. In a Shakespearean sonnet, the argument builds up like this:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>First quatrain:</b> An exposition of the main theme and main metaphor.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Second quatrain:</b> Theme and metaphor extended or complicated; often, some imaginative example is given.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Third quatrain:</b> Peripeteia (a twist or conflict), often introduced by a \"but\" (very often leading off the ninth line).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Couplet:</b> Summarizes and leaves the reader with a new, concluding image.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nOne of Shakespeare's best-known sonnets, Sonnet 18, follows this pattern:\r\n<blockquote><i>Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?</i><i>\r\n</i><i>Thou art more lovely and more temperate.</i><i>\r\n</i><i>Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,</i><i>\r\n</i><i>And summer's lease hath all too short a date.</i></blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><i>Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,</i><i>\r\n</i><i>And often is his gold complexion dimmed;</i><i>\r\n</i><i>And every fair from fair sometime declines,</i><i>\r\n</i><i>By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;</i></blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><i>But thy eternal summer shall not fade,</i><i>\r\n</i><i>Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest,</i><i>\r\n</i><i>Nor shall death brag thou wanderest in his shade,</i><i>\r\n</i><i>When in eternal lines to time thou growest.</i></blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><i>So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,</i><i>\r\n</i><i>So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.</i></blockquote>\r\nThe argument of Sonnet 18 goes like this:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>First quatrain:</b> Shakespeare establishes the theme of comparing \"thou\" (or \"you\") to a summer's day, and why to do so is a bad idea. The metaphor is made by comparing his beloved to summer itself.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Second quatrain:</b> Shakespeare extends the theme, explaining why even the sun, supposed to be so great, gets obscured sometimes, and why everything that's beautiful decays from beauty sooner or later. He has shifted the metaphor: In the first quatrain, it was \"summer\" in general, and now he's comparing the sun and \"every fair,\" every beautiful thing, to his beloved.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Third quatrain:</b> Here the argument takes a big left turn with the familiar \"But.\" Shakespeare says that the main reason he won't compare his beloved to summer is that summer dies — but she won't. He refers to the first two quatrains — her \"eternal summer\" won't fade, and she won't \"lose possession\" of the \"fair\" (the beauty) she possesses. So, he keeps the metaphors going, but in a different direction.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">And for good measure, he throws in a negative version of all the sunshine in this poem — the \"shade\" of death, which, evidently, his beloved won't have to worry about.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Couplet:</b> How is his beloved going to escape death? In Shakespeare's poetry, which will keep her alive as long as people breathe or see. This bold statement gives closure to the whole argument — it's a surprise.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nAnd so far, Shakespeare's sonnet has done what he promised it would! See how tightly this sonnet is written, how complex, yet well-organized it is? Now that you know how to write a sonnet, try writing one your own!\r\n<p class=\"Remember\">Poets are attracted by the grace, concentration, and, yes, the sheer difficulty of sonnets. You may never write another sonnet in your life, but this exercise is more than just busywork. It does all the following:</p>\r\n\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Shows you how much you can pack into a short form.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Gives you practice with rhyme, meter, structure, metaphor, and argument.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Connects you with one of the oldest traditions in English poetry — one still vital today.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"Learn <strong>how to write a sonnet</strong> in iambic pentameter, just like <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/education/literature/shakespeare-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Shakespeare</a> did. Discover the rhythm and rhyme scheme of the quatrains and couplets that make up a Shakespearean sonnet.\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 400px;\">\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_238500\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"400\"]<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/example-shakespearean-sonnet.jpg\"><img class=\"wp-image-238500 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/example-shakespearean-sonnet.jpg\" alt=\"example-shakespearean-sonnet\" width=\"400\" height=\"250\" /></a> © 2008 Jinx! Licensed for use by Creative Commons[/caption]\r\n\r\n</div>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >How to write a sonnet</h2>\r\nWhen writing a Shakespearean-style sonnet, there are various rules you need to keep in mind. This form of poetry is required to follow a specific format including length, rhythm, and rhyme scheme. To write a sonnet properly, follow this process:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li>Select a subject to write your poem about (Shakespearean sonnets are traditionally grounded as love poems).</li>\r\n \t<li>Write your lines in iambic pentameter (duh-DUH-duh-DUH-duh-DUH-duh-DUH-duh-DUH.</li>\r\n \t<li>Write in one of various standard rhyme schemes (Shakespearean, Petrarchan, or Spenserian).</li>\r\n \t<li>Format the sonnet using 3 quatrains followed by 1 couplet.</li>\r\n \t<li>Compose your sonnet as an argument that builds up as it moves from one metaphor to the next.</li>\r\n \t<li>Ensure your poem is exactly 14 lines.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >The Shakespearean rhyme scheme</h2>\r\nIf you're writing the most familiar kind of sonnet, the Shakespearean, the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/education/language-arts/poetry/looking-at-rhythm-and-meter-in-poetry/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">rhyme scheme</a> is as follows:\r\n\r\nA\r\nB\r\nA\r\nB\r\n\r\nC\r\nD\r\nC\r\nD\r\n\r\nE\r\nF\r\nE\r\nF\r\n\r\nG\r\nG\r\n\r\nEvery A rhymes with every A, every B rhymes with every B, and so forth. You'll notice this type of sonnet consists of three quatrains (that is, four consecutive lines of verse that make up a stanza or division of lines in a poem) and one couplet (two consecutive rhyming lines of verse).\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >How a sonnet tells a story</h2>\r\nAh, but there's more to a sonnet than just the structure of it. A sonnet is also an argument — it builds up a certain way. And how it builds up is related to its metaphors and how it moves from one metaphor to the next. In a Shakespearean sonnet, the argument builds up like this:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>First quatrain:</b> An exposition of the main theme and main metaphor.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Second quatrain:</b> Theme and metaphor extended or complicated; often, some imaginative example is given.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Third quatrain:</b> Peripeteia (a twist or conflict), often introduced by a \"but\" (very often leading off the ninth line).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Couplet:</b> Summarizes and leaves the reader with a new, concluding image.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nOne of Shakespeare's best-known sonnets, Sonnet 18, follows this pattern:\r\n<blockquote><i>Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?</i><i>\r\n</i><i>Thou art more lovely and more temperate.</i><i>\r\n</i><i>Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,</i><i>\r\n</i><i>And summer's lease hath all too short a date.</i></blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><i>Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,</i><i>\r\n</i><i>And often is his gold complexion dimmed;</i><i>\r\n</i><i>And every fair from fair sometime declines,</i><i>\r\n</i><i>By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;</i></blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><i>But thy eternal summer shall not fade,</i><i>\r\n</i><i>Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest,</i><i>\r\n</i><i>Nor shall death brag thou wanderest in his shade,</i><i>\r\n</i><i>When in eternal lines to time thou growest.</i></blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><i>So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,</i><i>\r\n</i><i>So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.</i></blockquote>\r\nThe argument of Sonnet 18 goes like this:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>First quatrain:</b> Shakespeare establishes the theme of comparing \"thou\" (or \"you\") to a summer's day, and why to do so is a bad idea. The metaphor is made by comparing his beloved to summer itself.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Second quatrain:</b> Shakespeare extends the theme, explaining why even the sun, supposed to be so great, gets obscured sometimes, and why everything that's beautiful decays from beauty sooner or later. He has shifted the metaphor: In the first quatrain, it was \"summer\" in general, and now he's comparing the sun and \"every fair,\" every beautiful thing, to his beloved.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Third quatrain:</b> Here the argument takes a big left turn with the familiar \"But.\" Shakespeare says that the main reason he won't compare his beloved to summer is that summer dies — but she won't. He refers to the first two quatrains — her \"eternal summer\" won't fade, and she won't \"lose possession\" of the \"fair\" (the beauty) she possesses. So, he keeps the metaphors going, but in a different direction.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">And for good measure, he throws in a negative version of all the sunshine in this poem — the \"shade\" of death, which, evidently, his beloved won't have to worry about.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Couplet:</b> How is his beloved going to escape death? In Shakespeare's poetry, which will keep her alive as long as people breathe or see. This bold statement gives closure to the whole argument — it's a surprise.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nAnd so far, Shakespeare's sonnet has done what he promised it would! See how tightly this sonnet is written, how complex, yet well-organized it is? Now that you know how to write a sonnet, try writing one your own!\r\n<p class=\"Remember\">Poets are attracted by the grace, concentration, and, yes, the sheer difficulty of sonnets. You may never write another sonnet in your life, but this exercise is more than just busywork. It does all the following:</p>\r\n\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Shows you how much you can pack into a short form.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Gives you practice with rhyme, meter, structure, metaphor, and argument.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Connects you with one of the oldest traditions in English poetry — one still vital today.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9912,"name":"The Poetry Center","slug":"the-poetry-center","description":"The Poetry Center in San Francisco sponsors readings and awards, and houses a renowned poetry archive.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9912"}},{"authorId":9913,"name":"John Timpane","slug":"john-timpane","description":" <p><b>The Poetry Center</b> in San Francisco sponsors readings and awards and houses a renowned poetry archive. <b>John Timpane, Ph.D.,</b> is the author of <i>It Could Be Verse: Anybody&#39;s Guide to Poetry</i>. <b>Maureen Watts</b> is a writer and longtime poetry activist who serves on the board of the National Poetry Association ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9913"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33709,"title":"Literature","slug":"literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"How to write a sonnet","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"The Shakespearean rhyme scheme","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"How a sonnet tells a story","target":"#tab3"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":209243,"title":"Poetry For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"poetry-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209243"}},{"articleId":199175,"title":"Snuggling Up to the Language of Poetry","slug":"snuggling-up-to-the-language-of-poetry","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/199175"}},{"articleId":194024,"title":"Quick Poetry Quiz","slug":"quick-poetry-quiz","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/194024"}},{"articleId":194019,"title":"How to Read a Poem Aloud","slug":"how-to-read-a-poem-aloud","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/194019"}},{"articleId":194018,"title":"A Crash Course in Poetic History","slug":"a-crash-course-in-poetic-history","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/194018"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":209243,"title":"Poetry For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"poetry-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209243"}},{"articleId":209223,"title":"Shakespeare For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"shakespeare-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209223"}},{"articleId":209204,"title":"Sherlock Holmes For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sherlock-holmes-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209204"}},{"articleId":207889,"title":"Jane Austen For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"jane-austen-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207889"}},{"articleId":207831,"title":"The Origins of Tolkien's Middle-earth For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"the-origins-of-tolkiens-middle-earth-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207831"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282478,"slug":"poetry-for-dummies","isbn":"9780764552724","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/0764552724/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/0764552724/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/0764552724-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0764552724/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/0764552724/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/poetry-for-dummies-cover-9780764552724-204x255.jpg","width":204,"height":255},"title":"Poetry For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":"<p><b data-author-id=\"34784\">The Poetry Center</b> in San Francisco sponsors readings and awards and houses a renowned poetry archive. <b data-author-id=\"34784\">John Timpane, Ph.D.,</b> is the author of <i>It Could Be Verse: Anybody's Guide to Poetry</i>. <b data-author-id=\"34784\">Maureen Watts</b> is a writer and longtime poetry activist who serves on the board of the National Poetry Association </p>","authors":[{"authorId":34784,"name":"","slug":"","description":" <p><b> Joseph A. Allen, PhD</b> is a professor of industrial and organizational (I/O) psychology at the University of Utah. His articles have appeared in <i>Human Relations, Journal of Business Psychology</i>, and more.</p> <p><b>Karin M. Reed</b> is CEO of Speaker Dynamics, a corporate communications training firm. She is an Emmy award-winning broadcast journalist. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/34784"}},{"authorId":9913,"name":"John Timpane","slug":"john-timpane","description":" <p><b>The Poetry Center</b> in San Francisco sponsors readings and awards and houses a renowned poetry archive. <b>John Timpane, Ph.D.,</b> is the author of <i>It Could Be Verse: Anybody&#39;s Guide to Poetry</i>. <b>Maureen Watts</b> is a writer and longtime poetry activist who serves on the board of the National Poetry Association ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9913"}},{"authorId":34613,"name":"Maureen Watts","slug":"maureen-watts","description":" <p><b>The Poetry Center</b> in San Francisco sponsors readings and awards and houses a renowned poetry archive. <b>John Timpane, Ph.D.,</b> is the author of <i>It Could Be Verse: Anybody&#39;s Guide to Poetry</i>. <b>Maureen Watts</b> is a writer and longtime poetry activist who serves on the board of the National Poetry Association ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/34613"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9780764552724&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b001f0e3\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9780764552724&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b001fbe7\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2022-10-01T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":173998},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-27T16:49:03+00:00","modifiedTime":"2022-09-01T17:44:14+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:18:34+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"},"slug":"literature","categoryId":33709}],"title":"Jane Austen For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"jane austen for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"jane-austen-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","搜素游戏引挚SEO提升":{"metaDescription":"Calling all Jane Austen lovers: Reference this handy cheat sheet (or point others to it) when discussing this great author's world.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Jane Austen is the queen and inventor of the <i>Regency romance</i> (courtship literature set in England's Regency period, 1811–1820). Jane Austen's six most famous works <i>(Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, </i><i>Pride and Prejudice, </i><i>Mansfield Park, Emma, </i>and<i> </i><i>Persuasion</i><i>)</i> highlight the strict social etiquette of her day and the legal limitations that women of her social class endured. She also created memorable characters, from flirts and fools to some who displayed abnormal personality disorders.","description":"Jane Austen is the queen and inventor of the <i>Regency romance</i> (courtship literature set in England's Regency period, 1811–1820). Jane Austen's six most famous works <i>(Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, </i><i>Pride and Prejudice, </i><i>Mansfield Park, Emma, </i>and<i> </i><i>Persuasion</i><i>)</i> highlight the strict social etiquette of her day and the legal limitations that women of her social class endured. She also created memorable characters, from flirts and fools to some who displayed abnormal personality disorders.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9655,"name":"Joan Elizabeth Klingel Ray","slug":"joan-elizabeth-klingel-ray","description":" <b>Joan Klingel Ray</b>, PhD, is an English professor at the University of Colorado. She has written articles for numerous magazines and appeared on the A&amp;E biography of Jane Austen. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9655"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33709,"title":"Literature","slug":"literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":209243,"title":"Poetry For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"poetry-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209243"}},{"articleId":209223,"title":"Shakespeare For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"shakespeare-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209223"}},{"articleId":209204,"title":"Sherlock Holmes For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sherlock-holmes-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209204"}},{"articleId":207831,"title":"The Origins of Tolkien's Middle-earth For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"the-origins-of-tolkiens-middle-earth-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207831"}},{"articleId":201347,"title":"Exploring the Diverse Lands of Middle-earth","slug":"exploring-the-diverse-lands-of-middle-earth","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/201347"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[{"title":"For the Hopeless Romantic","slug":"for-the-hopeless-romantic","collectionId":287569}],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221afa588c6\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221afa593fe\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":163769,"title":"Social Etiquette in Jane Austen's World","slug":"social-etiquette-in-jane-austens-world","categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/163769"}},{"articleId":163768,"title":"4 Legal Limits for Ladies in Jane Austen's Time","slug":"4-legal-limits-for-ladies-in-jane-austens-time","categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/163768"}},{"articleId":163767,"title":"Jane Austen's Most Memorable Abnormal Personality","slug":"jane-austens-most-memorable-abnormal-personality","categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/163767"}}],"content":[{"title":"Social etiquette in Jane Austen's world","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p class=\"TechnicalStuff\">Strict rules of etiquette abounded for Jane Austen’s characters, who revealed a great deal about themselves by following them — or not. <i>Etiquette</i> is the French word for ticket; think of it this way: Good manners and polite behavior were (and still are) the ticket to social acceptability.</p>\n<p>Here are some of the ways Austen’s characters followed social guidelines:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Introducing and acknowledging people: </b>People lower in the social hierarchy waited to be introduced to those higher — unless the higher-class person introduced himself to the lower-class person. When not properly introduced, people had to remain silent.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Speaking appropriately:</b> Group conversation did not include jokes about young couples’ love interests, a woman’s pregnancy, or a child’s being born out of wedlock. Also, rude or suggestive comments were uncouth, as was boasting, interrupting, and pushy or loud conversation.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Courting: </b>Prior to their engagement, couples met at dances and dinner parties, where friends and family were also present and observing (chaperoning) them. Society forbid unengaged couples to take long walks alone; ride in carriages (open or closed) alone; go for a horseback ride alone; or even write letters to each other.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Dancing the night away:</b> Dancing was not close-body dancing: Dancers held hands with their arms extended. Unless they were engaged or very serious about each other, a couple could dance together only twice during a social event. With each dance consisting of two 15-minute dances, a couple had one hour together.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Four legal limits for ladies in Jane Austen's time","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>In Jane Austen’s day, the legal rights for a lady were minimal. A <i>lady</i> was a member of a social class called the <i>gentry</i><i>,</i> who were landowners and had the good taste and refinement associated with polite society. What seems like a life of leisure for these women, however, came at a cost.</p>\n<p>Under the law, a lady couldn’t do things that many women today take for granted. She could not:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Vote.</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Attend a university.</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Enter a profession.</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Control her money and property </b>(including her clothes!). Rarely did a married lady hold property in her own name. When a woman got married, she had to surrender her money and her legal rights to her husband. A lady’s one option for securing her own property was to place it in a trust.</p>\n<p class=\"child-para\">Her husband had</p>\n<ul class=\"level-two\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Control of their children.</b> If he wanted, he could deny her access to the children or take them away from their mother.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Control over their sex life.</b> He could demand sex and even rape her or commit adultery with impunity.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>The right to hit her.</b> She was his property, so he could do as he liked.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p class=\"Remember\">Now that you know the downside of being a woman in Austen’s time, don’t think that she lived in a nation of wife-beating brutes; a majority of marriages were happy or at least satisfactory, and most wives weren’t beaten!</p>\n"},{"title":"Jane Austen's most memorable abnormal personalities","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<div>\n<div class=\"cheat-sheet-section\">\n<p>Writing at the beginning of the nineteenth century, Jane Austen created a number of characters who displayed abnormal personality disorders — two centuries before they were identified as such.</p>\n<p>For example, Aunt Norris<i> </i>of <i>Mansfield Park</i> and Lady Catherine of <i>Pride and Prejudice</i> are controllers. Lucy Steele of <i>Sense and Sensibility</i> is passive aggressive toward Elinor Dashwood. And in the same novel with Lady Catherine, the attention-seeking Lydia is narcissistic. But with all of these characters vying for the most abnormal, it’s sociopath John Willoughby of <i>Sense and Sensibility</i> who takes the prize.</p>\n<p class=\"Remember\">Sociopaths are superficially charming and amiable. They tend to engage in casual sex and feel no guilt for any wrong they’ve done. Rather, they feel themselves to be victims.</p>\n<p>Now here’s a look at Willoughby:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">He’s attractive and appealing; the Dashwood women think he’s marvelous.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">He seduced and impregnated Eliza Williams and promptly forgot her.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">He admits to first paying attention to Marianne simply for the fun of it.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">He feels that Mrs. Smith (his wealthy relative) disinherited him simply because she’s acting like a prude after she learned how he mistreated Eliza.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">He blames his wealthy wife, the former Miss Grey, for making him write the callous break-up letter to Marianne.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p>With Willoughby’s unprincipled and dishonorable behavior, he could be called a cad (those who behave irresponsibly with women). But, Willoughby crossed too many lines with the Eliza pregnancy and abandonment. “Cad” would be too generous.</p>\n</div>\n</div>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2022-08-27T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":207889},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T22:39:37+00:00","modifiedTime":"2018-07-17T20:13:20+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:19:28+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"},"slug":"literature","categoryId":33709}],"title":"Understanding Point of View in Literature","strippedTitle":"understanding point of view in literature","slug":"understanding-point-of-view-in-literature","canonicalUrl":"","搜素游戏引挚SEO提升":{"metaDescription":"Literature provides a lens through which readers look at the world. Point of view is the way the author allows you to \"see\" and \"hear\" what's going on. Skillful","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Literature provides a lens through which readers look at the world. Point of view is the way the author allows you to \"see\" and \"hear\" what's going on. Skillful authors can fix their readers' attention on exactly the detail, opinion, or emotion the author wants to emphasize by manipulating the point of view of the story.\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >What are the kinds of point of view in literature?</h2>\r\nPoint of view comes in three varieties, which the English scholars have handily numbered for your convenience:\r\n<ul>\r\n\t<li><b>First-person</b> point of view is in use when a character narrates the story with <i>I-me-my-mine</i> in his or her speech. The advantage of this point of view is that you get to hear the thoughts of the narrator and see the world depicted in the story through his or her eyes. However, remember that no narrator, like no human being, has complete self-knowledge or, for that matter, complete knowledge of anything. Therefore, the reader's role is to go beyond what the narrator says.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n<ul>For example, Harper Lee's</ul>\r\n</ul>\r\n<i>To Kill a Mockingbird</i>\r\n<ul>is told from the point of view of Scout, a young child. She doesn't grasp the complex racial and socioeconomic relations of her town — but the reader does, because Scout gives information that the reader can interpret. Also, Scout's innocence reminds the reader of a simple, \"it's-not-fair\" attitude that contrasts with the rationalizations of other characters.</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n\t<li><b>Second-person</b> point of view, in which the author uses <i>you</i> and <i>your</i>, is rare; authors seldom speak directly to the reader. When you encounter this point of view, pay attention. Why? The author has made a daring choice, probably with a specific purpose in mind. Most times, second-person point of view draws the reader into the story, almost making the reader a participant in the action.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n<ul>Here's an example: Jay McInerney's best-selling</ul>\r\n</ul>\r\n<i>Bright Lights, Big City</i>\r\n<ul>was written in second person to make the experiences and tribulations of the unnamed main character more personal and intimate for the reader.</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n\t<li><b>Third-person</b> point of view is that of an outsider looking at the action. The writer may choose <i>third-person omniscient,</i> in which the thoughts of every character are open to the reader, or <i>third-person limited,</i> in which the reader enters only one character's mind, either throughout the entire work or in a specific section. Third-person limited differs from first-person because the author's voice, not the character's voice, is what you hear in the descriptive passages.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n<ul>In Virginia Woolf's wonderful novel</ul>\r\n</ul>\r\n<i>Mrs. Dalloway,</i>\r\n<ul>you're in one character's mind at a time. You know the title character's thoughts about Peter, the great love of her youth, for example, and then a few pages later, you hear Peter's thoughts about Mrs. Dalloway. Fascinating! When you're reading a third-person selection, either limited or omniscient, you're watching the story unfold as an outsider. Remember that most writers choose this point of view.</ul>","description":"Literature provides a lens through which readers look at the world. Point of view is the way the author allows you to \"see\" and \"hear\" what's going on. Skillful authors can fix their readers' attention on exactly the detail, opinion, or emotion the author wants to emphasize by manipulating the point of view of the story.\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >What are the kinds of point of view in literature?</h2>\r\nPoint of view comes in three varieties, which the English scholars have handily numbered for your convenience:\r\n<ul>\r\n\t<li><b>First-person</b> point of view is in use when a character narrates the story with <i>I-me-my-mine</i> in his or her speech. The advantage of this point of view is that you get to hear the thoughts of the narrator and see the world depicted in the story through his or her eyes. However, remember that no narrator, like no human being, has complete self-knowledge or, for that matter, complete knowledge of anything. Therefore, the reader's role is to go beyond what the narrator says.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n<ul>For example, Harper Lee's</ul>\r\n</ul>\r\n<i>To Kill a Mockingbird</i>\r\n<ul>is told from the point of view of Scout, a young child. She doesn't grasp the complex racial and socioeconomic relations of her town — but the reader does, because Scout gives information that the reader can interpret. Also, Scout's innocence reminds the reader of a simple, \"it's-not-fair\" attitude that contrasts with the rationalizations of other characters.</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n\t<li><b>Second-person</b> point of view, in which the author uses <i>you</i> and <i>your</i>, is rare; authors seldom speak directly to the reader. When you encounter this point of view, pay attention. Why? The author has made a daring choice, probably with a specific purpose in mind. Most times, second-person point of view draws the reader into the story, almost making the reader a participant in the action.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n<ul>Here's an example: Jay McInerney's best-selling</ul>\r\n</ul>\r\n<i>Bright Lights, Big City</i>\r\n<ul>was written in second person to make the experiences and tribulations of the unnamed main character more personal and intimate for the reader.</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n\t<li><b>Third-person</b> point of view is that of an outsider looking at the action. The writer may choose <i>third-person omniscient,</i> in which the thoughts of every character are open to the reader, or <i>third-person limited,</i> in which the reader enters only one character's mind, either throughout the entire work or in a specific section. Third-person limited differs from first-person because the author's voice, not the character's voice, is what you hear in the descriptive passages.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n<ul>In Virginia Woolf's wonderful novel</ul>\r\n</ul>\r\n<i>Mrs. Dalloway,</i>\r\n<ul>you're in one character's mind at a time. You know the title character's thoughts about Peter, the great love of her youth, for example, and then a few pages later, you hear Peter's thoughts about Mrs. Dalloway. Fascinating! When you're reading a third-person selection, either limited or omniscient, you're watching the story unfold as an outsider. Remember that most writers choose this point of view.</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33709,"title":"Literature","slug":"literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"What are the kinds of point of view in literature?","target":"#tab1"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":209243,"title":"Poetry For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"poetry-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209243"}},{"articleId":209223,"title":"Shakespeare For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"shakespeare-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209223"}},{"articleId":209204,"title":"Sherlock Holmes For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sherlock-holmes-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209204"}},{"articleId":207889,"title":"Jane Austen For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"jane-austen-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207889"}},{"articleId":207831,"title":"The Origins of Tolkien's Middle-earth For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"the-origins-of-tolkiens-middle-earth-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207831"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b302e50a\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b302ea56\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":null,"lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":198917},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T22:56:06+00:00","modifiedTime":"2018-01-23T18:44:58+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:04+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"},"slug":"literature","categoryId":33709}],"title":"Exploring the Diverse Lands of Middle-earth","strippedTitle":"exploring the diverse lands of middle-earth","slug":"exploring-the-diverse-lands-of-middle-earth","canonicalUrl":"","搜素游戏引挚SEO提升":{"metaDescription":"You may well wonder why it's important at all to locate Middle-earth in J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings . Does it really matter whether Middle-earth is a fut","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"You may well wonder why it's important at all to locate Middle-earth in J.R.R. Tolkien's <i>Lord of the Rings</i>. Does it really matter whether Middle-earth is a future world in another galaxy or a Europe long gone? Would it really detract from your enjoyment of Bilbo's journey to the Lonely Mountain or Frodo's quest from the Shire to Mount Doom if you found out that Middle-earth were nowhere on this earth?\r\n\r\nTolkien drew Middle-earth so well in <i>The Hobbit</i> and told the story of <i>The Lord of the Rings</i> so tightly that it wouldn't matter a whit if he had started off either story with the now famous declaration from George Lucas' <i>Star Wars</i> saga, \"A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away . . .\" On the other hand, coming to know how much Middle-earth owes to past European sagas, legends, and languages can only enhance appreciation of Tolkien's works and deepen understanding of their many lessons.\r\n\r\nAssociating Middle-earth with our world and not some alien planet or invisible dimension was very important to Tolkien. When pressed for the location of Middle-earth (as fans and critics continually did), Tolkien often replied that Middle-earth most definitely refers to lands of this world. In his letter commenting on a review of <i>The Lord of the Rings</i> by W. H. Auden, he wrote, \"Middle-earth is not an imaginary world.\" He then declared that his Middle-earth is \"the objectively real world\" as opposed to an imaginary world, such as Fairyland, or invisible ones, such as Heaven or Hell.\r\n\r\nIn another letter responding to a draft of a <i>Daily Telegraph</i> article for which he was interviewed, Tolkien said that the stories in <i>The Hobbit</i> and <i>The Lord of the Rings</i> take place in the \"north-west of 'Middle-earth,' equivalent to the coastlands of Europe and the north shores of the Mediterranean.\" He then went on to fix some of the primary locations in his books by stating that if you placed Hobbiton and Rivendell at the latitude of Oxford (which was his intention), then Minas Tirith, some 600 miles south in Gondor, would be at approximately the same latitude as Florence, Italy. This puts the Mouths of the river Anduin and the ancient Gondorian city of Pelagir at about the same latitude as the fabled city of Troy (made famous in Homer's heroic epic poem the <i>Iliad</i> and located on the west coast of modern-day Turkey).\r\n\r\nTo get an idea of these spatial relationships, see Figure 1, which shows the western coastline of Middle-earth and points out the specific parallel locations that Tolkien pinpointed in his letter. From this map, you'd be hard pressed to match any of Middle-earth's physical features with those of modern-day Europe. Tolkien would have explained this obvious discrepancy as the result of changes in coastal geography during the time that has elapsed since his epic adventures took place. You might look at it as the difference between Earth's Jurassic age and the Middle Ages — not too much looks the same, but it's the same old Earth.\r\n<div class=\"figure\"><img class=\"alignnone\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/0-7645-4186-2_000100.jpg\" alt=\"Middle-earth's coastline superimposed on Western Europe.\" width=\"525\" height=\"689\" border=\"0\" /></div>\r\n<span class=\"caption\"><b>Figure 1:</b> Middle-earth's coastline superimposed on Western Europe.</span>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >The origin of the term \"Middle-earth\"</h2>\r\nIn the letter commenting on a <i>New York Times </i>book review, Tolkien stated that the name <i>Middle-earth</i> is \"just a use of Middle English <i>midden-erd </i>(or <i>erthe)</i>, altered from Old English <i>Middangeard,</i> the name for the inhabited lands of Men 'between the seas' . . .\"\r\n\r\n<i>Midden-erde</i> (or <i>erthe</i>), however, is good old Middle English for \"middle-earth.\" As Tolkien pointed out, it hails from an earlier form, <i>middangeard,</i> which literally means the \"middle yard\" in Old English or Anglo-Saxon, the language Tolkien taught at Oxford University. <i>Middangeard</i> was taken to mean, like <i>oikumenos,</i> the \"inhabited world.\" It is rumored that Tolkien first happened upon this term as an undergraduate student when he read the following lines in <i>Crist</i> <i>(Christ)</i>, an Old English poem attributed to a bard named Cynewulf:\r\n<p class=\"article-code\">Éala Éarendel engla beorhtast ofer middangeard monnum sended</p>\r\nThis reads, \"Hail, Earendel, the brightest of angels sent to the world of men!\" In this early form, Middle-earth was not only the inhabited lands in the midst of the encircling seas, but also the middle ground between Heaven above and Hell below. This vertical dimension of the early European Christian Middle-earth is entirely missing from Tolkien's — even though you'd be hard pressed to find a more devout Catholic Christian.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >\"Stuck in the middle again . . .\"</h2>\r\nAt the time when <i>The Hobbit</i> and <i>The Lord of the Rings </i>take place, the inhabited lands of Middle-earth are surrounded on three sides by wastelands and on the west by open sea. To the north lies the Ice Bay of Forochel, and beyond that is the frozen Northern Waste; to the east is Rhûn, populated by the barbaric Easterlings. To the south you find the vast deserts of Harad, populated by dark-skinned peoples called the Haradrim (\"Southerns\"). In <i>The Lord of the Rings,</i> both Easterlings and Southrons often make war on the free peoples of Middle-earth and are allied with Sauron, Dark Lord of the eastern realm of Mordor, who is the greatest threat to freedom in Middle-earth.\r\n\r\nOn the west, many of the lands of Middle-earth, just like many lands of Europe, have borders that adjoin the sea. According to Tolkien's thinking, at the time of <i>The Hobbit</i> and <i>The Lord of the Rings,</i> you could sail west and not find any other land masses (you certainly wouldn't discover the Americas). In earlier ages, though, sailing directly west would bring you to the island of Númenor, the ancient homeland of the people who end up settling the northern and southern coasts of Middle-earth. And west of Númenor lay the continent of Aman — the so-called Blessed Realm or Undying Lands. Aman is where two types of immortal beings, the Valar and Elves, dwell together. By the Third Age, the one in which <i>The Hobbit</i> and <i>The Lord of the Rings</i> take place, the island of Númenor has sunk beneath the sea, and Aman, removed from the physical plane of the world, is accessible only by the magic White Ships of the Elves.\r\n\r\nViewed from this perspective, you can start to understand how the peoples of Tolkien's Middle-earth perceive their lands as being encircled by limiting forces, some of which are hostile. This viewpoint is perhaps not so unlike the Anglo-Saxons before they came to Britain, when they still dwelt along the northwestern coast of Europe in the lands now known as Denmark and northwest Germany. At that time, they were surrounded on three sides by potentially hostile tribes and the open sea on the other. The situation didn't change much when they got to England, except that the sea was mostly at their back with the hostile Celts in front and on either side of them. Much of the orientation of Middle-earth's geography may be rooted in the perspective of Tolkien's Anglo-Saxon ancestors, whose language he knew so well.","description":"You may well wonder why it's important at all to locate Middle-earth in J.R.R. Tolkien's <i>Lord of the Rings</i>. Does it really matter whether Middle-earth is a future world in another galaxy or a Europe long gone? Would it really detract from your enjoyment of Bilbo's journey to the Lonely Mountain or Frodo's quest from the Shire to Mount Doom if you found out that Middle-earth were nowhere on this earth?\r\n\r\nTolkien drew Middle-earth so well in <i>The Hobbit</i> and told the story of <i>The Lord of the Rings</i> so tightly that it wouldn't matter a whit if he had started off either story with the now famous declaration from George Lucas' <i>Star Wars</i> saga, \"A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away . . .\" On the other hand, coming to know how much Middle-earth owes to past European sagas, legends, and languages can only enhance appreciation of Tolkien's works and deepen understanding of their many lessons.\r\n\r\nAssociating Middle-earth with our world and not some alien planet or invisible dimension was very important to Tolkien. When pressed for the location of Middle-earth (as fans and critics continually did), Tolkien often replied that Middle-earth most definitely refers to lands of this world. In his letter commenting on a review of <i>The Lord of the Rings</i> by W. H. Auden, he wrote, \"Middle-earth is not an imaginary world.\" He then declared that his Middle-earth is \"the objectively real world\" as opposed to an imaginary world, such as Fairyland, or invisible ones, such as Heaven or Hell.\r\n\r\nIn another letter responding to a draft of a <i>Daily Telegraph</i> article for which he was interviewed, Tolkien said that the stories in <i>The Hobbit</i> and <i>The Lord of the Rings</i> take place in the \"north-west of 'Middle-earth,' equivalent to the coastlands of Europe and the north shores of the Mediterranean.\" He then went on to fix some of the primary locations in his books by stating that if you placed Hobbiton and Rivendell at the latitude of Oxford (which was his intention), then Minas Tirith, some 600 miles south in Gondor, would be at approximately the same latitude as Florence, Italy. This puts the Mouths of the river Anduin and the ancient Gondorian city of Pelagir at about the same latitude as the fabled city of Troy (made famous in Homer's heroic epic poem the <i>Iliad</i> and located on the west coast of modern-day Turkey).\r\n\r\nTo get an idea of these spatial relationships, see Figure 1, which shows the western coastline of Middle-earth and points out the specific parallel locations that Tolkien pinpointed in his letter. From this map, you'd be hard pressed to match any of Middle-earth's physical features with those of modern-day Europe. Tolkien would have explained this obvious discrepancy as the result of changes in coastal geography during the time that has elapsed since his epic adventures took place. You might look at it as the difference between Earth's Jurassic age and the Middle Ages — not too much looks the same, but it's the same old Earth.\r\n<div class=\"figure\"><img class=\"alignnone\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/0-7645-4186-2_000100.jpg\" alt=\"Middle-earth's coastline superimposed on Western Europe.\" width=\"525\" height=\"689\" border=\"0\" /></div>\r\n<span class=\"caption\"><b>Figure 1:</b> Middle-earth's coastline superimposed on Western Europe.</span>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >The origin of the term \"Middle-earth\"</h2>\r\nIn the letter commenting on a <i>New York Times </i>book review, Tolkien stated that the name <i>Middle-earth</i> is \"just a use of Middle English <i>midden-erd </i>(or <i>erthe)</i>, altered from Old English <i>Middangeard,</i> the name for the inhabited lands of Men 'between the seas' . . .\"\r\n\r\n<i>Midden-erde</i> (or <i>erthe</i>), however, is good old Middle English for \"middle-earth.\" As Tolkien pointed out, it hails from an earlier form, <i>middangeard,</i> which literally means the \"middle yard\" in Old English or Anglo-Saxon, the language Tolkien taught at Oxford University. <i>Middangeard</i> was taken to mean, like <i>oikumenos,</i> the \"inhabited world.\" It is rumored that Tolkien first happened upon this term as an undergraduate student when he read the following lines in <i>Crist</i> <i>(Christ)</i>, an Old English poem attributed to a bard named Cynewulf:\r\n<p class=\"article-code\">Éala Éarendel engla beorhtast ofer middangeard monnum sended</p>\r\nThis reads, \"Hail, Earendel, the brightest of angels sent to the world of men!\" In this early form, Middle-earth was not only the inhabited lands in the midst of the encircling seas, but also the middle ground between Heaven above and Hell below. This vertical dimension of the early European Christian Middle-earth is entirely missing from Tolkien's — even though you'd be hard pressed to find a more devout Catholic Christian.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >\"Stuck in the middle again . . .\"</h2>\r\nAt the time when <i>The Hobbit</i> and <i>The Lord of the Rings </i>take place, the inhabited lands of Middle-earth are surrounded on three sides by wastelands and on the west by open sea. To the north lies the Ice Bay of Forochel, and beyond that is the frozen Northern Waste; to the east is Rhûn, populated by the barbaric Easterlings. To the south you find the vast deserts of Harad, populated by dark-skinned peoples called the Haradrim (\"Southerns\"). In <i>The Lord of the Rings,</i> both Easterlings and Southrons often make war on the free peoples of Middle-earth and are allied with Sauron, Dark Lord of the eastern realm of Mordor, who is the greatest threat to freedom in Middle-earth.\r\n\r\nOn the west, many of the lands of Middle-earth, just like many lands of Europe, have borders that adjoin the sea. According to Tolkien's thinking, at the time of <i>The Hobbit</i> and <i>The Lord of the Rings,</i> you could sail west and not find any other land masses (you certainly wouldn't discover the Americas). In earlier ages, though, sailing directly west would bring you to the island of Númenor, the ancient homeland of the people who end up settling the northern and southern coasts of Middle-earth. And west of Númenor lay the continent of Aman — the so-called Blessed Realm or Undying Lands. Aman is where two types of immortal beings, the Valar and Elves, dwell together. By the Third Age, the one in which <i>The Hobbit</i> and <i>The Lord of the Rings</i> take place, the island of Númenor has sunk beneath the sea, and Aman, removed from the physical plane of the world, is accessible only by the magic White Ships of the Elves.\r\n\r\nViewed from this perspective, you can start to understand how the peoples of Tolkien's Middle-earth perceive their lands as being encircled by limiting forces, some of which are hostile. This viewpoint is perhaps not so unlike the Anglo-Saxons before they came to Britain, when they still dwelt along the northwestern coast of Europe in the lands now known as Denmark and northwest Germany. At that time, they were surrounded on three sides by potentially hostile tribes and the open sea on the other. The situation didn't change much when they got to England, except that the sea was mostly at their back with the hostile Celts in front and on either side of them. Much of the orientation of Middle-earth's geography may be rooted in the perspective of Tolkien's Anglo-Saxon ancestors, whose language he knew so well.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9027,"name":"Greg Harvey","slug":"greg-harvey","description":" <b>Greg Harvey</b> has authored tons of computer books, the most recent being <i>Excel 2007 For Dummies, Windows Vista For Dummies Quick Reference,</i> and <i>Excel Workbook For Dummies.</i> He started out training business users on how to use IBM personal computers and their attendant computer software in the rough-and-tumble days of DOS, WordStar, and Lotus 1-2-3 in the mid-80s of the last century. After working for a number of independent training firms, he went on to teaching semester-long courses in spreadsheet and database management software at Golden Gate University in San Francisco.<br /> His love of teaching has translated into an equal love of writing. <i>For Dummies</i> books are, of course, his all-time favorites to write because they enable him to write to his favorite audience, the beginner. They also enable him to use humor (a key element to success in the training room) and, most delightful of all, to express an opinion or two about the subject matter at hand.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9027"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33709,"title":"Literature","slug":"literature","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"The origin of the term \"Middle-earth\"","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"\"Stuck in the middle again . . .\"","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":209243,"title":"Poetry For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"poetry-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209243"}},{"articleId":209223,"title":"Shakespeare For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"shakespeare-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209223"}},{"articleId":209204,"title":"Sherlock Holmes For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sherlock-holmes-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209204"}},{"articleId":207889,"title":"Jane Austen For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"jane-austen-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207889"}},{"articleId":207831,"title":"The Origins of Tolkien's Middle-earth For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"the-origins-of-tolkiens-middle-earth-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","literature"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207831"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221aa031892\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;literature&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221aa031e1a\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":null,"lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":201347}],"_links":{"self":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709/categoryArticles?sortField=time&sortOrder=1&size=10&offset=0"},"next":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709/categoryArticles?sortField=time&sortOrder=1&size=10&offset=10"},"last":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33709/categoryArticles?sortField=time&sortOrder=1&size=10&offset=28"}}},"objectTitle":"","status":"success","pageType":"article-category","objectId":"33709","page":1,"sortField":"time","sortOrder":1,"categoriesIds":[],"articleTypes":[],"filterData":{"categoriesFilter":[{"itemId":0,"itemName":"All Categories","count":38}],"articleTypeFilter":[{"articleType":"All Types","count":38},{"articleType":"Articles","count":33},{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","count":5}]},"filterDataLoadedStatus":"success","pageSize":10},"adsState":{"pageScripts":{"headers":{"timestamp":"2025-01-31T00:50:01+00:00"},"adsId":0,"data":{"scripts":[{"pages":["all"],"location":"header","script":"<!--Optimizely Script-->\r\n<script src=\"//cdn.optimizely.com/js/10563184655.js\"></script>","enabled":false},{"pages":["all"],"location":"header","script":"<!-- comScore Tag -->\r\n<script>var _comscore = _comscore || [];_comscore.push({ c1: \"2\", c2: \"15097263\" });(function() {var s = document.createElement(\"script\"), el = document.getElementsByTagName(\"script\")[0]; s.async = true;s.src = (document.location.protocol == \"https:\" ? \"//sb\" : \"//b\") + \".scorecardresearch.com/beacon.js\";el.parentNode.insertBefore(s, el);})();</script><noscript><img src=\"//sb.scorecardresearch.com/p?c1=2&c2=15097263&cv=2.0&cj=1\" /></noscript>\r\n<!-- / comScore Tag -->","enabled":true},{"pages":["all"],"location":"footer","script":"<!--BEGIN QUALTRICS WEBSITE FEEDBACK SNIPPET-->\r\n<script type='text/javascript'>\r\n(function(){var g=function(e,h,f,g){\r\nthis.get=function(a){for(var a=a+\"=\",c=document.cookie.split(\";\"),b=0,e=c.length;b<e;b++){for(var d=c[b];\" \"==d.charAt(0);)d=d.substring(1,d.length);if(0==d.indexOf(a))return d.substring(a.length,d.length)}return null};\r\nthis.set=function(a,c){var b=\"\",b=new Date;b.setTime(b.getTime()+6048E5);b=\"; expires=\"+b.toGMTString();document.cookie=a+\"=\"+c+b+\"; path=/; \"};\r\nthis.check=function(){var a=this.get(f);if(a)a=a.split(\":\");else if(100!=e)\"v\"==h&&(e=Math.random()>=e/100?0:100),a=[h,e,0],this.set(f,a.join(\":\"));else return!0;var c=a[1];if(100==c)return!0;switch(a[0]){case \"v\":return!1;case \"r\":return c=a[2]%Math.floor(100/c),a[2]++,this.set(f,a.join(\":\")),!c}return!0};\r\nthis.go=function(){if(this.check()){var a=document.createElement(\"script\");a.type=\"text/javascript\";a.src=g;document.body&&document.body.appendChild(a)}};\r\nthis.start=function(){var t=this;\"complete\"!==document.readyState?window.addEventListener?window.addEventListener(\"load\",function(){t.go()},!1):window.attachEvent&&window.attachEvent(\"onload\",function(){t.go()}):t.go()};};\r\ntry{(new g(100,\"r\",\"QSI_S_ZN_5o5yqpvMVjgDOuN\",\"//zn5o5yqpvmvjgdoun-wiley.siteintercept.qualtrics.com/SIE/?Q_ZID=ZN_5o5yqpvMVjgDOuN\")).start()}catch(i){}})();\r\n</script><div id='ZN_5o5yqpvMVjgDOuN'><!--DO NOT REMOVE-CONTENTS PLACED HERE--></div>\r\n<!--END WEBSITE FEEDBACK SNIPPET-->","enabled":false},{"pages":["all"],"location":"header","script":"<!-- Hotjar Tracking Code for //coursofppt.com -->\r\n<script>\r\n (function(h,o,t,j,a,r){\r\n h.hj=h.hj||function(){(h.hj.q=h.hj.q||[]).push(arguments)};\r\n h._hjSettings={hjid:257151,hjsv:6};\r\n a=o.getElementsByTagName('head')[0];\r\n r=o.createElement('script');r.async=1;\r\n r.src=t+h._hjSettings.hjid+j+h._hjSettings.hjsv;\r\n a.appendChild(r);\r\n })(window,document,'//static.hotjar.com/c/hotjar-','.js?sv=');\r\n</script>","enabled":false},{"pages":["article"],"location":"header","script":"<!-- //Connect Container: dummies --> <script src=\"//get.s-onetag.com/bffe21a1-6bb8-4928-9449-7beadb468dae/tag.min.js\" async defer></script>","enabled":true},{"pages":["homepage"],"location":"header","script":"<meta name=\"facebook-domain-verification\" content=\"irk8y0irxf718trg3uwwuexg6xpva0\" />","enabled":true},{"pages":["homepage","article","category","search"],"location":"footer","script":"<!-- Facebook Pixel Code -->\r\n<noscript>\r\n<img height=\"1\" width=\"1\" src=\"//www.facebook.com/tr?id=256338321977984&ev=PageView&noscript=1\"/>\r\n</noscript>\r\n<!-- End Facebook Pixel Code -->","enabled":true}]}},"pageScriptsLoadedStatus":"success"},"navigationState":{"navigationCollections":[{"collectionId":287568,"title":"BYOB (Be Your Own Boss)","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-entry-level-entrepreneur-287568"},{"collectionId":293237,"title":"Be a Rad Dad","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/be-the-best-dad-293237"},{"collectionId":295890,"title":"Career Shifting","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/career-shifting-295890"},{"collectionId":294090,"title":"Contemplating the Cosmos","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/theres-something-about-space-294090"},{"collectionId":287563,"title":"For Those Seeking Peace of Mind","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-those-seeking-peace-of-mind-287563"},{"collectionId":287570,"title":"For the Aspiring Aficionado","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-bougielicious-287570"},{"collectionId":291903,"title":"For the Budding Cannabis Enthusiast","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-budding-cannabis-enthusiast-291903"},{"collectionId":299891,"title":"For the College Bound","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-college-bound-299891"},{"collectionId":291934,"title":"For the Exam-Season Crammer","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-exam-season-crammer-291934"},{"collectionId":287569,"title":"For the Hopeless Romantic","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-hopeless-romantic-287569"}],"navigationCollectionsLoadedStatus":"success","navigationCategories":{"books":{"0":{"data":[{"categoryId":33512,"title":"Technology","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/books/technology-33512"},{"categoryId":33662,"title":"Academics & The Arts","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/books/academics-the-arts-33662"},{"categoryId":33809,"title":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/books/home-auto-hobbies-33809"},{"categoryId":34038,"title":"Body, Mind, & Spirit","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/books/body-mind-spirit-34038"},{"categoryId":34224,"title":"Business, Careers, & Money","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/books/business-careers-money-34224"}],"breadcrumbs":[],"categoryTitle":"Level 0 Category","mainCategoryUrl":"/category/books/level-0-category-0"}},"articles":{"0":{"data":[{"categoryId":33512,"title":"Technology","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/articles/technology-33512"},{"categoryId":33662,"title":"Academics & The Arts","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/articles/academics-the-arts-33662"},{"categoryId":33809,"title":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/articles/home-auto-hobbies-33809"},{"categoryId":34038,"title":"Body, Mind, & Spirit","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/articles/body-mind-spirit-34038"},{"categoryId":34224,"title":"Business, Careers, & Money","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/articles/business-careers-money-34224"}],"breadcrumbs":[],"categoryTitle":"Level 0 Category","mainCategoryUrl":"/category/articles/level-0-category-0"}}},"navigationCategoriesLoadedStatus":"success"},"searchState":{"searchList":[],"searchStatus":"initial","relatedArticlesList":[],"relatedArticlesStatus":"initial"},"routeState":{"name":"ArticleCategory","path":"/category/articles/literature-33709/","hash":"","query":{},"params":{"category":"literature-33709"},"fullPath":"/category/articles/literature-33709/","meta":{"routeType":"category","breadcrumbInfo":{"suffix":"Articles","baseRoute":"/category/articles"},"prerenderWithAsyncData":true},"from":{"name":null,"path":"/","hash":"","query":{},"params":{},"fullPath":"/","meta":{}}},"profileState":{"auth":{},"userOptions":{},"status":"success"}}
fun88 casino net cách chơi keno trực tuyến game đánh bài baccarat baccarat quốc tế sòng bài trực tuyến