chơi xổ số keno trực tuyến

{"appState":{"pageLoadApiCallsStatus":true},"categoryState":{"relatedCategories":{"headers":{"timestamp":"2025-01-31T04:01:10+00:00"},"categoryId":33800,"data":{"title":"Teaching","slug":"teaching","image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33800"},"slug":"teaching","categoryId":33800}],"parentCategory":{"categoryId":33662,"title":"Academics & The Arts","slug":"academics-the-arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"}},"childCategories":[{"categoryId":33801,"title":"Classroom","slug":"classroom","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33801"},"image":{"src":"/img/background-image-2.fabfbd5c.png","width":0,"height":0},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":7,"bookCount":1},{"categoryId":33804,"title":"Homeschooling","slug":"homeschooling","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33804"},"image":{"src":"/img/background-image-1.daf74cf0.png","width":0,"height":0},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":12,"bookCount":3},{"categoryId":33805,"title":"Online Education","slug":"online-education","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33805"},"image":{"src":"/img/background-image-2.fabfbd5c.png","width":0,"height":0},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":false,"articleCount":1,"bookCount":0},{"categoryId":33806,"title":"Skills Tests","slug":"skills-tests","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33806"},"image":{"src":"/img/background-image-1.daf74cf0.png","width":0,"height":0},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":142,"bookCount":4},{"categoryId":34387,"title":"General Teaching","slug":"general-teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34387"},"image":{"src":"/img/background-image-2.fabfbd5c.png","width":0,"height":0},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":5,"bookCount":1}],"description":"In the classroom, at home, or online. We've got the right stuff to help you excel as an educator.","relatedArticles":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles?category=33800&offset=0&size=5"},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":167,"bookCount":9},"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33800"}},"relatedCategoriesLoadedStatus":"success"},"listState":{"list":{"count":10,"total":168,"items":[{"headers":{"creationTime":"2021-02-24T01:15:23+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-09-06T13:36:39+00:00","timestamp":"2024-09-06T15:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33800"},"slug":"teaching","categoryId":33800},{"name":"Skills Tests","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33806"},"slug":"skills-tests","categoryId":33806},{"name":"Praxis","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33807"},"slug":"praxis","categoryId":33807}],"title":"Capitalization: What You Need to Know for the Praxis Core","strippedTitle":"capitalization: what you need to know for the praxis core","slug":"capitalization-what-you-need-to-know-for-the-praxis-core","canonicalUrl":"","收目录擎SEO":{"metaDescription":"For success on the Praxis Core, get to know some of the trickier rules about capitalization, which are the rules the Praxis writing test will ask about.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"When you first began looking into what is or isn’t tested on the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/academics-the-arts/teaching/skills-tests/praxis/praxis-writing-knowing-the-big-5-grammar-rules-149786/\">Praxis writing exam</a>, your reaction to finding out that there were questions about capitalization was probably something like “There are questions about <em>capitalization</em> on this test?! What am I, in third grade?”\r\n\r\nYes, you almost certainly already know that the first letters of the first words of sentences are capitalized, as are people’s names; the names of proper places like cities, states, or countries; the names of companies like “Facebook”; the names of sports teams and bands; and the words in the titles of books, movies, and so on.\r\n\r\nYou may not, however, know some of the trickier rules about capitalization, and those are the ones that the Praxis writing test will ask about. Here’s a rundown of the most common capitalization-related tricks:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Titles, like “president”:</strong> Titles, such as “president,” “mayor,” and so forth, are only capitalized when they are placed before the name of, or used to indicate, a <em>specific</em> president or mayor or what have you. So, you should write “Abraham Lincoln was the 16th president,” but “Everyone knows that President Lincoln wore a stovepipe hat.” If you’re talking about the <em>current</em> president (or mayor, or whomever), you capitalize the word even if the person’s name doesn’t appear in the sentence, because you’re still indicating a specific person: “The President held a press conference this morning.”</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">The same rule applies for God versus a god: You capitalize “God” when referring to a/the deity with the proper name God, but not when you’re talking about deities in general: “I prayed to God that I would pass the test” versus “Apollo was one of the Greek gods.”</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>The names of seasons:</strong> Many people are unclear about this, but the rule is that the names of seasons are only capitalized if you are addressing the season directly, as you might in a poem. So, you say “I love the way the leaves change color in the fall,” but “Oh, my beloved Fall, how I love it when your leaves change color!”</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>The names of specific regions, even if they are not actual countries:</strong> You should capitalize the names of all proper nouns, and that includes geographical areas that are not technically specific countries, cities, and the like: “My uncle frequently travels to the Far East.” You should <em>not,</em> however, capitalize the names of cardinal directions when they’re just used to indicate directions rather than an areas: “My uncle has to fly east to get to the Far East.” You should also not capitalize the “cardinal direction” part of a name when a suffix is attached to it, because that involves a comparison rather than a proper name, with the exception of cases where the cardinal direction with a comparative suffix is part of an actual proper noun: “Many people don’t realize that northern Brazil lies in the Northern Hemisphere.”</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Specific eras in history:</strong> The title of a specific period in history, even a slang or unofficial one, is a proper noun and should be capitalized accordingly: “The Disco Era was mercifully short-lived.”</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"When you first began looking into what is or isn’t tested on the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/academics-the-arts/teaching/skills-tests/praxis/praxis-writing-knowing-the-big-5-grammar-rules-149786/\">Praxis writing exam</a>, your reaction to finding out that there were questions about capitalization was probably something like “There are questions about <em>capitalization</em> on this test?! What am I, in third grade?”\r\n\r\nYes, you almost certainly already know that the first letters of the first words of sentences are capitalized, as are people’s names; the names of proper places like cities, states, or countries; the names of companies like “Facebook”; the names of sports teams and bands; and the words in the titles of books, movies, and so on.\r\n\r\nYou may not, however, know some of the trickier rules about capitalization, and those are the ones that the Praxis writing test will ask about. Here’s a rundown of the most common capitalization-related tricks:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Titles, like “president”:</strong> Titles, such as “president,” “mayor,” and so forth, are only capitalized when they are placed before the name of, or used to indicate, a <em>specific</em> president or mayor or what have you. So, you should write “Abraham Lincoln was the 16th president,” but “Everyone knows that President Lincoln wore a stovepipe hat.” If you’re talking about the <em>current</em> president (or mayor, or whomever), you capitalize the word even if the person’s name doesn’t appear in the sentence, because you’re still indicating a specific person: “The President held a press conference this morning.”</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">The same rule applies for God versus a god: You capitalize “God” when referring to a/the deity with the proper name God, but not when you’re talking about deities in general: “I prayed to God that I would pass the test” versus “Apollo was one of the Greek gods.”</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>The names of seasons:</strong> Many people are unclear about this, but the rule is that the names of seasons are only capitalized if you are addressing the season directly, as you might in a poem. So, you say “I love the way the leaves change color in the fall,” but “Oh, my beloved Fall, how I love it when your leaves change color!”</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>The names of specific regions, even if they are not actual countries:</strong> You should capitalize the names of all proper nouns, and that includes geographical areas that are not technically specific countries, cities, and the like: “My uncle frequently travels to the Far East.” You should <em>not,</em> however, capitalize the names of cardinal directions when they’re just used to indicate directions rather than an areas: “My uncle has to fly east to get to the Far East.” You should also not capitalize the “cardinal direction” part of a name when a suffix is attached to it, because that involves a comparison rather than a proper name, with the exception of cases where the cardinal direction with a comparative suffix is part of an actual proper noun: “Many people don’t realize that northern Brazil lies in the Northern Hemisphere.”</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Specific eras in history:</strong> The title of a specific period in history, even a slang or unofficial one, is a proper noun and should be capitalized accordingly: “The Disco Era was mercifully short-lived.”</li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10794,"name":"Carla C. Kirkland","slug":"carla-c-kirkland","description":" <p><b>Carla Kirkland,</b> founder and CEO of the Kirkland Group, an educational consulting firm, has helped educators prepare their students for standardized tests for more than 20 years.</p> <p><b>Chan Cleveland,</b> executive vice president of the Kirkland Group, is an English educator who has developed language arts resources for multiple school districts.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10794"}},{"authorId":9384,"name":"Chan Cleveland","slug":"chan-cleveland","description":" <p><b>Carla Kirkland,</b> founder and CEO of the Kirkland Group, an educational consulting firm, has helped educators prepare their students for standardized tests for more than 20 years.</p> <p><b>Chan Cleveland,</b> executive vice president of the Kirkland Group, is an English educator who has developed language arts resources for multiple school districts.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9384"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33807,"title":"Praxis","slug":"praxis","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33807"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":268455,"title":"Identify and Correct Errors in Praxis Core Selected-Response Items","slug":"identify-and-correct-errors-in-praxis-core-selected-response-items","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/268455"}},{"articleId":268441,"title":"How Data is Represented on the Praxis Core 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Sheet","slug":"praxis-core-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207653"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":268455,"title":"Identify and Correct Errors in Praxis Core Selected-Response Items","slug":"identify-and-correct-errors-in-praxis-core-selected-response-items","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/268455"}},{"articleId":268441,"title":"How Data is Represented on the Praxis Core Exam","slug":"how-data-is-represented-on-the-praxis-core-exam","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/268441"}},{"articleId":268435,"title":"How to Narrow Down Answer Choices on the Praxis Math Test","slug":"how-to-narrow-down-answer-choices-on-the-praxis-math-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/268435"}},{"articleId":268426,"title":"Visual- and Quantitative-Information Questions on the Praxis Reading Test","slug":"visual-and-quantitative-information-questions-on-the-praxis-reading-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/268426"}},{"articleId":254476,"title":"How to Register for the Praxis Exam","slug":"register-praxis-core-academic-skills-educators-exam","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/254476"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282492,"slug":"praxis-core-for-dummies-with-online-practice-tests-3rd-edition","isbn":"9781119888178","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119888174/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119888174/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119888174-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119888174/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119888174/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/praxis-core-2023-2024-for-dummies-cover-9781119888178-199x255.jpg","width":199,"height":255},"title":"Praxis Core 2023-2024 For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b>Carla Kirkland,</b> founder and CEO of the Kirkland Group, an educational consulting firm, has helped educators prepare their students for standardized tests for more than 20 years.</p> <p><b>Chan Cleveland,</b> executive vice president of the Kirkland Group, is an English educator who has developed language arts resources for multiple school districts.</p> <p><b>Carla Kirkland,</b> founder and CEO of the Kirkland Group, an educational consulting firm, has helped educators prepare their students for standardized tests for more than 20 years.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9384\">Chan Cleveland</b>,</b> executive vice president of the Kirkland Group, is an English educator who has developed language arts resources for multiple school districts.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":10794,"name":"Carla C. Kirkland","slug":"carla-c-kirkland","description":" <p><b>Carla Kirkland,</b> founder and CEO of the Kirkland Group, an educational consulting firm, has helped educators prepare their students for standardized tests for more than 20 years.</p> <p><b>Chan Cleveland,</b> executive vice president of the Kirkland Group, is an English educator who has developed language arts resources for multiple school districts.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10794"}},{"authorId":9384,"name":"Chan Cleveland","slug":"chan-cleveland","description":" <p><b>Carla Kirkland,</b> founder and CEO of the Kirkland Group, an educational consulting firm, has helped educators prepare their students for standardized tests for more than 20 years.</p> <p><b>Chan Cleveland,</b> executive vice president of the Kirkland Group, is an English educator who has developed language arts resources for multiple school districts.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9384"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;skills-tests&quot;,&quot;praxis&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119888178&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64f8942eeae35\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;skills-tests&quot;,&quot;praxis&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119888178&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64f8942eeb77c\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"One year","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-09-06T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":268458},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-07-13T20:30:56+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-08-03T16:31:38+00:00","timestamp":"2024-08-03T18:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33800"},"slug":"teaching","categoryId":33800},{"name":"General Teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34387"},"slug":"general-teaching","categoryId":34387}],"title":"How to Get Through Your First Week as a First-Year Teacher","strippedTitle":"how to get through your first week as a first-year teacher","slug":"your-first-week-as-a-new-teacher","canonicalUrl":"","收目录擎SEO":{"metaDescription":"Get some advice from experienced teachers about how to survive and thrive during your first week as a brand new teacher.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"I didn’t sleep much the night before my first day of school. I was nervous, anxious, scared, and more afraid of riding the bus than anything else, but that’s mostly because I was 5 years old and terrified to start kindergarten.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_299736\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-299736\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/teacher-elementary-classroom-adobeStock_504129729.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"420\" /> ©Wavebreak3 / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n\r\nFlash forward 17 years, and the mood was much the same my first week as a first-year teacher. The evening before my first day as a real, bona fide, certified teacher was just as nerve-wracking. I had a lot of the same worries. Would the kids respect me? Would I embarrass myself? What if I did something wrong? Where would I put my lunch?\r\n\r\nYou’ve spent at least two decades in school to prepare for your life as a teacher. You may very well be a teacher for the next 30 years and live on in the minds and memories of your students. But all such journeys must begin with a single step, and this step feels as significant as Neil Armstrong’s first hops across the moon.\r\n\r\nAs seasoned educators, we're writing this (and a couple of other coursofppt.com articles) to provide some important first-year teaching advice that we hope will help you during this somewhat scary time.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Making that important first impression</h2>\r\nYour first week as a first-year teacher is your biggest and best chance to make a first impression. If you’ve been on a blind date before, you know that first impressions mean everything. Studies show that it takes as little as seven seconds for those impressions to form, but they’ll definitely be hard-coded by the end of your first instructional week together.\r\n\r\nWhen students size you up for the first time, first and foremost, they want to determine who’s in charge. If you show signs of weakness, they know that it’ll just be a matter of time until they figure out how to get under your skin (figuratively speaking, hopefully). This begs the question: What can you do and how can you carry yourself to assert that you’re in control of the classroom? To answer that question, let’s use a metaphor of a lion tamer.\r\n\r\nTeaching may be a scary job at times, but its inherent danger really doesn’t much compare to the profession of lion tamer. Giant, ferocious, feral beasts bent on drinking human blood surround one, small, proportionally insignificant lion tamer.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">For more on how to not just get through, but thrive during your first days, weeks, and year as a brand new teacher, check out our book <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/book/academics-the-arts/teaching/general-teaching/first-year-teaching-for-dummies-299516/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><em>First-Year Teaching For Dummies</em></a>.</p>\r\nThey’re armed with only a whip, perhaps a chair, and the unspoken support and empathy of the thousands in the circus stands surrounding them. Slowly, they walk around the cage, staring down the hulking monsters, which growl menacingly and paw at the air as they walk by.\r\n\r\nSuddenly, they crack their whip, and the lions do all sorts of crazy things. They balance on giant, oversized balls. They jump through flaming hoops. They do political sketch comedy. It’s amazing! What keeps these huge cats from realizing that, if they teamed up, the lion tamer would stand no chance against them? What makes them follow the advice and admonition of the teeny human with the whip and the chair? (And why a chair? Are they trying to threaten the lions with the notion of being seated comfortably?)\r\n\r\nA lion tamer is very deliberate about when they enter and exit the cage. They’re always the first in and the last out. Why is this so important? When you are the person in the cage, you’re establishing your territory — this is your realm, and you rule over it.\r\n\r\nWhen the lions are allowed in later, they enter with the implicit understanding that the tamer is king or queen of the cage, and they’re merely guests invited at a royal whim. If the lions were to enter first, they’d recognize the empty space as theirs and be more willing to attack to defend their territory.\r\n\r\nIf you haven’t guessed it, you’re the lion tamer in this metaphor, and your students are the lions. During the first week of school, you need to be in your room, greeting students as they walk in the door.\r\n\r\nDon’t roam the hallways during class changes or come flying into your classroom as the bell is sounding. You need to show that you’re completely in control of what happens in that classroom, from the first minute to the last minute that you share with your students each day.\r\n\r\nHere are some other benefits of the lion tamer’s initial presence in the classroom:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><strong>You can direct your students to their assigned seats.</strong> You <em>must</em> have your seating arrangement ready to go with assigned seats for every student on the first day. The easiest way to assign these seats is alphabetically, for a couple of reasons. First of all, taking roll is easy when seats are in alphabetical order, which is extremely helpful before you learn all your kids’ names.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">Secondly, seating according to the alphabet is completely impartial. Kids are just like adults in that they want to be close to their friends when entering a completely unknown situation. Your classroom is a total mystery to them, and their knee-jerk reaction will be to try to sit with their friends. By denying them the ability to sit wherever they please, you’ve made your first statement about who’s in charge without making anything personal.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">The lions may not be happy when they can’t sit where they want, but this is not their territory; it is yours. Perhaps down the road the seating arrangement may change, but that’s not a topic of discussion for the day. Facing complaints and tears, the lion tamer is unmoved. One word of warning: Lions whose last names fall close together in the alphabet may be very familiar with each other because of other classes seated alphabetically.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">Don’t hesitate to separate students who look overly comfortable together on the first day of class. If they’re chatting amiably minutes after you’ve seated them, you need to make a mental note to have new seats the next day. The first day of school often represents your students’ best behavior that they’ll manage all year. If they’re already distracted and ignoring instructions on day one, it’s not going to improve unless you do something.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>You can begin to pair names with faces.</strong> Remember that kid everyone warned you about? Pair the name with the face immediately. Know your lions, especially the ones more likely to bite. In fact, learning student names should be your first major objective in the school year. A student will respond better to “Jim” than “the young man in the front row, third seat from my left — your right — with blue eyes and brown hair, dressed in a white T-shirt, jeans, and bright red sneakers.”</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>You give students clear direction about what you expect.</strong> In earth and space sciences, you learn that nature abhors a vacuum. It’s a simple principle — nature rushes to overwhelm any empty space it finds. For example, if you suck the air out of a plastic milk jug, it will collapse upon itself. Nature doesn’t like the absence of air in the container, so it collapses the container around it to fill in that space.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Students also abhor living in a vacuum — even more than they think they hate rules. They actually crave structure, though they may not know it. They want to know what is expected of them at all times during the school day. This, of course, doesn’t mean that they’ll actually <em>do</em> what is expected, but it at least satisfies their curiosity.</p>\r\nIf you’re in your classroom before class starts, you can give direction to the students coming in. Most teachers write learning objectives and warm-ups (or to use fancy-pants educational jargon, an anticipatory set of questions) so that the students have an immediate goal as soon as they enter the room.\r\n\r\nAttendance, grading, and other administrative tasks may occupy you for the first five minutes of class, especially during the first week of school, so this gives students something to focus on while you get your head on straight. It’s much better than leaving them to find their own entertainment, because then you are ceding choice and control to the lions right away.\r\n\r\nBe prepared with an activity that students can immediately immerse themselves in. For example, provide paper and crayons, and ask them to draw a picture of something they did that summer or perhaps draw a picture of their families. Drawing and coloring are familiar activities, so you are providing structure in a context that they already understand while allowing you time to get yourself together.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Building a reputation in your first year teaching</h2>\r\nNo one wants to deal with the discipline issues that arise day to day. Even if you’re good at classroom management, dealing with it constantly is a bummer. Time for some harsh reality: You’ll deal with more discipline issues in your first three or four months of teaching than you will for the next three or four years. It’s all about reputation.\r\n\r\nThe students know which teachers can be pushed around and which ones stick fast to the rules. And they pay special attention to people who are going through their first year as a teacher.\r\n\r\nStudents pass the information to each other like spies in a hostile country. “In Mrs. Brown’s class, you’re allowed to swear (just as long as it’s not one of the major swear words), but she hates it when you chew gum. Also, if she’s having a bad day, don’t talk without raising your hand. A kid did that last year and she went completely mental, yelling for like 25 minutes straight. She even made a couple of kids cry, and they were on the football team!”\r\n\r\nStudents are extremely curious; from the first minute they meet you, they’re going to try to figure out everything they can, including:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Your first name</li>\r\n \t<li>How old you are</li>\r\n \t<li>Where you live</li>\r\n \t<li>The kind of car you drive (and where you park)</li>\r\n \t<li>Whether you have a significant other, if you’re married — if so, why; and if not, why not</li>\r\n \t<li>How often you yell and what prompts it</li>\r\n \t<li>Why you’ve worn the same pants two days in a row</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThey’ll build their overall impression of you slowly, over the course of the first few weeks, based on how you react to them, what kind of teaching style you use, and how dutifully you stick to both your personal rules and the school rules.\r\n\r\nAnother bit of wisdom from our list of first-year teacher tips: Don’t be surprised if all of your students, even the ones you’ve been warned about in advance, are at least tolerable, if not very well behaved at the beginning.\r\n\r\nVery few students will actually challenge you openly in the first few days of school because even they know that that’s a poor way to get the year started. However, very slowly, they’ll begin to test you, to see exactly where your boundaries are. This shouldn’t surprise you that much — you and your peers did the same things when you were a student.\r\n\r\nWe’ve said this already, but it bears repeating: To avoid future problems, stick to your rules, unless they’re wildly inappropriate and must be changed on the spot (this is almost never the case). If your notebook-collection rule was a little too eager and it stinks having to gather them up and grade them weekly, too bad. You made that rule, so stick by it.\r\n\r\nIf you start changing things around right away, students are going to question every single one of your rules, and the argument “But you changed your grading policy twice already” is going to frustrate your principal, who can’t support you unless you stay consistent with the rules you’ve set.\r\n\r\nIf your students push back on the rules, tell them “I’m not here to make it easy. I am here to make it worthwhile.” After a few months of being Mr. or Mrs. By the Book, the students will get the point: You make the rules, and they aren’t going to change, so if anything needs changing, it’ll be their attitudes and work habits.\r\n\r\nIn essence, you always want to bring students up to your level of expectations rather than lower those expectations to make it easier for your class. By November or December, you can be more jovial and kid around with the students because you’ve established the parameters within which you will operate for the rest of the school year and beyond.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">In your first year of teaching, starting the year relaxed and then trying to introduce discipline later is almost impossible. Beginning the school year as a stickler for the rules and easing up as the school year goes on is much easier. Just about every new teacher we spoke with told us, “I wish I’d been tougher at first, and I definitely will be next year.” Being tough from the beginning makes things much less stressful for you because you’ll actually be able to focus on teaching rather than constant supervision. You will find that this pays dividends for you going forward. Students already know what you expect every other year moving forward, and you won’t have to be a crank next fall.</p>\r\nOne of my former students, Laura, gave me a terrific compliment when she graduated. She was studying to be a teacher, and one of her professors told her that first-year teachers are historically very bad because they have a lot to learn. Laura told the class about me because she was in my class the first year I taught. “For the first three months, we thought he was mean. He had lots of fun ways to learn stuff, but when it came down to the rules, he wouldn’t budge. Then, one random day in the spring, we suddenly noticed that he was much more relaxed, and everyone was following the rules, and we never even realized what he’d done. Pretty slick.”\r\n<p class=\"article-tip tip\"><strong>Don't smile until December?</strong> If there’s one piece of advice we heard over and over again as we prepared to teach, it was the old adage “Don’t smile until December.” In other words, be firm and stern at the beginning of the school year and slowly ease up as the year progresses and student behavior allows. There’s a reason this advice is so popular — it works, if applied correctly.</p>","description":"I didn’t sleep much the night before my first day of school. I was nervous, anxious, scared, and more afraid of riding the bus than anything else, but that’s mostly because I was 5 years old and terrified to start kindergarten.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_299736\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-299736\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/teacher-elementary-classroom-adobeStock_504129729.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"420\" /> ©Wavebreak3 / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n\r\nFlash forward 17 years, and the mood was much the same my first week as a first-year teacher. The evening before my first day as a real, bona fide, certified teacher was just as nerve-wracking. I had a lot of the same worries. Would the kids respect me? Would I embarrass myself? What if I did something wrong? Where would I put my lunch?\r\n\r\nYou’ve spent at least two decades in school to prepare for your life as a teacher. You may very well be a teacher for the next 30 years and live on in the minds and memories of your students. But all such journeys must begin with a single step, and this step feels as significant as Neil Armstrong’s first hops across the moon.\r\n\r\nAs seasoned educators, we're writing this (and a couple of other coursofppt.com articles) to provide some important first-year teaching advice that we hope will help you during this somewhat scary time.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Making that important first impression</h2>\r\nYour first week as a first-year teacher is your biggest and best chance to make a first impression. If you’ve been on a blind date before, you know that first impressions mean everything. Studies show that it takes as little as seven seconds for those impressions to form, but they’ll definitely be hard-coded by the end of your first instructional week together.\r\n\r\nWhen students size you up for the first time, first and foremost, they want to determine who’s in charge. If you show signs of weakness, they know that it’ll just be a matter of time until they figure out how to get under your skin (figuratively speaking, hopefully). This begs the question: What can you do and how can you carry yourself to assert that you’re in control of the classroom? To answer that question, let’s use a metaphor of a lion tamer.\r\n\r\nTeaching may be a scary job at times, but its inherent danger really doesn’t much compare to the profession of lion tamer. Giant, ferocious, feral beasts bent on drinking human blood surround one, small, proportionally insignificant lion tamer.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">For more on how to not just get through, but thrive during your first days, weeks, and year as a brand new teacher, check out our book <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/book/academics-the-arts/teaching/general-teaching/first-year-teaching-for-dummies-299516/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><em>First-Year Teaching For Dummies</em></a>.</p>\r\nThey’re armed with only a whip, perhaps a chair, and the unspoken support and empathy of the thousands in the circus stands surrounding them. Slowly, they walk around the cage, staring down the hulking monsters, which growl menacingly and paw at the air as they walk by.\r\n\r\nSuddenly, they crack their whip, and the lions do all sorts of crazy things. They balance on giant, oversized balls. They jump through flaming hoops. They do political sketch comedy. It’s amazing! What keeps these huge cats from realizing that, if they teamed up, the lion tamer would stand no chance against them? What makes them follow the advice and admonition of the teeny human with the whip and the chair? (And why a chair? Are they trying to threaten the lions with the notion of being seated comfortably?)\r\n\r\nA lion tamer is very deliberate about when they enter and exit the cage. They’re always the first in and the last out. Why is this so important? When you are the person in the cage, you’re establishing your territory — this is your realm, and you rule over it.\r\n\r\nWhen the lions are allowed in later, they enter with the implicit understanding that the tamer is king or queen of the cage, and they’re merely guests invited at a royal whim. If the lions were to enter first, they’d recognize the empty space as theirs and be more willing to attack to defend their territory.\r\n\r\nIf you haven’t guessed it, you’re the lion tamer in this metaphor, and your students are the lions. During the first week of school, you need to be in your room, greeting students as they walk in the door.\r\n\r\nDon’t roam the hallways during class changes or come flying into your classroom as the bell is sounding. You need to show that you’re completely in control of what happens in that classroom, from the first minute to the last minute that you share with your students each day.\r\n\r\nHere are some other benefits of the lion tamer’s initial presence in the classroom:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><strong>You can direct your students to their assigned seats.</strong> You <em>must</em> have your seating arrangement ready to go with assigned seats for every student on the first day. The easiest way to assign these seats is alphabetically, for a couple of reasons. First of all, taking roll is easy when seats are in alphabetical order, which is extremely helpful before you learn all your kids’ names.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">Secondly, seating according to the alphabet is completely impartial. Kids are just like adults in that they want to be close to their friends when entering a completely unknown situation. Your classroom is a total mystery to them, and their knee-jerk reaction will be to try to sit with their friends. By denying them the ability to sit wherever they please, you’ve made your first statement about who’s in charge without making anything personal.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">The lions may not be happy when they can’t sit where they want, but this is not their territory; it is yours. Perhaps down the road the seating arrangement may change, but that’s not a topic of discussion for the day. Facing complaints and tears, the lion tamer is unmoved. One word of warning: Lions whose last names fall close together in the alphabet may be very familiar with each other because of other classes seated alphabetically.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">Don’t hesitate to separate students who look overly comfortable together on the first day of class. If they’re chatting amiably minutes after you’ve seated them, you need to make a mental note to have new seats the next day. The first day of school often represents your students’ best behavior that they’ll manage all year. If they’re already distracted and ignoring instructions on day one, it’s not going to improve unless you do something.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>You can begin to pair names with faces.</strong> Remember that kid everyone warned you about? Pair the name with the face immediately. Know your lions, especially the ones more likely to bite. In fact, learning student names should be your first major objective in the school year. A student will respond better to “Jim” than “the young man in the front row, third seat from my left — your right — with blue eyes and brown hair, dressed in a white T-shirt, jeans, and bright red sneakers.”</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>You give students clear direction about what you expect.</strong> In earth and space sciences, you learn that nature abhors a vacuum. It’s a simple principle — nature rushes to overwhelm any empty space it finds. For example, if you suck the air out of a plastic milk jug, it will collapse upon itself. Nature doesn’t like the absence of air in the container, so it collapses the container around it to fill in that space.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Students also abhor living in a vacuum — even more than they think they hate rules. They actually crave structure, though they may not know it. They want to know what is expected of them at all times during the school day. This, of course, doesn’t mean that they’ll actually <em>do</em> what is expected, but it at least satisfies their curiosity.</p>\r\nIf you’re in your classroom before class starts, you can give direction to the students coming in. Most teachers write learning objectives and warm-ups (or to use fancy-pants educational jargon, an anticipatory set of questions) so that the students have an immediate goal as soon as they enter the room.\r\n\r\nAttendance, grading, and other administrative tasks may occupy you for the first five minutes of class, especially during the first week of school, so this gives students something to focus on while you get your head on straight. It’s much better than leaving them to find their own entertainment, because then you are ceding choice and control to the lions right away.\r\n\r\nBe prepared with an activity that students can immediately immerse themselves in. For example, provide paper and crayons, and ask them to draw a picture of something they did that summer or perhaps draw a picture of their families. Drawing and coloring are familiar activities, so you are providing structure in a context that they already understand while allowing you time to get yourself together.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Building a reputation in your first year teaching</h2>\r\nNo one wants to deal with the discipline issues that arise day to day. Even if you’re good at classroom management, dealing with it constantly is a bummer. Time for some harsh reality: You’ll deal with more discipline issues in your first three or four months of teaching than you will for the next three or four years. It’s all about reputation.\r\n\r\nThe students know which teachers can be pushed around and which ones stick fast to the rules. And they pay special attention to people who are going through their first year as a teacher.\r\n\r\nStudents pass the information to each other like spies in a hostile country. “In Mrs. Brown’s class, you’re allowed to swear (just as long as it’s not one of the major swear words), but she hates it when you chew gum. Also, if she’s having a bad day, don’t talk without raising your hand. A kid did that last year and she went completely mental, yelling for like 25 minutes straight. She even made a couple of kids cry, and they were on the football team!”\r\n\r\nStudents are extremely curious; from the first minute they meet you, they’re going to try to figure out everything they can, including:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Your first name</li>\r\n \t<li>How old you are</li>\r\n \t<li>Where you live</li>\r\n \t<li>The kind of car you drive (and where you park)</li>\r\n \t<li>Whether you have a significant other, if you’re married — if so, why; and if not, why not</li>\r\n \t<li>How often you yell and what prompts it</li>\r\n \t<li>Why you’ve worn the same pants two days in a row</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThey’ll build their overall impression of you slowly, over the course of the first few weeks, based on how you react to them, what kind of teaching style you use, and how dutifully you stick to both your personal rules and the school rules.\r\n\r\nAnother bit of wisdom from our list of first-year teacher tips: Don’t be surprised if all of your students, even the ones you’ve been warned about in advance, are at least tolerable, if not very well behaved at the beginning.\r\n\r\nVery few students will actually challenge you openly in the first few days of school because even they know that that’s a poor way to get the year started. However, very slowly, they’ll begin to test you, to see exactly where your boundaries are. This shouldn’t surprise you that much — you and your peers did the same things when you were a student.\r\n\r\nWe’ve said this already, but it bears repeating: To avoid future problems, stick to your rules, unless they’re wildly inappropriate and must be changed on the spot (this is almost never the case). If your notebook-collection rule was a little too eager and it stinks having to gather them up and grade them weekly, too bad. You made that rule, so stick by it.\r\n\r\nIf you start changing things around right away, students are going to question every single one of your rules, and the argument “But you changed your grading policy twice already” is going to frustrate your principal, who can’t support you unless you stay consistent with the rules you’ve set.\r\n\r\nIf your students push back on the rules, tell them “I’m not here to make it easy. I am here to make it worthwhile.” After a few months of being Mr. or Mrs. By the Book, the students will get the point: You make the rules, and they aren’t going to change, so if anything needs changing, it’ll be their attitudes and work habits.\r\n\r\nIn essence, you always want to bring students up to your level of expectations rather than lower those expectations to make it easier for your class. By November or December, you can be more jovial and kid around with the students because you’ve established the parameters within which you will operate for the rest of the school year and beyond.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">In your first year of teaching, starting the year relaxed and then trying to introduce discipline later is almost impossible. Beginning the school year as a stickler for the rules and easing up as the school year goes on is much easier. Just about every new teacher we spoke with told us, “I wish I’d been tougher at first, and I definitely will be next year.” Being tough from the beginning makes things much less stressful for you because you’ll actually be able to focus on teaching rather than constant supervision. You will find that this pays dividends for you going forward. Students already know what you expect every other year moving forward, and you won’t have to be a crank next fall.</p>\r\nOne of my former students, Laura, gave me a terrific compliment when she graduated. She was studying to be a teacher, and one of her professors told her that first-year teachers are historically very bad because they have a lot to learn. Laura told the class about me because she was in my class the first year I taught. “For the first three months, we thought he was mean. He had lots of fun ways to learn stuff, but when it came down to the rules, he wouldn’t budge. Then, one random day in the spring, we suddenly noticed that he was much more relaxed, and everyone was following the rules, and we never even realized what he’d done. Pretty slick.”\r\n<p class=\"article-tip tip\"><strong>Don't smile until December?</strong> If there’s one piece of advice we heard over and over again as we prepared to teach, it was the old adage “Don’t smile until December.” In other words, be firm and stern at the beginning of the school year and slowly ease up as the year progresses and student behavior allows. There’s a reason this advice is so popular — it works, if applied correctly.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10466,"name":"W. Michael Kelley","slug":"w-michael-kelley","description":" \t <p><b>W. Michael Kelley</b> is a former calculus teacher who now works in the Department of Education at the University of Maryland. His Web site, www.calculus&#45;help.com, has won many awards. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10466"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34387,"title":"General Teaching","slug":"general-teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34387"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Making that important first impression","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Building a reputation in your first year teaching","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":299763,"title":"Classroom Discipline Advice for First-Year Teachers","slug":"how-to-control-your-classroom-as-a-first-year-teacher","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299763"}},{"articleId":299743,"title":"Important First-Week Tasks for a New Teacher","slug":"identifying-important-first-week-tasks","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299743"}},{"articleId":299571,"title":"First-Year Teaching For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"first-year-teaching-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299571"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":299763,"title":"Classroom Discipline Advice for First-Year Teachers","slug":"how-to-control-your-classroom-as-a-first-year-teacher","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299763"}},{"articleId":299743,"title":"Important First-Week Tasks for a New Teacher","slug":"identifying-important-first-week-tasks","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299743"}},{"articleId":299571,"title":"First-Year Teaching For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"first-year-teaching-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299571"}},{"articleId":172372,"title":"How to Present in a College Seminar","slug":"how-to-present-in-a-college-seminar","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/172372"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":299516,"slug":"first-year-teaching-for-dummies","isbn":"9781394189762","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1394189761/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1394189761/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1394189761-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1394189761/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1394189761/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/first-year-teaching-for-dummies-9781394189762-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"First-Year Teaching For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"10466\">W. Michael Kelley</b></b> is a former calculus teacher who now works in the Department of Education at the University of Maryland. His Web site, www.calculus&#45;help.com, has won many awards. <p><b>W. Michael Kelley</b> is a former calculus teacher who now works in the Department of Education at the University of Maryland. His Web site, www.calculus&#45;help.com, has won many awards. <p><b>W. Michael Kelley</b> is a former calculus teacher who now works in the Department of Education at the University of Maryland. His Web site, www.calculus&#45;help.com, has won many awards.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":10466,"name":"W. Michael Kelley","slug":"w-michael-kelley","description":" \t <p><b>W. Michael Kelley</b> is a former calculus teacher who now works in the Department of Education at the University of Maryland. His Web site, www.calculus&#45;help.com, has won many awards. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10466"}},{"authorId":35306,"name":"Carol Flaherty","slug":"carol-flaherty","description":" \t <p><b>W. Michael Kelley</b> is a former calculus teacher who now works in the Department of Education at the University of Maryland. His Web site, www.calculus&#45;help.com, has won many awards. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35306"}},{"authorId":35307,"name":"Flirtisha Harris","slug":"flirtisha-harris","description":" \t <p><b>W. Michael Kelley</b> is a former calculus teacher who now works in the Department of Education at the University of Maryland. His Web site, www.calculus&#45;help.com, has won many awards. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35307"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;general-teaching&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781394189762&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64cbeb5f8bee5\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;general-teaching&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781394189762&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64cbeb5f8c4f5\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-07-13T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":299728},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-07-17T16:16:59+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-07-18T12:29:10+00:00","timestamp":"2024-07-18T15:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33800"},"slug":"teaching","categoryId":33800},{"name":"General Teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34387"},"slug":"general-teaching","categoryId":34387}],"title":"Classroom Discipline Advice for First-Year Teachers","strippedTitle":"classroom discipline advice for first-year teachers","slug":"how-to-control-your-classroom-as-a-first-year-teacher","canonicalUrl":"","收目录擎SEO":{"metaDescription":"Get some invaluable advice from experienced teachers about how to handle classroom control as a first-year teacher.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Without a doubt, brand new teachers worry more about classroom discipline and management skills than they worry about anything else. Deep down, you know that if you can’t maintain discipline, you have little hope of getting rehired and eventually receiving tenure.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_299776\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-299776\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/cartoon-teaching-classroom-discipline-adobeStock_73699280.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"483\" /> ©Cartoonresource / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n\r\nAt its very heart, effective classroom discipline boils down to three basic skills: motivating your students, confronting inappropriate behavior, and maintaining class discipline after you’ve established it. In this article, we give you some practical advice for each of these skills to help shape you into a successful classroom manager.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >What the front office expects from you</h2>\r\nAdministrators value good classroom-management skills above everything else when evaluating teachers. They know that before any learning can take place, you must have an orderly environment. No amount of group learning, discovery-based lessons, or (insert current education buzzword here<em>)</em> can cure the ailments of an undisciplined classroom.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">In most administrators’ minds, if you can keep your kids under control, they can help you with anything else. If you have a solid classroom management plan, all other small dents in the armor of your teacher preparation can be hammered out. And that includes some early and clumsy lesson plans that, perhaps, don’t quite work.</p>\r\nEffective class discipline is usually different in practice than most first-year teachers expect. In our new teacher dreams, we were facilitators of small utopian societies, where all students respected one another and accepted our leadership. Would it surprise you to learn that’s not the way things worked out?\r\n\r\nStudents may crave order subconsciously, but they don’t enjoy order being imposed on them. Truth be told, none of us love being told what to do, how to do it, where to go, and how to get there. In business terms we call this <em>micromanagement,</em> and it rarely inspires loyalty and joy in an employee.\r\n\r\nHowever, children aren’t adults. They need guidance and can’t be expected, automatically, to know how to comport themselves and fit into the classroom environment you’re building. Therein lies the conundrum. How can you lead a classroom effectively without becoming a dictator? Dictators are always looking over their shoulders, living in fear, trying to squash uprisings, and that’s not what you envisioned for yourself when you decided to become a teacher.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Motivating students</h2>\r\nYou can run a classroom a thousand different ways, but all classrooms that run smoothly have one characteristic in common: The students are motivated. The way that you interact with students on a daily basis provides the foundation for this motivation.\r\n\r\nHow can you motivate a student? It’s an age-old dilemma, and the question has no simple answer. However, we’ve found the following three universal truths:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Motivated students know that their teacher cares about them individually.</strong> Hopefully, you’ve already made it a point to learn the names of your kids in the first week of classes. Now, find out more about them on a personal basis. As you roam about the room to check homework or pass back assignments, engage in small talk. Although some will be shy at first, others will be itching to talk to you and get to know you better. The other, more reticent, students will watch these initial interactions and decide, in time, to trust you enough to share their thoughts and lives as well.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Motivated students want to know how they can succeed in your class.</strong> Describing your rules was just the beginning. You also need to explain exactly what you expect in every homework assignment and quiz or test question. If students are constantly thinking, “I have no idea what the heck they’re asking!” or “What can I possibly do to succeed in this class?” your expectations are either too vague or too inconsistent day to day.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Motivated students respect their teachers as consummate professionals.</strong> Your kids know if you’re slacking in your teaching responsibilities. They can tell how well you plan for classes based on how comfortable you are with the material, and they want to know just how dedicated you are to doing your job well. If they sense that your lesson plans are thorough, that you’re well prepared, and that you’re working hard for them, they’ll be more willing to work hard for you.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nAfter you’ve established these three foundational truths in your class, you can do all kinds of more tangible things to motivate your kids. You can go out of your way to make learning fun and add little things to the everyday drudgery of class to spice things up.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">For more about getting to know your students during the first week of school, and for more on all you need to know as a first-year teacher, check out our book <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/book/academics-the-arts/teaching/general-teaching/first-year-teaching-for-dummies-299516/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><em>First-Year Teaching For Dummies</em></a>.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Facing bad behavior head on</h2>\r\nEventually, it has to happen. One of your kids is going to break a rule, and you’ll have no doubt in your mind that it was both intentional and a direct challenge to your authority. No matter how fantastic your rules and how motivated most of your students are, one of them is going to push back to see how you react to it.\r\n\r\nAfter you deal with this probing, testing tendency of your students, you’ll be well on your way to earning a reputation. If you deal quickly and thoroughly with your first offenders, you’ll spend less time disciplining kids for the rest of the year — they’ll already know exactly where your boundaries lie.\r\n<h3>Winning the discipline war</h3>\r\nMost new teachers wish that they didn’t have to deal with discipline and (if they had a choice) would ignore inappropriate behavior. Confrontation causes tension, and you’re trying to establish a supportive classroom atmosphere, so disciplining a student almost seems contrary to the goal. Nothing could be further from the truth. Although discipline is certainly tough and by no means fun, it’s an essential component of classroom management.\r\n\r\nConfrontation is actually healthy in any relationship, if handled correctly. Conflict arises when two groups do not see eye to eye, and until you confront that conflict, neither party can move forward. When a problem arises in your class, when the gauntlet is thrown, pick it up and put it on.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">It is your responsibility to establish and protect the learning environment. Kids in your room need to know that if they are disrespectful or break a rule, the consequences are going to be unpleasant. Therefore, you have to know how to confront students effectively when they step out of line. In short, you need to step up to face down the challenge.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Where teacher education fails</h2>\r\nWhy is classroom management such a sticking point for first-year teachers, and why does it cause such anxiety? The answer is simple: Most (if not all) teacher-education programs fail to provide you with the training and the skills you need to be the leader in your classroom. Most don't provide you with strategies for positive discipline in the classroom or teach you how to develop a classroom discipline plan.\r\n\r\nTeacher education programs teach you philosophy. They teach you how to create a behavioral objective. And then, they teach you how to do that over and over. (We’ll never understand why they obsess about objectives so much — it’s like they’d rather talk about teaching than actually teach.) They teach you the order in which to list multiple-choice questions when you write a test. But they don’t tell you what to do if a student refuses to follow your directions.\r\n\r\nIf you shy away from confrontation, you are welcoming inconsistent chaos. Every day is going to be chaotic but in a new and unpredictable way, and that sounds like a lousy way to spend a school year.\r\n\r\nInstead of viewing confrontation as something to dread, look at it as an opportunity. Keep in mind, though, that it’s an opportunity you need to use wisely. Many variables can play out in an infinite number of ways, so you want to be sure to approach the situation with a plan.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >The three A’s of confrontation</h2>\r\nComing up with classroom discipline strategies and a practical approach to student confrontation takes time. You don’t want to be a monster who is always on edge, waiting for a student to do something wrong so that you can correct them, and you don’t want students who were disciplined in class to feel that you hold a grudge after everything is said and done. Your goal is to be someone who will maintain classroom order when push comes to shove.\r\n\r\nThree key practices will help you confront students when the need arises. We call these the three A’s of confrontation — anticipate, assert, and align:\r\n<h3>Anticipate behavioral problems</h3>\r\nAlways keep one ear to the ground to listen for oncoming trains. Behavioral problems rarely spring up unexpectedly and are usually the result of days or weeks of pent-up aggravation. Listen to student conversations before and after class, whenever you can eavesdrop from your desk. Students can be passive-aggressive if they don’t like you, and they’ll discuss their displeasure with a classmate when they know you can hear them.\r\n\r\nFor example, if you overhear a student say, “This assignment is really unfair,” or “I don’t care what she says, I’m going to the bathroom when class starts,” that should raise red flags in your mind that confrontation is imminent. If you’re careful about watching for the warning signs, you’re less likely to be caught unprepared.\r\n\r\nIf you suspect something, you need to speak with that student individually, away from the rest of the class, before things escalate. If that’s not possible, position yourself near that student’s desk often during the lesson so that you can keep an eye on them. Most of the time, if that student sees that you’re suspicious, that’s enough to stifle an in-class argument, allowing you to see that kid after class. Find out what the problem is and talk to the student honestly and openly.\r\n\r\nFor example, you might say: “I heard what you said before class started. I appreciate that you didn’t escalate things during class time, and I’d like to talk about it now, unless you’d like some time to cool off.”\r\n\r\nThere is no judgment here and you have not ceded your authority, so it’s a win-win. You are indicating that you understand confrontation is coming, you are keeping it from impacting the class as a whole, and you are opening the lines of communication. Sometimes, a simple gesture like this, which shows that you are willing to treat your student as a human being with valid thoughts and emotions, works wonders.\r\n<h3>Assert authority appropriately</h3>\r\nWhen an important rule is broken, consequences must follow. However, the punishment must fit the crime. Remember that if you start out by shouting at the smallest infractions, you have nowhere to go — you can’t up the ante.\r\n\r\nWhen you’re in front of a class, let the students know exactly how you feel, and make them respond to you as a person rather than telling them specifically what to do. For example, rather than simply barking, “Be quiet!” while a big angry vein pulsates in your forehead, try, “Folks, the room needs to quiet down right now because I’m short on patience today.”\r\n\r\nLook at the big differences in those two approaches. The latter gives a valid warning before real confrontation occurs. It gives the students a chance to fix their own behavior before you fix it for them. Also, by explaining how you feel, you open yourself up as a person and not simply a mindless authority figure.\r\n\r\nFurthermore, this second approach shows them some respect, because you’re not automatically initiating confrontation. With this cue, you’re firing a metaphorical warning shot across their bow.\r\n<h3>Align students as allies after the line has been crossed</h3>\r\nEventually, you’re going to have your fill of nonsense, and your temper will flare. When this happens, don’t be apologetic, and don’t act as though you regret the temper flare. An angry teacher should make the classroom atmosphere darken as though clouds have moved in and blotted out the sun.\r\n\r\nHowever, after you’ve gotten the point across, back away from additional confrontation and return to business as normal. After they’ve witnessed the consequences of unacceptable behavior, they must be given the opportunity to behave correctly. Take a deep breath. Take fifty deep breaths, whatever it takes to get back to center.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Don’t hold a grudge against students, because if you do, there’s no motivation for them to change their behavior. Most kids would rather not be on your bad side, especially when they see how bad that bad side can be, so you must give them the opportunity to cross into the other camp and become your ally. You’ll discover that (oddly) some of the kids you’ll discipline repeatedly will form the closest relationships with you later.</p>\r\nFinally, keep in mind that the goal of confronting bad behavior isn’t just to inflict consequences. Old school discipline works like this: You screwed up and now you have to pay the price. Think about your own life. Would you like consequences every single time you did anything wrong? Of course not. You’d hope that an authority figure would give you a break if you’re doing your best and your error was not the end of the world.\r\n\r\nBe merciful to your students as you would want others to be merciful to you. Again, that doesn’t mean ignore; it just means that you don’t always have to punish. The goal is to fix problems and move on, not to inflict misery on children. It’s hard for students to build a relationship with a scorpion, always worried when it will strike and whether they’ll survive the encounter.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">If you’ve done a good job confronting unacceptable behavior, things won’t feel good right away. If the students respect you, they’ll probably feel a little guilty, and the room will be quieter than usual. You may even feel bad if you were a little rough.</p>\r\nToo often, new teachers try to compensate for confrontation by joking around or acting apologetic immediately afterwards. Don’t make this mistake! If you were mad, you were mad. If you were sorely disappointed, the students should feel a little guilty! Let the rest of the class go by quietly, and don’t speak any more on the issue.\r\n\r\nThese are real emotions, because you’re a real person! You’re demonstrating healthy conflict, which doesn’t resolve itself immediately. By the next day, class will be closer to normal — but with one exception: The students have learned a valuable lesson about who’s in charge and what you expect of them.","description":"Without a doubt, brand new teachers worry more about classroom discipline and management skills than they worry about anything else. Deep down, you know that if you can’t maintain discipline, you have little hope of getting rehired and eventually receiving tenure.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_299776\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-299776\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/cartoon-teaching-classroom-discipline-adobeStock_73699280.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"483\" /> ©Cartoonresource / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n\r\nAt its very heart, effective classroom discipline boils down to three basic skills: motivating your students, confronting inappropriate behavior, and maintaining class discipline after you’ve established it. In this article, we give you some practical advice for each of these skills to help shape you into a successful classroom manager.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >What the front office expects from you</h2>\r\nAdministrators value good classroom-management skills above everything else when evaluating teachers. They know that before any learning can take place, you must have an orderly environment. No amount of group learning, discovery-based lessons, or (insert current education buzzword here<em>)</em> can cure the ailments of an undisciplined classroom.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">In most administrators’ minds, if you can keep your kids under control, they can help you with anything else. If you have a solid classroom management plan, all other small dents in the armor of your teacher preparation can be hammered out. And that includes some early and clumsy lesson plans that, perhaps, don’t quite work.</p>\r\nEffective class discipline is usually different in practice than most first-year teachers expect. In our new teacher dreams, we were facilitators of small utopian societies, where all students respected one another and accepted our leadership. Would it surprise you to learn that’s not the way things worked out?\r\n\r\nStudents may crave order subconsciously, but they don’t enjoy order being imposed on them. Truth be told, none of us love being told what to do, how to do it, where to go, and how to get there. In business terms we call this <em>micromanagement,</em> and it rarely inspires loyalty and joy in an employee.\r\n\r\nHowever, children aren’t adults. They need guidance and can’t be expected, automatically, to know how to comport themselves and fit into the classroom environment you’re building. Therein lies the conundrum. How can you lead a classroom effectively without becoming a dictator? Dictators are always looking over their shoulders, living in fear, trying to squash uprisings, and that’s not what you envisioned for yourself when you decided to become a teacher.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Motivating students</h2>\r\nYou can run a classroom a thousand different ways, but all classrooms that run smoothly have one characteristic in common: The students are motivated. The way that you interact with students on a daily basis provides the foundation for this motivation.\r\n\r\nHow can you motivate a student? It’s an age-old dilemma, and the question has no simple answer. However, we’ve found the following three universal truths:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Motivated students know that their teacher cares about them individually.</strong> Hopefully, you’ve already made it a point to learn the names of your kids in the first week of classes. Now, find out more about them on a personal basis. As you roam about the room to check homework or pass back assignments, engage in small talk. Although some will be shy at first, others will be itching to talk to you and get to know you better. The other, more reticent, students will watch these initial interactions and decide, in time, to trust you enough to share their thoughts and lives as well.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Motivated students want to know how they can succeed in your class.</strong> Describing your rules was just the beginning. You also need to explain exactly what you expect in every homework assignment and quiz or test question. If students are constantly thinking, “I have no idea what the heck they’re asking!” or “What can I possibly do to succeed in this class?” your expectations are either too vague or too inconsistent day to day.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Motivated students respect their teachers as consummate professionals.</strong> Your kids know if you’re slacking in your teaching responsibilities. They can tell how well you plan for classes based on how comfortable you are with the material, and they want to know just how dedicated you are to doing your job well. If they sense that your lesson plans are thorough, that you’re well prepared, and that you’re working hard for them, they’ll be more willing to work hard for you.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nAfter you’ve established these three foundational truths in your class, you can do all kinds of more tangible things to motivate your kids. You can go out of your way to make learning fun and add little things to the everyday drudgery of class to spice things up.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">For more about getting to know your students during the first week of school, and for more on all you need to know as a first-year teacher, check out our book <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/book/academics-the-arts/teaching/general-teaching/first-year-teaching-for-dummies-299516/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><em>First-Year Teaching For Dummies</em></a>.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Facing bad behavior head on</h2>\r\nEventually, it has to happen. One of your kids is going to break a rule, and you’ll have no doubt in your mind that it was both intentional and a direct challenge to your authority. No matter how fantastic your rules and how motivated most of your students are, one of them is going to push back to see how you react to it.\r\n\r\nAfter you deal with this probing, testing tendency of your students, you’ll be well on your way to earning a reputation. If you deal quickly and thoroughly with your first offenders, you’ll spend less time disciplining kids for the rest of the year — they’ll already know exactly where your boundaries lie.\r\n<h3>Winning the discipline war</h3>\r\nMost new teachers wish that they didn’t have to deal with discipline and (if they had a choice) would ignore inappropriate behavior. Confrontation causes tension, and you’re trying to establish a supportive classroom atmosphere, so disciplining a student almost seems contrary to the goal. Nothing could be further from the truth. Although discipline is certainly tough and by no means fun, it’s an essential component of classroom management.\r\n\r\nConfrontation is actually healthy in any relationship, if handled correctly. Conflict arises when two groups do not see eye to eye, and until you confront that conflict, neither party can move forward. When a problem arises in your class, when the gauntlet is thrown, pick it up and put it on.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">It is your responsibility to establish and protect the learning environment. Kids in your room need to know that if they are disrespectful or break a rule, the consequences are going to be unpleasant. Therefore, you have to know how to confront students effectively when they step out of line. In short, you need to step up to face down the challenge.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Where teacher education fails</h2>\r\nWhy is classroom management such a sticking point for first-year teachers, and why does it cause such anxiety? The answer is simple: Most (if not all) teacher-education programs fail to provide you with the training and the skills you need to be the leader in your classroom. Most don't provide you with strategies for positive discipline in the classroom or teach you how to develop a classroom discipline plan.\r\n\r\nTeacher education programs teach you philosophy. They teach you how to create a behavioral objective. And then, they teach you how to do that over and over. (We’ll never understand why they obsess about objectives so much — it’s like they’d rather talk about teaching than actually teach.) They teach you the order in which to list multiple-choice questions when you write a test. But they don’t tell you what to do if a student refuses to follow your directions.\r\n\r\nIf you shy away from confrontation, you are welcoming inconsistent chaos. Every day is going to be chaotic but in a new and unpredictable way, and that sounds like a lousy way to spend a school year.\r\n\r\nInstead of viewing confrontation as something to dread, look at it as an opportunity. Keep in mind, though, that it’s an opportunity you need to use wisely. Many variables can play out in an infinite number of ways, so you want to be sure to approach the situation with a plan.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >The three A’s of confrontation</h2>\r\nComing up with classroom discipline strategies and a practical approach to student confrontation takes time. You don’t want to be a monster who is always on edge, waiting for a student to do something wrong so that you can correct them, and you don’t want students who were disciplined in class to feel that you hold a grudge after everything is said and done. Your goal is to be someone who will maintain classroom order when push comes to shove.\r\n\r\nThree key practices will help you confront students when the need arises. We call these the three A’s of confrontation — anticipate, assert, and align:\r\n<h3>Anticipate behavioral problems</h3>\r\nAlways keep one ear to the ground to listen for oncoming trains. Behavioral problems rarely spring up unexpectedly and are usually the result of days or weeks of pent-up aggravation. Listen to student conversations before and after class, whenever you can eavesdrop from your desk. Students can be passive-aggressive if they don’t like you, and they’ll discuss their displeasure with a classmate when they know you can hear them.\r\n\r\nFor example, if you overhear a student say, “This assignment is really unfair,” or “I don’t care what she says, I’m going to the bathroom when class starts,” that should raise red flags in your mind that confrontation is imminent. If you’re careful about watching for the warning signs, you’re less likely to be caught unprepared.\r\n\r\nIf you suspect something, you need to speak with that student individually, away from the rest of the class, before things escalate. If that’s not possible, position yourself near that student’s desk often during the lesson so that you can keep an eye on them. Most of the time, if that student sees that you’re suspicious, that’s enough to stifle an in-class argument, allowing you to see that kid after class. Find out what the problem is and talk to the student honestly and openly.\r\n\r\nFor example, you might say: “I heard what you said before class started. I appreciate that you didn’t escalate things during class time, and I’d like to talk about it now, unless you’d like some time to cool off.”\r\n\r\nThere is no judgment here and you have not ceded your authority, so it’s a win-win. You are indicating that you understand confrontation is coming, you are keeping it from impacting the class as a whole, and you are opening the lines of communication. Sometimes, a simple gesture like this, which shows that you are willing to treat your student as a human being with valid thoughts and emotions, works wonders.\r\n<h3>Assert authority appropriately</h3>\r\nWhen an important rule is broken, consequences must follow. However, the punishment must fit the crime. Remember that if you start out by shouting at the smallest infractions, you have nowhere to go — you can’t up the ante.\r\n\r\nWhen you’re in front of a class, let the students know exactly how you feel, and make them respond to you as a person rather than telling them specifically what to do. For example, rather than simply barking, “Be quiet!” while a big angry vein pulsates in your forehead, try, “Folks, the room needs to quiet down right now because I’m short on patience today.”\r\n\r\nLook at the big differences in those two approaches. The latter gives a valid warning before real confrontation occurs. It gives the students a chance to fix their own behavior before you fix it for them. Also, by explaining how you feel, you open yourself up as a person and not simply a mindless authority figure.\r\n\r\nFurthermore, this second approach shows them some respect, because you’re not automatically initiating confrontation. With this cue, you’re firing a metaphorical warning shot across their bow.\r\n<h3>Align students as allies after the line has been crossed</h3>\r\nEventually, you’re going to have your fill of nonsense, and your temper will flare. When this happens, don’t be apologetic, and don’t act as though you regret the temper flare. An angry teacher should make the classroom atmosphere darken as though clouds have moved in and blotted out the sun.\r\n\r\nHowever, after you’ve gotten the point across, back away from additional confrontation and return to business as normal. After they’ve witnessed the consequences of unacceptable behavior, they must be given the opportunity to behave correctly. Take a deep breath. Take fifty deep breaths, whatever it takes to get back to center.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Don’t hold a grudge against students, because if you do, there’s no motivation for them to change their behavior. Most kids would rather not be on your bad side, especially when they see how bad that bad side can be, so you must give them the opportunity to cross into the other camp and become your ally. You’ll discover that (oddly) some of the kids you’ll discipline repeatedly will form the closest relationships with you later.</p>\r\nFinally, keep in mind that the goal of confronting bad behavior isn’t just to inflict consequences. Old school discipline works like this: You screwed up and now you have to pay the price. Think about your own life. Would you like consequences every single time you did anything wrong? Of course not. You’d hope that an authority figure would give you a break if you’re doing your best and your error was not the end of the world.\r\n\r\nBe merciful to your students as you would want others to be merciful to you. Again, that doesn’t mean ignore; it just means that you don’t always have to punish. The goal is to fix problems and move on, not to inflict misery on children. It’s hard for students to build a relationship with a scorpion, always worried when it will strike and whether they’ll survive the encounter.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">If you’ve done a good job confronting unacceptable behavior, things won’t feel good right away. If the students respect you, they’ll probably feel a little guilty, and the room will be quieter than usual. You may even feel bad if you were a little rough.</p>\r\nToo often, new teachers try to compensate for confrontation by joking around or acting apologetic immediately afterwards. Don’t make this mistake! If you were mad, you were mad. If you were sorely disappointed, the students should feel a little guilty! Let the rest of the class go by quietly, and don’t speak any more on the issue.\r\n\r\nThese are real emotions, because you’re a real person! You’re demonstrating healthy conflict, which doesn’t resolve itself immediately. By the next day, class will be closer to normal — but with one exception: The students have learned a valuable lesson about who’s in charge and what you expect of them.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":35306,"name":"Carol Flaherty","slug":"carol-flaherty","description":"<strong>Carol Flaherty</strong> is a 25-year veteran elementary school teacher who spent most of her years teaching first and fourth grades.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35306"}},{"authorId":35307,"name":"Flirtisha Harris","slug":"flirtisha-harris","description":"<strong>Flirtisha Harris</strong> has been teaching secondary school for more than 20 years in Texas and southern Maryland.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35307"}},{"authorId":10466,"name":"W. Michael Kelley","slug":"w-michael-kelley","description":"<b>W. Michael Kelley</b> started as a high school math teacher and has spent 30 years teaching and training people of all ages.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10466"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34387,"title":"General Teaching","slug":"general-teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34387"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"What the front office expects from you","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Motivating students","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Facing bad behavior head on","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Where teacher education fails","target":"#tab4"},{"label":"The three A’s of confrontation","target":"#tab5"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":299743,"title":"Important First-Week Tasks for a New Teacher","slug":"identifying-important-first-week-tasks","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299743"}},{"articleId":299728,"title":"How To Get Through Your First Week as a First-Year Teacher","slug":"your-first-week-as-a-new-teacher","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299728"}},{"articleId":299571,"title":"First-Year Teaching For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"first-year-teaching-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299571"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":299743,"title":"Important First-Week Tasks for a New Teacher","slug":"identifying-important-first-week-tasks","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299743"}},{"articleId":299728,"title":"How To Get Through Your First Week as a First-Year Teacher","slug":"your-first-week-as-a-new-teacher","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299728"}},{"articleId":299571,"title":"First-Year Teaching For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"first-year-teaching-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299571"}},{"articleId":172372,"title":"How to Present in a College Seminar","slug":"how-to-present-in-a-college-seminar","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/172372"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":299516,"slug":"first-year-teaching-for-dummies","isbn":"9781394189762","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1394189761/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1394189761/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1394189761-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1394189761/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1394189761/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/first-year-teaching-for-dummies-cover-9781394189762-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"First-Year Teaching For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"10466\">W. Michael Kelley</b></b> started as a high school math teacher and has spent 30 years teaching and training people of all ages. <strong><b data-author-id=\"35306\">Carol Flaherty</b></strong> is a 25-year veteran elementary school teacher who spent most of her years teaching first and fourth grades. <strong><b data-author-id=\"35307\">Flirtisha Harris</b></strong> has been teaching secondary school for more than 20 years in Texas and southern Maryland.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":10466,"name":"W. Michael Kelley","slug":"w-michael-kelley","description":"<b>W. Michael Kelley</b> started as a high school math teacher and has spent 30 years teaching and training people of all ages.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10466"}},{"authorId":35306,"name":"Carol Flaherty","slug":"carol-flaherty","description":"<strong>Carol Flaherty</strong> is a 25-year veteran elementary school teacher who spent most of her years teaching first and fourth grades.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35306"}},{"authorId":35307,"name":"Flirtisha Harris","slug":"flirtisha-harris","description":"<strong>Flirtisha Harris</strong> has been teaching secondary school for more than 20 years in Texas and southern Maryland.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35307"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;general-teaching&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781394189762&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64b6a92ea596e\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;general-teaching&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781394189762&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64b6a92ea681d\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-07-17T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":299763},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-07-14T13:57:00+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-07-17T14:13:43+00:00","timestamp":"2024-07-17T15:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33800"},"slug":"teaching","categoryId":33800},{"name":"General Teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34387"},"slug":"general-teaching","categoryId":34387}],"title":"Important First-Week Tasks for a New Teacher","strippedTitle":"important first-week tasks for a new teacher","slug":"identifying-important-first-week-tasks","canonicalUrl":"","收目录擎SEO":{"metaDescription":"Here's some invaluable advice from experienced teachers about how to make your first week as a new teacher go as smoothly as possible.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Your first week with students is a lot like a first date. In both cases, you don’t know each other very well, so conversation is awkward and forced. Therefore, you need to have a full agenda planned so that none of those awkward lulls in conversation cause the chemistry between you to fizzle. Other than learning names and assigning seats, what should you try to accomplish during the first week? Great question.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_299759\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-299759\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/teacher-classroom-adobeStock_562138530.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"420\" /> ©Peopleimages.com / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Addressing administrative tasks</h2>\r\nNothing says “first week of school” more than paperwork, rules, expectation setting, and more paperwork. Although these tasks are routine, they’re nonetheless crucial.\r\n<h3><strong>Highlight important classroom rules</strong></h3>\r\nNow’s the time to address the rules most important to you, including hall-pass rules, dismissal rules, and rules foundational to the way you conduct your class. Any nontraditional rules or procedures need to be addressed so that students get time to acclimate to them.\r\n\r\n<strong>Co-author Mike says:</strong> For example, I gave no credit for any math homework assignment that was incomplete, rather than constantly spending time determining how many points partial assignments earned. Either you tried all the problems or you didn’t — to me the effort mattered more than the correctness as students learned new skills. Because this rule is rather odd and strict, I always highlighted it on the first day. Every year, it caused ripples of panic. “What if I don’t understand how to do one of the problems? Am I going to get a zero?”\r\n\r\nI explained how I wanted students to attempt problems, even if they ultimately got them wrong, instead of just leaving them blank. As long as you tried, you got full credit, and if you had no idea how to even begin, you’d still get full credit if you wrote a few sentences explaining what was hanging you up. That way, we could jump straight to remediation.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">For more detail on creating classroom rules that suit your personality, and for everything you need to know for your first year as a new teacher, check out our book <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/book/academics-the-arts/teaching/general-teaching/first-year-teaching-for-dummies-299516/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><em>First-Year Teaching For Dummies</em></a>.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3><strong>Discuss emergency and safety procedures</strong></h3>\r\nStudents need to know what to do in case of any emergency, from fire to zombie apocalypse. Mike will never, never, never forget the safety lecture delivered by his tenth-grade chemistry teacher. During it, she talked about how dangerous it was to wear loose-fitting clothing while performing experiments. “Think about someone you have a crush on, someone that matters to you, someone who you either write love notes to or wish you could. What if they had loose sleeves and one caught fire over a Bunsen burner? As the teacher, it’s my responsibility to rip their shirts off and throw them, half-clothed, into the safety shower.”\r\n\r\nYou could hear a pin drop. The room was awash in silence and hormones. Message received. Chemistry was going to be the sexiest class anyone had ever taken. Turns out nothing could be further from the truth, but it was still effective. Mike still rolls up his sleeves if he sees so much as a candle.\r\n<h3><strong>Distribute school-furnished supplies and equipment</strong></h3>\r\nMake sure to set the expectations about caring for these items. Books should come back without writing in them or torn/folded pages, and laptops should come back in the same operating condition, without missing keys or a cracked screen. Make sure to complete whatever inventory control forms the school requires to ensure that all equipment is returned.\r\n<h3><strong>Explain your grading system</strong></h3>\r\nWhether you use total points, categories, or a blindfold and a dartboard to assign grades, enlighten your students to your computational method as soon as you can. If you expect them to keep a journal or portfolio, explain how you want it organized and how often you’ll collect it. Will you allow partial credit or is it all or nothing? Do you give multiple-choice tests or do you fancy essays?\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Surprises are nice, and they keep things fresh, but you don’t ever want your grading system to be a surprise. Parents and administrators alike tend to frown on things like that. For example, if you insist on students using pencil in your class, you’d better let them know before your first assignment and give them time to buy the supplies they need.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3><strong>Distribute introduction cards to collect information</strong></h3>\r\nWe suggest using half of a letter-sized sheet of cardstock, so you can print two cards per sheet. Introduction cards are your way of learning more about the student and who you will be contacting at home if the need arises. On your introduction card, ask for the following:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Student full legal name and nickname/preferred name</li>\r\n \t<li>Student home address</li>\r\n \t<li>Student birthdate</li>\r\n \t<li>Student email</li>\r\n \t<li>Parent/guardian full names, home addresses, cellphone numbers, and e-mails (don’t assume that parents have the same last names or home addresses)</li>\r\n \t<li>Student’s most trusted teacher in the building (where they’d feel comfortable going for emotional support should something happen)</li>\r\n \t<li>Anything you want the teacher to know about you</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<strong>Co-author Flirtisha says:</strong> Add questions that fit your personality. For example, I asked each student to identify their personal theme song, the song they wish would play when they entered the room. (I also told them to pick songs that have school-appropriate lyrics.) I read through my introduction cards over and over during the first week of school, honoring the effort they made by answering my questions. Each year, I make a master list of the theme songs they choose, and every once in a while, I’ll have one playing when the kids walk into class. They love it: “That’s my song! You actually read my card!” Then I cross that song off the list and make sure I play all of them by the end of the school year.\r\n\r\nElementary students may need help completing their introduction cards, so you might need to send them home to get filled out. Secondary students can complete them during class. You can list the questions on the board and have students write their answers on 4-x-6 index cards while you go around the room learning names on the first day. That way, everyone is occupied if they’re not digging the name game.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">If you’re a secondary teacher, consider asking students to identify their preferred pronouns and preferred gender identity. Remember, your roll is not to make a judgment call on their lives. Acknowledging these preferences reinforces your willingness to meet them at their level. We know that some are diametrically opposed to the idea of preferred pronouns and gender, and in those cases, we would expect teachers, at the very least, to address students by their preferred nickname.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3><strong>Discuss any major projects for the year</strong></h3>\r\nOutline each of the major projects for the upcoming school year, especially any projects that are going to require multiple steps and stretch out over a lengthy period of time.\r\n<h3><strong>List the field trips you’ll take</strong></h3>\r\nField trips are a welcome respite from day-in, day-out drudgery, and discussing the field trips you will take during the school year gives students something to look forward to.\r\n<h3><strong>Explain how to get extra help</strong></h3>\r\nYou’re not only expected to teach students during school hours, but also as requested (on a reasonable basis) after school. In our district, our contractual working hours extended 20 minutes beyond the close of school, and we were expected to tutor any of our students (without cost, of course) who needed help during that time. Realistically, you’ll be tutoring longer than that. You’d be a monster if you stood up at the end of those 20 minutes and said, “Well, my workday’s over; see you later, alligator.”\r\n\r\nAsk your students to schedule tutoring, instead of showing up randomly. You don’t get much time during school to take care of personal matters, so sometimes when the day ends, you need to blaze out of that building like a comet to make a dentist appointment, mail a package, drop the dog off to get shampooed, or address whatever other pressing errand is on your plate.\r\n\r\n<strong>Co-author Mike says:</strong> I always told parents, “I’m available every day after school for any kind of tutoring help your child may need, and I don’t mind staying as long as it takes. However, your student needs to take the initiative and set up an appointment with me at least 24 hours in advance so that I can rearrange my personal schedule to match.” There’s nothing rude about asking for a little common courtesy, just as long as you explain your terms upfront. I also set up a weekly Study Buddy Day, which worked very well for me.\r\n\r\nYou’ll have a lot of stuff to cover during the first week, but we have faith that you’ll get through it all and get the year started with positive momentum and a huge playlist of theme songs!\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Breaking the ice</h2>\r\nBy now, you’re probably stressed about all the things you’ll need to accomplish quickly. Don’t forget that you’re not the only one making a big adjustment as the school year starts. Kids who have never been in school (we’re looking at you, kindergarten and first-grade teachers) may very well be traumatized. Other young kids may be having a hard time adjusting from one teacher to another.\r\n\r\nThe attachments at that age are deep, and there may be a weaning period from “Mrs. Wilson, my last year teacher who was always so nice, and who was my favorite teacher of all time” to you. Don’t worry; they’ll come around. Younger kids really want to like you. Sometime in middle school, though, a big paradigm shift occurs, and the students realize that it’s much more fun to begin the school year not liking the teacher.","description":"Your first week with students is a lot like a first date. In both cases, you don’t know each other very well, so conversation is awkward and forced. Therefore, you need to have a full agenda planned so that none of those awkward lulls in conversation cause the chemistry between you to fizzle. Other than learning names and assigning seats, what should you try to accomplish during the first week? Great question.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_299759\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-299759\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/teacher-classroom-adobeStock_562138530.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"420\" /> ©Peopleimages.com / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Addressing administrative tasks</h2>\r\nNothing says “first week of school” more than paperwork, rules, expectation setting, and more paperwork. Although these tasks are routine, they’re nonetheless crucial.\r\n<h3><strong>Highlight important classroom rules</strong></h3>\r\nNow’s the time to address the rules most important to you, including hall-pass rules, dismissal rules, and rules foundational to the way you conduct your class. Any nontraditional rules or procedures need to be addressed so that students get time to acclimate to them.\r\n\r\n<strong>Co-author Mike says:</strong> For example, I gave no credit for any math homework assignment that was incomplete, rather than constantly spending time determining how many points partial assignments earned. Either you tried all the problems or you didn’t — to me the effort mattered more than the correctness as students learned new skills. Because this rule is rather odd and strict, I always highlighted it on the first day. Every year, it caused ripples of panic. “What if I don’t understand how to do one of the problems? Am I going to get a zero?”\r\n\r\nI explained how I wanted students to attempt problems, even if they ultimately got them wrong, instead of just leaving them blank. As long as you tried, you got full credit, and if you had no idea how to even begin, you’d still get full credit if you wrote a few sentences explaining what was hanging you up. That way, we could jump straight to remediation.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">For more detail on creating classroom rules that suit your personality, and for everything you need to know for your first year as a new teacher, check out our book <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/book/academics-the-arts/teaching/general-teaching/first-year-teaching-for-dummies-299516/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><em>First-Year Teaching For Dummies</em></a>.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3><strong>Discuss emergency and safety procedures</strong></h3>\r\nStudents need to know what to do in case of any emergency, from fire to zombie apocalypse. Mike will never, never, never forget the safety lecture delivered by his tenth-grade chemistry teacher. During it, she talked about how dangerous it was to wear loose-fitting clothing while performing experiments. “Think about someone you have a crush on, someone that matters to you, someone who you either write love notes to or wish you could. What if they had loose sleeves and one caught fire over a Bunsen burner? As the teacher, it’s my responsibility to rip their shirts off and throw them, half-clothed, into the safety shower.”\r\n\r\nYou could hear a pin drop. The room was awash in silence and hormones. Message received. Chemistry was going to be the sexiest class anyone had ever taken. Turns out nothing could be further from the truth, but it was still effective. Mike still rolls up his sleeves if he sees so much as a candle.\r\n<h3><strong>Distribute school-furnished supplies and equipment</strong></h3>\r\nMake sure to set the expectations about caring for these items. Books should come back without writing in them or torn/folded pages, and laptops should come back in the same operating condition, without missing keys or a cracked screen. Make sure to complete whatever inventory control forms the school requires to ensure that all equipment is returned.\r\n<h3><strong>Explain your grading system</strong></h3>\r\nWhether you use total points, categories, or a blindfold and a dartboard to assign grades, enlighten your students to your computational method as soon as you can. If you expect them to keep a journal or portfolio, explain how you want it organized and how often you’ll collect it. Will you allow partial credit or is it all or nothing? Do you give multiple-choice tests or do you fancy essays?\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Surprises are nice, and they keep things fresh, but you don’t ever want your grading system to be a surprise. Parents and administrators alike tend to frown on things like that. For example, if you insist on students using pencil in your class, you’d better let them know before your first assignment and give them time to buy the supplies they need.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3><strong>Distribute introduction cards to collect information</strong></h3>\r\nWe suggest using half of a letter-sized sheet of cardstock, so you can print two cards per sheet. Introduction cards are your way of learning more about the student and who you will be contacting at home if the need arises. On your introduction card, ask for the following:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Student full legal name and nickname/preferred name</li>\r\n \t<li>Student home address</li>\r\n \t<li>Student birthdate</li>\r\n \t<li>Student email</li>\r\n \t<li>Parent/guardian full names, home addresses, cellphone numbers, and e-mails (don’t assume that parents have the same last names or home addresses)</li>\r\n \t<li>Student’s most trusted teacher in the building (where they’d feel comfortable going for emotional support should something happen)</li>\r\n \t<li>Anything you want the teacher to know about you</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<strong>Co-author Flirtisha says:</strong> Add questions that fit your personality. For example, I asked each student to identify their personal theme song, the song they wish would play when they entered the room. (I also told them to pick songs that have school-appropriate lyrics.) I read through my introduction cards over and over during the first week of school, honoring the effort they made by answering my questions. Each year, I make a master list of the theme songs they choose, and every once in a while, I’ll have one playing when the kids walk into class. They love it: “That’s my song! You actually read my card!” Then I cross that song off the list and make sure I play all of them by the end of the school year.\r\n\r\nElementary students may need help completing their introduction cards, so you might need to send them home to get filled out. Secondary students can complete them during class. You can list the questions on the board and have students write their answers on 4-x-6 index cards while you go around the room learning names on the first day. That way, everyone is occupied if they’re not digging the name game.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">If you’re a secondary teacher, consider asking students to identify their preferred pronouns and preferred gender identity. Remember, your roll is not to make a judgment call on their lives. Acknowledging these preferences reinforces your willingness to meet them at their level. We know that some are diametrically opposed to the idea of preferred pronouns and gender, and in those cases, we would expect teachers, at the very least, to address students by their preferred nickname.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3><strong>Discuss any major projects for the year</strong></h3>\r\nOutline each of the major projects for the upcoming school year, especially any projects that are going to require multiple steps and stretch out over a lengthy period of time.\r\n<h3><strong>List the field trips you’ll take</strong></h3>\r\nField trips are a welcome respite from day-in, day-out drudgery, and discussing the field trips you will take during the school year gives students something to look forward to.\r\n<h3><strong>Explain how to get extra help</strong></h3>\r\nYou’re not only expected to teach students during school hours, but also as requested (on a reasonable basis) after school. In our district, our contractual working hours extended 20 minutes beyond the close of school, and we were expected to tutor any of our students (without cost, of course) who needed help during that time. Realistically, you’ll be tutoring longer than that. You’d be a monster if you stood up at the end of those 20 minutes and said, “Well, my workday’s over; see you later, alligator.”\r\n\r\nAsk your students to schedule tutoring, instead of showing up randomly. You don’t get much time during school to take care of personal matters, so sometimes when the day ends, you need to blaze out of that building like a comet to make a dentist appointment, mail a package, drop the dog off to get shampooed, or address whatever other pressing errand is on your plate.\r\n\r\n<strong>Co-author Mike says:</strong> I always told parents, “I’m available every day after school for any kind of tutoring help your child may need, and I don’t mind staying as long as it takes. However, your student needs to take the initiative and set up an appointment with me at least 24 hours in advance so that I can rearrange my personal schedule to match.” There’s nothing rude about asking for a little common courtesy, just as long as you explain your terms upfront. I also set up a weekly Study Buddy Day, which worked very well for me.\r\n\r\nYou’ll have a lot of stuff to cover during the first week, but we have faith that you’ll get through it all and get the year started with positive momentum and a huge playlist of theme songs!\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Breaking the ice</h2>\r\nBy now, you’re probably stressed about all the things you’ll need to accomplish quickly. Don’t forget that you’re not the only one making a big adjustment as the school year starts. Kids who have never been in school (we’re looking at you, kindergarten and first-grade teachers) may very well be traumatized. Other young kids may be having a hard time adjusting from one teacher to another.\r\n\r\nThe attachments at that age are deep, and there may be a weaning period from “Mrs. Wilson, my last year teacher who was always so nice, and who was my favorite teacher of all time” to you. Don’t worry; they’ll come around. Younger kids really want to like you. Sometime in middle school, though, a big paradigm shift occurs, and the students realize that it’s much more fun to begin the school year not liking the teacher.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":35306,"name":"Carol Flaherty","slug":"carol-flaherty","description":"<strong>Carol Flaherty</strong> is a 25-year veteran elementary school teacher who spent most of her years teaching first and fourth grades.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35306"}},{"authorId":35307,"name":"Flirtisha Harris","slug":"flirtisha-harris","description":"<strong>Flirtisha Harris</strong> has been teaching secondary school for more than 20 years in Texas and southern Maryland.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35307"}},{"authorId":10466,"name":"W. Michael Kelley","slug":"w-michael-kelley","description":"<b>W. Michael Kelley</b> started as a high school math teacher and has spent 30 years teaching and training people of all ages.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10466"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34387,"title":"General Teaching","slug":"general-teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34387"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Addressing administrative tasks","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Breaking the ice","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":299728,"title":"How To Get Through Your First Week as a New Teacher","slug":"your-first-week-as-a-new-teacher","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299728"}},{"articleId":299571,"title":"First-Year Teaching For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"first-year-teaching-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299571"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":299728,"title":"How To Get Through Your First Week as a New Teacher","slug":"your-first-week-as-a-new-teacher","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299728"}},{"articleId":299571,"title":"First-Year Teaching For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"first-year-teaching-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299571"}},{"articleId":172372,"title":"How to Present in a College Seminar","slug":"how-to-present-in-a-college-seminar","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/172372"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":299516,"slug":"first-year-teaching-for-dummies","isbn":"9781394189762","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1394189761/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1394189761/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1394189761-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1394189761/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1394189761/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/first-year-teaching-for-dummies-cover-9781394189762-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"First-Year Teaching For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"10466\">W. Michael Kelley</b></b> started as a high school math teacher and has spent 30 years teaching and training people of all ages. <strong><b data-author-id=\"35306\">Carol Flaherty</b></strong> is a 25-year veteran elementary school teacher who spent most of her years teaching first and fourth grades. <strong><b data-author-id=\"35307\">Flirtisha Harris</b></strong> has been teaching secondary school for more than 20 years in Texas and southern Maryland.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":10466,"name":"W. Michael Kelley","slug":"w-michael-kelley","description":"<b>W. Michael Kelley</b> started as a high school math teacher and has spent 30 years teaching and training people of all ages.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10466"}},{"authorId":35306,"name":"Carol Flaherty","slug":"carol-flaherty","description":"<strong>Carol Flaherty</strong> is a 25-year veteran elementary school teacher who spent most of her years teaching first and fourth grades.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35306"}},{"authorId":35307,"name":"Flirtisha Harris","slug":"flirtisha-harris","description":"<strong>Flirtisha Harris</strong> has been teaching secondary school for more than 20 years in Texas and southern Maryland.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35307"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;general-teaching&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781394189762&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64b557af0ca94\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;general-teaching&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781394189762&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64b557af0d361\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-07-14T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":299743},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-07-05T16:21:57+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-07-05T16:21:57+00:00","timestamp":"2024-07-05T18:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33800"},"slug":"teaching","categoryId":33800},{"name":"General Teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34387"},"slug":"general-teaching","categoryId":34387}],"title":"First-Year Teaching For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"first-year teaching for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"first-year-teaching-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","收目录擎SEO":{"metaDescription":"Learn how to handle some of the trickier parts of your first year of teaching, including how to deal with minor behavior problems.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"This Cheat Sheet summarizes how to handle some of the tricky parts of being a first-year teacher, including planning for a substitute teacher, keys to a successful teaching observation, what you should get done during the first week of school, and how to deal with minor behavior problems.","description":"This Cheat Sheet summarizes how to handle some of the tricky parts of being a first-year teacher, including planning for a substitute teacher, keys to a successful teaching observation, what you should get done during the first week of school, and how to deal with minor behavior problems.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10466,"name":"W. Michael Kelley","slug":"w-michael-kelley","description":"<b>W. Michael Kelley</b> started as a high school math teacher and has spent 30 years teaching and training people of all ages.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10466"}},{"authorId":35307,"name":"Flirtisha Harris","slug":"flirtisha-harris","description":"<strong>Flirtisha Harris</strong> has been teaching secondary school for more than 20 years in Texas and southern Maryland.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35307"}},{"authorId":35306,"name":"Carol Flaherty","slug":"carol-flaherty","description":"<strong>Carol Flaherty</strong> is a 25-year veteran elementary school teacher who spent most of her years teaching first and fourth grades.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35306"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34387,"title":"General Teaching","slug":"general-teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34387"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":172372,"title":"How to Present in a College Seminar","slug":"how-to-present-in-a-college-seminar","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/172372"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":299516,"slug":"first-year-teaching-for-dummies","isbn":"9781394189762","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","general-teaching"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1394189761/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1394189761/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1394189761-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1394189761/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1394189761/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/first-year-teaching-for-dummies-cover-9781394189762-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"First-Year Teaching For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"10466\">W. Michael Kelley</b></b> started as a high school math teacher and has spent 30 years teaching and training people of all ages. <strong><b data-author-id=\"35306\">Carol Flaherty</b></strong> is a 25-year veteran elementary school teacher who spent most of her years teaching first and fourth grades. <strong><b data-author-id=\"35307\">Flirtisha Harris</b></strong> has been teaching secondary school for more than 20 years in Texas and southern Maryland.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":10466,"name":"W. Michael Kelley","slug":"w-michael-kelley","description":"<b>W. Michael Kelley</b> started as a high school math teacher and has spent 30 years teaching and training people of all ages.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10466"}},{"authorId":35306,"name":"Carol Flaherty","slug":"carol-flaherty","description":"<strong>Carol Flaherty</strong> is a 25-year veteran elementary school teacher who spent most of her years teaching first and fourth grades.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35306"}},{"authorId":35307,"name":"Flirtisha Harris","slug":"flirtisha-harris","description":"<strong>Flirtisha Harris</strong> has been teaching secondary school for more than 20 years in Texas and southern Maryland.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35307"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;general-teaching&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781394189762&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64a5afdf3a87d\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;general-teaching&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781394189762&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64a5afdf3afc0\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":0,"title":"","slug":null,"categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/"}}],"content":[{"title":"Planning for a substitute teacher","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Don’t leave your substitute teacher in the lurch! Give them more than just lesson plans (although definitely do leave those). Make sure you also include the following:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>A copy of your schedule, including the times each class begins and ends</li>\n<li>Your seating chart (kids will try to sit wherever they want if they see a sub in the room)</li>\n<li>A map showing how to get from class to class if you’re a floating teacher</li>\n<li>A description of what to do in case of a fire or other emergency drill, including the evacuation route your kids are supposed to follow</li>\n<li>Any important information about individual students:</li>\n<li>Medical conditions and instructions to follow if the condition flares up during class</li>\n<li>Important parts of an Individualized Education Program (IEP), such as “Student should not be required to read in front of the class”</li>\n<li>An explanation of how and when to assign hallway passes, and any procedures you have in place that differ from the norm</li>\n<li>A description of your duty assignments and an explanation about how to fulfill the responsibilities of each</li>\n<li>The name and room number of a nearby teacher of the same subject or grade level, who can help out and answer questions the sub may have</li>\n<li>Your phone number, so that the sub can call you if they have any questions</li>\n<li>A list of kids who are trustworthy in each class (but ask that the list not be made public)</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Keys to a successful observation","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>If a supervisor or administrator is rating your class, here are a few tips to keep in mind:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>Make sure your lesson includes any elements required by your school district.</li>\n<li>Showcase your best material.</li>\n<li>Don’t make any dramatic changes to your class on observation day.</li>\n<li>Demonstrate your relationship with students.</li>\n<li>Don’t worry about a little bit of noise in the room.</li>\n<li>Try to involve all your kids in the lesson.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Things to accomplish during the first week of school","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Set yourself up for success by completing these tasks:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>Highlight the important rules in your classroom.</li>\n<li>Discuss emergency and safety procedures.</li>\n<li>Distribute textbooks, laptops, and other school-furnished supplies as soon as possible.</li>\n<li>Explain your grading system.</li>\n<li>Distribute introduction cards to collect information.</li>\n<li>Discuss any major projects for the year.</li>\n<li>List the field trips you’ll take.</li>\n<li>Explain how to get extra help.</li>\n<li>Use ice breaker activities to build community.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"How to handle minor behavior problems","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Here are a few things you can do to squelch bad behavior without resorting to administrators:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>Use proximity: Approach and stand beside the culprit.</li>\n<li>Give the offender the icy stare of death.</li>\n<li>Defuse potential distractions with humor.</li>\n<li>Employ a distraction.</li>\n<li>Rearrange your seating chart.</li>\n<li>Isolate the offender.</li>\n<li>Don’t be stingy on detentions.</li>\n<li>Call a parent or coach and outline your concerns.</li>\n<li>Send kids to another teacher.</li>\n</ul>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-07-05T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":299571},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2021-08-29T23:54:41+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-04-27T18:11:42+00:00","timestamp":"2024-04-27T21:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33800"},"slug":"teaching","categoryId":33800},{"name":"Homeschooling","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33804"},"slug":"homeschooling","categoryId":33804}],"title":"10 Educational Games that Enhance Homeschooling","strippedTitle":"10 educational games that enhance homeschooling","slug":"10-educational-games-that-enhance-your-homeschool-day","canonicalUrl":"","收目录擎SEO":{"metaDescription":"Explore 10 games you can substitute for a lesson once in a while with no regrets. These games cover math, science, social studies, and language arts.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"What do you pull out when you want to play school rather than actually teach? Why, one of these games, of course! The games in this list offer you much more than Monopoly or Connect Four; in fact, you can substitute any one of these for a subject lesson once in a while with no regrets.\r\n\r\nFrom electrical circuits to business conglomerates and from food chains to famous battles, these games cover math, science, social studies, and language arts in the finest tradition of play. Although playing these games may take longer than it would to present a ten-to-twenty-minute lesson in whatever, there’s something to be said for variety in the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/education/homeschooling/homeschooling-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">home schoolroom</a>. Some of them can even be played solo, an unusual boon for games.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">You should be able to find all (or most) of these games at your local specialty game retailer. If your city manages to exist without a game store, you can usually order directly from the manufacturer from the website listed with each game, or try the following websites:</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><a href=\"//www.boardlandia.com/\">Boardlandia</a></li>\r\n \t<li><a href=\"//www.funagain.com/\">Funagain Games</a></li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" ><a name=\"_Toc43895348\"></a>Anti-Monopoly</h2>\r\nThis is not your family Monopoly game. Invented by Ralph Auspach, a retired economics professor, you start the game as a monopolist or small business. You get two parallel sets of rules and two ways to play the game; it’s designed to show the difference between how a large corporation works and how a small business functions. Will you be a monopolist or a free market competitor? This is a game we pull down for high-school economics class; it is an update to the Landlord’s Game invented by Elizabeth Magie on her dining room table. For two to eight players; ages 8 and up; from <a href=\"//www.universitygames.com/\">University Games</a>—if you lose your instructions, you can download more here. You can purchase from <a href=\"//www.areyougame.com/\">AreYouGame</a>.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_272949\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-272949\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/homeschooling-anti-monopoly.jpg\" alt=\"Anti-Monopoly board game\" width=\"556\" height=\"276\" /> Courtesy University Games website<br /><br />Anti-Monopoly is from University Games.[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" ><a name=\"_Toc43895349\"></a>Evolution</h2>\r\nIn Evolution you create, evolve, and sustain your species. Applying trait cards to a base species allows it to adapt to the ever-changing climate of the table. This game requires a unique strategy not found in many other games, and you can upgrade it with its expansion, Flight. If you love this, you might also like Evolution: Climate, a stand-alone game (not an expansion to the original game). Recommended for ages 12 and older; for two to six players; <a href=\"//www.northstargames.com/\">North Star Games</a>.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" ><a name=\"_Toc43895350\"></a>Forbidden Island/Desert</h2>\r\nForbidden Island and its kin: Forbidden Desert and Forbidden Sky, are <em>cooperative</em> games that pit you against the board. You need to work together as a team or you will lose. Forbidden Island, the first of the series, traps you on an island that slowly sinks into the sea. You need to collect four treasures and escape before the water engulfs you. Each game in the series presents different challenges and contains slightly different rules. If you absolutely love this series, you may also want to look for Pandemic, a more complicated game by the same designer. For 2–4 players; ages 10 and up; <a href=\"//www.gamewright.com/\">Game Wright</a>.<a name=\"_Toc43895351\"></a>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >The Garden Game</h2>\r\nWhat do you get when you cross seeds, pollinators, predators, and the weather? Well, if you do it outside, you may get a garden out of it. If you do it inside, you’ll probably find yourself in the middle of The Garden Game.\r\n\r\nYour goal is to plant and pollinate your seeds before the predators or nasty weather gets the better of you. At the same time, you move around the board through the seasons. This game includes a nice, multipage discussion on plant pollination and gardening, and it definitely fits within an upper elementary or middle-school science curriculum. (My garden lover, however, loved playing this from age 5.) For two to six players, ages 8 and up; <a href=\"//www.ampersandpress.com/\">Ampersand Press</a>.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" ><a name=\"_Toc43895352\"></a>How Do You See the World?</h2>\r\nThs card game comes closer to traditionally educational than anything else in this chapter. Choose one of 100 cards, roll the die, and answer the open-ended question. Categories include reflections, relationships, aspirations, life’s purpose, and beliefs. Typical questions for the game: How much do you want to work in a week? What is one meaningless activity you engage in? How does your past influence your future?\r\n\r\nIf you want your kids to reflect and communicate about all kinds of issues and thoughts, this may be a game for you. How Do You See The World? would also make a great downtime game, whether you use it after dinner, while you travel, or at a family gathering between activities. For one to however-many players; ages 12 and up; <a href=\"//www.authenticagilitygames.com/\">Authentic Agility Games</a>.<a name=\"_Toc43895353\"></a>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab6\" >Into the Forest</h2>\r\nThis card game explores the food chains of the forest. From the animal and plant cards in your hand, you pit one portion of the food chain against another, much like the game of war. So if you lay down a Grass card, and your opponent places Millipedes on the table, your opponent gets your Grass card because Millipedes eat decaying grass.\r\n\r\nRather than win by point accumulation, players compete against a timer to simulate the never-ending cycle of life in the forest. List this game under science. (If your students really enjoy the game and its concepts, this company also produces the game Onto the Desert, which focuses on survival in the desert climate.) For two to six players, ages 7 and up; <a href=\"//www.ampersandpress.com/\">Ampersand Press</a>.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab7\" ><a name=\"_Toc43895354\"></a>Krypto</h2>\r\nKrypto is one of those classic card games that people muse over. “Oh yes, I remember Krypto . . . ” and they lapse into silence, wondering if it’s still available. Although kind of difficult to locate, the game is still around.\r\n\r\nEach player gets five numerical cards, ranging anywhere from 1 to 25. Then a target card is turned face up; this is your goal card. Using all five cards, you need to somehow equal the target number through addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division.\r\n\r\nKrypto also comes in a fractions supplement (fraction cards that you add to the regular Krypto game). Kryto accommodates one to ten players of any age. You can also find this game on Amazon.com.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab8\" ><a name=\"_Toc43895355\"></a>Periodic</h2>\r\nGenius Games is known for its real science games, by real scientists. Periodic is no exception. In this game you create compounds by visiting each of their elements on the periodic table. Once you gather all needed ingredients, the compound becomes yours and it marches you toward victory.\r\n\r\nThis is a great game for learning about elements and compounds, not to mention memorizing the periodic table. In the box you’ll find the game instructions, but you’ll also see a booklet that discusses the science behind the game. Other games by Genius include: Ion, Covalence, Cytosis, and Tesla vs. Edison. For two to five players; ages 10 and up; <a href=\"//www.geniusgames.org/\">Genius Games</a>.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab9\" ><a name=\"_Toc43895356\"></a>Spell Smashers</h2>\r\nIn Spell Smashers you play as a rugged adventurer, descending into dungeons and defeating monsters. You use gold that you gain through your exploits to purchase upgrades that make you a better adventurer. And oh yes, this is a game about making words. You draw letters as you go into battle and use them to construct words. Just for fun, each monster that you encounter marches onto the board with an adjective card. A nasty elemental, you say? A tiny minotaur? The adjective cards modify the monsters, and each monster carries a letter that you can use in words after you defeat it.\r\n\r\nThis game makes spelling and word construction fun. Because of its fantasy wrapper, this is more appealing to kids than “Hey guys, wanna spell some words?” For one to five players; ages 12 and up; <a href=\"//www.renegadegamestudios.com/\">Renegade Game Studios</a>.<a name=\"_Toc43895357\"></a>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab10\" >Wingspan</h2>\r\nThis is visually a beautiful game. You are a bird enthusiast: a bird watcher, ornithologist, or researcher. Your goal is to discover and assemble birds according to their habitat, and to do this you need to feed your birds, gather eggs (which allow you to access upgrades that help you gather more birds), and build your habitat.\r\n\r\nThis is an engine-building game. You have a certain set of cards, these cards all have certain abilities, and those abilities work together like a machine to help you win the game. Engine building is a particular genre of game; if you love this game, you may like Gizmos (less involved than Wingspan), or Terraforming Mars (more involved than Wingspan). For one to five players; ages 10 and up; <a href=\"//www.stonemaiergames.com/\">Stonemaier Games</a>.","description":"What do you pull out when you want to play school rather than actually teach? Why, one of these games, of course! The games in this list offer you much more than Monopoly or Connect Four; in fact, you can substitute any one of these for a subject lesson once in a while with no regrets.\r\n\r\nFrom electrical circuits to business conglomerates and from food chains to famous battles, these games cover math, science, social studies, and language arts in the finest tradition of play. Although playing these games may take longer than it would to present a ten-to-twenty-minute lesson in whatever, there’s something to be said for variety in the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/education/homeschooling/homeschooling-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">home schoolroom</a>. Some of them can even be played solo, an unusual boon for games.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">You should be able to find all (or most) of these games at your local specialty game retailer. If your city manages to exist without a game store, you can usually order directly from the manufacturer from the website listed with each game, or try the following websites:</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><a href=\"//www.boardlandia.com/\">Boardlandia</a></li>\r\n \t<li><a href=\"//www.funagain.com/\">Funagain Games</a></li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" ><a name=\"_Toc43895348\"></a>Anti-Monopoly</h2>\r\nThis is not your family Monopoly game. Invented by Ralph Auspach, a retired economics professor, you start the game as a monopolist or small business. You get two parallel sets of rules and two ways to play the game; it’s designed to show the difference between how a large corporation works and how a small business functions. Will you be a monopolist or a free market competitor? This is a game we pull down for high-school economics class; it is an update to the Landlord’s Game invented by Elizabeth Magie on her dining room table. For two to eight players; ages 8 and up; from <a href=\"//www.universitygames.com/\">University Games</a>—if you lose your instructions, you can download more here. You can purchase from <a href=\"//www.areyougame.com/\">AreYouGame</a>.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_272949\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-272949\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/homeschooling-anti-monopoly.jpg\" alt=\"Anti-Monopoly board game\" width=\"556\" height=\"276\" /> Courtesy University Games website<br /><br />Anti-Monopoly is from University Games.[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" ><a name=\"_Toc43895349\"></a>Evolution</h2>\r\nIn Evolution you create, evolve, and sustain your species. Applying trait cards to a base species allows it to adapt to the ever-changing climate of the table. This game requires a unique strategy not found in many other games, and you can upgrade it with its expansion, Flight. If you love this, you might also like Evolution: Climate, a stand-alone game (not an expansion to the original game). Recommended for ages 12 and older; for two to six players; <a href=\"//www.northstargames.com/\">North Star Games</a>.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" ><a name=\"_Toc43895350\"></a>Forbidden Island/Desert</h2>\r\nForbidden Island and its kin: Forbidden Desert and Forbidden Sky, are <em>cooperative</em> games that pit you against the board. You need to work together as a team or you will lose. Forbidden Island, the first of the series, traps you on an island that slowly sinks into the sea. You need to collect four treasures and escape before the water engulfs you. Each game in the series presents different challenges and contains slightly different rules. If you absolutely love this series, you may also want to look for Pandemic, a more complicated game by the same designer. For 2–4 players; ages 10 and up; <a href=\"//www.gamewright.com/\">Game Wright</a>.<a name=\"_Toc43895351\"></a>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >The Garden Game</h2>\r\nWhat do you get when you cross seeds, pollinators, predators, and the weather? Well, if you do it outside, you may get a garden out of it. If you do it inside, you’ll probably find yourself in the middle of The Garden Game.\r\n\r\nYour goal is to plant and pollinate your seeds before the predators or nasty weather gets the better of you. At the same time, you move around the board through the seasons. This game includes a nice, multipage discussion on plant pollination and gardening, and it definitely fits within an upper elementary or middle-school science curriculum. (My garden lover, however, loved playing this from age 5.) For two to six players, ages 8 and up; <a href=\"//www.ampersandpress.com/\">Ampersand Press</a>.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" ><a name=\"_Toc43895352\"></a>How Do You See the World?</h2>\r\nThs card game comes closer to traditionally educational than anything else in this chapter. Choose one of 100 cards, roll the die, and answer the open-ended question. Categories include reflections, relationships, aspirations, life’s purpose, and beliefs. Typical questions for the game: How much do you want to work in a week? What is one meaningless activity you engage in? How does your past influence your future?\r\n\r\nIf you want your kids to reflect and communicate about all kinds of issues and thoughts, this may be a game for you. How Do You See The World? would also make a great downtime game, whether you use it after dinner, while you travel, or at a family gathering between activities. For one to however-many players; ages 12 and up; <a href=\"//www.authenticagilitygames.com/\">Authentic Agility Games</a>.<a name=\"_Toc43895353\"></a>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab6\" >Into the Forest</h2>\r\nThis card game explores the food chains of the forest. From the animal and plant cards in your hand, you pit one portion of the food chain against another, much like the game of war. So if you lay down a Grass card, and your opponent places Millipedes on the table, your opponent gets your Grass card because Millipedes eat decaying grass.\r\n\r\nRather than win by point accumulation, players compete against a timer to simulate the never-ending cycle of life in the forest. List this game under science. (If your students really enjoy the game and its concepts, this company also produces the game Onto the Desert, which focuses on survival in the desert climate.) For two to six players, ages 7 and up; <a href=\"//www.ampersandpress.com/\">Ampersand Press</a>.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab7\" ><a name=\"_Toc43895354\"></a>Krypto</h2>\r\nKrypto is one of those classic card games that people muse over. “Oh yes, I remember Krypto . . . ” and they lapse into silence, wondering if it’s still available. Although kind of difficult to locate, the game is still around.\r\n\r\nEach player gets five numerical cards, ranging anywhere from 1 to 25. Then a target card is turned face up; this is your goal card. Using all five cards, you need to somehow equal the target number through addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division.\r\n\r\nKrypto also comes in a fractions supplement (fraction cards that you add to the regular Krypto game). Kryto accommodates one to ten players of any age. You can also find this game on Amazon.com.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab8\" ><a name=\"_Toc43895355\"></a>Periodic</h2>\r\nGenius Games is known for its real science games, by real scientists. Periodic is no exception. In this game you create compounds by visiting each of their elements on the periodic table. Once you gather all needed ingredients, the compound becomes yours and it marches you toward victory.\r\n\r\nThis is a great game for learning about elements and compounds, not to mention memorizing the periodic table. In the box you’ll find the game instructions, but you’ll also see a booklet that discusses the science behind the game. Other games by Genius include: Ion, Covalence, Cytosis, and Tesla vs. Edison. For two to five players; ages 10 and up; <a href=\"//www.geniusgames.org/\">Genius Games</a>.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab9\" ><a name=\"_Toc43895356\"></a>Spell Smashers</h2>\r\nIn Spell Smashers you play as a rugged adventurer, descending into dungeons and defeating monsters. You use gold that you gain through your exploits to purchase upgrades that make you a better adventurer. And oh yes, this is a game about making words. You draw letters as you go into battle and use them to construct words. Just for fun, each monster that you encounter marches onto the board with an adjective card. A nasty elemental, you say? A tiny minotaur? The adjective cards modify the monsters, and each monster carries a letter that you can use in words after you defeat it.\r\n\r\nThis game makes spelling and word construction fun. Because of its fantasy wrapper, this is more appealing to kids than “Hey guys, wanna spell some words?” For one to five players; ages 12 and up; <a href=\"//www.renegadegamestudios.com/\">Renegade Game Studios</a>.<a name=\"_Toc43895357\"></a>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab10\" >Wingspan</h2>\r\nThis is visually a beautiful game. You are a bird enthusiast: a bird watcher, ornithologist, or researcher. Your goal is to discover and assemble birds according to their habitat, and to do this you need to feed your birds, gather eggs (which allow you to access upgrades that help you gather more birds), and build your habitat.\r\n\r\nThis is an engine-building game. You have a certain set of cards, these cards all have certain abilities, and those abilities work together like a machine to help you win the game. Engine building is a particular genre of game; if you love this game, you may like Gizmos (less involved than Wingspan), or Terraforming Mars (more involved than Wingspan). For one to five players; ages 10 and up; <a href=\"//www.stonemaiergames.com/\">Stonemaier Games</a>.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10376,"name":"Jennifer Kaufeld","slug":"jennifer-kaufeld","description":" <p><b>Jennifer Kaufeld</b> has nearly three decades of homeschooling experience. She is a regular speaker at state and regional homeschooling and education conferences, and frequently contributes expert advice to several communities on Facebook and elsewhere online. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10376"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33804,"title":"Homeschooling","slug":"homeschooling","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33804"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Anti-Monopoly","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Evolution","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Forbidden Island/Desert","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"The Garden Game","target":"#tab4"},{"label":"How Do You See the World?","target":"#tab5"},{"label":"Into the Forest","target":"#tab6"},{"label":"Krypto","target":"#tab7"},{"label":"Periodic","target":"#tab8"},{"label":"Spell Smashers","target":"#tab9"},{"label":"Wingspan","target":"#tab10"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":272972,"title":"The Cost of Homeschooling","slug":"the-cost-of-homeschooling","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/272972"}},{"articleId":272969,"title":"10 Common Homeschool Fears","slug":"10-common-homeschool-fears","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/272969"}},{"articleId":272962,"title":"Homeschooling as a Family","slug":"homeschooling-as-a-family","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/272962"}},{"articleId":272948,"title":"Tips for Homeschooling Elementary Math","slug":"tips-for-homeschooling-elementary-math","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/272948"}},{"articleId":209050,"title":"Homeschooling For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"homeschooling-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209050"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":297135,"title":"Teaching Your Kids New Math, Grades 6-8 For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"teaching-your-kids-new-math-grades-6-8-for-dummies","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297135"}},{"articleId":272972,"title":"The Cost of Homeschooling","slug":"the-cost-of-homeschooling","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/272972"}},{"articleId":272969,"title":"10 Common Homeschool Fears","slug":"10-common-homeschool-fears","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/272969"}},{"articleId":272962,"title":"Homeschooling as a Family","slug":"homeschooling-as-a-family","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/272962"}},{"articleId":272948,"title":"Tips for Homeschooling Elementary Math","slug":"tips-for-homeschooling-elementary-math","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/272948"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282284,"slug":"homeschooling-for-dummies-2nd-edition","isbn":"9781119740827","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119740827/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119740827/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119740827-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119740827/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119740827/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/homeschooling-for-dummies-2nd-edition-cover-9781119740827-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Homeschooling For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"10376\">Jennifer Kaufeld</b></b> has nearly three decades of homeschooling experience. She is a regular speaker at state and regional homeschooling and education conferences, and frequently contributes expert advice to several communities on Facebook and elsewhere online.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":10376,"name":"Jennifer Kaufeld","slug":"jennifer-kaufeld","description":" <p><b>Jennifer Kaufeld</b> has nearly three decades of homeschooling experience. She is a regular speaker at state and regional homeschooling and education conferences, and frequently contributes expert advice to several communities on Facebook and elsewhere online. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10376"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;homeschooling&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119740827&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-644ae28f02f7d\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;homeschooling&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119740827&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-644ae28f03743\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Two years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-07-18T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":272965},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-02-09T17:08:17+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-02-13T14:44:40+00:00","timestamp":"2024-02-13T15:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33800"},"slug":"teaching","categoryId":33800},{"name":"Homeschooling","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33804"},"slug":"homeschooling","categoryId":33804}],"title":"Teaching Your Kids New Math, Grades 6-8 For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"teaching your kids new math, grades 6-8 for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"teaching-your-kids-new-math-grades-6-8-for-dummies","canonicalUrl":"","收目录擎SEO":{"metaDescription":"Keep this Cheat Sheet handy when you're teaching math to kids in grades six through eight. It includes the basics on many different topics.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"When you’re working with your child to practice math skills, it can help to have a quick reference tool to remind you of some of the basics related to sixth through eighth grade math topics. For those times, this Cheat Sheet is a handy reference.\r\n\r\nIf your child is struggling with addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, or fractions, you may also want to check out the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/academics-the-arts/math/basic-math/teaching-your-kids-new-math-k-5-for-dummies-cheat-sheet-291491/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Cheat Sheet</a> for the book <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/book/academics-the-arts/teaching/homeschooling/teaching-your-kids-new-math-k-5-for-dummies-291192/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><em>Teaching Your Kids New Math, K-5 For Dummies</em> </a>and the book itself.","description":"When you’re working with your child to practice math skills, it can help to have a quick reference tool to remind you of some of the basics related to sixth through eighth grade math topics. For those times, this Cheat Sheet is a handy reference.\r\n\r\nIf your child is struggling with addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, or fractions, you may also want to check out the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/academics-the-arts/math/basic-math/teaching-your-kids-new-math-k-5-for-dummies-cheat-sheet-291491/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Cheat Sheet</a> for the book <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/book/academics-the-arts/teaching/homeschooling/teaching-your-kids-new-math-k-5-for-dummies-291192/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><em>Teaching Your Kids New Math, K-5 For Dummies</em> </a>and the book itself.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":34734,"name":"Kris Jamsa","slug":"kris-jamsa","description":" <p><b>Dr. Kris Jamsa </b>is the author of 115 books on computing and education. He holds eight college degrees, which include a PhD in Computer Science, a PhD in Education, and a Masters in Education with a focus on multiple intelligences. Jamsa was the founder of the Head of the Class series, an e-learning portal for kindergarten through fifth grade. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/34734"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33804,"title":"Homeschooling","slug":"homeschooling","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33804"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":272972,"title":"The Cost of Homeschooling","slug":"the-cost-of-homeschooling","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/272972"}},{"articleId":272969,"title":"10 Common Homeschool Fears","slug":"10-common-homeschool-fears","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/272969"}},{"articleId":272965,"title":"10 Educational Games That Enhance Your Homeschool Day","slug":"10-educational-games-that-enhance-your-homeschool-day","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/272965"}},{"articleId":272962,"title":"Homeschooling as a Family","slug":"homeschooling-as-a-family","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/272962"}},{"articleId":272948,"title":"Tips for Homeschooling Elementary Math","slug":"tips-for-homeschooling-elementary-math","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/272948"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":297049,"slug":"teaching-your-kids-new-math-grades-6-8-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119986393","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","homeschooling"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119986397/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119986397/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119986397-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119986397/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119986397/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/teaching-your-kids-new-math-grades-6-8-for-dummies-cover-1119986397-202x255.jpg","width":202,"height":255},"title":"Teaching Your Kids New Math, Grades 6-8 For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b>Dr. <b data-author-id=\"34734\">Kris Jamsa</b> </b>is the author of 115 books on computing and education. He holds eight college degrees, which include a PhD in Computer Science, a PhD in Education, and a Masters in Education with a focus on multiple intelligences. Jamsa was the founder of the Head of the Class series, an e-learning portal for kindergarten through fifth grade.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":34734,"name":"Kris Jamsa","slug":"kris-jamsa","description":" <p><b>Dr. Kris Jamsa </b>is the author of 115 books on computing and education. He holds eight college degrees, which include a PhD in Computer Science, a PhD in Education, and a Masters in Education with a focus on multiple intelligences. Jamsa was the founder of the Head of the Class series, an e-learning portal for kindergarten through fifth grade. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/34734"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;homeschooling&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119986393&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63ea50ae8ad6e\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;homeschooling&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119986393&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63ea50ae8b680\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":0,"title":"","slug":null,"categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/"}}],"content":[{"title":"Area, perimeter, circumference, and volumes","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Prior to sixth grade, your child likely learned how to calculate the distance around a shape (perimeter and circumference) as well as the space inside (area). This section reviews the equations for such calculations, as well as volume, which is the space inside a 3D shape.</p>\n<h3>Perimeter</h3>\n<p><em>Perimeter</em> is the distance around a shape. To calculate the distance around a rectangle, square, triangle, and other shapes, you add the length of each side:</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone wp-image-297139 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781119986393-fgcs01.jpg\" alt=\"Illustration showing perimeter calculation for a square and triangle\" width=\"535\" height=\"287\" /></p>\n<h3>Area</h3>\n<p><em>Area</em> is the space inside of a shape. To calculate the area of a rectangle, you multiply the length times the width:</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone wp-image-297140 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781119986393-fgcs02.jpg\" alt=\"Illustration showing area calculation for a rectangle.\" width=\"220\" height=\"207\" /></p>\n<p>To calculate the area of a triangle, you use :</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone wp-image-297141 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781119986393-fgcs03.jpg\" alt=\"Illustration showing the area calculation for a triangle\" width=\"130\" height=\"318\" /></p>\n<h3>Circumference</h3>\n<p><em>Circumference</em> is the distance around a circle. To calculate the circumference of a circle, you use :</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone wp-image-297142 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781119986393-fgcs04.jpg\" alt=\"Illustration showing the circumference calculation for a circle.\" width=\"230\" height=\"233\" /></p>\n<h3>Area of a circle</h3>\n<p>To calculate the area of a circle, you use :</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone wp-image-297143 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781119986393-fgcs05.jpg\" alt=\"Illustration showing the area calculation for a circle.\" width=\"120\" height=\"209\" /></p>\n<h3>Volume</h3>\n<p>Volume is a measure of the space inside of a 3D shape, such as a cube, sphere, or cylinder. To calculate the volume of a cube, you multiply the sides times the height:</p>\n<p><strong>volume = length x height x width</strong></p>\n<p>To calculate the volume of a sphere, you use the following equation:</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297150\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/sphere-volume.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"163\" height=\"55\" /></p>\n<p>To calculate the volume of a cylinder, you use the following equation:</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297149\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/cyllinder-volume.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"202\" height=\"43\" /></p>\n"},{"title":"Negative numbers","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Through fifth grade, your child will work only with positive numbers (called counting numbers). In middle school, though, they begin working with negative numbers and learning their special rules.</p>\n<p>When you add a negative number, such as 3 + (–5), you simply subtract the negative number:</p>\n<p>3 = (–5) = 3 – 5 = –2</p>\n<p>When you subtract a negative number, such as 3 – (–4),  you add the negative number:</p>\n<p>3 – (–4) = 3 + 4 = 7</p>\n<p>When you multiply a negative number by another number, if only one of the numbers is negative, as in 3 x (–5), the result is negative (–15). If both numbers are negative, as in (–3) x (–4), the result is positive (12).</p>\n<p>When you divide a negative number by another number, if only one of the numbers is negative, as in 6 ÷ (–2), the result is negative (–3). If both numbers are negative, as in (–12) ÷ (–4),  the result is positive (4).</p>\n<p>The additive inverse of a number is the value you must add to the number to equal zero. The additive inverse of 4 is –4 and the additive inverse of –5 is 5.</p>\n"},{"title":"Simple statistics","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>The average (or mean) is the sum of the numbers (when you add all the numbers together) and then divide by the number of values. The average of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 is  or 30.</p>\n<p>The minimum value is the smallest value. The minimum of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 is 10.</p>\n<p>The maximum value is the largest value. The maximum of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 is 50.</p>\n<p>The range is the maximum value minus the minimum value. The range of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 is  or 40.</p>\n<p>The median is the middle value. The median of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 is 30.</p>\n<p>The mode value is the value that occurs most often in the list. The mode of 10, 20, 20, 30, 30, 30 is 30.</p>\n<p>A box-and-whiskers chart shows the minimum, maximum, median, and quartile values (range for the bottom 25 percent and top 25 percent). The box shows the range within which 50 percent of the data resides.</p>\n<div class=\"figure-container\"><figure id=\"attachment_297138\" aria-labelledby=\"figcaption_attachment_297138\" class=\"wp-caption alignnone\" style=\"width: 410px\"><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"size-full wp-image-297138\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781119986393-fgcs06.jpg\" alt=\"Chart explaining median, maximum, minimum, and bottom quartile\" width=\"400\" height=\"285\" /><figcaption id=\"figcaption_attachment_297138\" class=\"wp-caption-text\">©John Wiley &amp; Sons, Inc.</figcaption></figure></div><div class=\"clearfix\"></div>\n"},{"title":"Ratios","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>A ratio is a value that lets you compare two things. For example, if the ratio of dogs to cats is 3 to 1, this means that there are 3 dogs for every 1 cat. Ratios can also be written as a fraction (3/1) or with a colon (3:1).</p>\n"},{"title":"Exponents","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>An exponent is the power to which you raise another number. For 3<sup>2</sup> , the exponent is 2 and the base number is 3.</p>\n<p>A positive exponent tells you the number of times you should multiply the base number times itself. For 3<sup>2 </sup>, you would multiply 3 x 3, which equals 9.</p>\n<p>A negative exponent, such as 4<sup>-2</sup> , tells you the number of times you should multiply the base number’s reciprocal times itself.</p>\n<p>In this case, the reciprocal of 4 is</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297156\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/1-4-image.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"22\" height=\"49\" /></p>\n<p>so you would multiply</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297157\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/1-4-times-1-4-math.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"51\" height=\"49\" /></p>\n<p>which is</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297158\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/1-16-math.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"25\" height=\"46\" /></p>\n<p>Any value raised to the power of 1 is that number. For example, 4<sup>1</sup> is 4.</p>\n<p>Any value raised to the power of 0 is 1. For example, 4<sup>0</sup> is 1.</p>\n<p>A value’s square root is the number you must square (multiply times itself) to equal the value. The square root of 25 is 5 and the square root of 100 is 10. The following equations demonstrate the use of the square root symbol:</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297160\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/square-root-equations.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"369\" height=\"49\" /></p>\n<p>When you multiply the same value with exponents, you can simply add the exponents:</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297164\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/multiply-exponent-equations.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"247\" height=\"40\" /></p>\n<p>When you divide the same value with exponents, you can simply subtract the exponents:</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297163\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/divide-exponent-equations.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"253\" height=\"51\" /></p>\n<p>The cube root is the value you must multiply by itself 3 times to equal a value:</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297203\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/cube-root-exponents.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"103\" height=\"96\" /></p>\n"},{"title":"Algebra","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Algebra is a branch of math that uses symbols, such as <em>x</em> and <em>y</em>, to represent unknowns.</p>\n<p>To solve for a single unknown, such as <em>x</em>, you must perform math operations to isolate <em>x</em> by itself on one side of the equal sign:</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297167\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/isolate-x-on-side-algebra.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"465\" height=\"82\" /></p>\n<p>To solve for two unknowns, such as <em>x</em> and <em>y</em>, you must have two expressions:</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297168\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/solve-two-unknowns-algebra.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"76\" height=\"63\" /></p>\n<p>Solve for one of the variables in terms of the other: x = y + 5</p>\n<p>Plug the result for the first variable, in this case, <em>x, </em>into one of the two equations, and solve for the other unknown:</p>\n<p>2y + 5 = 7</p>\n<p>y = 1</p>\n<p>Plug the result into one of the two equations to solve for the other unknown, in this case, <em>x</em>:</p>\n<p>x + 1 = 7</p>\n<p>x = 6</p>\n"},{"title":"Percentages","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>A <em>percentage</em> is a fraction with 100 as the denominator (the bottom number) and written in decimal form. The common 15 percent tip, for example, is</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297170\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/percentage-calculation.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"37\" height=\"43\" /></p>\n<p>In other words, percentages are always expressed in terms of hundredths: 100</p>\n<p>To calculate 15% of 33, you multiply 0,15 x 33, which equals 4.95.</p>\n<p>To calculate what percentage one number is of another, you divide the smaller number by the larger number and multiply by 100. For example, 7 is what percent of 21? The answer is:</p>\n<p>7 ÷ 21 x 100 is 33.3%</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n"},{"title":"Unit rates","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>A <em>unit rate</em> is a special type of rate, such as miles per gallon or the cost of an item. For example, two gas stations are selling gas at $5.25 and $5.35 a gallon. The unit rate (dollars per gallon) is less expensive at the first gas station.</p>\n"},{"title":"Converting a fraction to a decimal","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>To convert a fraction, such as</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297156\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/1-4-image.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"22\" height=\"49\" /></p>\n<p>to a decimal, you perform the division. In this case, you would divide 1 by 4, which is 0.25. Here are some other examples:</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297172\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/converting-fractions-to-decimals.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"364\" height=\"235\" /></p>\n"},{"title":"Order of operations","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>When you perform arithmetic operations, the order in which you perform the operations matters. PEMDAS is an acronym that can help:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>Parentheses first</li>\n<li>Exponents second</li>\n<li>Multiplication and Division third</li>\n<li>Addition and Subtraction last</li>\n</ul>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297174\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/order-of-operations.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"178\" height=\"64\" /></p>\n"},{"title":"Angles and triangles","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Geometry is a branch of math that deals with angles, lines, and shapes. In 6<sup>th</sup> through 8<sup>th</sup> grade math, your child will solve problems that angles and triangles. To solve such problems, they should be able to identify the following angles and triangles.</p>\n<h3>Angles</h3>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297176\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781119986393-fgcs07.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"535\" height=\"356\" /></p>\n<h3>Triangles</h3>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297177\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781119986393-fgcs08.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"535\" height=\"287\" /></p>\n"},{"title":"Numbers","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>In 6<sup>th</sup> through 8<sup>th</sup> grade math, your child will move from counting numbers and fractions to integers and rational and irrational numbers. The following chart relates the number types your child should know.</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-297179\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781119986393-fgcs09.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"479\" height=\"400\" /></p>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-02-09T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":297135},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2019-07-26T02:12:36+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-12-14T17:44:00+00:00","timestamp":"2023-12-14T18:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33800"},"slug":"teaching","categoryId":33800},{"name":"Skills Tests","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33806"},"slug":"skills-tests","categoryId":33806},{"name":"Praxis","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33807"},"slug":"praxis","categoryId":33807}],"title":"How to Register for the Praxis Exam","strippedTitle":"how to register for the praxis exam","slug":"register-praxis-core-academic-skills-educators-exam","canonicalUrl":"","收目录擎SEO":{"metaDescription":"Before you register to take the Praxis, check with the local department of education to make sure you’re taking the right test. Don’t ask ETS or your mom or any","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Before you register to take the Praxis, check with the local department of education to make sure you’re taking the right test. Don’t ask ETS or your mom or anyone else who isn’t in a position to admit you to a teaching program; they may give you wrong information, which can lead to wasted time and money.\r\n\r\nYou can find out how to register to take the Praxis Core by going to <a href=\"//www.ets.org/\">the ETS website</a>. The Praxis Core is offered during testing windows at more than 300 Prometric testing sites across the country. Contact your local testing site for specific questions regarding its testing windows. Test-takers must register at least three days prior to their intended test date, and you must pay the testing fee online. At the time of this writing, individual tests (reading, writing, or mathematics) cost $90; the price to take all three tests at once (on the same day) is discounted to $150.\r\n\r\nAfter you register, read all the admission ticket info to make sure all the content is correct. Contact ETS if you have any disabilities that require accommodations.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Consider taking one test per day instead of multiple tests per day. You know your limits and abilities. Some people take all three tests on the same day, and they bomb all three. If you aren’t super confident that you can pass multiple tests in one sitting, you may want to schedule them for different days. This approach will also help you map out your study plan more strategically (see the next section). You can study for one test at a time instead of all three.</p>","description":"Before you register to take the Praxis, check with the local department of education to make sure you’re taking the right test. Don’t ask ETS or your mom or anyone else who isn’t in a position to admit you to a teaching program; they may give you wrong information, which can lead to wasted time and money.\r\n\r\nYou can find out how to register to take the Praxis Core by going to <a href=\"//www.ets.org/\">the ETS website</a>. The Praxis Core is offered during testing windows at more than 300 Prometric testing sites across the country. Contact your local testing site for specific questions regarding its testing windows. Test-takers must register at least three days prior to their intended test date, and you must pay the testing fee online. At the time of this writing, individual tests (reading, writing, or mathematics) cost $90; the price to take all three tests at once (on the same day) is discounted to $150.\r\n\r\nAfter you register, read all the admission ticket info to make sure all the content is correct. Contact ETS if you have any disabilities that require accommodations.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Consider taking one test per day instead of multiple tests per day. You know your limits and abilities. Some people take all three tests on the same day, and they bomb all three. If you aren’t super confident that you can pass multiple tests in one sitting, you may want to schedule them for different days. This approach will also help you map out your study plan more strategically (see the next section). You can study for one test at a time instead of all three.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10794,"name":"Carla C. Kirkland","slug":"carla-c-kirkland","description":" <p><b>Carla Kirkland,</b> founder and CEO of the Kirkland Group, an educational consulting firm, has helped educators prepare their students for standardized tests for more than 20 years.</p> <p><b>Chan Cleveland,</b> executive vice president of the Kirkland Group, is an English educator who has developed language arts resources for multiple school districts.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10794"}},{"authorId":9384,"name":"Chan Cleveland","slug":"chan-cleveland","description":" <p><b>Carla Kirkland,</b> founder and CEO of the Kirkland Group, an educational consulting firm, has helped educators prepare their students for standardized tests for more than 20 years.</p> <p><b>Chan Cleveland,</b> executive vice president of the Kirkland Group, is an English educator who has developed language arts resources for multiple school districts.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9384"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33807,"title":"Praxis","slug":"praxis","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33807"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":268458,"title":"Capitalization: What You Need to Know for the Praxis Core","slug":"capitalization-what-you-need-to-know-for-the-praxis-core","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/268458"}},{"articleId":268455,"title":"Identify and Correct Errors in Praxis Core Selected-Response Items","slug":"identify-and-correct-errors-in-praxis-core-selected-response-items","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/268455"}},{"articleId":268441,"title":"How Data is Represented on the Praxis Core Exam","slug":"how-data-is-represented-on-the-praxis-core-exam","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/268441"}},{"articleId":268435,"title":"How to Narrow Down Answer Choices on the Praxis Math Test","slug":"how-to-narrow-down-answer-choices-on-the-praxis-math-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/268435"}},{"articleId":268426,"title":"Visual- and Quantitative-Information Questions on the Praxis Reading Test","slug":"visual-and-quantitative-information-questions-on-the-praxis-reading-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/268426"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;skills-tests&quot;,&quot;praxis&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-639a0f5fe3451\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;skills-tests&quot;,&quot;praxis&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-639a0f5fe3cc8\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Two years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-12-14T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":254476},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2019-05-29T20:42:28+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-12-14T17:39:42+00:00","timestamp":"2023-12-14T18:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Teaching","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33800"},"slug":"teaching","categoryId":33800},{"name":"Skills Tests","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33806"},"slug":"skills-tests","categoryId":33806},{"name":"Praxis","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33807"},"slug":"praxis","categoryId":33807}],"title":"How to Budget Your Time During the Praxis Exam","strippedTitle":"how to budget your time during the praxis exam","slug":"budget-time-praxis-core-academic-skills-educators-exam","canonicalUrl":"","收目录擎SEO":{"metaDescription":"On test day, it’s all about pacing yourself. Look at the Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators exam from the perspective of how many questions you have to a","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"On test day, it’s all about pacing yourself. Look at the Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators exam from the perspective of how many questions you have to answer per minute:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>The math and reading sections give you 85 minutes to answer 56 questions. This gives you a little over a minute and a half to answer each question.</li>\r\n \t<li>The writing section gives you 40 minutes to answer 40 multiple-choice questions. That comes out to one question per minute.</li>\r\n \t<li>The essay section gives you 60 minutes to write two essays.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nYou may look at those numbers and think, “There’s no way I can answer questions that quickly!” But fear not. Here are some tips that will help you shave seconds off the amount of time it takes you to answer many of the questions:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Watch the clock on the computer screen.</strong> Monitor the time on the computer screen like it’s your million-dollar countdown. Remember that you’ll have at least one minute per question, and you need to use every minute wisely.</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\"><strong>Don’t make time your sole focus.</strong> Don’t get so caught up on timing that you aren’t paying attention to what the questions are asking. Strike a balance between monitoring the time and concentrating on the task at hand.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Watch for the traps.</strong> The people who write the assessment questions always add “trap” answers into the mix. These incorrect answers look like they’re correct, but they’re not. For example, you may see an answer to a word problem that’s achieved by multiplying when you should be dividing. It’s a trap. Watch out for it.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Use the process of elimination.</strong> If you don’t know the answer immediately after reading the answer choices, try to eliminate as many answers as possible. Then guess at the answer. Your chances of guessing correctly increase as you eliminate more answer choices.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Read all possible answers.</strong> Sift through each answer choice and ensure that you aren’t overlooking a better answer. Don’t select Choice (A) before looking at the alternative answer choices.</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"On test day, it’s all about pacing yourself. Look at the Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators exam from the perspective of how many questions you have to answer per minute:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>The math and reading sections give you 85 minutes to answer 56 questions. This gives you a little over a minute and a half to answer each question.</li>\r\n \t<li>The writing section gives you 40 minutes to answer 40 multiple-choice questions. That comes out to one question per minute.</li>\r\n \t<li>The essay section gives you 60 minutes to write two essays.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nYou may look at those numbers and think, “There’s no way I can answer questions that quickly!” But fear not. Here are some tips that will help you shave seconds off the amount of time it takes you to answer many of the questions:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Watch the clock on the computer screen.</strong> Monitor the time on the computer screen like it’s your million-dollar countdown. Remember that you’ll have at least one minute per question, and you need to use every minute wisely.</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\"><strong>Don’t make time your sole focus.</strong> Don’t get so caught up on timing that you aren’t paying attention to what the questions are asking. Strike a balance between monitoring the time and concentrating on the task at hand.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Watch for the traps.</strong> The people who write the assessment questions always add “trap” answers into the mix. These incorrect answers look like they’re correct, but they’re not. For example, you may see an answer to a word problem that’s achieved by multiplying when you should be dividing. It’s a trap. Watch out for it.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Use the process of elimination.</strong> If you don’t know the answer immediately after reading the answer choices, try to eliminate as many answers as possible. Then guess at the answer. Your chances of guessing correctly increase as you eliminate more answer choices.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Read all possible answers.</strong> Sift through each answer choice and ensure that you aren’t overlooking a better answer. Don’t select Choice (A) before looking at the alternative answer choices.</li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10794,"name":"Carla C. Kirkland","slug":"carla-c-kirkland","description":" <p><b>Carla Kirkland,</b> founder and CEO of the Kirkland Group, an educational consulting firm, has helped educators prepare their students for standardized tests for more than 20 years.</p> <p><b>Chan Cleveland,</b> executive vice president of the Kirkland Group, is an English educator who has developed language arts resources for multiple school districts.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10794"}},{"authorId":9384,"name":"Chan Cleveland","slug":"chan-cleveland","description":" <p><b>Carla Kirkland,</b> founder and CEO of the Kirkland Group, an educational consulting firm, has helped educators prepare their students for standardized tests for more than 20 years.</p> <p><b>Chan Cleveland,</b> executive vice president of the Kirkland Group, is an English educator who has developed language arts resources for multiple school districts.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9384"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33807,"title":"Praxis","slug":"praxis","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33807"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":268458,"title":"Capitalization: What You Need to Know for the Praxis Core","slug":"capitalization-what-you-need-to-know-for-the-praxis-core","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/268458"}},{"articleId":268455,"title":"Identify and Correct Errors in Praxis Core Selected-Response 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sheet","slug":"praxis-core-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","收目录擎SEO":{"metaDescription":"Use this Cheat Sheet to prepare for the Praxis exam. Review math vocabulary and get lots of math, reading, writing, and essay section tips.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Before you get too excited, understand that the following information isn’t actually about how to cheat on the Praxis. It’s really about the most efficient ways to prepare for the exam. But “preparation sheet” doesn’t quite have the same ring to it. Besides, cheating is unnecessary if you know what you’re doing, and sometimes figuring out what to do is actually easier. As Bart Simpson once said after accidentally studying for a test, “It was like a whole new way to cheat!”","description":"Before you get too excited, understand that the following information isn’t actually about how to cheat on the Praxis. It’s really about the most efficient ways to prepare for the exam. But “preparation sheet” doesn’t quite have the same ring to it. Besides, cheating is unnecessary if you know what you’re doing, and sometimes figuring out what to do is actually easier. As Bart Simpson once said after accidentally studying for a test, “It was like a whole new way to cheat!”","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9383,"name":"Carla Kirkland","slug":"carla-kirkland","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9383"}},{"authorId":9384,"name":"Chan Cleveland","slug":"chan-cleveland","description":" <p><b>Carla C. Kirkland</b> is CEO of The Kirkland Group, a consulting firm providing professional development, technical assistance, and standardized test preparation to schools. <b>Chan Cleveland,</b> Executive Vice President of The Kirkland Group, has created and revised language arts standards for many school districts. 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","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9384"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;skills-tests&quot;,&quot;praxis&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119888178&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b5216b26\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;teaching&quot;,&quot;skills-tests&quot;,&quot;praxis&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119888178&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b52170a7\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":149756,"title":"General Tips for Succeeding on the Praxis","slug":"general-tips-for-succeeding-on-the-praxis","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/149756"}},{"articleId":149755,"title":"Reviewing Math Vocabulary and Rules for the Praxis","slug":"reviewing-math-vocabulary-and-rules-for-the-praxis","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/149755"}},{"articleId":149745,"title":"5 Tips to Keep in Mind for the Praxis Reading Section","slug":"5-tips-to-keep-in-mind-for-the-praxis-reading-section","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/149745"}},{"articleId":149744,"title":"6 Tips to Keep in Mind for the Praxis Writing Section","slug":"6-tips-to-keep-in-mind-for-the-praxis-writing-section","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/149744"}},{"articleId":149757,"title":"5 Tips to Keep in Mind for the Essay Portions of the Praxis Writing Test","slug":"5-tips-to-keep-in-mind-for-the-essay-portions-of-the-praxis-writing-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","teaching","skills-tests","praxis"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/149757"}}],"content":[{"title":"General tips for succeeding on the Praxis","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>No matter how much you study before taking the Praxis Core, that knowledge will be hazy unless you’re also in good physical and emotional test-taking condition. Keep the following points in mind in the days leading up to and on the day of the test.</p>\n<ul>\n<li>Be sure to eat something before the test, no matter how nervous you are. Even if you don’t feel hungry before the test, hunger pangs have a way of sneaking up on you the moment the test starts. If you’re too jittery to choke down your customary bacon and eggs, have some bananas on hand, as they make for a good, filling breakfast that’s easy on a nervous stomach. And during the test, they’ll keep your blood sugar from dropping, so you’ll stay alert.</li>\n<li>The answer to the “coffee or no coffee” is “do whatever you normally do.” If you’re a daily coffee-drinker, there’s no need to go without your java on test day. But if you don’t typically drink coffee, suddenly pounding one before the test is more likely to shake you up than improve your performance.</li>\n<li>“Get a good night’s sleep” is always good advice, but it’s important not to psych yourself out by feeling compelled to alter your sleep schedule. If you normally go to bed at 11, the only thing crawling into bed at 8 will accomplish is you getting angry at yourself for not falling asleep fast enough. Once again, “do what you normally do” is the best advice.</li>\n<li>Remember that, unlike on some other standardized tests, there’s no penalty for a wrong guess on the Praxis, so there’s never any reason to leave a question blank.</li>\n<li>When a question gives you trouble, eliminating wrong answer choices one by one is more productive than hoping that the right answer will jump out at you.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Math vocabulary and rules for the Praxis","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Success on the <a href=\"//dummies-wp-admin.coursofppt.com/test-prep/praxis/practice-math-questions-praxis-simplifying-algebraic-expression/\">math section of the Praxis Core exam</a> requires knowledge of many word meanings and rules. These are some of the major word definitions and rules you need to know:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>A <em>factor</em> of a number goes into it a whole number of times; a number is multiplied by a whole number to get a <em>multiple</em> of itself.</li>\n<li>To convert a decimal number to a percent, move the decimal two places to the right and add a percent sign (%); to convert a percent to a decimal number, drop the percent sign and move the decimal two places to the left.</li>\n<li>To multiply a variable to any power by the same variable to any power, give the variable an exponent that is the sum of the exponents involved in the multiplying.</li>\n<li><em>Like terms</em> have exactly the same variables with exactly the same exponents for each. Only like terms can be combined.</li>\n<li>To solve an equation or inequality, get the variable by itself on one side by doing the opposite of everything that is being done to it to both entire sides.</li>\n<li>You must change the direction of an inequality sign if you multiply or divide both sides by a negative or if you switch the sides.</li>\n<li>Vertical angles are congruent.</li>\n<li><em>Supplementary angles</em> have measures with a sum of 180°. <em>Complementary angles</em> have measures with a sum of 90°.</li>\n<li>Angles that form a linear pair are supplementary.</li>\n<li>The sum of the interior angles of a triangle is 180°. The sum of the interior angles of a quadrilateral is 360°.</li>\n<li>Similar polygons have the same shape but not necessarily the same size. Their corresponding side measures are in proportion, which means that they have the same ratio in every case.</li>\n<li>The sum of the squares of the leg measures of a right triangle is equal to the square of the hypotenuse measure.</li>\n<li>The <em>mean</em> of a set of data is the average, the <em>median</em> is the middle number or the mean of the two middle numbers when the numbers are in order, and the <em>mode</em> is the number that appears the most.</li>\n<li>The <em>probability</em> of an event is the number of qualifying outcomes divided by the number of possible outcomes.</li>\n<li>A number expressed in <em>scientific notation</em> is a single digit followed by a decimal and the digits that come after the decimal multiplied by 10 with an exponent.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"5 tips to keep in mind for the Praxis reading section","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>There are no essays or short-answer portions on the Praxis reading section of the exam. Every question is multiple-choice and asks you about a brief passage, a longer passage, a pair of passages, or a chart or graph. Here are some hints for doing your best:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>Always read the whole passage before you look at the questions and the answer choices.</li>\n<li>When a question asks for the “main idea” or “author’s primary purpose,” steer clear of overly detailed answers and pick the broadest answer choice that isn’t wrong.</li>\n<li>The passages are excerpted from writers who know what they’re talking about, so no statement that is factually false is ever a correct answer. You don’t need outside knowledge to answer the questions correctly, but you can eliminate wrong answers based on outside knowledge when and if you happen to have some.</li>\n<li>When you see a set of paired passages (from “author one” and “author two”), take a few moments to develop a sense of what the two authors agree or disagree about in your own words <em>before</em> you look at the question and the answer choices.</li>\n<li>If the visual-information questions (the ones about charts and graphs) make you nervous, rest easy in the knowledge that they’re near the end of the test, which puts you in a good position to judge how much time you have left and verify your answers by plugging in the wrong answers to double-check that they are indeed wrong.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"6 tips to keep in mind for the Praxis writing section","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>The Praxis writing section is mainly multiple-choice questions about grammar rules, plus some more multiple-choice questions about passage-editing and research skills before the two brief essays at the end. Here are some pointers to help you do well on the multiple-choice questions:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>Watch out for comma splices. They’re the single most common reason why a wrong answer is wrong. Even if you’re hazy on some of the finer points of grammar, you should be able to spot a comma splice from a mile away before you take the test.</li>\n<li>On the “No Error” questions, remember that just because an element of the sentence could have been phrased a different way, that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s wrong. You’re supposed to be on the lookout for actual rule-breaking errors, not just things that could have been said differently.</li>\n<li>Don’t be afraid to pick “No Error.” It’s the right answer as often as any other choice is.</li>\n<li>Remember to keep your eyes peeled for capitalization errors. Unlike most other standardized tests for older students, the Praxis does include questions involving capitalization issues.</li>\n<li>When reading the long passage for the “editing passage” questions, keep an eye out for sentences that seem awkward or out of place. That’s a sign that questions about them are coming up.</li>\n<li>Research questions can usually be answered with common sense, even if your academic background is not that strong. The good old “which of these things is not like the others” system is very helpful on the research questions.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"5 tips to keep in mind for the essay portions of the Praxis writing test","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>The Praxis writing test closes with a pair of essays, and you have half an hour to write each one. The first is an open response in which you’re asked to present your position on an issue. The second is a source-based essay that is graded more on how efficiently and clearly you incorporate and cite source materials. Keep these tips in mind:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>Don’t spend a lot of time making an outline before you start writing either one of the essays. Length is not the be-all and end-all, but it does matter, so you want to be writing for the vast majority of the allotted time. How eloquent you are and how clearly you seem to understand the issue matters a lot more than whether your points are in some kind of strict logical order, so don’t stress out about micromanaging the organization of your essays.</li>\n<li>Your open-response essay should clearly state a position somewhere near the beginning, but you don’t have to state an uncompromising thesis that won’t leave you any room for admitting when the other side has a good point. On the contrary, making it clear that you can understand why the people on the other side of the issue may see things differently is a sign of philosophical maturity that improves your score.</li>\n<li>Don’t try to use a bunch of big words for no reason. They make your essay annoying to read and don’t help your score. The trick is to seem like you enjoy writing, not simply to deploy a bunch of big words that you memorized for the test.</li>\n<li>On the source-based essay, be sure to quote from all the authors included in the sources and to use proper citation format after the quotes (the author’s last name followed by a comma and the year of publication if you’re using APA style, or the author’s last name followed by the page number the quotation is from if you’re using MLA style).</li>\n<li>Sometimes the passages on which the source-based essay is based include “quotes within quotes” — asking you to cite authors who are themselves citing other authors — to try to trip you up. 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