chơi xổ số keno trực tuyến

{"appState":{"pageLoadApiCallsStatus":true},"categoryState":{"relatedCategories":{"headers":{"timestamp":"2025-01-31T04:01:09+00:00"},"categoryId":33747,"data":{"title":"Performing Arts","slug":"performing-arts","image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Performing Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747"},"slug":"performing-arts","categoryId":33747}],"parentCategory":{"categoryId":33662,"title":"Academics & The Arts","slug":"academics-the-arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"}},"childCategories":[{"categoryId":33748,"title":"Dance","slug":"dance","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33748"},"image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":8,"bookCount":1},{"categoryId":33749,"title":"Film","slug":"film","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33749"},"image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":69,"bookCount":4},{"categoryId":33750,"title":"Theater","slug":"theater","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33750"},"image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":22,"bookCount":4}],"description":"Here's your cue — step on stage, step on screen, or just watch from the wings. We've got what you need to pursue your love of the arts.","relatedArticles":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles?category=33747&offset=0&size=5"},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":102,"bookCount":9},"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747"}},"relatedCategoriesLoadedStatus":"success"},"listState":{"list":{"count":10,"total":102,"items":[{"headers":{"creationTime":"2020-12-30T23:17:47+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-09-15T16:44:23+00:00","timestamp":"2024-09-15T18:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Performing Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747"},"slug":"performing-arts","categoryId":33747},{"name":"Film","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33749"},"slug":"film","categoryId":33749}],"title":"10 Tips for Shooting Video on Your Smartphone","strippedTitle":"10 tips for shooting video on your smartphone","slug":"10-tips-for-shooting-on-your-smartphone","canonicalUrl":"","查找发动机提高":{"metaDescription":"Learn how to use your smartphone to shoot a professional looking short movie, or even a full-length feature.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Today’s smartphones are so sophisticated, and the technology so advanced, you can shoot a professional looking short movie, or even a full-length feature on your smartphone. Your phone probably shoots 4K broadcast quality images — something that many older expensive video cameras can’t even do.\r\n\r\nSome of the advantages to shooting with your smartphone include:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>You just point and shoot.</li>\r\n \t<li>You don’t have to fuss with bulky movie lenses.</li>\r\n \t<li>No manual F or T stops to deal with.</li>\r\n \t<li>No depth of field or focus headaches.</li>\r\n \t<li>No exposure issues.</li>\r\n \t<li>No need to lug around a heavy, bulky camera.</li>\r\n \t<li>Your phone is always with you — ready to capture that million-to-one encounter or shoot that on-the-spot great idea.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Shooting in landscape mode</h2>\r\nThe first thing you have to remember is you’re shooting a movie, not a photo, not a selfie, and not something you’re just going to post to Facebook or Instagram. So, you now have to remember to turn your smartphone sideways. This is called <em>landscape mode</em>.\r\n\r\nThe normal way you’re use to holding your phone is <em>profile mode</em>. Note that landscape mode resembles the dimensions of your 16x9 TV. Note also that when you watch YouTube videos or feature films on your smartphone, you turn it sideways for the image to fill the whole screen. If you don’t shoot your movie in landscape mode, you’ll have black bars on each side of the image, and your movie will not fill the entire screen. So, landscape, don’t profile!\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Always make sure your smartphone is charged and ready to go. Shooting video on your phone drains the battery faster than talking or listening to music on your phone.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Take off with airplane mode</h2>\r\nYou’re moving in for the perfect shot, the actors embrace, and you’re capturing a priceless moment — <em>and</em> then your perfect shot is interrupted by your <em>phone ringing</em> — your camera is ringing<em>! “Cut! Hello? Hi mom, I’m busy, shooting my movie.”</em> It’s happened to me.\r\n\r\nGo into your phone settings and put your phone on <em>airplane mode</em>. All the functions of your phone will work except your shoot won’t be interrupted by another phone call or annoying text. You want your smartphone to be a 100-percent dedicated camera for your shoot, not a communications device.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Steady as she goes</h2>\r\nYour smartphone is already a sophisticated movie camera. Most smartphones have a built-in stabilizer to ensure steadier shots. Often, you can handhold your smartphone for many of your shots, especially moving or following shots.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Steady as a rock</h2>\r\nFor steady tripod shots, you can get special adapters for your phone that have a tripod mount, so you can attach the phone to a tripod for rock-solid shots or for smooth panning ones. You’ll find plenty of smartphone tripod adapters on Amazon for as low as $5.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >Shooting format and resolution</h2>\r\nBefore you start shooting with your smartphone, you need to go into your camera video settings. You will have a choice of resolution quality. Usually the options are 720, 1080 (2K) and 4K. I’m sure that 6K and up will soon be available for your phone. I recommend shooting on 720 or 2K because the quality is awesome and both resolutions are broadcast quality.\r\n\r\nIf you shoot in 4K, you will very quickly eat up a lot of storage space on your phone. In the video settings, you should also have the choice of shooting at 30 frames per second or 24 frames per second. Choose 24fps for a more film-like look. A great smartphone app called Filmic Pro will add even more professional shooting options to your already advanced smartphone.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab6\" >Saving your movie files</h2>\r\nDepending on your smartphone’s built-in storage capacity — or if your smartphone has a removable SD memory card — you will have to constantly offload (transfer) your shots to an external hard drive or your computer. If you don’t, your phone’s memory will soon fill up and you will have no more room to shoot anything.\r\n\r\nSome smartphones connect to your computer via USB and allow you to download your footage this way. An iPhone allows you to wirelessly download your footage from your phone using Airdrop. This allows you to easily and effortlessly download your footage, which then you can erase (trash) off your phone and continue shooting.\r\n\r\nThere’s also a great (free) app called Simple Transfer, which is absolutely one of my favorite apps. It lets you view all your phone’s photos and movies on your computer desktop, and you can choose which shots you want to download from your phone to your computer in one batch — so you don’t have to transfer one shot at a time. I absolutely love this app so much it’s on my phone’s main home screen.\r\n\r\nMany smartphones are now synced up with the cloud, so, chances are, your smartphone footage will automatically download to your computer if both are talking to the cloud.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">I can’t emphasize this warning enough. If your phone is talking to the cloud and your footage is automatically downloaded to your computer, be absolutely sure to move those shots (digital video files) to a separate folder <em>outside your camera roll</em>. If you don’t, they will all get erased in the cloud when you erase them off your phone. They will also get erased off your computer and any other device that also talks to the cloud.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">This is one major flaw of syncing with the cloud — most people think they can trash stuff on their phone to free up memory because it was transferred to their computer and lives in the cloud, but in reality, your computer is talking to the cloud and unless you transfer it out of your camera roll into a folder on your desktop, you’ll lose everything.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">All your movie files will be saved to your camera roll in your phone and filed under Videos. But move your movie shots out of the camera roll into a special folder that isn’t mirroring your camera roll in the cloud.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab7\" >Miniature camera equipment</h2>\r\nThe great thing about your movie camera being your smartphone is that everything is light and portable. Your phone is also small enough to mount on a car dashboard or adhere to the car window (on the inside) for great single shots of your driver and passenger or a nice two shot from inside the windshield. Or, turn your phone around so it’s looking out your windshield for a nice POV (point-of-view) shot of the road.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Use a selfie-stick as your camera crane for high shots or low to the ground shots. (See the following figure.) Cut a slot out of a paper cup to make a tripod to hold your phone — this also works great as a dolly, too — and just slide the cup along a desk top or the floor. Try furniture sliders to slide your smartphone along carpets or hardwood floors for smooth dolly shots.</p>\r\n\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_266980\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"wp-image-266980 size-full\" src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/filmmaking-selfie-stick.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"556\" height=\"446\" /> ©Bryan Michael Stoller / A selfie stick used as a camera crane for the Smartphone. High and low shots. (The model in this shot is Honey Bear.)[/caption]\r\n\r\nIf you want professional-looking dolly shots, check out <a href=\"//www.dynoequipment.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Dyno Trek</a>. It’s a miniature, motorized dolly system (also called a <em>slider system</em>) built just for smartphones. It comes with tracks that magnetically hook together for flawless, smooth movement. You can dolly in and out and side to side, or turn the track vertically and get dolly-up and dolly-down shots.\r\n\r\nYou can program the speed of the dolly and even set it up to move in sync with your smartphone for time-lapse shots or stop-motion animation. The kit is lightweight and portable and comes in a sturdy carry case.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you have an older smartphone that you put away after you bought the latest and greatest upgrade, it may be time to dust it off. Even though cellular service isn’t activated on your old phone, all its camera functions should be working fine. It’s really an iPod without cellular service. But you still have Wi-Fi!</p>\r\nThis old smartphone can be used as your action backup camera (make sure it’s not a big deal if this extra phone gets damaged or destroyed). Place it in the middle of a quiet neighborhood street and have your actor in a car drive over and past the camera. Just make sure he knows to keep the smartphone between the tires! Secure this “B” action camera on the outside of your car for some dramatic driving shots.\r\n\r\nYou can even find a car suction cup mounting device for your smartphone on Amazon — or, just use lots of masking tape on the phone to secure it. (I recommend tying the phone down securely — just in case. The wind could catch it and send it flying!)\r\n\r\nThrow the phone in the air to a friend to simulate the POV of a ball being tossed back and forth. I recommend doing this on the grass in case one of you misses a catch.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab8\" >Use several smartphones to capture your movie</h2>\r\nPretty much everyone on your crew (even if there’s just two of you) has a smartphone, so any one of these could be used as a second or third camera on your shoot. If you have two actors talking, you can save time by having one smartphone on each actor, instead of using one camera to shoot each actor separately. You can also use an extra smartphone for your wide shots, and another for close-ups (just don’t get the phones used for close-ups in the wide shot!)\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Apple’s latest iPhones feature a triple-camera system that allows users to shoot multiple different-size shots at the same time with just one smartphone camera. Apple's iPhones have three different lenses: a telephoto lens, a wide lens, and an ultra-wide lens.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Using a revolutionary app developed by <a href=\"//www.filmicpro.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Filmic Pro</a>, each lens can record its own file — thus creating three different-sized shots at one time. It’s like three cameras rolled into one smartphone. It’s also invaluable for documentaries and spur-of-the-moment events.</p>\r\nAnother ingenious advancement with the Filmic Pro app, is the ability to use the iPhone to shoot an interview in which both the interviewer and the interviewee are filmed at the same time. The app records footage from both the front and back camera at the same time and creates two separate digital files. So, you don’t have to have two separate cameras to shoot your interview! This unique technology is absolutely a game-changer for the independent filmmaker shooting with an iPhone and the Filmic Pro app!\r\n<h2 id=\"tab9\" >Great sound on your smartphone, too!</h2>\r\nNot only can your smartphone shoot great, broadcast-quality digital images, but it also gives you pristine digital sound recording. To get the best of this, plug in a professional directional microphone. You don’t want to use your built-in smartphone microphone because it only picks up good sound close to the phone, or ambient sound from all around your environment. Some wireless sound options can record sound directly into your smartphone without the hassle of tripping over wires. <a href=\"//www.rode.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Røde</a> makes the Wireless GO, which is perfect as a wireless, compact microphone for your smartphone shoot.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab10\" >Your Smartphone Is an Entire Production Studio</h2>\r\nYour smartphone gives you a camera to shoot your movie, and it can give you great sound. But that’s not all. You pretty much have an entire production studio in your pocket! You can even write your screenplay on your smartphone with the <a href=\"//store.finaldraft.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Final Draft</a> app.\r\n\r\nStoryboard on your phone with storyboard apps like <a href=\"//www.afternow.io/tag/blocker/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Blocker by AfterNow</a> (an absolutely amazing 3D app) and <a href=\"//apps.apple.com/us/app/storyboard-animator/id1326518944\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Storyboard Animator</a> for free. You can create a shot list on your phone with an app called Shotlist – Movie Shoot Planning<em>.</em>\r\n\r\nYou can also download stock footage and sound effects right to your phone. In post-production, edit your entire movie on smartphone apps like the free iPhone version of iMovie or myriad Android editing apps. And, when you’ve completed your movie, use your phone to upload it directly to YouTube or Vimeo!","description":"Today’s smartphones are so sophisticated, and the technology so advanced, you can shoot a professional looking short movie, or even a full-length feature on your smartphone. Your phone probably shoots 4K broadcast quality images — something that many older expensive video cameras can’t even do.\r\n\r\nSome of the advantages to shooting with your smartphone include:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>You just point and shoot.</li>\r\n \t<li>You don’t have to fuss with bulky movie lenses.</li>\r\n \t<li>No manual F or T stops to deal with.</li>\r\n \t<li>No depth of field or focus headaches.</li>\r\n \t<li>No exposure issues.</li>\r\n \t<li>No need to lug around a heavy, bulky camera.</li>\r\n \t<li>Your phone is always with you — ready to capture that million-to-one encounter or shoot that on-the-spot great idea.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Shooting in landscape mode</h2>\r\nThe first thing you have to remember is you’re shooting a movie, not a photo, not a selfie, and not something you’re just going to post to Facebook or Instagram. So, you now have to remember to turn your smartphone sideways. This is called <em>landscape mode</em>.\r\n\r\nThe normal way you’re use to holding your phone is <em>profile mode</em>. Note that landscape mode resembles the dimensions of your 16x9 TV. Note also that when you watch YouTube videos or feature films on your smartphone, you turn it sideways for the image to fill the whole screen. If you don’t shoot your movie in landscape mode, you’ll have black bars on each side of the image, and your movie will not fill the entire screen. So, landscape, don’t profile!\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Always make sure your smartphone is charged and ready to go. Shooting video on your phone drains the battery faster than talking or listening to music on your phone.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Take off with airplane mode</h2>\r\nYou’re moving in for the perfect shot, the actors embrace, and you’re capturing a priceless moment — <em>and</em> then your perfect shot is interrupted by your <em>phone ringing</em> — your camera is ringing<em>! “Cut! Hello? Hi mom, I’m busy, shooting my movie.”</em> It’s happened to me.\r\n\r\nGo into your phone settings and put your phone on <em>airplane mode</em>. All the functions of your phone will work except your shoot won’t be interrupted by another phone call or annoying text. You want your smartphone to be a 100-percent dedicated camera for your shoot, not a communications device.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Steady as she goes</h2>\r\nYour smartphone is already a sophisticated movie camera. Most smartphones have a built-in stabilizer to ensure steadier shots. Often, you can handhold your smartphone for many of your shots, especially moving or following shots.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Steady as a rock</h2>\r\nFor steady tripod shots, you can get special adapters for your phone that have a tripod mount, so you can attach the phone to a tripod for rock-solid shots or for smooth panning ones. You’ll find plenty of smartphone tripod adapters on Amazon for as low as $5.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >Shooting format and resolution</h2>\r\nBefore you start shooting with your smartphone, you need to go into your camera video settings. You will have a choice of resolution quality. Usually the options are 720, 1080 (2K) and 4K. I’m sure that 6K and up will soon be available for your phone. I recommend shooting on 720 or 2K because the quality is awesome and both resolutions are broadcast quality.\r\n\r\nIf you shoot in 4K, you will very quickly eat up a lot of storage space on your phone. In the video settings, you should also have the choice of shooting at 30 frames per second or 24 frames per second. Choose 24fps for a more film-like look. A great smartphone app called Filmic Pro will add even more professional shooting options to your already advanced smartphone.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab6\" >Saving your movie files</h2>\r\nDepending on your smartphone’s built-in storage capacity — or if your smartphone has a removable SD memory card — you will have to constantly offload (transfer) your shots to an external hard drive or your computer. If you don’t, your phone’s memory will soon fill up and you will have no more room to shoot anything.\r\n\r\nSome smartphones connect to your computer via USB and allow you to download your footage this way. An iPhone allows you to wirelessly download your footage from your phone using Airdrop. This allows you to easily and effortlessly download your footage, which then you can erase (trash) off your phone and continue shooting.\r\n\r\nThere’s also a great (free) app called Simple Transfer, which is absolutely one of my favorite apps. It lets you view all your phone’s photos and movies on your computer desktop, and you can choose which shots you want to download from your phone to your computer in one batch — so you don’t have to transfer one shot at a time. I absolutely love this app so much it’s on my phone’s main home screen.\r\n\r\nMany smartphones are now synced up with the cloud, so, chances are, your smartphone footage will automatically download to your computer if both are talking to the cloud.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">I can’t emphasize this warning enough. If your phone is talking to the cloud and your footage is automatically downloaded to your computer, be absolutely sure to move those shots (digital video files) to a separate folder <em>outside your camera roll</em>. If you don’t, they will all get erased in the cloud when you erase them off your phone. They will also get erased off your computer and any other device that also talks to the cloud.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">This is one major flaw of syncing with the cloud — most people think they can trash stuff on their phone to free up memory because it was transferred to their computer and lives in the cloud, but in reality, your computer is talking to the cloud and unless you transfer it out of your camera roll into a folder on your desktop, you’ll lose everything.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">All your movie files will be saved to your camera roll in your phone and filed under Videos. But move your movie shots out of the camera roll into a special folder that isn’t mirroring your camera roll in the cloud.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab7\" >Miniature camera equipment</h2>\r\nThe great thing about your movie camera being your smartphone is that everything is light and portable. Your phone is also small enough to mount on a car dashboard or adhere to the car window (on the inside) for great single shots of your driver and passenger or a nice two shot from inside the windshield. Or, turn your phone around so it’s looking out your windshield for a nice POV (point-of-view) shot of the road.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Use a selfie-stick as your camera crane for high shots or low to the ground shots. (See the following figure.) Cut a slot out of a paper cup to make a tripod to hold your phone — this also works great as a dolly, too — and just slide the cup along a desk top or the floor. Try furniture sliders to slide your smartphone along carpets or hardwood floors for smooth dolly shots.</p>\r\n\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_266980\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"wp-image-266980 size-full\" src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/filmmaking-selfie-stick.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"556\" height=\"446\" /> ©Bryan Michael Stoller / A selfie stick used as a camera crane for the Smartphone. High and low shots. (The model in this shot is Honey Bear.)[/caption]\r\n\r\nIf you want professional-looking dolly shots, check out <a href=\"//www.dynoequipment.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Dyno Trek</a>. It’s a miniature, motorized dolly system (also called a <em>slider system</em>) built just for smartphones. It comes with tracks that magnetically hook together for flawless, smooth movement. You can dolly in and out and side to side, or turn the track vertically and get dolly-up and dolly-down shots.\r\n\r\nYou can program the speed of the dolly and even set it up to move in sync with your smartphone for time-lapse shots or stop-motion animation. The kit is lightweight and portable and comes in a sturdy carry case.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you have an older smartphone that you put away after you bought the latest and greatest upgrade, it may be time to dust it off. Even though cellular service isn’t activated on your old phone, all its camera functions should be working fine. It’s really an iPod without cellular service. But you still have Wi-Fi!</p>\r\nThis old smartphone can be used as your action backup camera (make sure it’s not a big deal if this extra phone gets damaged or destroyed). Place it in the middle of a quiet neighborhood street and have your actor in a car drive over and past the camera. Just make sure he knows to keep the smartphone between the tires! Secure this “B” action camera on the outside of your car for some dramatic driving shots.\r\n\r\nYou can even find a car suction cup mounting device for your smartphone on Amazon — or, just use lots of masking tape on the phone to secure it. (I recommend tying the phone down securely — just in case. The wind could catch it and send it flying!)\r\n\r\nThrow the phone in the air to a friend to simulate the POV of a ball being tossed back and forth. I recommend doing this on the grass in case one of you misses a catch.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab8\" >Use several smartphones to capture your movie</h2>\r\nPretty much everyone on your crew (even if there’s just two of you) has a smartphone, so any one of these could be used as a second or third camera on your shoot. If you have two actors talking, you can save time by having one smartphone on each actor, instead of using one camera to shoot each actor separately. You can also use an extra smartphone for your wide shots, and another for close-ups (just don’t get the phones used for close-ups in the wide shot!)\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Apple’s latest iPhones feature a triple-camera system that allows users to shoot multiple different-size shots at the same time with just one smartphone camera. Apple's iPhones have three different lenses: a telephoto lens, a wide lens, and an ultra-wide lens.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Using a revolutionary app developed by <a href=\"//www.filmicpro.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Filmic Pro</a>, each lens can record its own file — thus creating three different-sized shots at one time. It’s like three cameras rolled into one smartphone. It’s also invaluable for documentaries and spur-of-the-moment events.</p>\r\nAnother ingenious advancement with the Filmic Pro app, is the ability to use the iPhone to shoot an interview in which both the interviewer and the interviewee are filmed at the same time. The app records footage from both the front and back camera at the same time and creates two separate digital files. So, you don’t have to have two separate cameras to shoot your interview! This unique technology is absolutely a game-changer for the independent filmmaker shooting with an iPhone and the Filmic Pro app!\r\n<h2 id=\"tab9\" >Great sound on your smartphone, too!</h2>\r\nNot only can your smartphone shoot great, broadcast-quality digital images, but it also gives you pristine digital sound recording. To get the best of this, plug in a professional directional microphone. You don’t want to use your built-in smartphone microphone because it only picks up good sound close to the phone, or ambient sound from all around your environment. Some wireless sound options can record sound directly into your smartphone without the hassle of tripping over wires. <a href=\"//www.rode.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Røde</a> makes the Wireless GO, which is perfect as a wireless, compact microphone for your smartphone shoot.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab10\" >Your Smartphone Is an Entire Production Studio</h2>\r\nYour smartphone gives you a camera to shoot your movie, and it can give you great sound. But that’s not all. You pretty much have an entire production studio in your pocket! You can even write your screenplay on your smartphone with the <a href=\"//store.finaldraft.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Final Draft</a> app.\r\n\r\nStoryboard on your phone with storyboard apps like <a href=\"//www.afternow.io/tag/blocker/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Blocker by AfterNow</a> (an absolutely amazing 3D app) and <a href=\"//apps.apple.com/us/app/storyboard-animator/id1326518944\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Storyboard Animator</a> for free. You can create a shot list on your phone with an app called Shotlist – Movie Shoot Planning<em>.</em>\r\n\r\nYou can also download stock footage and sound effects right to your phone. In post-production, edit your entire movie on smartphone apps like the free iPhone version of iMovie or myriad Android editing apps. And, when you’ve completed your movie, use your phone to upload it directly to YouTube or Vimeo!","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10360,"name":"Bryan Michael Stoller","slug":"bryan-michael-stoller","description":" <p><b>Bryan Michael Stoller</b> is an award&#45;winning filmmaker who has produced, written, and directed more than 100 productions from music videos and commercials to TV shows and feature films. His movie <i>First Dog</i> had nearly a half&#45;million Redbox rentals, and he has directed stars such as Edward Asner, Barbra Streisand, James Earl Jones, Drew Barrymore, and Dan Aykroyd. Bryan&#39;s movies have amassed close to eighteen&#45;million views on video on demand platforms. Learn more at www.BryanMichaelStoller.com. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10360"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33749,"title":"Film","slug":"film","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33749"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Shooting in landscape mode","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Take off with airplane mode","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Steady as she goes","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Steady as a rock","target":"#tab4"},{"label":"Shooting format and resolution","target":"#tab5"},{"label":"Saving your movie files","target":"#tab6"},{"label":"Miniature camera equipment","target":"#tab7"},{"label":"Use several smartphones to capture your movie","target":"#tab8"},{"label":"Great sound on your smartphone, too!","target":"#tab9"},{"label":"Your Smartphone Is an Entire Production Studio","target":"#tab10"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":266974,"title":"Secrets to Entering and Winning Film Festivals","slug":"secrets-to-entering-and-winning-film-festivals","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266974"}},{"articleId":266967,"title":"Filmmaking and Makeup Special Effects","slug":"filmmaking-and-makeup-special-effects","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266967"}},{"articleId":266962,"title":"The Process and Roles in Film Editing","slug":"editing-your-movie-putting-one-frame-in-front-of-the-other","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266962"}},{"articleId":266956,"title":"Film Editing on Your Computer","slug":"film-editing-on-your-computer","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266956"}},{"articleId":209011,"title":"Filmmaking For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"filmmaking-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209011"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":284321,"title":"Bollywood For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"bollywood-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284321"}},{"articleId":266974,"title":"Secrets to Entering and Winning Film Festivals","slug":"secrets-to-entering-and-winning-film-festivals","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266974"}},{"articleId":266967,"title":"Filmmaking and Makeup Special Effects","slug":"filmmaking-and-makeup-special-effects","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266967"}},{"articleId":266962,"title":"The Process and Roles in Film Editing","slug":"editing-your-movie-putting-one-frame-in-front-of-the-other","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266962"}},{"articleId":266956,"title":"Film Editing on Your Computer","slug":"film-editing-on-your-computer","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266956"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282198,"slug":"filmmaking-for-dummies-3rd-edition","isbn":"9781119617853","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119617855/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119617855/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119617855-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119617855/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119617855/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/filmmaking-for-dummies-3rd-edition-cover-9781119617853-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Filmmaking For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"10360\">Bryan Michael Stoller</b></b> is an award&#45;winning filmmaker who has produced, written, and directed more than 100 productions from music videos and commercials to TV shows and feature films. His movie <i>First Dog</i> had nearly a half&#45;million Redbox rentals, and he has directed stars such as Edward Asner, Barbra Streisand, James Earl Jones, Drew Barrymore, and Dan Aykroyd. Bryan&#39;s movies have amassed close to eighteen&#45;million views on video on demand platforms. Learn more at www.BryanMichaelStoller.com.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":10360,"name":"Bryan Michael Stoller","slug":"bryan-michael-stoller","description":" <p><b>Bryan Michael Stoller</b> is an award&#45;winning filmmaker who has produced, written, and directed more than 100 productions from music videos and commercials to TV shows and feature films. His movie <i>First Dog</i> had nearly a half&#45;million Redbox rentals, and he has directed stars such as Edward Asner, Barbra Streisand, James Earl Jones, Drew Barrymore, and Dan Aykroyd. Bryan&#39;s movies have amassed close to eighteen&#45;million views on video on demand platforms. Learn more at www.BryanMichaelStoller.com. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10360"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;performing-arts&quot;,&quot;film&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119617853&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-65049bdf0ef60\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;performing-arts&quot;,&quot;film&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119617853&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-65049bdf0f46e\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-09-15T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":266979},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-03-16T16:16:28+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-08-03T16:42:55+00:00","timestamp":"2024-08-03T18:01:04+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Performing Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747"},"slug":"performing-arts","categoryId":33747}],"title":"Guide to Buying Tickets for a Broadway Show","strippedTitle":"guide to buying tickets for a broadway show","slug":"guide-to-buying-broadway-show-tickets","canonicalUrl":"","查找发动机提高":{"metaDescription":"This article has several helpful tips for landing Broadway show tickets, including finding tickets on short notice and for less money.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"<figure style=\"margin: 0;\"><figcaption style=\"margin-bottom: 10px;\">Listen to the article:</figcaption><audio src=\"/wp-content/uploads/guide-buying-theatre-tickets-broadway-show.mp3\" controls=\"controls\"><a href=\"/wp-content/uploads/guide-buying-theatre-tickets-broadway-show.mp3\"><span data-mce-type=\"bookmark\" style=\"display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;\" class=\"mce_SELRES_start\"></span>Download audio</a></audio></figure>\r\nIf your number-one priority is seeing your favorite Broadway show, in the best seats, at a specific time, with no hassle, then the best option is to plan ahead. That means buying your tickets months in advance and planning to pay significant, although not astronomical, prices.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_297884\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-297884\" src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tkts-ticket-booth-new-york-city-1.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"421\" /> ©saaton / Shutterstock<br />The TKTS ticket booth location at Times Square in New York City[/caption]\r\n\r\nThe good news is that popular musicals release tickets six to eight months in advance. That allows patrons to plan an entire Broadway trip (like booking plane tickets, securing vacation time, and getting hotel rooms) and experiences (like seeing other tourist attractions) well beforehand.\r\n\r\nYou can purchase tickets through the production’s website directly or by visiting the theatre box office. Buying directly from the box office is ideal because it allows you to make sure you’re paying the actual ticket price listed versus a higher price through processing fees or additional charges from a ticketing agency. And if you don’t live in New York City, surely you know <em>someone</em> who does, right? Ask them to go to the box office for you and snag those tickets!\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Taking a chance at a TKTS booth</h2>\r\nSometimes you can’t purchase tickets in advance. If you’re not set on a specific show, a wonderful and definitely cheaper option is to visit a TKTS ticket booth.\r\n\r\nTKTS ticketing booths sell <em>day of</em> tickets anywhere from 25 to 50 percent off the regular ticket price. That adds up to substantial savings for you and potentially fuller audiences for struggling or less popular shows.\r\n\r\nA show’s producer(s) makes these tickets available to TKTS because the show isn’t sold out. On the other hand, shows that do sell out often aren’t available on TKTS. You can count on popular shows being available, but not the hottest ones.\r\n\r\nTKTS has four locations in New York City, with the most well-known being in Times Square (see photo above). London has one in Leicester Square for West End shows. These booths traditionally open four to six hours before shows begin and are run by the Theatre Development Fund in New York City and the Society of London Theatre in the West End.\r\n<div class=\"article-tips tip\">\r\n\r\nIf you live near New York City or visit regularly, then the Theatre Development Fund (TDF) is fabulous to join. If you’re eligible, it’s only $40 a year, and you get lots and lots of tickets to Broadway, Off-Broadway, and Off-Off Broadway shows offered at discounted prices. Check out <a href=\"//www.tdf.org/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">www.tdf.org</a>.\r\n\r\nAnd if you’re going to be spending time in the U.K., check out <a href=\"//solt.co.uk/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">//solt.co.uk/</a> to buy Theatre Tokens, which can be used to get tickets to more than 260 venues in the U.K. — they have no expiration date!\r\n\r\n</div>\r\nI have so many fond memories of going into New York City with my dad on the weekends and lining up on 47th Street. One of us would run ahead and see what shows were on the board. If there was one we really wanted to see, we’d be thrilled but so anxious waiting in that long line because the available tickets for the show we wanted to see could be gone by the time we finally got to the booth. Therefore, then, as well as now, it’s always important to have a second choice.\r\n\r\nNowadays, you can download the TKTS app, which is extremely helpful, especially on the days leading up to your theatre adventure. Why? Because you can check every day to see the shows that are available so you can get a sense in advance of what you want to see.\r\n\r\nAnd, with the TKTS app, you can see if your favorite show is listed every day and, if not, what day is the most likely for your show to be available. Getting discounted tickets to the most popular shows on the weekend is more difficult. Weekday nights are a better time to visit TKTS.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Playing the lottery and winning big</h2>\r\nAnother option is to explore whether or not your favorite show has any lottery options. <em>Lottery sales</em> on the day of a show can include tickets sold in the front two rows of a theatre, reduced-price tickets for students with a valid student ID, or cancellation lines for those who purchased seats but unexpectedly have to cancel. Whereas TKTS is the place to get tickets to shows that don’t sell out, lotteries are the best bet for shows that almost always sell out.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Go to the show’s website to find out what their lottery process is before you trudge to the theatre. Lotteries began during <em>Rent</em> and the sight of people camped out hours before the show added to the show’s reputation as a mega-hit. And during <em>Hamilton</em>’s lottery, Lin-Manuel Miranda and other cast members would often put on a live show on the sidewalk to entertain those waiting to see if they’d win. Search for those shows on YouTube — they’re so fun.</p>\r\nYou don’t have to be special to win the lottery. It’s a number’s game, so if you have time on your hands, enter lotteries often. The more you do it, the more chance you have of winning those coveted tickets. And just because you won this week doesn’t mean they won’t let you enter next week. If you’re obsessed with a show, lotteries are a great way to see your obsession multiple times without declaring bankruptcy.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Try out TodayTix</h2>\r\nA relatively new and wonderful way to tickets is through <a href=\"//www.TodayTix.com\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">TodayTix.com</a>, which offers nicely priced tickets for same day, same week, or advance sales of Broadway shows (and many other events). They also have same day lotteries <em>and</em> rush seats available. To enter, you usually just have to post something on social media announcing that you’ve entered the lottery.\r\n\r\nTodayTix has expanded from New York City to around the world so download the app onto your phone for when you’re travelling and want to know what performances are happening in the city you’re visiting.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Buying from a reseller: When ya just gotta see it</h2>\r\nSometimes, you find yourself with little to no options other than getting out your credit card and paying whatever it takes. When you find yourself in that situation, going through a ticket broker or reseller is your only avenue.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">One of the risks associated with this option is the possibility of using a reseller who sells you fake tickets or tickets at exorbitant prices (such unsavory types were previously known as <em>scalpers)</em>. Just like with sporting events, make sure you realize that any tickets you acquire that aren’t from the theatre or an approved vendor can be a dicey proposition. That’s why you should carefully vet any ticket agency you eventually use.</p>\r\nGoing through a reseller or secondary ticketing agency includes paying extremely high ticket prices, but it also helps ensure that you can get what you pay for: the best tickets, on the best day, in the best location.\r\n\r\nBefore you buy these tickets, feel free to vet whether they’re legitimate by posting on a theatre message board. They are full of major theatre fans who can tell you if you’re being scammed. I recommend <a href=\"//www.AllThatChat.com\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">AllThatChat.com</a> for quick responses from knowledgeable theatre folk.","description":"<figure style=\"margin: 0;\"><figcaption style=\"margin-bottom: 10px;\">Listen to the article:</figcaption><audio src=\"/wp-content/uploads/guide-buying-theatre-tickets-broadway-show.mp3\" controls=\"controls\"><a href=\"/wp-content/uploads/guide-buying-theatre-tickets-broadway-show.mp3\"><span data-mce-type=\"bookmark\" style=\"display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;\" class=\"mce_SELRES_start\"></span>Download audio</a></audio></figure>\r\nIf your number-one priority is seeing your favorite Broadway show, in the best seats, at a specific time, with no hassle, then the best option is to plan ahead. That means buying your tickets months in advance and planning to pay significant, although not astronomical, prices.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_297884\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-297884\" src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tkts-ticket-booth-new-york-city-1.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"421\" /> ©saaton / Shutterstock<br />The TKTS ticket booth location at Times Square in New York City[/caption]\r\n\r\nThe good news is that popular musicals release tickets six to eight months in advance. That allows patrons to plan an entire Broadway trip (like booking plane tickets, securing vacation time, and getting hotel rooms) and experiences (like seeing other tourist attractions) well beforehand.\r\n\r\nYou can purchase tickets through the production’s website directly or by visiting the theatre box office. Buying directly from the box office is ideal because it allows you to make sure you’re paying the actual ticket price listed versus a higher price through processing fees or additional charges from a ticketing agency. And if you don’t live in New York City, surely you know <em>someone</em> who does, right? Ask them to go to the box office for you and snag those tickets!\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Taking a chance at a TKTS booth</h2>\r\nSometimes you can’t purchase tickets in advance. If you’re not set on a specific show, a wonderful and definitely cheaper option is to visit a TKTS ticket booth.\r\n\r\nTKTS ticketing booths sell <em>day of</em> tickets anywhere from 25 to 50 percent off the regular ticket price. That adds up to substantial savings for you and potentially fuller audiences for struggling or less popular shows.\r\n\r\nA show’s producer(s) makes these tickets available to TKTS because the show isn’t sold out. On the other hand, shows that do sell out often aren’t available on TKTS. You can count on popular shows being available, but not the hottest ones.\r\n\r\nTKTS has four locations in New York City, with the most well-known being in Times Square (see photo above). London has one in Leicester Square for West End shows. These booths traditionally open four to six hours before shows begin and are run by the Theatre Development Fund in New York City and the Society of London Theatre in the West End.\r\n<div class=\"article-tips tip\">\r\n\r\nIf you live near New York City or visit regularly, then the Theatre Development Fund (TDF) is fabulous to join. If you’re eligible, it’s only $40 a year, and you get lots and lots of tickets to Broadway, Off-Broadway, and Off-Off Broadway shows offered at discounted prices. Check out <a href=\"//www.tdf.org/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">www.tdf.org</a>.\r\n\r\nAnd if you’re going to be spending time in the U.K., check out <a href=\"//solt.co.uk/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">//solt.co.uk/</a> to buy Theatre Tokens, which can be used to get tickets to more than 260 venues in the U.K. — they have no expiration date!\r\n\r\n</div>\r\nI have so many fond memories of going into New York City with my dad on the weekends and lining up on 47th Street. One of us would run ahead and see what shows were on the board. If there was one we really wanted to see, we’d be thrilled but so anxious waiting in that long line because the available tickets for the show we wanted to see could be gone by the time we finally got to the booth. Therefore, then, as well as now, it’s always important to have a second choice.\r\n\r\nNowadays, you can download the TKTS app, which is extremely helpful, especially on the days leading up to your theatre adventure. Why? Because you can check every day to see the shows that are available so you can get a sense in advance of what you want to see.\r\n\r\nAnd, with the TKTS app, you can see if your favorite show is listed every day and, if not, what day is the most likely for your show to be available. Getting discounted tickets to the most popular shows on the weekend is more difficult. Weekday nights are a better time to visit TKTS.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Playing the lottery and winning big</h2>\r\nAnother option is to explore whether or not your favorite show has any lottery options. <em>Lottery sales</em> on the day of a show can include tickets sold in the front two rows of a theatre, reduced-price tickets for students with a valid student ID, or cancellation lines for those who purchased seats but unexpectedly have to cancel. Whereas TKTS is the place to get tickets to shows that don’t sell out, lotteries are the best bet for shows that almost always sell out.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Go to the show’s website to find out what their lottery process is before you trudge to the theatre. Lotteries began during <em>Rent</em> and the sight of people camped out hours before the show added to the show’s reputation as a mega-hit. And during <em>Hamilton</em>’s lottery, Lin-Manuel Miranda and other cast members would often put on a live show on the sidewalk to entertain those waiting to see if they’d win. Search for those shows on YouTube — they’re so fun.</p>\r\nYou don’t have to be special to win the lottery. It’s a number’s game, so if you have time on your hands, enter lotteries often. The more you do it, the more chance you have of winning those coveted tickets. And just because you won this week doesn’t mean they won’t let you enter next week. If you’re obsessed with a show, lotteries are a great way to see your obsession multiple times without declaring bankruptcy.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Try out TodayTix</h2>\r\nA relatively new and wonderful way to tickets is through <a href=\"//www.TodayTix.com\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">TodayTix.com</a>, which offers nicely priced tickets for same day, same week, or advance sales of Broadway shows (and many other events). They also have same day lotteries <em>and</em> rush seats available. To enter, you usually just have to post something on social media announcing that you’ve entered the lottery.\r\n\r\nTodayTix has expanded from New York City to around the world so download the app onto your phone for when you’re travelling and want to know what performances are happening in the city you’re visiting.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Buying from a reseller: When ya just gotta see it</h2>\r\nSometimes, you find yourself with little to no options other than getting out your credit card and paying whatever it takes. When you find yourself in that situation, going through a ticket broker or reseller is your only avenue.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">One of the risks associated with this option is the possibility of using a reseller who sells you fake tickets or tickets at exorbitant prices (such unsavory types were previously known as <em>scalpers)</em>. Just like with sporting events, make sure you realize that any tickets you acquire that aren’t from the theatre or an approved vendor can be a dicey proposition. That’s why you should carefully vet any ticket agency you eventually use.</p>\r\nGoing through a reseller or secondary ticketing agency includes paying extremely high ticket prices, but it also helps ensure that you can get what you pay for: the best tickets, on the best day, in the best location.\r\n\r\nBefore you buy these tickets, feel free to vet whether they’re legitimate by posting on a theatre message board. They are full of major theatre fans who can tell you if you’re being scammed. I recommend <a href=\"//www.AllThatChat.com\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">AllThatChat.com</a> for quick responses from knowledgeable theatre folk.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":35250,"name":"Seth Rudetsky","slug":"seth-rudetsky","description":" <p><b>Seth Rudetsky </b>is the afternoon host of “On Broadway” on SIRIUSXM<sup>®</sup>. Seth has played piano and/or conducted more than a dozen Broadway shows, including <i>Les Misérables, The Phantom of the Opera</i>, and <i>Grease</i>. He co-wrote and starred on Broadway in the <i>New York Times</i> Critics pick musical <I>DISASTER!</I> During the COVID lockdown, he and his husband James Wesley raised more than $1,000,000 for the Actors Fund with their online show <i>Stars In The House</i>. For more info go to SethRudetsky.com. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35250"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33747,"title":"Performing Arts","slug":"performing-arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Taking a chance at a TKTS booth","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Playing the lottery and winning big","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Try out TodayTix","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Buying from a reseller: When ya just gotta see it","target":"#tab4"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":297890,"title":"How to Audition for a Musical Theatre Production","slug":"how-to-audition-for-a-musical-theatre-production","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297890"}},{"articleId":297863,"title":"What Was the Golden Age of Broadway?","slug":"what-was-the-golden-age-of-broadway","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297863"}},{"articleId":297205,"title":"Musical Theatre For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"musical-theatre-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","theater"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297205"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":297890,"title":"How to Audition for a Musical Theatre Production","slug":"how-to-audition-for-a-musical-theatre-production","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297890"}},{"articleId":297863,"title":"What Was the Golden Age of Broadway?","slug":"what-was-the-golden-age-of-broadway","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297863"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":297053,"slug":"musical-theatre-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119889502","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","theater"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119889502/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119889502/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119889502-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119889502/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119889502/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/musical-theatre-for-dummies-cover-1119889502-206x255.jpg","width":206,"height":255},"title":"Musical Theatre For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"35250\">Seth Rudetsky</b> </b>is the afternoon host of “On Broadway” on SIRIUSXM<sup>®</sup>. Seth has played piano and/or conducted more than a dozen Broadway shows, including <i>Les Misérables, The Phantom of the Opera</i>, and <i>Grease</i>. He co-wrote and starred on Broadway in the <i>New York Times</i> Critics pick musical <I>DISASTER!</I> During the COVID lockdown, he and his husband James Wesley raised more than $1,000,000 for the Actors Fund with their online show <i>Stars In The House</i>. For more info go to SethRudetsky.com.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":35250,"name":"Seth Rudetsky","slug":"seth-rudetsky","description":" <p><b>Seth Rudetsky </b>is the afternoon host of “On Broadway” on SIRIUSXM<sup>®</sup>. Seth has played piano and/or conducted more than a dozen Broadway shows, including <i>Les Misérables, The Phantom of the Opera</i>, and <i>Grease</i>. He co-wrote and starred on Broadway in the <i>New York Times</i> Critics pick musical <I>DISASTER!</I> During the COVID lockdown, he and his husband James Wesley raised more than $1,000,000 for the Actors Fund with their online show <i>Stars In The House</i>. For more info go to SethRudetsky.com. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35250"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;performing-arts&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119889502&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64cbeb6010be3\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;performing-arts&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119889502&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64cbeb6011141\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Two years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-03-16T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":297881},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-03-16T19:45:02+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-08-03T16:42:28+00:00","timestamp":"2024-08-03T18:01:04+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Performing Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747"},"slug":"performing-arts","categoryId":33747}],"title":"How to Audition for a Musical Theatre Production","strippedTitle":"how to audition for a musical theatre production","slug":"how-to-audition-for-a-musical-theatre-production","canonicalUrl":"","查找发动机提高":{"metaDescription":"Learn what to expect at a musical theatre audition and what you should do to give yourself the best possible chance for a callback.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"<figure style=\"margin: 0;\"><figcaption style=\"margin-bottom: 10px;\">Listen to the article:</figcaption><audio src=\"/wp-content/uploads/how-to-audition-musical-theatre-production.mp3\" controls=\"controls\"><a href=\"/wp-content/uploads/how-to-audition-musical-theatre-production.mp3\">Download audio</a></audio></figure>\r\nHave you thought about being in a musical? Good! You may, therefore, wonder whether being in a musical is easy. The answer is <em>yes!</em> You may also wonder whether being in a musical is hard. The answer is also <em>yes!</em>\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_297889\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-297889\" src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/auditioning-for-show-adobeStock_391235125.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"419\" /> ©GuruXOX / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n\r\nAs contradictory as that sounds, it really is both. Certain things are required for performing in a musical that are intuitive to many people and don’t require training.\r\n\r\nHowever, other things are difficult to do without proper training. And no matter what, the more training you have, the more musicals you’ll be cast in. In this article, I'm covering auditioning, but for more about the skills you need for musicals, check out my book <em><a href=\"//www.coursofppt.com/book/academics-the-arts/performing-arts/theater/musical-theatre-for-dummies-297053/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Musical Theatre For Dummies</a></em>.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Parts of the audition process</h2>\r\nLots of shows hold an initial audition and then callbacks, and then, hopefully, you get the role. But that’s not often the case. There can also be a dance call after the first audition, or another kind of call, like <em>Meet Me In St. Louis,</em> which had an ice-skating audition. (Yes, the Broadway show had an ice rink for Act Two!)\r\n\r\nHere are some of the common types of auditions:\r\n<h3><strong>Initial audition</strong></h3>\r\nThis is the first time you’re auditioning for the show. The audition requirement might be to sing something from the show, something in the style of the show, or perhaps just sing something that shows your abilities.\r\n\r\nIf a whole bunch of people are being seen, perhaps the casting office is just asking for 16 <em>bars</em> of music (16 measures is about 1 minute).\r\n\r\nThe creative team might be at this audition or, perhaps, just the casting director or casting associates are. It’s very rare that anyone is offered the job after this audition <em>unless</em> it’s an audition for a role in a show that’s running and they’re bringing in people whom they know are right for the role. That usually means the creative team is at the audition and they decide that day who gets the gig.\r\n<h3><strong>Callbacks</strong></h3>\r\nThis is the audition <em>after</em> the first audition. Often there’s more than one callback. And sometimes there are lots (like more than five!). Multiple callbacks happen for various reasons:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Sometimes you’re given additional material to learn.</li>\r\n \t<li>Sometimes you’re given an acting note to work on and come back.</li>\r\n \t<li>Often, as they whittle down the final candidates for the role, more and more powers-that-be are brought in to watch the audition — like the producers, the writers, and so on.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h3><strong>Dance calls</strong></h3>\r\nFor ensemble dance roles, auditions usually begin with a dance call. You audition in a group by learning a dance taught by the choreographer or an associate. After that, they usually call out the names of those whom they want to stay and show more. Everyone else knows to leave. Sometimes you’re asked to stay and sing or sometimes you’re asked to dance a different combination.\r\n\r\nThis is for the ensemble who are labeled as “dancers who sing.” The reverse happens for ensemble members who are “singers who dance.” You come in and sing, and if they like what they hear, you’re asked to come to a dance call.\r\n\r\nThe same audition process happens with roles that have some dancing. You audition with a song (and maybe a scene) and then you may be asked to return and do a dance call specific for that role. Often it’s with a bunch of other people auditioning for that same role!\r\n<h3><strong>Chemistry calls</strong></h3>\r\nSometimes a show holds chemistry calls, in which two people audition together to see if they connect well onstage.\r\n\r\nAs you can see, there’s no set number of auditions one can have for a role.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Peeking inside the audition room</h2>\r\nThough the amount of auditions vary, the majority of them look basically the same. They’re usually held in a rehearsal room at a rehearsal studio. A pianist is present with the people leading the audition sitting behind a table. Sometimes one person is behind the table, but usually a few.\r\n\r\nTypically you’ll see the casting person, director, and music director. The further along the audition, the more people. Depending on the role, final auditions can have many people there to give their approval — 10, 15, 20!\r\n<div class=\"article-tips\">\r\n\r\nIf you have an audition time, you sit in the area outside the rehearsal room with other people who are also waiting to audition. If it’s an <em>open call,</em> meaning anyone can audition, you usually line up and wait — sometimes for long periods of time.\r\n\r\nThe process of waiting can be tedious, but you can chat with the people around you, which is how friendships are formed. Just don’t be the annoying person who can’t take a hint and chats nonstop as a fellow auditioner is trying to prepare, and don’t be the blowhard that keeps talking loudly about their various amazing auditions and upcoming gigs (#Shunned).\r\n\r\n</div>\r\nAfter your name is called, you walk in, make small talk with the people behind the table, and hand the pianist your music. You then sing, make more small talk, and then sometimes you’re asked to sing another song you have with you or perform your own monologue.\r\n\r\nSometimes, you’ll be asked to read something from the show that you received in advance. If it’s not a monologue, you’ll do the scene with a reader. A <em>reader</em> is an actor who’s hired to perform various scenes with everyone auditioning. (By the way, these readers are <em>good</em>. Santino Fontana began as a reader before he won his Tony Award for <em>Tootsie!)</em>\r\n\r\nAfter you’re finished, you’ll usually be thanked, and you’ll find out later whether you got a callback. Sometimes you’ll be asked on the spot if you’re available later for a callback. It’s always a delicious feeling to walk out of an audition room knowing they want to see you again! But try not to smirk <em>too</em> much when you walk by the other peeps auditioning.\r\n\r\nDance auditions are similar in terms of being in a rehearsal studio with a pianist. The studio has walls with mirrors so you can watch yourself as you learn the dance.\r\n<h3>The audition that's not an audition</h3>\r\nThe most frustrating type of audition is one where you don’t get to actually audition. That’s when the powers-that-be <em>type</em> you. This happens during auditions where there are lots and lots of hopefuls.\r\n\r\nThey bring in groups of around 10 to 20 people who stand in a line, and the person in charge of the audition looks at everyone and decides what types look right for the show. Those people who pass the physical test are asked to stay … and everyone else is asked to leave — without ever having auditioned!\r\n\r\nWhen that happens, it means you’ve been <em>typed out.</em> You’ve waited for hours just to have someone look at you and say no … in about 20 seconds. It happened to Priscilla Lopez when she auditioned to be one of the young girls in the original production of <em>Gypsy.</em> But years later, she won a Tony Award, so there!\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Focus on these tips for auditioning</h2>\r\nPreparation is key. Here are some quick tips for auditioning, no matter what level of musical theatre you’re doing:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><strong>Have a few great go-to audition songs.</strong> Have a song (or songs) that shows who <em>you</em> are. It doesn’t have to have incredibly specific lyrics. A general song about happiness or love can be great because you can bring your specific self to it. The way you express the lyric makes you unique. Think about how you would say “I love Paris in the Springtime” and think about how your mom would say it. I bet it’s totally different.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">My point is, if you express the lyrics as you really would in real life, you’ll be special. And always be thinking when you’re singing and when you’re not singing.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>Make sure you’re always thinking and that it shows in your facial expressions. “What good is sitting alone in your room?” (Thought: Here’s a great idea for you to cheer yourself up!) “Come hear the music play!”</li>\r\n \t<li>Avoid going blank-faced between phrases. “What good is sitting alone in your room?” (Blank-faced) “Come hear the music play.”</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">The way you look when you’re thinking or expressing that thought in the air is uniquely you, and <em>that’s</em> what will make you stand out at an audition.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><strong>Know exactly in what key you sing your audition song.</strong> You may sound fantastic on a sustained belted A, but the sheet music you have ends on a C. Change the key! Find the key that fits <em>your</em> voice.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">You can do this if you’re singing an audition song <em>not</em> from the show you’re auditioning for. But if you’re auditioning for a specific part in the show, the music you sing should be in the key of the show. It’s not that common for a theatre (except Broadway) to transpose the key of a song from a show that already exists.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">No matter what, <em>always</em> run your audition song with a pianist in advance. I’ve played piano at so many auditions where people bring music they’ve never rehearsed. They buy the sheet music thinking it’s the same as the recorded version they’ve sung along with … and it’s not! They wind up singing something that doesn’t suit their range at all — too low or too high — or it’s a version of the song with a different ending than what they know. The result is the same: a bad audition.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>You <em>can</em> sing from the show if you want, but you don’t have to.</strong> I suggest you bring a song that’s similar to the role you want to get. After you’re done, the people behind the table making the casting choices may ask you if you know a song from the show, and if you do, that gives you another opportunity to sing for them!</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><strong>Remember that the people behind the table have a problem, and they want you to solve it.</strong> They need to cast this show, and it would be great if <em>you</em> were the person they could cast. Then they can move on to the next phase of the show.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">So, don’t think they’re sitting there thinking, “How dare this person think they can be in our show?” They <em>want</em> you to succeed. The meanness of the judges on <em>American Idol</em> isn’t how Broadway (or other theatres) is. Yes, there has been the random hostile director, casting director, music director, or whatever, but it isn’t the norm! So go in there confident that you’re the person they want.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"<figure style=\"margin: 0;\"><figcaption style=\"margin-bottom: 10px;\">Listen to the article:</figcaption><audio src=\"/wp-content/uploads/how-to-audition-musical-theatre-production.mp3\" controls=\"controls\"><a href=\"/wp-content/uploads/how-to-audition-musical-theatre-production.mp3\">Download audio</a></audio></figure>\r\nHave you thought about being in a musical? Good! You may, therefore, wonder whether being in a musical is easy. The answer is <em>yes!</em> You may also wonder whether being in a musical is hard. The answer is also <em>yes!</em>\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_297889\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-297889\" src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/auditioning-for-show-adobeStock_391235125.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"419\" /> ©GuruXOX / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n\r\nAs contradictory as that sounds, it really is both. Certain things are required for performing in a musical that are intuitive to many people and don’t require training.\r\n\r\nHowever, other things are difficult to do without proper training. And no matter what, the more training you have, the more musicals you’ll be cast in. In this article, I'm covering auditioning, but for more about the skills you need for musicals, check out my book <em><a href=\"//www.coursofppt.com/book/academics-the-arts/performing-arts/theater/musical-theatre-for-dummies-297053/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Musical Theatre For Dummies</a></em>.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Parts of the audition process</h2>\r\nLots of shows hold an initial audition and then callbacks, and then, hopefully, you get the role. But that’s not often the case. There can also be a dance call after the first audition, or another kind of call, like <em>Meet Me In St. Louis,</em> which had an ice-skating audition. (Yes, the Broadway show had an ice rink for Act Two!)\r\n\r\nHere are some of the common types of auditions:\r\n<h3><strong>Initial audition</strong></h3>\r\nThis is the first time you’re auditioning for the show. The audition requirement might be to sing something from the show, something in the style of the show, or perhaps just sing something that shows your abilities.\r\n\r\nIf a whole bunch of people are being seen, perhaps the casting office is just asking for 16 <em>bars</em> of music (16 measures is about 1 minute).\r\n\r\nThe creative team might be at this audition or, perhaps, just the casting director or casting associates are. It’s very rare that anyone is offered the job after this audition <em>unless</em> it’s an audition for a role in a show that’s running and they’re bringing in people whom they know are right for the role. That usually means the creative team is at the audition and they decide that day who gets the gig.\r\n<h3><strong>Callbacks</strong></h3>\r\nThis is the audition <em>after</em> the first audition. Often there’s more than one callback. And sometimes there are lots (like more than five!). Multiple callbacks happen for various reasons:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Sometimes you’re given additional material to learn.</li>\r\n \t<li>Sometimes you’re given an acting note to work on and come back.</li>\r\n \t<li>Often, as they whittle down the final candidates for the role, more and more powers-that-be are brought in to watch the audition — like the producers, the writers, and so on.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h3><strong>Dance calls</strong></h3>\r\nFor ensemble dance roles, auditions usually begin with a dance call. You audition in a group by learning a dance taught by the choreographer or an associate. After that, they usually call out the names of those whom they want to stay and show more. Everyone else knows to leave. Sometimes you’re asked to stay and sing or sometimes you’re asked to dance a different combination.\r\n\r\nThis is for the ensemble who are labeled as “dancers who sing.” The reverse happens for ensemble members who are “singers who dance.” You come in and sing, and if they like what they hear, you’re asked to come to a dance call.\r\n\r\nThe same audition process happens with roles that have some dancing. You audition with a song (and maybe a scene) and then you may be asked to return and do a dance call specific for that role. Often it’s with a bunch of other people auditioning for that same role!\r\n<h3><strong>Chemistry calls</strong></h3>\r\nSometimes a show holds chemistry calls, in which two people audition together to see if they connect well onstage.\r\n\r\nAs you can see, there’s no set number of auditions one can have for a role.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Peeking inside the audition room</h2>\r\nThough the amount of auditions vary, the majority of them look basically the same. They’re usually held in a rehearsal room at a rehearsal studio. A pianist is present with the people leading the audition sitting behind a table. Sometimes one person is behind the table, but usually a few.\r\n\r\nTypically you’ll see the casting person, director, and music director. The further along the audition, the more people. Depending on the role, final auditions can have many people there to give their approval — 10, 15, 20!\r\n<div class=\"article-tips\">\r\n\r\nIf you have an audition time, you sit in the area outside the rehearsal room with other people who are also waiting to audition. If it’s an <em>open call,</em> meaning anyone can audition, you usually line up and wait — sometimes for long periods of time.\r\n\r\nThe process of waiting can be tedious, but you can chat with the people around you, which is how friendships are formed. Just don’t be the annoying person who can’t take a hint and chats nonstop as a fellow auditioner is trying to prepare, and don’t be the blowhard that keeps talking loudly about their various amazing auditions and upcoming gigs (#Shunned).\r\n\r\n</div>\r\nAfter your name is called, you walk in, make small talk with the people behind the table, and hand the pianist your music. You then sing, make more small talk, and then sometimes you’re asked to sing another song you have with you or perform your own monologue.\r\n\r\nSometimes, you’ll be asked to read something from the show that you received in advance. If it’s not a monologue, you’ll do the scene with a reader. A <em>reader</em> is an actor who’s hired to perform various scenes with everyone auditioning. (By the way, these readers are <em>good</em>. Santino Fontana began as a reader before he won his Tony Award for <em>Tootsie!)</em>\r\n\r\nAfter you’re finished, you’ll usually be thanked, and you’ll find out later whether you got a callback. Sometimes you’ll be asked on the spot if you’re available later for a callback. It’s always a delicious feeling to walk out of an audition room knowing they want to see you again! But try not to smirk <em>too</em> much when you walk by the other peeps auditioning.\r\n\r\nDance auditions are similar in terms of being in a rehearsal studio with a pianist. The studio has walls with mirrors so you can watch yourself as you learn the dance.\r\n<h3>The audition that's not an audition</h3>\r\nThe most frustrating type of audition is one where you don’t get to actually audition. That’s when the powers-that-be <em>type</em> you. This happens during auditions where there are lots and lots of hopefuls.\r\n\r\nThey bring in groups of around 10 to 20 people who stand in a line, and the person in charge of the audition looks at everyone and decides what types look right for the show. Those people who pass the physical test are asked to stay … and everyone else is asked to leave — without ever having auditioned!\r\n\r\nWhen that happens, it means you’ve been <em>typed out.</em> You’ve waited for hours just to have someone look at you and say no … in about 20 seconds. It happened to Priscilla Lopez when she auditioned to be one of the young girls in the original production of <em>Gypsy.</em> But years later, she won a Tony Award, so there!\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Focus on these tips for auditioning</h2>\r\nPreparation is key. Here are some quick tips for auditioning, no matter what level of musical theatre you’re doing:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><strong>Have a few great go-to audition songs.</strong> Have a song (or songs) that shows who <em>you</em> are. It doesn’t have to have incredibly specific lyrics. A general song about happiness or love can be great because you can bring your specific self to it. The way you express the lyric makes you unique. Think about how you would say “I love Paris in the Springtime” and think about how your mom would say it. I bet it’s totally different.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">My point is, if you express the lyrics as you really would in real life, you’ll be special. And always be thinking when you’re singing and when you’re not singing.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>Make sure you’re always thinking and that it shows in your facial expressions. “What good is sitting alone in your room?” (Thought: Here’s a great idea for you to cheer yourself up!) “Come hear the music play!”</li>\r\n \t<li>Avoid going blank-faced between phrases. “What good is sitting alone in your room?” (Blank-faced) “Come hear the music play.”</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">The way you look when you’re thinking or expressing that thought in the air is uniquely you, and <em>that’s</em> what will make you stand out at an audition.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><strong>Know exactly in what key you sing your audition song.</strong> You may sound fantastic on a sustained belted A, but the sheet music you have ends on a C. Change the key! Find the key that fits <em>your</em> voice.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">You can do this if you’re singing an audition song <em>not</em> from the show you’re auditioning for. But if you’re auditioning for a specific part in the show, the music you sing should be in the key of the show. It’s not that common for a theatre (except Broadway) to transpose the key of a song from a show that already exists.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">No matter what, <em>always</em> run your audition song with a pianist in advance. I’ve played piano at so many auditions where people bring music they’ve never rehearsed. They buy the sheet music thinking it’s the same as the recorded version they’ve sung along with … and it’s not! They wind up singing something that doesn’t suit their range at all — too low or too high — or it’s a version of the song with a different ending than what they know. The result is the same: a bad audition.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>You <em>can</em> sing from the show if you want, but you don’t have to.</strong> I suggest you bring a song that’s similar to the role you want to get. After you’re done, the people behind the table making the casting choices may ask you if you know a song from the show, and if you do, that gives you another opportunity to sing for them!</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><strong>Remember that the people behind the table have a problem, and they want you to solve it.</strong> They need to cast this show, and it would be great if <em>you</em> were the person they could cast. Then they can move on to the next phase of the show.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">So, don’t think they’re sitting there thinking, “How dare this person think they can be in our show?” They <em>want</em> you to succeed. The meanness of the judges on <em>American Idol</em> isn’t how Broadway (or other theatres) is. Yes, there has been the random hostile director, casting director, music director, or whatever, but it isn’t the norm! So go in there confident that you’re the person they want.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":35250,"name":"Seth Rudetsky","slug":"seth-rudetsky","description":" <p><b>Seth Rudetsky </b>is the afternoon host of “On Broadway” on SIRIUSXM<sup>®</sup>. Seth has played piano and/or conducted more than a dozen Broadway shows, including <i>Les Misérables, The Phantom of the Opera</i>, and <i>Grease</i>. He co-wrote and starred on Broadway in the <i>New York Times</i> Critics pick musical <I>DISASTER!</I> During the COVID lockdown, he and his husband James Wesley raised more than $1,000,000 for the Actors Fund with their online show <i>Stars In The House</i>. For more info go to SethRudetsky.com. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35250"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33747,"title":"Performing Arts","slug":"performing-arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Parts of the audition process","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Peeking inside the audition room","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Focus on these tips for auditioning","target":"#tab3"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":297881,"title":"Guide to Buying Tickets for a Broadway Show","slug":"guide-to-buying-broadway-show-tickets","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297881"}},{"articleId":297863,"title":"What Was the Golden Age of Broadway?","slug":"what-was-the-golden-age-of-broadway","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297863"}},{"articleId":297205,"title":"Musical Theatre For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"musical-theatre-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","theater"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297205"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":297881,"title":"Guide to Buying Tickets for a Broadway Show","slug":"guide-to-buying-broadway-show-tickets","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297881"}},{"articleId":297863,"title":"What Was the Golden Age of Broadway?","slug":"what-was-the-golden-age-of-broadway","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297863"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":297053,"slug":"musical-theatre-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119889502","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","theater"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119889502/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119889502/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119889502-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119889502/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119889502/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/musical-theatre-for-dummies-cover-1119889502-206x255.jpg","width":206,"height":255},"title":"Musical Theatre For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"35250\">Seth Rudetsky</b> </b>is the afternoon host of “On Broadway” on SIRIUSXM<sup>®</sup>. Seth has played piano and/or conducted more than a dozen Broadway shows, including <i>Les Misérables, The Phantom of the Opera</i>, and <i>Grease</i>. He co-wrote and starred on Broadway in the <i>New York Times</i> Critics pick musical <I>DISASTER!</I> During the COVID lockdown, he and his husband James Wesley raised more than $1,000,000 for the Actors Fund with their online show <i>Stars In The House</i>. For more info go to SethRudetsky.com.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":35250,"name":"Seth Rudetsky","slug":"seth-rudetsky","description":" <p><b>Seth Rudetsky </b>is the afternoon host of “On Broadway” on SIRIUSXM<sup>®</sup>. Seth has played piano and/or conducted more than a dozen Broadway shows, including <i>Les Misérables, The Phantom of the Opera</i>, and <i>Grease</i>. He co-wrote and starred on Broadway in the <i>New York Times</i> Critics pick musical <I>DISASTER!</I> During the COVID lockdown, he and his husband James Wesley raised more than $1,000,000 for the Actors Fund with their online show <i>Stars In The House</i>. For more info go to SethRudetsky.com. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35250"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;performing-arts&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119889502&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64cbeb600a962\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;performing-arts&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119889502&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64cbeb600ae6d\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Two years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-03-16T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":297890},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2020-12-30T22:52:19+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-04-27T18:26:31+00:00","timestamp":"2024-04-27T21:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Performing Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747"},"slug":"performing-arts","categoryId":33747},{"name":"Film","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33749"},"slug":"film","categoryId":33749}],"title":"The Process and Roles in Film Editing","strippedTitle":"the process and roles in film editing","slug":"editing-your-movie-putting-one-frame-in-front-of-the-other","canonicalUrl":"","查找发动机提高":{"metaDescription":"Learn about some of the details involved in editing a film and what a director's cut is. Explore whether or not you want to edit your film yourself.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Editing is more than just piecing together shots into scenes. Understanding the story and the best way to tell it is an art. <a href=\"//www.coursofppt.com/art-center/performing-arts/filmmaking/film-editing-on-your-computer/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Editing</a> controls the feel of your film and can make or break the illusion.\r\n\r\nTo edit well, you need to know on what frame to start your shot and on what frame to end it, when to cut to the <em>reaction shot</em> (a visual response from another actor in the scene), and when to stay on the main character.\r\n\r\nSome of the elements you need to consider when editing are\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Pacing: </strong>The length of shots and scenes gives the entire film a pace — a feeling of moving fast or slow. You don’t want your film to lag.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Scene length:</strong> Keep scenes under three minutes if possible, so they don’t drag on and seem monotonous.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Order of shots and scenes:</strong> By arranging your shots in a particular sequence, you can dramatically affect a scene’s meaning. See the later section “Linear versus Nonlinear Editing” for details.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Cutting on action: </strong>Most shots cut (or edit) better on action. If your actor is opening a car door, have him or her repeat the action while you shoot it from different angles or shot sizes (such as a close-up or a wide shot). You then can overlap the shots as you cut on the motion. This is also called <em>matching,</em> and it helps hide the cut, making the transition appear seamless.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Matching shots: </strong>You want to join static shots with static shots, and moving shots next to other moving shots. If you have a fast-paced car-chase scene and the camera is moving wildly to follow the action, a sudden static shot of a car sitting quietly at a stop light will be jarring. (Of course, that may be the effect you want.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Varying the angle and size of shots: </strong>A <em>jump-cut</em> happens when shots that are too similar in appearance are cut together, making the picture look as if it has jumped, or that the actor has popped from one spot to another. In order to avoid a jump-cut, you need to vary the angle and size of the next shot. One way to avoid a jump-cut is to shoot a cutaway of an actor’s reaction or of a significant object on-set that you can use to tie two different shots together. An appropriate cutaway can often save the day.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Showing simultaneous action:</strong> You can cut back and forth between scenes happening at the same time. This is called <em>cross-cutting. </em>Or you can make a <em>parallel cut, </em>which is showing the simultaneous action with a split screen. This was often done on the TV show <em>24</em>.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Choosing the best take (or combining the best of several takes): </strong>You shoot several takes of a particular scene so that you have a choice in the editing room. Obviously, the more takes you have, the more choices. You can also combine parts of various takes — the beginning of one take, and the end of another, for example, if you have a cutaway to insert between them — to create the scene you want.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Choosing an editor: Cut that out!</h2>\r\nYou need to decide whether you’re going to edit the movie yourself or get a fresh pair of eyes to do it for you. Many directors avoid editing their pictures because they’re too close to the material and want to bring another perspective to the story. That’s why, on a big studio production, a picture editor starts assembling your shots and scenes together as you’re shooting, and a sound editor edits the dialogue and other sound elements.\r\n\r\nYou can place an ad seeking an editor in the classified section of many film and trade magazines like <em>Backstage</em> (www.backstage.com) or search online at www.crewnet.com for an editor near you.\r\n\r\nLook for someone who has at least a few films under their belt and ask to see a sample of their work — do they cut scenes tight so they don’t lag?\r\n\r\nHowever, if you’re on a small production, you’re probably your own editor. You’re in good company, though. Robert Rodriguez <em>(El Mariachi </em>and<em> Sin City)</em> prefers to cut his own films.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">One of the advantages of hiring an editor is that they can start assembling what you’ve shot immediately after the first day on the set. This means that your editor can tell you while you’re shooting whether you need extra footage: a <em>cutaway</em> (a reaction shot or something that helps piece two other shots together seamlessly) to make a scene work better, a close-up of some person or object, or an <em>establishing shot</em> (a wide shot of the location that orientates the audience to where the scene is taking place).</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" ><a name=\"_Toc203303599\"></a>Shooting enough coverage</h2>\r\nYou need to shoot enough <em>coverage</em> so that you have plenty of different takes and interesting angles to choose from. Every time you add another angle to a scene, you make it more interesting and less monotonous.\r\n\r\nUsing just one shot in a two-minute scene is like having a stare-down — and that’s just dull and annoying (unless it’s a bet to see who wins). The camera never blinks — that’s what cutting is for. Cutting is like blinking from one shot to the next. When you watch a play, you don’t stare at the stage as a whole the entire time; you concentrate on the individual actors as they speak, or on a prop or action sequence that catches your attention.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you don’t have time to shoot several angles, then create movement in the shot, such as having the camera follow or lead your actors as they’re walking and talking. Make the shot as interesting as possible.</p>\r\nSome directors shoot a ratio of three takes to get one shot (3:1), and some shoot ten or more. The editor’s job is to find the best take or to combine the best of several takes with cutaways. As you start to piece the movie together, it magically begins to take on a shape of its own, and the story starts to (hopefully) make sense.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" ><a name=\"_Toc203303600\"></a>Assembling a first cut</h2>\r\nThe first step is piecing together what is called an <em>assembly cut, rough cut,</em> or <em>first cut.</em> This is the most basic cut possible, showing the story in continuity (because often the scenes are shot out of order, out of continuity).\r\n\r\nEditing the visuals of your movie is very similar to writing a screenplay. The first assembly of footage is like the first rough draft, putting things into perspective and giving you a feel for your story. After you have your basic cut, you start shaping, trimming, and cutting until your film feels complete. Like dancing, there’s a rhythm to cutting — it flows, and everything feels like it’s falling into place.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Don’t be discouraged if the first cut doesn’t excite you. The pacing may seem too slow, the performances may appear dull. I’ve often been disappointed with a first cut — and apparently, many big studio directors have had concerns after working on their first cuts.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">After your first cut, you start to get a sense of how to tighten up the picture. You start to cut out long boring exits to the door, pauses that are too long between lines, or a scene that isn’t working and that won’t be missed if you cut it out entirely. You may even want to reshoot or add a completely new scene to make the picture better as a whole.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">You need to do a lot of shaping and adjusting before your masterpiece shines through. It’s like molding something out of clay — you have to keep chipping away until you like what you see. Also, remember, you are seeing the movie still in its raw form because color-correction, sound effects, music score, special effects, and other elements have not been added yet.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" ><a name=\"_Toc203303601\"></a>Building a director’s cut</h2>\r\nThe director’s contract usually stipulates whether the director gets to make sure their vision is followed in the editing room by approving the final cut of the movie. This final, director-approved cut is called a <em>director’s cut.</em>\r\n\r\nThe director usually views an assembly, or first, cut (scenes assembled loosely in continuity according to the screenplay; see the preceding section) by the picture editor. The director then gives the editor suggestions on where to place specific shots, close-ups, and establishing shots; how to change the order of things; how to tighten a scene; and so on.\r\n\r\nUsually, a director gets a director’s cut based on their clout in the industry. Ultimately, the big studio has the final say in the cutting of a picture if the director doesn’t contractually have final cut.\r\n\r\nFor example, Steven Spielberg always gets final say because he’s earned that honor and proven himself to know what works and what doesn’t. George Lucas always has the final cut because he doesn’t report to anyone but himself!\r\n\r\nWith the release of most films on DVD or streaming now, many directors who didn’t have the clout to get a director’s cut theatrically in their studio contract now have the opportunity to get a director’s cut featured as one of the bonuses on the DVD or streaming sites, such as on iTunes.\r\n\r\nChances are, you are your own studio boss, so you decide who gets final say on editing. You will probably have the director’s cut because you report to yourself!\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_266963\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-266963\" src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/filmmaking-directors-cut.jpg\" alt=\"director editing on iMac\" width=\"556\" height=\"417\" /> The author working on his “director’s cut” on an iMac connected to a big screen TV for checking details.[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" ><a name=\"_Toc203303602\"></a>Photo finish: Finalizing a final cut</h2>\r\nMany times a studio screens a version of the movie to a <em>test audience</em> (a group of people brought in to watch and rate the picture). The audience members fill out a questionnaire, and the studio (or the director, if they have final cut) evaluates all the comments from the screening and may re-edit accordingly.\r\n\r\nAfter all the editing is finished and approved, you create the final, <em>locked</em> picture approved by the studio — or by the director if they have the authority to make the final cut (which you probably do have if you’re an independent director). Now the postproduction work on sound begins, and the composer can start timing the scenes that will be <em>scored</em> (set to music).\r\n<h2 id=\"tab6\" ><a name=\"_Toc203303603\"></a>Listening to the sound editor</h2>\r\nIn addition to editing the picture on your movie, you have to assemble and edit the sound elements. These elements are prepared by the sound editor, who is most often the picture editor and even the final postproduction sound mixer on an independent film.\r\n\r\nThe sound elements are put onto separate audio channels (called <em>tracks</em>) and then mixed down into a final soundtrack that combines all channels mixed together. Some of those edited sound elements include:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Dialogue (may have separate dialogue tracks for each actor)</li>\r\n \t<li>Sound effects (can have unlimited sound-effects tracks)</li>\r\n \t<li>Music (usually one or two tracks for music)</li>\r\n \t<li>Ambience (background sounds like birds chirping, an air-conditioner humming, ocean waves crashing, and so on)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Dialogue editing is as important as your picture edit. The sound editor has a variety of elements to consider, such as overlapping conversations or starting a character’s dialogue over the end of another character’s shot.</p>","description":"Editing is more than just piecing together shots into scenes. Understanding the story and the best way to tell it is an art. <a href=\"//www.coursofppt.com/art-center/performing-arts/filmmaking/film-editing-on-your-computer/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Editing</a> controls the feel of your film and can make or break the illusion.\r\n\r\nTo edit well, you need to know on what frame to start your shot and on what frame to end it, when to cut to the <em>reaction shot</em> (a visual response from another actor in the scene), and when to stay on the main character.\r\n\r\nSome of the elements you need to consider when editing are\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Pacing: </strong>The length of shots and scenes gives the entire film a pace — a feeling of moving fast or slow. You don’t want your film to lag.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Scene length:</strong> Keep scenes under three minutes if possible, so they don’t drag on and seem monotonous.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Order of shots and scenes:</strong> By arranging your shots in a particular sequence, you can dramatically affect a scene’s meaning. See the later section “Linear versus Nonlinear Editing” for details.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Cutting on action: </strong>Most shots cut (or edit) better on action. If your actor is opening a car door, have him or her repeat the action while you shoot it from different angles or shot sizes (such as a close-up or a wide shot). You then can overlap the shots as you cut on the motion. This is also called <em>matching,</em> and it helps hide the cut, making the transition appear seamless.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Matching shots: </strong>You want to join static shots with static shots, and moving shots next to other moving shots. If you have a fast-paced car-chase scene and the camera is moving wildly to follow the action, a sudden static shot of a car sitting quietly at a stop light will be jarring. (Of course, that may be the effect you want.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Varying the angle and size of shots: </strong>A <em>jump-cut</em> happens when shots that are too similar in appearance are cut together, making the picture look as if it has jumped, or that the actor has popped from one spot to another. In order to avoid a jump-cut, you need to vary the angle and size of the next shot. One way to avoid a jump-cut is to shoot a cutaway of an actor’s reaction or of a significant object on-set that you can use to tie two different shots together. An appropriate cutaway can often save the day.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Showing simultaneous action:</strong> You can cut back and forth between scenes happening at the same time. This is called <em>cross-cutting. </em>Or you can make a <em>parallel cut, </em>which is showing the simultaneous action with a split screen. This was often done on the TV show <em>24</em>.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Choosing the best take (or combining the best of several takes): </strong>You shoot several takes of a particular scene so that you have a choice in the editing room. Obviously, the more takes you have, the more choices. You can also combine parts of various takes — the beginning of one take, and the end of another, for example, if you have a cutaway to insert between them — to create the scene you want.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Choosing an editor: Cut that out!</h2>\r\nYou need to decide whether you’re going to edit the movie yourself or get a fresh pair of eyes to do it for you. Many directors avoid editing their pictures because they’re too close to the material and want to bring another perspective to the story. That’s why, on a big studio production, a picture editor starts assembling your shots and scenes together as you’re shooting, and a sound editor edits the dialogue and other sound elements.\r\n\r\nYou can place an ad seeking an editor in the classified section of many film and trade magazines like <em>Backstage</em> (www.backstage.com) or search online at www.crewnet.com for an editor near you.\r\n\r\nLook for someone who has at least a few films under their belt and ask to see a sample of their work — do they cut scenes tight so they don’t lag?\r\n\r\nHowever, if you’re on a small production, you’re probably your own editor. You’re in good company, though. Robert Rodriguez <em>(El Mariachi </em>and<em> Sin City)</em> prefers to cut his own films.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">One of the advantages of hiring an editor is that they can start assembling what you’ve shot immediately after the first day on the set. This means that your editor can tell you while you’re shooting whether you need extra footage: a <em>cutaway</em> (a reaction shot or something that helps piece two other shots together seamlessly) to make a scene work better, a close-up of some person or object, or an <em>establishing shot</em> (a wide shot of the location that orientates the audience to where the scene is taking place).</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" ><a name=\"_Toc203303599\"></a>Shooting enough coverage</h2>\r\nYou need to shoot enough <em>coverage</em> so that you have plenty of different takes and interesting angles to choose from. Every time you add another angle to a scene, you make it more interesting and less monotonous.\r\n\r\nUsing just one shot in a two-minute scene is like having a stare-down — and that’s just dull and annoying (unless it’s a bet to see who wins). The camera never blinks — that’s what cutting is for. Cutting is like blinking from one shot to the next. When you watch a play, you don’t stare at the stage as a whole the entire time; you concentrate on the individual actors as they speak, or on a prop or action sequence that catches your attention.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you don’t have time to shoot several angles, then create movement in the shot, such as having the camera follow or lead your actors as they’re walking and talking. Make the shot as interesting as possible.</p>\r\nSome directors shoot a ratio of three takes to get one shot (3:1), and some shoot ten or more. The editor’s job is to find the best take or to combine the best of several takes with cutaways. As you start to piece the movie together, it magically begins to take on a shape of its own, and the story starts to (hopefully) make sense.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" ><a name=\"_Toc203303600\"></a>Assembling a first cut</h2>\r\nThe first step is piecing together what is called an <em>assembly cut, rough cut,</em> or <em>first cut.</em> This is the most basic cut possible, showing the story in continuity (because often the scenes are shot out of order, out of continuity).\r\n\r\nEditing the visuals of your movie is very similar to writing a screenplay. The first assembly of footage is like the first rough draft, putting things into perspective and giving you a feel for your story. After you have your basic cut, you start shaping, trimming, and cutting until your film feels complete. Like dancing, there’s a rhythm to cutting — it flows, and everything feels like it’s falling into place.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Don’t be discouraged if the first cut doesn’t excite you. The pacing may seem too slow, the performances may appear dull. I’ve often been disappointed with a first cut — and apparently, many big studio directors have had concerns after working on their first cuts.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">After your first cut, you start to get a sense of how to tighten up the picture. You start to cut out long boring exits to the door, pauses that are too long between lines, or a scene that isn’t working and that won’t be missed if you cut it out entirely. You may even want to reshoot or add a completely new scene to make the picture better as a whole.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">You need to do a lot of shaping and adjusting before your masterpiece shines through. It’s like molding something out of clay — you have to keep chipping away until you like what you see. Also, remember, you are seeing the movie still in its raw form because color-correction, sound effects, music score, special effects, and other elements have not been added yet.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" ><a name=\"_Toc203303601\"></a>Building a director’s cut</h2>\r\nThe director’s contract usually stipulates whether the director gets to make sure their vision is followed in the editing room by approving the final cut of the movie. This final, director-approved cut is called a <em>director’s cut.</em>\r\n\r\nThe director usually views an assembly, or first, cut (scenes assembled loosely in continuity according to the screenplay; see the preceding section) by the picture editor. The director then gives the editor suggestions on where to place specific shots, close-ups, and establishing shots; how to change the order of things; how to tighten a scene; and so on.\r\n\r\nUsually, a director gets a director’s cut based on their clout in the industry. Ultimately, the big studio has the final say in the cutting of a picture if the director doesn’t contractually have final cut.\r\n\r\nFor example, Steven Spielberg always gets final say because he’s earned that honor and proven himself to know what works and what doesn’t. George Lucas always has the final cut because he doesn’t report to anyone but himself!\r\n\r\nWith the release of most films on DVD or streaming now, many directors who didn’t have the clout to get a director’s cut theatrically in their studio contract now have the opportunity to get a director’s cut featured as one of the bonuses on the DVD or streaming sites, such as on iTunes.\r\n\r\nChances are, you are your own studio boss, so you decide who gets final say on editing. You will probably have the director’s cut because you report to yourself!\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_266963\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-266963\" src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/filmmaking-directors-cut.jpg\" alt=\"director editing on iMac\" width=\"556\" height=\"417\" /> The author working on his “director’s cut” on an iMac connected to a big screen TV for checking details.[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" ><a name=\"_Toc203303602\"></a>Photo finish: Finalizing a final cut</h2>\r\nMany times a studio screens a version of the movie to a <em>test audience</em> (a group of people brought in to watch and rate the picture). The audience members fill out a questionnaire, and the studio (or the director, if they have final cut) evaluates all the comments from the screening and may re-edit accordingly.\r\n\r\nAfter all the editing is finished and approved, you create the final, <em>locked</em> picture approved by the studio — or by the director if they have the authority to make the final cut (which you probably do have if you’re an independent director). Now the postproduction work on sound begins, and the composer can start timing the scenes that will be <em>scored</em> (set to music).\r\n<h2 id=\"tab6\" ><a name=\"_Toc203303603\"></a>Listening to the sound editor</h2>\r\nIn addition to editing the picture on your movie, you have to assemble and edit the sound elements. These elements are prepared by the sound editor, who is most often the picture editor and even the final postproduction sound mixer on an independent film.\r\n\r\nThe sound elements are put onto separate audio channels (called <em>tracks</em>) and then mixed down into a final soundtrack that combines all channels mixed together. Some of those edited sound elements include:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Dialogue (may have separate dialogue tracks for each actor)</li>\r\n \t<li>Sound effects (can have unlimited sound-effects tracks)</li>\r\n \t<li>Music (usually one or two tracks for music)</li>\r\n \t<li>Ambience (background sounds like birds chirping, an air-conditioner humming, ocean waves crashing, and so on)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Dialogue editing is as important as your picture edit. The sound editor has a variety of elements to consider, such as overlapping conversations or starting a character’s dialogue over the end of another character’s shot.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10360,"name":"Bryan Michael Stoller","slug":"bryan-michael-stoller","description":" <p><b>Bryan Michael Stoller</b> is an award&#45;winning filmmaker who has produced, written, and directed more than 100 productions from music videos and commercials to TV shows and feature films. His movie <i>First Dog</i> had nearly a half&#45;million Redbox rentals, and he has directed stars such as Edward Asner, Barbra Streisand, James Earl Jones, Drew Barrymore, and Dan Aykroyd. Bryan&#39;s movies have amassed close to eighteen&#45;million views on video on demand platforms. Learn more at www.BryanMichaelStoller.com. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10360"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33749,"title":"Film","slug":"film","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33749"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Choosing an editor: Cut that out!","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Shooting enough coverage","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Assembling a first cut","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Building a director’s cut","target":"#tab4"},{"label":"Photo finish: Finalizing a final cut","target":"#tab5"},{"label":"Listening to the sound editor","target":"#tab6"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":266979,"title":"10 Tips for Shooting on Your Smartphone","slug":"10-tips-for-shooting-on-your-smartphone","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266979"}},{"articleId":266974,"title":"Secrets to Entering and Winning Film Festivals","slug":"secrets-to-entering-and-winning-film-festivals","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266974"}},{"articleId":266967,"title":"Filmmaking and Makeup Special Effects","slug":"filmmaking-and-makeup-special-effects","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266967"}},{"articleId":266956,"title":"Film Editing on Your Computer","slug":"film-editing-on-your-computer","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266956"}},{"articleId":209011,"title":"Filmmaking For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"filmmaking-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209011"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":284321,"title":"Bollywood For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"bollywood-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284321"}},{"articleId":266979,"title":"10 Tips for Shooting on Your Smartphone","slug":"10-tips-for-shooting-on-your-smartphone","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266979"}},{"articleId":266974,"title":"Secrets to Entering and Winning Film Festivals","slug":"secrets-to-entering-and-winning-film-festivals","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266974"}},{"articleId":266967,"title":"Filmmaking and Makeup Special Effects","slug":"filmmaking-and-makeup-special-effects","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266967"}},{"articleId":266956,"title":"Film Editing on Your Computer","slug":"film-editing-on-your-computer","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266956"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282198,"slug":"filmmaking-for-dummies-3rd-edition","isbn":"9781119617853","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119617855/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119617855/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119617855-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119617855/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119617855/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/filmmaking-for-dummies-3rd-edition-cover-9781119617853-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Filmmaking For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"10360\">Bryan Michael Stoller</b></b> is an award&#45;winning filmmaker who has produced, written, and directed more than 100 productions from music videos and commercials to TV shows and feature films. His movie <i>First Dog</i> had nearly a half&#45;million Redbox rentals, and he has directed stars such as Edward Asner, Barbra Streisand, James Earl Jones, Drew Barrymore, and Dan Aykroyd. Bryan&#39;s movies have amassed close to eighteen&#45;million views on video on demand platforms. Learn more at www.BryanMichaelStoller.com.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":10360,"name":"Bryan Michael Stoller","slug":"bryan-michael-stoller","description":" <p><b>Bryan Michael Stoller</b> is an award&#45;winning filmmaker who has produced, written, and directed more than 100 productions from music videos and commercials to TV shows and feature films. His movie <i>First Dog</i> had nearly a half&#45;million Redbox rentals, and he has directed stars such as Edward Asner, Barbra Streisand, James Earl Jones, Drew Barrymore, and Dan Aykroyd. Bryan&#39;s movies have amassed close to eighteen&#45;million views on video on demand platforms. Learn more at www.BryanMichaelStoller.com. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10360"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;performing-arts&quot;,&quot;film&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119617853&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-644ae28f0c9aa\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;performing-arts&quot;,&quot;film&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119617853&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-644ae28f0d044\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-04-27T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":266962},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T07:39:57+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-04-25T16:16:52+00:00","timestamp":"2024-04-25T18:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Performing Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747"},"slug":"performing-arts","categoryId":33747},{"name":"Film","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33749"},"slug":"film","categoryId":33749}],"title":"How To Mic for Dialogue in Digital Filmmaking","strippedTitle":"how to mic for dialogue in digital filmmaking","slug":"microphone-techniques-for-dialogue-in-digital-filmmaking","canonicalUrl":"","查找发动机提高":{"metaDescription":"The key to recording dialogue in digital filmmaking is placing the microphone as close as possible to your actor without the microphone appearing in the shot. A","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"The key to recording dialogue in digital filmmaking is placing the microphone as close as possible to your actor without the microphone appearing in the shot. Also, aiming the microphone in the direction of the sound helps to keep the dialogue clear.\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 535px;\">\r\n\r\n<img src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/480719.image0.jpg\" alt=\"Aiming your microphone can help you get a clear sound.\" width=\"535\" height=\"178\" />\r\n<div class=\"imageCaption\">Aiming your microphone can help you get a clear sound.</div>\r\n</div>\r\nIf you’re using an external microphone on a boom pole or a handheld, it’s important to keep it as still as possible when recording because this prevents the device from picking up any noises from the boom operator. Microphones are very sensitive and can pick up noises, including from the hands holding them.\r\n\r\nThe best way to detect unwanted noises is through a pair of headphones. Without headphones, any unwanted noise can easily go undetected, noticed only when you’re importing the footage into the editing tool later. You can use <i>closed</i><i>‐</i><i>back</i> headphones, which surround the ears and cut out most of the noise coming from the outside, so that the person monitoring sound can mainly hear what is being picked up by the microphone. These can be expensive, but a budget pair starts at only around $10.\r\n\r\nIf you hear a distracting background noise through the headphones when filming, such as from a plane, gust of wind, or passing car, stop filming and wait for the sound to pass, and then retake that shot. If the sound of a plane appears in the background in one shot and not in the next, the sound will be uneven between shots, and this will sound odd for your audience.\r\n\r\nThe following list describes a few ways to avoid recording unwanted noises during filming:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Turn off any air-conditioning units or fan heaters while filming. Microphones can pick up noises that sometimes humans can’t even hear when filming.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Make sure all cellphones are off or on silent when filming because if they go off, they can bring a shoot to a stop. Also, sometimes a cellphone’s roaming or searching signal can interfere with the camera and can be heard on the recorded audio.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Avoid pointing the microphone in the direction of any clear background noise, including roads, waterfalls, or fountains. Again, these sounds can come across clearly in the recording and can make it hard to hear dialogue.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Avoid filming in empty rooms because they can create distracting echoes in your recording (unless, of course, you <i>want</i> echoes in your film). To eliminate echoes, place hand blankets on walls to help deaden the sound.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"The key to recording dialogue in digital filmmaking is placing the microphone as close as possible to your actor without the microphone appearing in the shot. Also, aiming the microphone in the direction of the sound helps to keep the dialogue clear.\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 535px;\">\r\n\r\n<img src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/480719.image0.jpg\" alt=\"Aiming your microphone can help you get a clear sound.\" width=\"535\" height=\"178\" />\r\n<div class=\"imageCaption\">Aiming your microphone can help you get a clear sound.</div>\r\n</div>\r\nIf you’re using an external microphone on a boom pole or a handheld, it’s important to keep it as still as possible when recording because this prevents the device from picking up any noises from the boom operator. Microphones are very sensitive and can pick up noises, including from the hands holding them.\r\n\r\nThe best way to detect unwanted noises is through a pair of headphones. Without headphones, any unwanted noise can easily go undetected, noticed only when you’re importing the footage into the editing tool later. You can use <i>closed</i><i>‐</i><i>back</i> headphones, which surround the ears and cut out most of the noise coming from the outside, so that the person monitoring sound can mainly hear what is being picked up by the microphone. These can be expensive, but a budget pair starts at only around $10.\r\n\r\nIf you hear a distracting background noise through the headphones when filming, such as from a plane, gust of wind, or passing car, stop filming and wait for the sound to pass, and then retake that shot. If the sound of a plane appears in the background in one shot and not in the next, the sound will be uneven between shots, and this will sound odd for your audience.\r\n\r\nThe following list describes a few ways to avoid recording unwanted noises during filming:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Turn off any air-conditioning units or fan heaters while filming. Microphones can pick up noises that sometimes humans can’t even hear when filming.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Make sure all cellphones are off or on silent when filming because if they go off, they can bring a shoot to a stop. Also, sometimes a cellphone’s roaming or searching signal can interfere with the camera and can be heard on the recorded audio.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Avoid pointing the microphone in the direction of any clear background noise, including roads, waterfalls, or fountains. Again, these sounds can come across clearly in the recording and can make it hard to hear dialogue.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Avoid filming in empty rooms because they can create distracting echoes in your recording (unless, of course, you <i>want</i> echoes in your film). To eliminate echoes, place hand blankets on walls to help deaden the sound.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9125,"name":"Nick Willoughby","slug":"nick-willoughby","description":" <p><b>Nick Willoughby </b>heads Filmmaking For Kids and Film Future, a pair of programs designed to teach kids aged 7&#45;16 the various aspects of filmmaking. Nick is also a writer and director for 7 Stream Media, a video and media production firm based in the UK.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9125"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33749,"title":"Film","slug":"film","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33749"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":257035,"title":"Filmmaking Tips: How to Film and Frame an Interview","slug":"filmmaking-tips-how-to-film-and-frame-an-interview","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/257035"}},{"articleId":256947,"title":"Types of Shots in Filmmaking and How to Frame Them","slug":"types-of-shots-in-filmmaking-and-how-to-frame-them","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/256947"}},{"articleId":210235,"title":"How to Create a Digital Film Trailer (Lost in Time Trailer)","slug":"how-to-create-a-digital-film-trailer-lost-in-time-trailer","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/210235"}},{"articleId":210083,"title":"How to Create a Digital Documentary Film","slug":"how-to-create-a-digital-documentary-film","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/210083"}},{"articleId":210082,"title":"How to Create a Digital Short Film (Lost in Time)","slug":"how-to-create-a-digital-short-film-lost-in-time","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/210082"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":284321,"title":"Bollywood For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"bollywood-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284321"}},{"articleId":266979,"title":"10 Tips for Shooting on Your Smartphone","slug":"10-tips-for-shooting-on-your-smartphone","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266979"}},{"articleId":266974,"title":"Secrets to Entering and Winning Film Festivals","slug":"secrets-to-entering-and-winning-film-festivals","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266974"}},{"articleId":266967,"title":"Filmmaking and Makeup Special Effects","slug":"filmmaking-and-makeup-special-effects","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266967"}},{"articleId":266962,"title":"Editing Your Movie: Putting One Frame in Front of the Other","slug":"editing-your-movie-putting-one-frame-in-front-of-the-other","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266962"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":281682,"slug":"digital-filmmaking-for-kids-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119027409","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119027403/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119027403/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119027403-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119027403/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119027403/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/digital-filmmaking-for-kids-for-dummies-cover-9781119027409-205x255.jpg","width":205,"height":255},"title":"Digital Filmmaking For Kids For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":"<p><b data-author-id=\"9125\">Nick Willoughby </b>heads Filmmaking For Kids and Film Future, a pair of programs designed to teach kids aged 7-16 the various aspects of filmmaking. Nick is also a writer and director for 7 Stream Media, a video and media production firm based in the UK.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9125,"name":"Nick Willoughby","slug":"nick-willoughby","description":" <p><b>Nick Willoughby </b>heads Filmmaking For Kids and Film Future, a pair of programs designed to teach kids aged 7&#45;16 the various aspects of filmmaking. Nick is also a writer and director for 7 Stream Media, a video and media production firm based in the UK.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9125"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;For Kids&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119027409&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6448155eef1a7\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;For Kids&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119027409&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6448155eef8a5\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Two years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-11-14T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"yes","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"\"For Kids\"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":142748},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T07:39:58+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-04-17T19:54:19+00:00","timestamp":"2024-04-17T21:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Performing Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747"},"slug":"performing-arts","categoryId":33747},{"name":"Film","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33749"},"slug":"film","categoryId":33749}],"title":"Using Gels and Filters in Digital Filmmaking","strippedTitle":"using gels and filters in digital filmmaking","slug":"how-to-use-colored-gels-and-filters-in-digital-filmmaking","canonicalUrl":"","查找发动机提高":{"metaDescription":"You can use colored gels and filters to achieve certain effects in your digital film. There are different colors of light, which is measured in kelvin. This det","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"You can use colored gels and filters to achieve certain effects in your digital film. There are different colors of light, which is measured in kelvin. This determines how cold or how warm the color of light is. Daylight is in the middle of the scale. If your shot is cold or too blue in color, then you can set your camera’s white balance higher to make the shot look warmer and more natural.\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">If you’re shooting indoors using the lights in your house, your shots may look orange or red, and lowering the white balance setting on your camera will make your shot look more natural. Most cameras have an automatic white balance setting, which measures the color of the light in the room and changes the white balance setting automatically.</p>\r\nYou can set your white balance manually, however, because sometimes the camera gets it wrong. To find out how to adjust the white balance on your camera, have a look at the camera’s instructions.\r\n\r\nYou can get different types of filters for film lights that can change the color and mood of a shot. These filter gels are specifically designed for use with studio lights, so they can withstand high temperatures. Some homemade options may not cope with high temperatures as well and could be a fire risk. Colored filter gel sheets can be bought from camera stores for around $5 per sheet, or you can save money by buying them in variety packs. Some lights come with colored filters.\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 535px;\">\r\n\r\n<img src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/480727.image0.jpg\" alt=\"Colored filters are handy tools to have when shooting.\" width=\"535\" height=\"357\" />\r\n<div class=\"imageCaption\">Colored filters are handy tools to have when shooting.</div>\r\n</div>\r\nIf you want to create a moonlight effect for a nighttime shot, for example, you can use a blue filter or you could lower the white balance on your camera to create a more blue and cold feel. If you want to create a warmer more sunny effect, on the other hand, you could use an orange or yellow filter over your light or increase the white balance setting on your camera.\r\n\r\nHere are shots of an actor with and without a blue filter. The blue filter throws a blue light that makes the shot look cold.\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 535px;\">\r\n\r\n<img src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/480728.image1.jpg\" alt=\"Making your shots look cold can add a special effect to your film.\" width=\"535\" height=\"150\" />\r\n<div class=\"imageCaption\">Making your shots look cold can add a special effect to your film.</div>\r\n</div>\r\nMost lights used for film can be quite harsh and can create strong shadows around the subject or character. To reduce these shadows, use diffusion filter paper (also called a <i>scrim</i>), which, when placed over your lights, spreads the light over a scene. This helps reduce shadows and create a more natural‐looking light. It also softens the light on your actors’ skin.\r\n\r\nHere is a shot of an actor with and without diffusion paper. Diffusion paper designed for studio lights can be bought from camera stores for around $5 per sheet.\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 535px;\">\r\n\r\n<img src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/480729.image2.jpg\" alt=\"Diffusion lights are a good inexpensive option.\" width=\"535\" height=\"150\" />\r\n<div class=\"imageCaption\">Diffusion lights are a good inexpensive option.</div>\r\n</div>\r\nLight doesn’t always have to be used on a subject. You can use lights to light the background of a scene instead, which adds depth to a shot. You could also add a colored gel to the background light to throw some color on the background.\r\n<p class=\"Remember\">Any light you add to a scene needs to have a reason. For example, adding a blue filtered light onto one side of an actor’s face would look odd to viewers unless there was a good reason for it to be there — such as, say, to represent the moonlight shining through the window onto the actor.</p>","description":"You can use colored gels and filters to achieve certain effects in your digital film. There are different colors of light, which is measured in kelvin. This determines how cold or how warm the color of light is. Daylight is in the middle of the scale. If your shot is cold or too blue in color, then you can set your camera’s white balance higher to make the shot look warmer and more natural.\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">If you’re shooting indoors using the lights in your house, your shots may look orange or red, and lowering the white balance setting on your camera will make your shot look more natural. Most cameras have an automatic white balance setting, which measures the color of the light in the room and changes the white balance setting automatically.</p>\r\nYou can set your white balance manually, however, because sometimes the camera gets it wrong. To find out how to adjust the white balance on your camera, have a look at the camera’s instructions.\r\n\r\nYou can get different types of filters for film lights that can change the color and mood of a shot. These filter gels are specifically designed for use with studio lights, so they can withstand high temperatures. Some homemade options may not cope with high temperatures as well and could be a fire risk. Colored filter gel sheets can be bought from camera stores for around $5 per sheet, or you can save money by buying them in variety packs. Some lights come with colored filters.\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 535px;\">\r\n\r\n<img src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/480727.image0.jpg\" alt=\"Colored filters are handy tools to have when shooting.\" width=\"535\" height=\"357\" />\r\n<div class=\"imageCaption\">Colored filters are handy tools to have when shooting.</div>\r\n</div>\r\nIf you want to create a moonlight effect for a nighttime shot, for example, you can use a blue filter or you could lower the white balance on your camera to create a more blue and cold feel. If you want to create a warmer more sunny effect, on the other hand, you could use an orange or yellow filter over your light or increase the white balance setting on your camera.\r\n\r\nHere are shots of an actor with and without a blue filter. The blue filter throws a blue light that makes the shot look cold.\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 535px;\">\r\n\r\n<img src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/480728.image1.jpg\" alt=\"Making your shots look cold can add a special effect to your film.\" width=\"535\" height=\"150\" />\r\n<div class=\"imageCaption\">Making your shots look cold can add a special effect to your film.</div>\r\n</div>\r\nMost lights used for film can be quite harsh and can create strong shadows around the subject or character. To reduce these shadows, use diffusion filter paper (also called a <i>scrim</i>), which, when placed over your lights, spreads the light over a scene. This helps reduce shadows and create a more natural‐looking light. It also softens the light on your actors’ skin.\r\n\r\nHere is a shot of an actor with and without diffusion paper. Diffusion paper designed for studio lights can be bought from camera stores for around $5 per sheet.\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 535px;\">\r\n\r\n<img src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/480729.image2.jpg\" alt=\"Diffusion lights are a good inexpensive option.\" width=\"535\" height=\"150\" />\r\n<div class=\"imageCaption\">Diffusion lights are a good inexpensive option.</div>\r\n</div>\r\nLight doesn’t always have to be used on a subject. You can use lights to light the background of a scene instead, which adds depth to a shot. You could also add a colored gel to the background light to throw some color on the background.\r\n<p class=\"Remember\">Any light you add to a scene needs to have a reason. For example, adding a blue filtered light onto one side of an actor’s face would look odd to viewers unless there was a good reason for it to be there — such as, say, to represent the moonlight shining through the window onto the actor.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9125,"name":"Nick Willoughby","slug":"nick-willoughby","description":" <p><b>Nick Willoughby </b>heads Filmmaking For Kids and Film Future, a pair of programs designed to teach kids aged 7&#45;16 the various aspects of filmmaking. Nick is also a writer and director for 7 Stream Media, a video and media production firm based in the UK.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9125"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33749,"title":"Film","slug":"film","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33749"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":257035,"title":"Filmmaking Tips: How to Film and Frame an Interview","slug":"filmmaking-tips-how-to-film-and-frame-an-interview","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/257035"}},{"articleId":256947,"title":"Types of Shots in Filmmaking and How to Frame Them","slug":"types-of-shots-in-filmmaking-and-how-to-frame-them","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/256947"}},{"articleId":210235,"title":"How to Create a Digital Film Trailer (Lost in Time Trailer)","slug":"how-to-create-a-digital-film-trailer-lost-in-time-trailer","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/210235"}},{"articleId":210083,"title":"How to Create a Digital Documentary Film","slug":"how-to-create-a-digital-documentary-film","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/210083"}},{"articleId":210082,"title":"How to Create a Digital Short Film (Lost in Time)","slug":"how-to-create-a-digital-short-film-lost-in-time","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/210082"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":284321,"title":"Bollywood For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"bollywood-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284321"}},{"articleId":266979,"title":"10 Tips for Shooting on Your Smartphone","slug":"10-tips-for-shooting-on-your-smartphone","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266979"}},{"articleId":266974,"title":"Secrets to Entering and Winning Film Festivals","slug":"secrets-to-entering-and-winning-film-festivals","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266974"}},{"articleId":266967,"title":"Filmmaking and Makeup Special Effects","slug":"filmmaking-and-makeup-special-effects","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266967"}},{"articleId":266962,"title":"Editing Your Movie: Putting One Frame in Front of the Other","slug":"editing-your-movie-putting-one-frame-in-front-of-the-other","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266962"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":281682,"slug":"digital-filmmaking-for-kids-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119027409","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119027403/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119027403/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119027403-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119027403/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119027403/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/digital-filmmaking-for-kids-for-dummies-cover-9781119027409-205x255.jpg","width":205,"height":255},"title":"Digital Filmmaking For Kids For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":"<p><b data-author-id=\"9125\">Nick Willoughby </b>heads Filmmaking For Kids and Film Future, a pair of programs designed to teach kids aged 7-16 the various aspects of filmmaking. Nick is also a writer and director for 7 Stream Media, a video and media production firm based in the UK.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9125,"name":"Nick Willoughby","slug":"nick-willoughby","description":" <p><b>Nick Willoughby </b>heads Filmmaking For Kids and Film Future, a pair of programs designed to teach kids aged 7&#45;16 the various aspects of filmmaking. Nick is also a writer and director for 7 Stream Media, a video and media production firm based in the UK.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9125"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;For Kids&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119027409&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-643db38fdd25c\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;For Kids&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119027409&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-643db38fddb12\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Two years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-11-14T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"yes","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"\"For Kids\"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":142749},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2019-11-06T18:05:09+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-04-12T20:48:32+00:00","timestamp":"2024-04-12T21:01:04+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Performing Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747"},"slug":"performing-arts","categoryId":33747},{"name":"Film","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33749"},"slug":"film","categoryId":33749}],"title":"Filmmaking Tips: How to Film and Frame an Interview","strippedTitle":"filmmaking tips: how to film and frame an interview","slug":"filmmaking-tips-how-to-film-and-frame-an-interview","canonicalUrl":"","查找发动机提高":{"metaDescription":"Learn digital filmaking tips, including how to frame an interview subject on camera, how to ensure continuity between shots, and why it is best to always take more shots than needed, from coursofppt.com, learning made easy.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Interviewing someone on camera can be tricky; this video gives you some tips on how to position and frame your interview subjects and how to direct them. It’s a good idea to plan your film before beginning the interview. Knowing how to frame your interview subject will help improve your digital film.\r\n\r\n<div class=\"video-player-organism\"></div>\r\n\r\nFirst, you need to decide on the type of shot you're going to use for your interview subject. Mid shots and close-ups tend to look best when someone is just talking. You want to see their expressions and possibly their hand movements. You might want to do mostly mid shots but zoom in for a close-up shot when the interview subject is expressing a lot of emotion.\r\n\r\nNext, you need to decide whether you want the interview subject to look at the camera or to look off camera. If the interview subject is speaking directly to the audience, like Nick is in the video, have them speak to the camera. If they are answering interview questions, have them look to the right of the camera or to the left of the camera and place them in the opposite third of the frame using the rule of thirds. You can even position the interviewer there so that the interview seems more natural.\r\n\r\nYou also want to give your interviewer some direction in how they answer questions. It's important that they repeat or paraphrase the question back when answering on the film. This helps you avoid yes and no answers to questions that the audience is not hearing.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Filming documentaries: Tips for filming interviews</h2>\r\nIf your documentary film will include interviews, you may wish to shoot them first, because your subjects’ answers may help you choose what to include in the rest of the documentary.\r\n\r\nThe subjects that you are filming for the interview are unlikely to be actors or people used to being on camera, so it’s very likely that they’ll be nervous, and they may make mistakes. It’s your job as a filmmaker and director to make them feel as comfortable as possible. You can do this by introducing yourself and your <a href=\"//www.coursofppt.com/article/academics-the-arts/performing-arts/film/roles-in-a-filmmaking-team-142811/\">role within the documentary film</a> and by explaining to them what will happen during filming and what you would like them to do.\r\n\r\nMany interview subjects think that they only have one chance to get their answers right, which may make them feel more nervous. Try to keep them calm. Explain that you’re there to help them, and that they can retake the interview if necessary. Allow the subjects to practice their answers in front of the camera: This may help them feel more comfortable and allow them to think about what they’re going to say in the documentary interview.\r\n<h3>Framing the subject in your documentary interview</h3>\r\nYou will want to frame your subject as you might want to frame him in your documentary film.\r\n\r\nIf you have extra lights you can use, consider using the three‐point lighting technique for the interviews. Make sure you set up the lighting and equipment before your subject arrives. You want to be sure both you and your subject are as comfortable as possible. If you’re still setting up when the subject arrives, you’ll be under pressure to get started quickly. This is how mistakes often happen when filming documentaries.\r\n\r\nIt’s also important to think in advance about how you’ll record sound. Do you have an external microphone you can use or will you be using the onboard microphone? Remember to check for background noises and any other distractions while filming the interviews.\r\n\r\nMid shots and close-up shots give the most natural look to a documentary interview. You could use both. You might start with a mid shot for the first question, change to a close‐up for the second question, and then back to a mid shot for the third. This means you can cut out the questions from the interviewer when editing, leaving just the answers. When these pieces are assembled together, this can look like one long answer from the interview subject and you can change the camera angle as he or she moves from one answer to the next.\r\n\r\nMake sure the interviewer stays quiet while the interview subject is answering the questions because you don’t want any interruptions in your documentary film from off‐camera noises or laughter. Removing background noises during editing can be difficult and sometimes impossible.\r\n\r\nRemember to use the rule of thirds.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_257036\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"535\"]<img class=\"wp-image-257036 size-full\" src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/framing-interview-video.jpg\" alt=\"framing interview subject in video\" width=\"535\" height=\"150\" /> Framing is important when interviewing subjects.[/caption]\r\n<h3>Looking off‐camera during the documentary interview</h3>\r\nMany filmmakers film documentary interviews with the subject looking away from the camera because this can be more comfortable for the audience to watch. Your subjects should look at the camera only when they’re talking directly to the audience. This technique is mainly used when filming TV presenters. To get this effect, have the person asking the questions to sit to one side of the camera, then ask your subject to look at that person when answering.\r\n\r\nRemind subjects that they can retake the answer if they make a mistake. You can also ask your interviewer to smile, nod, and keep eye contact with the subjects while they’re answering questions. This can help them feel more comfortable.\r\n<h3>Question in the answer when filming your documentary interview</h3>\r\nBefore you start filming your interview, ask your subject or character to answer the question fully, and to include the question in the answer. For example, one crew asked their subjects what their role was in the film. If the subject just said “camera operator,” this may not make any sense to the audience when the question was cut out later.\r\n\r\nIf instead the answer was “I’m one of the camera operators in this film,” then viewers would have no trouble understanding. Your subjects may forget to do this for every question, however, so you may have to remind them from time to time as you film your documentary.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Check here to find additional <a href=\"//www.coursofppt.com/article/academics-the-arts/performing-arts/film/tips-for-making-a-good-documentary-film-142777/\">tips for filming a good documentary</a>.</p>","description":"Interviewing someone on camera can be tricky; this video gives you some tips on how to position and frame your interview subjects and how to direct them. It’s a good idea to plan your film before beginning the interview. Knowing how to frame your interview subject will help improve your digital film.\r\n\r\n<div class=\"video-player-organism\"></div>\r\n\r\nFirst, you need to decide on the type of shot you're going to use for your interview subject. Mid shots and close-ups tend to look best when someone is just talking. You want to see their expressions and possibly their hand movements. You might want to do mostly mid shots but zoom in for a close-up shot when the interview subject is expressing a lot of emotion.\r\n\r\nNext, you need to decide whether you want the interview subject to look at the camera or to look off camera. If the interview subject is speaking directly to the audience, like Nick is in the video, have them speak to the camera. If they are answering interview questions, have them look to the right of the camera or to the left of the camera and place them in the opposite third of the frame using the rule of thirds. You can even position the interviewer there so that the interview seems more natural.\r\n\r\nYou also want to give your interviewer some direction in how they answer questions. It's important that they repeat or paraphrase the question back when answering on the film. This helps you avoid yes and no answers to questions that the audience is not hearing.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Filming documentaries: Tips for filming interviews</h2>\r\nIf your documentary film will include interviews, you may wish to shoot them first, because your subjects’ answers may help you choose what to include in the rest of the documentary.\r\n\r\nThe subjects that you are filming for the interview are unlikely to be actors or people used to being on camera, so it’s very likely that they’ll be nervous, and they may make mistakes. It’s your job as a filmmaker and director to make them feel as comfortable as possible. You can do this by introducing yourself and your <a href=\"//www.coursofppt.com/article/academics-the-arts/performing-arts/film/roles-in-a-filmmaking-team-142811/\">role within the documentary film</a> and by explaining to them what will happen during filming and what you would like them to do.\r\n\r\nMany interview subjects think that they only have one chance to get their answers right, which may make them feel more nervous. Try to keep them calm. Explain that you’re there to help them, and that they can retake the interview if necessary. Allow the subjects to practice their answers in front of the camera: This may help them feel more comfortable and allow them to think about what they’re going to say in the documentary interview.\r\n<h3>Framing the subject in your documentary interview</h3>\r\nYou will want to frame your subject as you might want to frame him in your documentary film.\r\n\r\nIf you have extra lights you can use, consider using the three‐point lighting technique for the interviews. Make sure you set up the lighting and equipment before your subject arrives. You want to be sure both you and your subject are as comfortable as possible. If you’re still setting up when the subject arrives, you’ll be under pressure to get started quickly. This is how mistakes often happen when filming documentaries.\r\n\r\nIt’s also important to think in advance about how you’ll record sound. Do you have an external microphone you can use or will you be using the onboard microphone? Remember to check for background noises and any other distractions while filming the interviews.\r\n\r\nMid shots and close-up shots give the most natural look to a documentary interview. You could use both. You might start with a mid shot for the first question, change to a close‐up for the second question, and then back to a mid shot for the third. This means you can cut out the questions from the interviewer when editing, leaving just the answers. When these pieces are assembled together, this can look like one long answer from the interview subject and you can change the camera angle as he or she moves from one answer to the next.\r\n\r\nMake sure the interviewer stays quiet while the interview subject is answering the questions because you don’t want any interruptions in your documentary film from off‐camera noises or laughter. Removing background noises during editing can be difficult and sometimes impossible.\r\n\r\nRemember to use the rule of thirds.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_257036\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"535\"]<img class=\"wp-image-257036 size-full\" src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/framing-interview-video.jpg\" alt=\"framing interview subject in video\" width=\"535\" height=\"150\" /> Framing is important when interviewing subjects.[/caption]\r\n<h3>Looking off‐camera during the documentary interview</h3>\r\nMany filmmakers film documentary interviews with the subject looking away from the camera because this can be more comfortable for the audience to watch. Your subjects should look at the camera only when they’re talking directly to the audience. This technique is mainly used when filming TV presenters. To get this effect, have the person asking the questions to sit to one side of the camera, then ask your subject to look at that person when answering.\r\n\r\nRemind subjects that they can retake the answer if they make a mistake. You can also ask your interviewer to smile, nod, and keep eye contact with the subjects while they’re answering questions. This can help them feel more comfortable.\r\n<h3>Question in the answer when filming your documentary interview</h3>\r\nBefore you start filming your interview, ask your subject or character to answer the question fully, and to include the question in the answer. For example, one crew asked their subjects what their role was in the film. If the subject just said “camera operator,” this may not make any sense to the audience when the question was cut out later.\r\n\r\nIf instead the answer was “I’m one of the camera operators in this film,” then viewers would have no trouble understanding. Your subjects may forget to do this for every question, however, so you may have to remind them from time to time as you film your documentary.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Check here to find additional <a href=\"//www.coursofppt.com/article/academics-the-arts/performing-arts/film/tips-for-making-a-good-documentary-film-142777/\">tips for filming a good documentary</a>.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9125,"name":"Nick Willoughby","slug":"nick-willoughby","description":" <p><b>Nick Willoughby </b>heads Filmmaking For Kids and Film Future, a pair of programs designed to teach kids aged 7&#45;16 the various aspects of filmmaking. Nick is also a writer and director for 7 Stream Media, a video and media production firm based in the UK.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9125"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33749,"title":"Film","slug":"film","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33749"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Filming documentaries: Tips for filming interviews","target":"#tab1"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":256947,"title":"Types of Shots in Filmmaking and How to Frame Them","slug":"types-of-shots-in-filmmaking-and-how-to-frame-them","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/256947"}},{"articleId":210235,"title":"How to Create a Digital Film Trailer (Lost in Time Trailer)","slug":"how-to-create-a-digital-film-trailer-lost-in-time-trailer","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/210235"}},{"articleId":210083,"title":"How to Create a Digital Documentary Film","slug":"how-to-create-a-digital-documentary-film","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/210083"}},{"articleId":210082,"title":"How to Create a Digital Short Film (Lost in Time)","slug":"how-to-create-a-digital-short-film-lost-in-time","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/210082"}},{"articleId":210080,"title":"Tips on How Directors Should Work with Actors","slug":"tips-on-how-directors-should-work-with-actors","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/210080"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":284321,"title":"Bollywood For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"bollywood-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284321"}},{"articleId":266979,"title":"10 Tips for Shooting on Your Smartphone","slug":"10-tips-for-shooting-on-your-smartphone","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266979"}},{"articleId":266974,"title":"Secrets to Entering and Winning Film Festivals","slug":"secrets-to-entering-and-winning-film-festivals","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266974"}},{"articleId":266967,"title":"Filmmaking and Makeup Special Effects","slug":"filmmaking-and-makeup-special-effects","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266967"}},{"articleId":266962,"title":"Editing Your Movie: Putting One Frame in Front of the Other","slug":"editing-your-movie-putting-one-frame-in-front-of-the-other","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266962"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":281682,"slug":"digital-filmmaking-for-kids-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119027409","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119027403/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119027403/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119027403-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119027403/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119027403/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/digital-filmmaking-for-kids-for-dummies-cover-9781119027409-205x255.jpg","width":205,"height":255},"title":"Digital Filmmaking For Kids For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":"<p><b data-author-id=\"9125\">Nick Willoughby </b>heads Filmmaking For Kids and Film Future, a pair of programs designed to teach kids aged 7-16 the various aspects of filmmaking. Nick is also a writer and director for 7 Stream Media, a video and media production firm based in the UK.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9125,"name":"Nick Willoughby","slug":"nick-willoughby","description":" <p><b>Nick Willoughby </b>heads Filmmaking For Kids and Film Future, a pair of programs designed to teach kids aged 7&#45;16 the various aspects of filmmaking. Nick is also a writer and director for 7 Stream Media, a video and media production firm based in the UK.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9125"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;performing-arts&quot;,&quot;film&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119027409&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64371c1011d1e\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;performing-arts&quot;,&quot;film&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119027409&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64371c10125fd\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":"4172714093001","name":"Digital Filmmaking Tip: Filming and Framing an Interview","accountId":"622696558001","playerId":"default","thumbnailUrl":"//cf-images.us-east-1.prod.boltdns.net/v1/static/622696558001/fa4e3ee8-136d-4af1-9982-e6dc003f3bc8/2fcf1257-3832-4b9c-af68-ff5b8d841ce9/160x90/match/image.jpg","description":"This video describes how to position and frame interview subject in a digital film.","uploadDate":"2023-06-30T22:20:05.678Z"}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Two years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-04-12T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":257035},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-03-15T20:56:11+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-03-17T14:07:25+00:00","timestamp":"2024-03-17T15:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Performing Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747"},"slug":"performing-arts","categoryId":33747}],"title":"What Was the Golden Age of Broadway?","strippedTitle":"what was the golden age of broadway?","slug":"what-was-the-golden-age-of-broadway","canonicalUrl":"","查找发动机提高":{"metaDescription":"Learn about the Golden Age of Broadway, when musical theatre hit after hit came out and star directors, choreographers, and actors were born.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"<figure style=\"margin: 0;\"><figcaption style=\"margin-bottom: 10px;\">Listen to the article:</figcaption><audio src=\"/wp-content/uploads/what-was-golden-age-broadway.mp3\" controls=\"controls\"><a href=\"/wp-content/uploads/what-was-golden-age-broadway.mp3\"><span data-mce-type=\"bookmark\" style=\"display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;\" class=\"mce_SELRES_start\"></span>Download audio</a></audio></figure>\r\nIf you ever have the option of using a time machine to relive the era when Broadway churned out hit after hit after hit, set those dials to the late 1940s and set your return date for the end of the 1950s. When you open your chamber door, you’ll be entering into what’s known as Broadway’s Golden Age.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_297870\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"wp-image-297870 size-full\" src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chita-rivera-west-side-story.jpg\" alt=\"Photo of Chita Rivera dancing in the Broadway musical West Side Story\" width=\"630\" height=\"494\" /> ©John Springer Collection / Getty Images<br />Chita Rivera (in front) dances in the Broadway musical West Side Story, which debuted in 1957.[/caption]\r\n\r\nAfter <em>Oklahoma!</em>, the hits just kept coming. Musicals that opened during these years are <em>still</em> being done all over the world — regionally and in summer stock, community theatre, high schools, and so on. And they’re often revived on Broadway. <em>Gypsy</em> (1959) has had five Broadway productions!\r\n\r\nRead on to find out why all the elements were right for the most fertile time in Broadway history and overviews of some of the most popular productions from this era.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >What made this age so golden?</h2>\r\nThe Golden Age came into its stride after World War II because of three main reasons:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>A bustling economy:</strong> Many Americans had money to spend on entertainment such as Broadway shows. Travel to New York City was easier, so tourists from across the United States and around the world could see Broadway shows, guaranteeing a steady stream of audience members.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Broadway on TV:</strong> <em>The Ed Sullivan Show,</em> which consistently staged long segments featuring Broadway musicals, brought Broadway shows into people’s living rooms every week. It’s one thing to have heard the title of the new R&H musical, and perhaps bought the album out of curiosity, but it was another to see the original cast perform three songs with full staging, whetting your appetite to order tickets and see the entire production.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Better quality:</strong> Broadway shows had reached a level not seen before; American tastes coincided with what Broadway was producing.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >The shows that defined the Golden Age</h2>\r\nShows of the Golden Age had many differences, yet the bones of them were the same:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>They were different because they took place in various locations (Siam, New York City, Napa Valley, London), different time periods (modern day, the 1920s, the 1930s, the 1800s, the early 1900s), and had different styles of music (classical, tin pan alley, jazz, swing).</li>\r\n \t<li>They were all similar in terms of having an overture, an intermission, a chorus, multiple leads, big and small moments of comedy, dancing, and more.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nHowever different or similar, the following Golden Age musicals are all musical theatre classics and are the result of the most fertile time on Broadway in terms of hit shows. (For more details and interesting anecdotes about these shows, check out my book <a href=\"//www.coursofppt.com/book/academics-the-arts/performing-arts/theater/musical-theatre-for-dummies-297053/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><em>Musical Theatre For Dummies</em></a>.)\r\n<h3>On the Town (1944)</h3>\r\nWhen <em>Oklahoma!</em> opened in 1943, three audience members were poised to have their own musical smash just a year later. On that fateful opening night, composer Leonard Bernstein and lyricist/librettists Betty Comden and Adolph Green, apparently, were on the street and offered tickets to <em>Oklahoma!</em> By 1944, they had their own hit musical called <em>On the Town.</em> The three not only wrote it, but Comden and Green also starred in two of the six main roles!\r\n<h3>Kiss Me, Kate (1948)</h3>\r\nCole Porter had a smash with <em>Anything Goes</em> in the 1930s, but <em>Kiss Me, Kate</em> proved to be his longest-running hit. The show lasted for more than 1,000 performances on Broadway, was made into a film, and was revived on Broadway in the late 1990s and again in 2019.\r\n\r\nThe show-within-a-show concept centered around two former lovers (who fall in love again) playing the leads in a musical version of <em>The Taming of the Shrew. </em>Porter churned out a bunch of hit songs for the show, like “Too Darn Hot,” “Wunderbar,” and “So in Love.”\r\n<h3>South Pacific (1949)</h3>\r\nRichard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, who were already famous for <em>State Fair, Carousel</em>, and <em>Oklahoma!</em>, continued their successful partnership with this musical based on James Michener’s <em>Tales of the South Pacific.</em>\r\n\r\nYou probably know this show is filled with beautiful songs like “Some Enchanted Evening,” “This Nearly Was Mine,” “Younger Than Springtime,” and “Bali Ha’i,” and charming uptempos like “Cockeyed Optimist,” and “Wonderful Guy.” But did you know it also has a strong progressive and anti-racism message?\r\n\r\nR&H got a lot of pushback for their song, “You’ve Got to be Carefully Taught,” which explains that racism is passed down from generation to generation, but they insisted the song stay in the show.\r\n<h3>Guys and Dolls (1950)</h3>\r\n<em>Guys and Dolls</em> was composer/lyricist Frank Loesser’s second hit Broadway musical (his first was <em>Where’s Charley?</em> in 1948, based on the play <em>Charley’s Aunt</em>) and was called “The greatest American Musical of all time” by Bob Fosse.\r\n\r\n<em>Guys and Dolls</em> was a smash on Broadway, a successful film, and had an enormously successful revival in the 1990s, winning Faith Prince a Best Actress in a Musical Tony Award for her show-stopping performance as Miss Adelaide. “Luck Be a Lady Tonight” and “I’ve Never Been in Love Before” are just two of the hit songs from <em>Guys and Dolls.</em>\r\n<h3>The King and I (1951)</h3>\r\nOne of R&H’s most enduring musicals, <em>The King and I</em> has been a Hollywood film and revived on Broadway three times. It continues to play all over the world. The musical is based on the novel <em>Anna and the King of Siam,</em> which was based on the memoirs of Anna, an actual British governess who went to Siam (now Thailand) to be a governess for the King’s children.\r\n\r\nThe show won numerous Tony Awards, including Best Musical, and introduced now classic R&H tunes, like “I Whistle a Happy Tune,” “Hello, Young Lovers,” and “Something Wonderful.” Original leads Gertrude Lawrence and Yul Brenner both won Tony Awards for their performances of Anna and the King, respectively.\r\n<h3>The Pajama Game (1954)</h3>\r\n<em>The Pajama Game</em> has a libretto by George Abbott and a score by then newcomers Richard Adler and Jerry Ross; it’s a truly enjoyable show featuring the often recorded “Hey, There” and, one of my personal favorites, “I’m Not at All in Love.”\r\n\r\nThis musical also boasts the Broadway debut of two theatrical titans <em>and</em> the launchpad of a movie star. <em>The Pajama Game</em> was the very first show produced by the man who won more Tony Awards than anyone else, Hal Prince!\r\n\r\nHal Prince hired Bob Fosse to choreograph, starting Fosse’s ascension as one of the most famous choreographers (and later director) on Broadway. Carol Haney played the role of Gladys and got rave reviews dancing and singing the lead in the trio “Steam Heat.” No one ever thought she’d miss a show, but she had no choice when she hurt her ankle. Her understudy went on (without rehearsal) and because a film agent was in the audience, she wound up signing a five-year Hollywood contract. The understudy was Shirley MacLaine, and that story has given hope to understudies ever since.\r\n<h3>Damn Yankees (1955)</h3>\r\nThe next musical that contained a score by Adler and Ross was <em>Damn Yankees.</em> Again, produced by Hal Prince with choreography by Fosse, this show cemented the stardom of Gwen Verdon who played Lola, a woman who sold her soul to the devil in order to be beautiful. The plot involves Joe Hardy who temporarily sells his soul to the devil so his beloved baseball team, The Washington Senators, can beat those “damn Yankees” and the Devil wants Lola to use her skills so he can own Joe’s soul permanently.\r\n<h3>My Fair Lady (1956)</h3>\r\nThe longest running musical of the 1950s was <em>My Fair Lady</em>. Based on George Bernard Shaw’s <em>Pygmalion</em>, the show has a score by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe and contains hit songs, like “I Could Have Danced All Night,” “I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face,” and “On the Street Where You Live.” The show made a star out of Julie Andrews, the flower girl who’s taught to speak “proper” English. However, she wasn’t enough of a star, according to producer Jack Warner, to be cast in the film, so the role went to Audrey Hepburn.\r\n\r\nLuckily for Andrews, she was cast as Mary Poppins the same year as <em>My Fair Lady</em>. She then got sweet revenge when Hepburn wasn’t nominated for an Oscar and, not only was Andrews nominated, but she won!\r\n<h3>Jamaica (1957)</h3>\r\n<em>Jamaica</em> is important in the evolution of Broadway because it was one of the few Golden Age musicals to have a Black leading lady. Harold Arlen and Yip Harburg (who composed the music and lyrics to <em>The Wizard of Oz</em>) wrote a score for <em>Jamaica</em> using the style of calypso music made popular by Harry Belafonte.\r\n\r\nThe musical was actually written <em>for</em> Belafonte, but when he became unavailable, the lead character was changed to a woman so Lena Horne could star. This role led to Horne being the first Black woman to be nominated for a Tony Award! And in the 1980s, she won a special Tony for <em>Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music.</em> In 2022, the Brooks Atkinson Theatre was renamed the Lena Horne Theatre, making her the first Black female performer to have her name on a Broadway theatre.\r\n<h3>The Music Man (1957)</h3>\r\n<em>The Music Man</em> is one of the rare shows with book, music, <em>and</em> lyrics all by the same person: Meredith Willson. On the surface, <em>The Music Man</em> appears to be an old-fashioned show with old-fashioned values, but it’s actually a very forward-thinking show. Rather than celebrate so-called small-town values, the show mocks the closed-mindedness of the citizens of River City, the fictional Iowa small town where the action takes place.\r\n<h3>West Side Story (1957)</h3>\r\nThe Broadway classic <em>West Side Story</em> is based on Shakespeare’s <em>Romeo and Juliet,</em> but instead of being about two feuding families, it’s about two rival gangs: The Sharks, whose members are of Puerto Rican heritage, and The Jets, whose members are of Polish heritage, represent the Capulets and the Montagues.\r\n\r\nThe show is filled with hit after hit: “Tonight,” “I Feel Pretty,” “Something’s Coming,” and “Somewhere,” which became a hit <em>again</em> almost 30 years later when Barbra Streisand recorded it for 1985’s <em>The Broadway Album.</em>\r\n\r\nThe role of Anita, created by Chita Rivera (see the photo above), requires not only comedic <em>and</em> dramatic acting chops, but also Broadway belting, and incredibly difficult dancing <em>while</em> singing. By all accounts, Rivera was brilliant as Anita. Yet, infuriatingly, not only did she <em>not</em> win a Tony Award, but she wasn’t even nominated. I’ve been traumatized by the unfairness since 1957, and I hadn’t even been born!\r\n<h3>Gypsy (1959)</h3>\r\n<em>Gypsy</em> is a musical fable based on the story of Gypsy Rose Lee, the famous stripper, and many consider it to be the all-time greatest American musical. Jule Styne wrote the music, and like <em>West Side Story</em>, Sondheim wrote the lyrics (his second Broadway musical) and Arthur Laurents was the playwright.\r\n\r\nEthel Merman originated the role of Mama Rose, and although it’s considered her greatest role, she didn’t win the Tony Award. That year it went to Mary Martin for <em>The Sound of Music,</em> adding fuel to the fire of their supposed feud. In truth, they were good friends and, on a side note, if you’re wondering what a Tony Award goes for, Mary Martin’s sold at an auction in 2015 for $35,000! I thought a nun takes a vow of poverty!\r\n<h3>The Sound of Music (1959)</h3>\r\n<em>The Sound of Music</em> represents the end of the Golden Age. Not only was it produced in 1959, which most people consider the final year of the Golden Age, but it was also the final musical written by R&H, whose <em>Oklahoma!</em> started the Golden Age.\r\n\r\nThe final lyrics that Hammerstein wrote were for the sweet folk tune “Edelweiss.” The show is based on the Von Trapp family singers and, proving again that Broadway embraces aging much more than Hollywood, Martin was 46 when she played the young virgin nun.\r\n\r\nBesides the title song, the show has the classic, “My Favorite Things,” which many consider a Christmas song for some reason. I guess because it references winter and presents?","description":"<figure style=\"margin: 0;\"><figcaption style=\"margin-bottom: 10px;\">Listen to the article:</figcaption><audio src=\"/wp-content/uploads/what-was-golden-age-broadway.mp3\" controls=\"controls\"><a href=\"/wp-content/uploads/what-was-golden-age-broadway.mp3\"><span data-mce-type=\"bookmark\" style=\"display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;\" class=\"mce_SELRES_start\"></span>Download audio</a></audio></figure>\r\nIf you ever have the option of using a time machine to relive the era when Broadway churned out hit after hit after hit, set those dials to the late 1940s and set your return date for the end of the 1950s. When you open your chamber door, you’ll be entering into what’s known as Broadway’s Golden Age.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_297870\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"wp-image-297870 size-full\" src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chita-rivera-west-side-story.jpg\" alt=\"Photo of Chita Rivera dancing in the Broadway musical West Side Story\" width=\"630\" height=\"494\" /> ©John Springer Collection / Getty Images<br />Chita Rivera (in front) dances in the Broadway musical West Side Story, which debuted in 1957.[/caption]\r\n\r\nAfter <em>Oklahoma!</em>, the hits just kept coming. Musicals that opened during these years are <em>still</em> being done all over the world — regionally and in summer stock, community theatre, high schools, and so on. And they’re often revived on Broadway. <em>Gypsy</em> (1959) has had five Broadway productions!\r\n\r\nRead on to find out why all the elements were right for the most fertile time in Broadway history and overviews of some of the most popular productions from this era.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >What made this age so golden?</h2>\r\nThe Golden Age came into its stride after World War II because of three main reasons:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>A bustling economy:</strong> Many Americans had money to spend on entertainment such as Broadway shows. Travel to New York City was easier, so tourists from across the United States and around the world could see Broadway shows, guaranteeing a steady stream of audience members.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Broadway on TV:</strong> <em>The Ed Sullivan Show,</em> which consistently staged long segments featuring Broadway musicals, brought Broadway shows into people’s living rooms every week. It’s one thing to have heard the title of the new R&H musical, and perhaps bought the album out of curiosity, but it was another to see the original cast perform three songs with full staging, whetting your appetite to order tickets and see the entire production.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Better quality:</strong> Broadway shows had reached a level not seen before; American tastes coincided with what Broadway was producing.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >The shows that defined the Golden Age</h2>\r\nShows of the Golden Age had many differences, yet the bones of them were the same:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>They were different because they took place in various locations (Siam, New York City, Napa Valley, London), different time periods (modern day, the 1920s, the 1930s, the 1800s, the early 1900s), and had different styles of music (classical, tin pan alley, jazz, swing).</li>\r\n \t<li>They were all similar in terms of having an overture, an intermission, a chorus, multiple leads, big and small moments of comedy, dancing, and more.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nHowever different or similar, the following Golden Age musicals are all musical theatre classics and are the result of the most fertile time on Broadway in terms of hit shows. (For more details and interesting anecdotes about these shows, check out my book <a href=\"//www.coursofppt.com/book/academics-the-arts/performing-arts/theater/musical-theatre-for-dummies-297053/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><em>Musical Theatre For Dummies</em></a>.)\r\n<h3>On the Town (1944)</h3>\r\nWhen <em>Oklahoma!</em> opened in 1943, three audience members were poised to have their own musical smash just a year later. On that fateful opening night, composer Leonard Bernstein and lyricist/librettists Betty Comden and Adolph Green, apparently, were on the street and offered tickets to <em>Oklahoma!</em> By 1944, they had their own hit musical called <em>On the Town.</em> The three not only wrote it, but Comden and Green also starred in two of the six main roles!\r\n<h3>Kiss Me, Kate (1948)</h3>\r\nCole Porter had a smash with <em>Anything Goes</em> in the 1930s, but <em>Kiss Me, Kate</em> proved to be his longest-running hit. The show lasted for more than 1,000 performances on Broadway, was made into a film, and was revived on Broadway in the late 1990s and again in 2019.\r\n\r\nThe show-within-a-show concept centered around two former lovers (who fall in love again) playing the leads in a musical version of <em>The Taming of the Shrew. </em>Porter churned out a bunch of hit songs for the show, like “Too Darn Hot,” “Wunderbar,” and “So in Love.”\r\n<h3>South Pacific (1949)</h3>\r\nRichard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, who were already famous for <em>State Fair, Carousel</em>, and <em>Oklahoma!</em>, continued their successful partnership with this musical based on James Michener’s <em>Tales of the South Pacific.</em>\r\n\r\nYou probably know this show is filled with beautiful songs like “Some Enchanted Evening,” “This Nearly Was Mine,” “Younger Than Springtime,” and “Bali Ha’i,” and charming uptempos like “Cockeyed Optimist,” and “Wonderful Guy.” But did you know it also has a strong progressive and anti-racism message?\r\n\r\nR&H got a lot of pushback for their song, “You’ve Got to be Carefully Taught,” which explains that racism is passed down from generation to generation, but they insisted the song stay in the show.\r\n<h3>Guys and Dolls (1950)</h3>\r\n<em>Guys and Dolls</em> was composer/lyricist Frank Loesser’s second hit Broadway musical (his first was <em>Where’s Charley?</em> in 1948, based on the play <em>Charley’s Aunt</em>) and was called “The greatest American Musical of all time” by Bob Fosse.\r\n\r\n<em>Guys and Dolls</em> was a smash on Broadway, a successful film, and had an enormously successful revival in the 1990s, winning Faith Prince a Best Actress in a Musical Tony Award for her show-stopping performance as Miss Adelaide. “Luck Be a Lady Tonight” and “I’ve Never Been in Love Before” are just two of the hit songs from <em>Guys and Dolls.</em>\r\n<h3>The King and I (1951)</h3>\r\nOne of R&H’s most enduring musicals, <em>The King and I</em> has been a Hollywood film and revived on Broadway three times. It continues to play all over the world. The musical is based on the novel <em>Anna and the King of Siam,</em> which was based on the memoirs of Anna, an actual British governess who went to Siam (now Thailand) to be a governess for the King’s children.\r\n\r\nThe show won numerous Tony Awards, including Best Musical, and introduced now classic R&H tunes, like “I Whistle a Happy Tune,” “Hello, Young Lovers,” and “Something Wonderful.” Original leads Gertrude Lawrence and Yul Brenner both won Tony Awards for their performances of Anna and the King, respectively.\r\n<h3>The Pajama Game (1954)</h3>\r\n<em>The Pajama Game</em> has a libretto by George Abbott and a score by then newcomers Richard Adler and Jerry Ross; it’s a truly enjoyable show featuring the often recorded “Hey, There” and, one of my personal favorites, “I’m Not at All in Love.”\r\n\r\nThis musical also boasts the Broadway debut of two theatrical titans <em>and</em> the launchpad of a movie star. <em>The Pajama Game</em> was the very first show produced by the man who won more Tony Awards than anyone else, Hal Prince!\r\n\r\nHal Prince hired Bob Fosse to choreograph, starting Fosse’s ascension as one of the most famous choreographers (and later director) on Broadway. Carol Haney played the role of Gladys and got rave reviews dancing and singing the lead in the trio “Steam Heat.” No one ever thought she’d miss a show, but she had no choice when she hurt her ankle. Her understudy went on (without rehearsal) and because a film agent was in the audience, she wound up signing a five-year Hollywood contract. The understudy was Shirley MacLaine, and that story has given hope to understudies ever since.\r\n<h3>Damn Yankees (1955)</h3>\r\nThe next musical that contained a score by Adler and Ross was <em>Damn Yankees.</em> Again, produced by Hal Prince with choreography by Fosse, this show cemented the stardom of Gwen Verdon who played Lola, a woman who sold her soul to the devil in order to be beautiful. The plot involves Joe Hardy who temporarily sells his soul to the devil so his beloved baseball team, The Washington Senators, can beat those “damn Yankees” and the Devil wants Lola to use her skills so he can own Joe’s soul permanently.\r\n<h3>My Fair Lady (1956)</h3>\r\nThe longest running musical of the 1950s was <em>My Fair Lady</em>. Based on George Bernard Shaw’s <em>Pygmalion</em>, the show has a score by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe and contains hit songs, like “I Could Have Danced All Night,” “I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face,” and “On the Street Where You Live.” The show made a star out of Julie Andrews, the flower girl who’s taught to speak “proper” English. However, she wasn’t enough of a star, according to producer Jack Warner, to be cast in the film, so the role went to Audrey Hepburn.\r\n\r\nLuckily for Andrews, she was cast as Mary Poppins the same year as <em>My Fair Lady</em>. She then got sweet revenge when Hepburn wasn’t nominated for an Oscar and, not only was Andrews nominated, but she won!\r\n<h3>Jamaica (1957)</h3>\r\n<em>Jamaica</em> is important in the evolution of Broadway because it was one of the few Golden Age musicals to have a Black leading lady. Harold Arlen and Yip Harburg (who composed the music and lyrics to <em>The Wizard of Oz</em>) wrote a score for <em>Jamaica</em> using the style of calypso music made popular by Harry Belafonte.\r\n\r\nThe musical was actually written <em>for</em> Belafonte, but when he became unavailable, the lead character was changed to a woman so Lena Horne could star. This role led to Horne being the first Black woman to be nominated for a Tony Award! And in the 1980s, she won a special Tony for <em>Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music.</em> In 2022, the Brooks Atkinson Theatre was renamed the Lena Horne Theatre, making her the first Black female performer to have her name on a Broadway theatre.\r\n<h3>The Music Man (1957)</h3>\r\n<em>The Music Man</em> is one of the rare shows with book, music, <em>and</em> lyrics all by the same person: Meredith Willson. On the surface, <em>The Music Man</em> appears to be an old-fashioned show with old-fashioned values, but it’s actually a very forward-thinking show. Rather than celebrate so-called small-town values, the show mocks the closed-mindedness of the citizens of River City, the fictional Iowa small town where the action takes place.\r\n<h3>West Side Story (1957)</h3>\r\nThe Broadway classic <em>West Side Story</em> is based on Shakespeare’s <em>Romeo and Juliet,</em> but instead of being about two feuding families, it’s about two rival gangs: The Sharks, whose members are of Puerto Rican heritage, and The Jets, whose members are of Polish heritage, represent the Capulets and the Montagues.\r\n\r\nThe show is filled with hit after hit: “Tonight,” “I Feel Pretty,” “Something’s Coming,” and “Somewhere,” which became a hit <em>again</em> almost 30 years later when Barbra Streisand recorded it for 1985’s <em>The Broadway Album.</em>\r\n\r\nThe role of Anita, created by Chita Rivera (see the photo above), requires not only comedic <em>and</em> dramatic acting chops, but also Broadway belting, and incredibly difficult dancing <em>while</em> singing. By all accounts, Rivera was brilliant as Anita. Yet, infuriatingly, not only did she <em>not</em> win a Tony Award, but she wasn’t even nominated. I’ve been traumatized by the unfairness since 1957, and I hadn’t even been born!\r\n<h3>Gypsy (1959)</h3>\r\n<em>Gypsy</em> is a musical fable based on the story of Gypsy Rose Lee, the famous stripper, and many consider it to be the all-time greatest American musical. Jule Styne wrote the music, and like <em>West Side Story</em>, Sondheim wrote the lyrics (his second Broadway musical) and Arthur Laurents was the playwright.\r\n\r\nEthel Merman originated the role of Mama Rose, and although it’s considered her greatest role, she didn’t win the Tony Award. That year it went to Mary Martin for <em>The Sound of Music,</em> adding fuel to the fire of their supposed feud. In truth, they were good friends and, on a side note, if you’re wondering what a Tony Award goes for, Mary Martin’s sold at an auction in 2015 for $35,000! I thought a nun takes a vow of poverty!\r\n<h3>The Sound of Music (1959)</h3>\r\n<em>The Sound of Music</em> represents the end of the Golden Age. Not only was it produced in 1959, which most people consider the final year of the Golden Age, but it was also the final musical written by R&H, whose <em>Oklahoma!</em> started the Golden Age.\r\n\r\nThe final lyrics that Hammerstein wrote were for the sweet folk tune “Edelweiss.” The show is based on the Von Trapp family singers and, proving again that Broadway embraces aging much more than Hollywood, Martin was 46 when she played the young virgin nun.\r\n\r\nBesides the title song, the show has the classic, “My Favorite Things,” which many consider a Christmas song for some reason. I guess because it references winter and presents?","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":35250,"name":"Seth Rudetsky","slug":"seth-rudetsky","description":" <p><b>Seth Rudetsky </b>is the afternoon host of “On Broadway” on SIRIUSXM<sup>®</sup>. Seth has played piano and/or conducted more than a dozen Broadway shows, including <i>Les Misérables, The Phantom of the Opera</i>, and <i>Grease</i>. He co-wrote and starred on Broadway in the <i>New York Times</i> Critics pick musical <I>DISASTER!</I> During the COVID lockdown, he and his husband James Wesley raised more than $1,000,000 for the Actors Fund with their online show <i>Stars In The House</i>. For more info go to SethRudetsky.com. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35250"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33747,"title":"Performing Arts","slug":"performing-arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"What made this age so golden?","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"The shows that defined the Golden Age","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":297890,"title":"How To Audition for a Musical Theatre Production","slug":"how-to-audition-for-a-musical-theatre-production","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297890"}},{"articleId":297881,"title":"Guide To Buying Broadway Show Tickets","slug":"guide-to-buying-broadway-show-tickets","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297881"}},{"articleId":297205,"title":"Musical Theatre For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"musical-theatre-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","theater"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297205"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":297890,"title":"How To Audition for a Musical Theatre Production","slug":"how-to-audition-for-a-musical-theatre-production","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297890"}},{"articleId":297881,"title":"Guide To Buying Broadway Show Tickets","slug":"guide-to-buying-broadway-show-tickets","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297881"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":297053,"slug":"musical-theatre-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119889502","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","theater"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119889502/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119889502/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119889502-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119889502/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119889502/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/musical-theatre-for-dummies-cover-1119889502-206x255.jpg","width":206,"height":255},"title":"Musical Theatre For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"35250\">Seth Rudetsky</b> </b>is the afternoon host of “On Broadway” on SIRIUSXM<sup>®</sup>. Seth has played piano and/or conducted more than a dozen Broadway shows, including <i>Les Misérables, The Phantom of the Opera</i>, and <i>Grease</i>. He co-wrote and starred on Broadway in the <i>New York Times</i> Critics pick musical <I>DISASTER!</I> During the COVID lockdown, he and his husband James Wesley raised more than $1,000,000 for the Actors Fund with their online show <i>Stars In The House</i>. For more info go to SethRudetsky.com.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":35250,"name":"Seth Rudetsky","slug":"seth-rudetsky","description":" <p><b>Seth Rudetsky </b>is the afternoon host of “On Broadway” on SIRIUSXM<sup>®</sup>. Seth has played piano and/or conducted more than a dozen Broadway shows, including <i>Les Misérables, The Phantom of the Opera</i>, and <i>Grease</i>. He co-wrote and starred on Broadway in the <i>New York Times</i> Critics pick musical <I>DISASTER!</I> During the COVID lockdown, he and his husband James Wesley raised more than $1,000,000 for the Actors Fund with their online show <i>Stars In The House</i>. For more info go to SethRudetsky.com. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35250"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;performing-arts&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119889502&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-641480aeaff9f\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;performing-arts&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119889502&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-641480aeb0dc0\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-03-15T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":297863},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T15:42:52+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-02-22T15:41:07+00:00","timestamp":"2024-02-22T18:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Performing Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747"},"slug":"performing-arts","categoryId":33747},{"name":"Film","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33749"},"slug":"film","categoryId":33749}],"title":"A Brief History of the Oscars","strippedTitle":"a brief history of the oscars","slug":"a-brief-history-of-the-oscars","canonicalUrl":"","查找发动机提高":{"metaDescription":"Learn about the Academy Awards, including when they started, a bit about the voting process, and interesting trivia about the winners.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"The <em>Academy Awards</em>, casually called the<em> Oscars</em>, is a formal awards ceremony to honor the best achievements in filmmaking from the previous year. The Academy Awards, from the nomination and voting processes to the ceremony itself, are overseen by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.\r\n\r\nThe Academy has more than 10,000 members and is a professional honorary society of people involved in all aspects of making movies.\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 267px;\">[caption id=\"\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"267\"]<img src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/358079.image0.jpg\" alt=\"[Credit: ©iStockphoto.comAydin Multa 2013]\" width=\"267\" height=\"400\" /> ©Aydin Multa / iStockphoto.com[/caption]</div>\r\nThe first Academy Awards were distributed in 1929 at the Hotel Roosevelt in Hollywood. Cinema has changed since then, and so have the categories for awards. Currently there are 24 awards categories presented at the ceremony, with more Oscars handed out for other lesser achievements before the formal ceremony.\r\n\r\nSome top categories of Academy Awards are Best Actor/Actress in a Leading Role, Best Actor/Actress in a Supporting Role, Best Picture, Best Director, Best Costume Design, Best Music, Best Visual Effects, and Best Animated Feature Film.\r\n\r\nOne of the more prestigious award ceremonies in the world, The Academy Awards ceremony is televised in over 100 countries. Those who love cinema tune in to see how their favorite movies and performers fare. Those who love fashion watch to see what the celebrities are wearing — which is often the latest in couture with astronomically expensive (usually loaned) jewelry.\r\n\r\nA film must open in the previous calendar year in Los Angeles County to qualify for the next year's Academy Awards ceremony (the one exception to this is Best Foreign Language Film).\r\n\r\nOften, if moviemakers think they have an award winner on their hands, they'll release a movie in the last week of the year to qualify for the upcoming awards. For example, <em>Silver Linings Playbook</em> was released on December 25, 2012 and was nominated for Best Picture and other Oscars in January, 2013). Conversely, the 2009 Best Picture Winner, <em>The Hurt Locker</em>, was first released in 2008, but didn't release in Los Angeles County until 2009, so it won its Best Picture award in 2010.\r\n\r\nIn late December, all Academy members receive ballots to select nominees for the next ceremony. For most categories, Academy members vote only for their peers (directors vote for nominees for Best Director, actors vote for nominees for Best Actor, etc.).\r\n\r\nThe exceptions to this are for Foreign Film, Documentary, and Animated Feature Film categories, which are nominated by special committees made up of members across the Academy, and all members are allowed to vote for nominees for the coveted Best Picture award.\r\n\r\nThe winners for each category are determined by a second voting round, which is opened up to all members of the Academy for most categories.\r\n\r\nHere is some fun Oscar trivia:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Walt Disney won more Academy Awards than any other person, with 26 Oscars (22 for his films and four honorary awards).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Edith Head won more Academy Awards than any other woman, with eight Oscars (all for Costume Design).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Katharine Hepburn won more Academy Awards than any other actor/actress, with four Oscars.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>Jack Nicholson, Daniel Day-Lewis, and Walter Brennan are tied for male actors winning the most Oscars.</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Meryl Streep has been nominated for more Academy Awards than any other actor/actress, with 21 nominations (she's won three times).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Three films are tied for winning the most Oscars total: 11. These films were: <em>Ben-Hur</em>, in 1960; <em>Titanic</em>, in 1998; and <em>The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King</em>, in 2003.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Tatum O'Neal is the youngest person to win an Oscar — she was 10 when she won Best Supporting Actress for <em>Paper Moon</em> (1973).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Anthony Hopkins is the oldest person to win the Best Actor award; at age 83, he won for <em>The Father</em> in 2020. Before that, it was Christopher Plummer, who was 82 when he won for <em>Beginners</em> (2010).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">James Dean is the only person to be nominated for two posthumous Academy Awards, for <em>East of Eden</em> (1956) and <em>Giant</em> (1957).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Beatrice Straight holds the record for winning an acting award for the shortest role — in 1975's <em>Network</em>, she was on screen for 5:40 minutes.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Woody Allen has been nominated for 21 Academy Awards, but he's only attended the ceremony once (in a year he wasn't nominated).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">No one really knows how The Oscars got its name. One story is that an Academy librarian saw one of the first statuettes and exclaimed \"it looks just like my Uncle Oscar!\" Another story is that Bette Davis named it after her ex-husband, Harmon Oscar Nelson, Jr.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"The <em>Academy Awards</em>, casually called the<em> Oscars</em>, is a formal awards ceremony to honor the best achievements in filmmaking from the previous year. The Academy Awards, from the nomination and voting processes to the ceremony itself, are overseen by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.\r\n\r\nThe Academy has more than 10,000 members and is a professional honorary society of people involved in all aspects of making movies.\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 267px;\">[caption id=\"\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"267\"]<img src=\"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/358079.image0.jpg\" alt=\"[Credit: ©iStockphoto.comAydin Multa 2013]\" width=\"267\" height=\"400\" /> ©Aydin Multa / iStockphoto.com[/caption]</div>\r\nThe first Academy Awards were distributed in 1929 at the Hotel Roosevelt in Hollywood. Cinema has changed since then, and so have the categories for awards. Currently there are 24 awards categories presented at the ceremony, with more Oscars handed out for other lesser achievements before the formal ceremony.\r\n\r\nSome top categories of Academy Awards are Best Actor/Actress in a Leading Role, Best Actor/Actress in a Supporting Role, Best Picture, Best Director, Best Costume Design, Best Music, Best Visual Effects, and Best Animated Feature Film.\r\n\r\nOne of the more prestigious award ceremonies in the world, The Academy Awards ceremony is televised in over 100 countries. Those who love cinema tune in to see how their favorite movies and performers fare. Those who love fashion watch to see what the celebrities are wearing — which is often the latest in couture with astronomically expensive (usually loaned) jewelry.\r\n\r\nA film must open in the previous calendar year in Los Angeles County to qualify for the next year's Academy Awards ceremony (the one exception to this is Best Foreign Language Film).\r\n\r\nOften, if moviemakers think they have an award winner on their hands, they'll release a movie in the last week of the year to qualify for the upcoming awards. For example, <em>Silver Linings Playbook</em> was released on December 25, 2012 and was nominated for Best Picture and other Oscars in January, 2013). Conversely, the 2009 Best Picture Winner, <em>The Hurt Locker</em>, was first released in 2008, but didn't release in Los Angeles County until 2009, so it won its Best Picture award in 2010.\r\n\r\nIn late December, all Academy members receive ballots to select nominees for the next ceremony. For most categories, Academy members vote only for their peers (directors vote for nominees for Best Director, actors vote for nominees for Best Actor, etc.).\r\n\r\nThe exceptions to this are for Foreign Film, Documentary, and Animated Feature Film categories, which are nominated by special committees made up of members across the Academy, and all members are allowed to vote for nominees for the coveted Best Picture award.\r\n\r\nThe winners for each category are determined by a second voting round, which is opened up to all members of the Academy for most categories.\r\n\r\nHere is some fun Oscar trivia:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Walt Disney won more Academy Awards than any other person, with 26 Oscars (22 for his films and four honorary awards).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Edith Head won more Academy Awards than any other woman, with eight Oscars (all for Costume Design).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Katharine Hepburn won more Academy Awards than any other actor/actress, with four Oscars.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>Jack Nicholson, Daniel Day-Lewis, and Walter Brennan are tied for male actors winning the most Oscars.</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Meryl Streep has been nominated for more Academy Awards than any other actor/actress, with 21 nominations (she's won three times).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Three films are tied for winning the most Oscars total: 11. These films were: <em>Ben-Hur</em>, in 1960; <em>Titanic</em>, in 1998; and <em>The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King</em>, in 2003.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Tatum O'Neal is the youngest person to win an Oscar — she was 10 when she won Best Supporting Actress for <em>Paper Moon</em> (1973).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Anthony Hopkins is the oldest person to win the Best Actor award; at age 83, he won for <em>The Father</em> in 2020. Before that, it was Christopher Plummer, who was 82 when he won for <em>Beginners</em> (2010).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">James Dean is the only person to be nominated for two posthumous Academy Awards, for <em>East of Eden</em> (1956) and <em>Giant</em> (1957).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Beatrice Straight holds the record for winning an acting award for the shortest role — in 1975's <em>Network</em>, she was on screen for 5:40 minutes.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Woody Allen has been nominated for 21 Academy Awards, but he's only attended the ceremony once (in a year he wasn't nominated).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">No one really knows how The Oscars got its name. One story is that an Academy librarian saw one of the first statuettes and exclaimed \"it looks just like my Uncle Oscar!\" Another story is that Bette Davis named it after her ex-husband, Harmon Oscar Nelson, Jr.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9387,"name":"Scott Barnes","slug":"scott-barnes","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9387"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33749,"title":"Film","slug":"film","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33749"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":284321,"title":"Bollywood For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"bollywood-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284321"}},{"articleId":266979,"title":"10 Tips for Shooting on Your Smartphone","slug":"10-tips-for-shooting-on-your-smartphone","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266979"}},{"articleId":266974,"title":"Secrets to Entering and Winning Film Festivals","slug":"secrets-to-entering-and-winning-film-festivals","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266974"}},{"articleId":266967,"title":"Filmmaking and Makeup Special Effects","slug":"filmmaking-and-makeup-special-effects","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266967"}},{"articleId":266962,"title":"Editing Your Movie: Putting One Frame in Front of the Other","slug":"editing-your-movie-putting-one-frame-in-front-of-the-other","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","film"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/266962"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;performing-arts&quot;,&quot;film&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63f6585e9a03a\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;performing-arts&quot;,&quot;film&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63f6585e9aa66\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-02-22T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":170148},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-02-10T17:15:55+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-02-13T15:01:20+00:00","timestamp":"2024-02-13T18:01:21+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Performing Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747"},"slug":"performing-arts","categoryId":33747},{"name":"Theater","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33750"},"slug":"theater","categoryId":33750}],"title":"Musical Theatre For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"musical theatre for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"musical-theatre-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","查找发动机提高":{"metaDescription":"This Cheat Sheet is a great reference for the great shows and songs of musical theatre, including classics and recent productions.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Whether you strive to become involved with musical theatre or you’re an enthusiastic fan who can’t get enough, you’ll want to know which shows truly made a difference in musical history. Want to star in a musical? Find out how to nail the audition! Want to impress even your most-in-the-know friends? Reference off-Broadway musicals!","description":"Whether you strive to become involved with musical theatre or you’re an enthusiastic fan who can’t get enough, you’ll want to know which shows truly made a difference in musical history. Want to star in a musical? Find out how to nail the audition! Want to impress even your most-in-the-know friends? Reference off-Broadway musicals!","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":35250,"name":"Seth Rudetsky","slug":"seth-rudetsky","description":"<b>Seth Rudetsky </b>is the afternoon host of “On Broadway” on SIRIUSXM<sup>®</sup>. Seth has played piano for and/or conducted more than a dozen Broadway shows, including <i>Les Misérables, The Phantom of the Opera</i>, and <i>Grease</i>. He co-wrote and starred on Broadway in the <i>New York Times</i> Critics pick musical <i>DISASTER!</i> During the COVID lockdown, he and his husband James Wesley raised more than $1 million for the Actors Fund with their online show <i>Stars In The House</i>. For more information, go to SethRudetsky.com.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35250"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33750,"title":"Theater","slug":"theater","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33750"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":209343,"title":"Breaking Into Acting For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"breaking-into-acting-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","theater"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209343"}},{"articleId":208633,"title":"Playwriting For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"playwriting-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","theater"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/208633"}},{"articleId":208135,"title":"Voice Acting For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"voice-acting-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","theater"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/208135"}},{"articleId":201309,"title":"Figuring Out What You Need to Succeed in Acting","slug":"figuring-out-what-you-need-to-succeed-in-acting","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","theater"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/201309"}},{"articleId":201284,"title":"Fine-Tuning Your Acting Performance on Film","slug":"fine-tuning-your-acting-performance-on-film","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","theater"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/201284"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":297053,"slug":"musical-theatre-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119889502","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","performing-arts","theater"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119889502/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119889502/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119889502-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119889502/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119889502/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//www.coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/musical-theatre-for-dummies-cover-1119889502-206x255.jpg","width":206,"height":255},"title":"Musical Theatre For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"35250\">Seth Rudetsky</b> </b>is the afternoon host of “On Broadway” on SIRIUSXM<sup>®</sup>. Seth has played piano for and/or conducted more than a dozen Broadway shows, including <i>Les Misérables, The Phantom of the Opera</i>, and <i>Grease</i>. He co-wrote and starred on Broadway in the <i>New York Times</i> Critics pick musical <i>DISASTER!</i> During the COVID lockdown, he and his husband James Wesley raised more than $1 million for the Actors Fund with their online show <i>Stars In The House</i>. For more information, go to SethRudetsky.com.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":35250,"name":"Seth Rudetsky","slug":"seth-rudetsky","description":"<b>Seth Rudetsky </b>is the afternoon host of “On Broadway” on SIRIUSXM<sup>®</sup>. Seth has played piano for and/or conducted more than a dozen Broadway shows, including <i>Les Misérables, The Phantom of the Opera</i>, and <i>Grease</i>. He co-wrote and starred on Broadway in the <i>New York Times</i> Critics pick musical <i>DISASTER!</i> During the COVID lockdown, he and his husband James Wesley raised more than $1 million for the Actors Fund with their online show <i>Stars In The House</i>. For more information, go to SethRudetsky.com.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35250"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;performing-arts&quot;,&quot;theater&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119889502&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63ea7af14f477\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;performing-arts&quot;,&quot;theater&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119889502&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63ea7af15044c\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":0,"title":"","slug":null,"categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/"}}],"content":[{"title":"Musical theatre productions that changed Broadway","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Here are the shows that changed Broadway that you should know as a true musical theatre fan. Listen to the original cast recordings, buy the script and read it, see a local production, (and even watch the movie).</p>\n<p>Do whatever you can do, so you know more than just the titles of these shows:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><em>Oklahoma!</em> incorporated story, music, lyrics, <em>and </em>dance. Its production marked the birth of the modern musical.</li>\n<li><em>West Side Story </em>brought gritty modern-day realism to Broadway, and it was Stephen Sondheim’s Broadway debut.</li>\n<li><em>Hair </em>is considered the first rock musical. And it’s the first musical with full frontal nudity!</li>\n<li><em>A Chorus Line </em>is a musical about the people who are in musicals and what it takes to get a job.</li>\n<li><em>Les Misérables, The Phantom of the Opera, </em>and<em> Miss Saigon </em>brought the British invasion of the 1980s that started the mega-long-running musical trend.</li>\n<li><em>Rent </em>made musicals cool again.</li>\n<li><em>Hamilton </em>is the first successful musical to use a major amount of hip hop and rap in the score. This show is a worldwide phenomenon — a hit wherever it plays.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Auditioning tips for musical theatre","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>You’re finally going to audition for a musical. Uh-oh. Now what? What must you know before you walk into that room with the pianist and the powers-that-be? Here are some quick tips you can use, so no one knows it’s your first time:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Familiarize yourself with the show.</strong> Read a synopsis of the show and listen to the cast recording. Is there a role that you think you’re right for? Mention it when you audition.</li>\n<li><strong>Bring a song in the style of the show.</strong> Yes, maybe you sound amazing on Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “People Will Say We’re in Love,” but that doesn’t have much to do with any of the songs in <em>Rent.</em> Similarly, if you sound amazing as a Schuyler sister, it doesn’t matter if the audition is for Cosette in <em>Les Misérables.</em></li>\n<li><strong>Practice your music with a pianist.</strong> There’s nothing worse than showing up to an audition and finding out your audition song is in the totally wrong key.</li>\n<li><strong>Dress like the era of the show.</strong> I don’t mean to wear a costume, but if you’re auditioning for the Mad Men era musical <em>How to Succeed in Business without Really Trying,</em> don’t wear a tank top and jeggings. As a matter of fact, don’t ever wear jeggings!</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"10 off-Broadway musical recordings you should know","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Plenty of off-Broadway musicals are fantastic. Here’s a list of ten (just know that the list of off-Broadway greats is much longer):</p>\n<h3><strong><em>The Last Five Years</em></strong></h3>\n<p>This show has an interesting concept; it focuses on a couple whose marriage has ended, but the female character begins the show at the end of the marriage and the male character begins the show at the start of the relationship. Her journey travels backward and his travels forward.</p>\n<p>The score has the wonderful songs of Jason Robert Brown and the recording is wonderful. The two stars, Norbert Leo Butz and Sherie Rene Scott, are at the top of their game, and Brown, the composer himself, is on piano!</p>\n<h3><strong><em>Falsettoland</em></strong></h3>\n<p>Music and lyrics are by William Finn and story by Finn and James Lapine. This became Act Two of Broadway’s <em>Falsettos,</em> but it was a stand-alone musical Off-Broadway in the late 1980s.</p>\n<p>Ultimately, it’s the incredibly sad story of Whizzer contracting AIDS and how that affects his ex (and then current) boyfriend Marvin and Marvin’s family. Yet, even though it’s sad, it also has so much comedy. It’s a beautiful and stunning masterpiece. Listen to the cast album from start to finish, and you’ll get the entire show — it’s all music!</p>\n<h3><strong><em>Forbidden Broadway</em></strong></h3>\n<p>This show began in the early 1980s because Gerard Alessandrini, then a struggling actor, was always rewriting comedy lyrics to Broadway songs.  He took a bunch of his parodies and put it into a four-person show at Palsson’s Supper Club (now called The Triad).</p>\n<p>This show has many versions because it’s been updated so many times. Get a bunch of the CDs (or stream them or whatever), and you’ll hear so many funny parodies.</p>\n<p>The original lyric in <em>Les Miz </em>is “At the end of the day you’re another day older,”  but Allesendrini changes it to comment on how the show was three hours and 15 minutes, and it becomes “At the end of the play you’re another year older.” Hilarious!</p>\n<h3><strong><em>The Wild Party</em></strong></h3>\n<p>An incredible score by Andrew Lippa and an incredible cast singing it, including Brian d’Arcy James, Taye Diggs, Julia Murney, and Idina Menzel.</p>\n<h3><strong><em>You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown</em></strong></h3>\n<p>So many charming and sweet songs, like “Happiness” (“Happiness is two kinds of ice cream”) and my favorite, “The Book Report.”</p>\n<p>This one has every character writing a book report on Peter Rabbit, and each character is so clear. Linus is writing a PhD level thesis; Schroeder is obsessed with Robin Hood and keeps turning the report back to that plotline; Lucy is obsessed with the word count; and Charlie Brown spends the entire song procrastinating. So brilliant!</p>\n<h3><strong><em>The Fantastiks</em></strong></h3>\n<p>The longest running off-Broadway musical was longest running for a reason. It truly is fantastik (sic!). Each song has beautiful/jazzy melodies and extremely clever yet simple lyrics and tells a lovely story that’s summed up in the opening lyrics, “without a hurt, the heart is hollow.”</p>\n<h3><strong><em>Jacques Brel Is Alive and Well and Living in Paris</em></strong></h3>\n<p>With a cast of four, this show features an entire score of songs written by French music writer/singing star Jacques Brel and translated English lyrics by Eric Blau and Mort Shuman. It has light songs like “Madeline” and “Jackie” and devastating songs like “Sons of” and “The Old Folks.”</p>\n<h3><strong><em>Altar Boyz</em></strong></h3>\n<p>Most of the shows in this list have lots of humor within them, but this one is a pure comedy. <em>Altar Boyz</em> is about a Christian boy band, and, boy, the singing is so great. It’s all in five-part harmony and sounds like all those great boy band songs you loved when you were a teenager.</p>\n<p>The talented cast is filled with great comic actors who are also great singers. And the songs aren’t only really melodious but also have so many super-funny lyrics parodying what a Christian boy band would sing, like “Jesus Called Me on My Cell Phone” and the love song one of the boyz sings to his girlfriend: “Girl, You Make Me Wanna Wait.” Hi-lar!</p>\n<h3><strong><em>Zanna, Don’t</em></strong></h3>\n<p>This is a wonderful cast album of a very special show. Tim Acito wrote the book, music, and lyrics to this musical about a high school where two people fall in love — what’s sometimes called “forbidden love.” But it’s not a gay love affair, it’s the opposite.</p>\n<p>In the world of <em>Zanna, Don’t!,</em> everyone is gay. That’s the norm. And when a boy and a girl fall in love, and their fellow students find out, what happens to them sadly mirrors what happens to many gay teenagers.</p>\n<p>Despite the profound message of this show, it also has so much joy in it, especially within the score. What’s also fun is some dialogue on the album where you can hear how Devanand Janki (who directed and choreographed) kept the style so consistent, almost representational and yet real.</p>\n<p>The whole cast is fantastic, but pay special attention to the high beltin’ ladies, Shelley Thomas and Anika Larsen, (who went on to be nominated for a Tony Award for playing Cynthia Weil in <em>Beautiful: The Carole King Musical</em>) in the song “Ride ‘Em” and “Whatcha Got.” So good!</p>\n<h3><strong><em>Bat Boy</em></strong></h3>\n<p>Those who were around in the 1980s might remember the tabloid called <em>The Weekly World News.</em> A common cover feature about Bat Boy told the story of a half boy/half bat who was on the run and “very dangerous” according to police.</p>\n<p>The story of Bat Boy was turned into a musical that could have been a one-joke <em>Saturday Night Live</em> sketch. Instead, it’s consistently filled with humor, along with  depth and pathos. The music is so tuneful, and the lyrics are so extremely clever (both by Laurence O’Keefe).</p>\n<p>If the show had transferred to Broadway, Deven May probably would have been nominated for a Tony Award (and quite possibly won) for his brilliant, comedic performance as the Bat Boy, going from a wild animal to an educated young man with a British accent.</p>\n<p>And the same goes for Kaitlin Hopkins who stopped the show every time with her high camp, yet very real performance as the woman who adopts — yet ultimately rejects — the Bat Boy.</p>\n<p>Listen to the song “Three Bedroom House” and enjoy her yell &#8220;Shelly, NOOOO!” sounding like a classic B movie. And then she hauls out her amazing belt on the final note. Brilliant!</p>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-02-10T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":297205}],"_links":{"self":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747/categoryArticles?sortField=time&sortOrder=1&size=10&offset=0"},"next":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747/categoryArticles?sortField=time&sortOrder=1&size=10&offset=10"},"last":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33747/categoryArticles?sortField=time&sortOrder=1&size=10&offset=92"}}},"objectTitle":"","status":"success","pageType":"article-category","objectId":"33747","page":1,"sortField":"time","sortOrder":1,"categoriesIds":[],"articleTypes":[],"filterData":{"categoriesFilter":[{"itemId":0,"itemName":"All Categories","count":102},{"itemId":33748,"itemName":"Dance","count":8},{"itemId":33749,"itemName":"Film","count":69},{"itemId":33747,"itemName":"Performing Arts","count":3},{"itemId":33750,"itemName":"Theater","count":22}],"articleTypeFilter":[{"articleType":"All Types","count":102},{"articleType":"Articles","count":83},{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","count":9},{"articleType":"Step by Step","count":2},{"articleType":"Videos","count":8}]},"filterDataLoadedStatus":"success","pageSize":10},"adsState":{"pageScripts":{"headers":{"timestamp":"2025-01-31T00:50:01+00:00"},"adsId":0,"data":{"scripts":[{"pages":["all"],"location":"header","script":"<!--Optimizely Script-->\r\n<script src=\"//cdn.optimizely.com/js/10563184655.js\"></script>","enabled":false},{"pages":["all"],"location":"header","script":"<!-- comScore Tag -->\r\n<script>var _comscore = _comscore || [];_comscore.push({ c1: \"2\", c2: \"15097263\" });(function() {var s = document.createElement(\"script\"), el = document.getElementsByTagName(\"script\")[0]; s.async = true;s.src = (document.location.protocol == \"https:\" ? \"//sb\" : \"//b\") + \".scorecardresearch.com/beacon.js\";el.parentNode.insertBefore(s, el);})();</script><noscript><img src=\"//sb.scorecardresearch.com/p?c1=2&c2=15097263&cv=2.0&cj=1\" /></noscript>\r\n<!-- / comScore Tag -->","enabled":true},{"pages":["all"],"location":"footer","script":"<!--BEGIN QUALTRICS WEBSITE FEEDBACK SNIPPET-->\r\n<script type='text/javascript'>\r\n(function(){var g=function(e,h,f,g){\r\nthis.get=function(a){for(var a=a+\"=\",c=document.cookie.split(\";\"),b=0,e=c.length;b<e;b++){for(var d=c[b];\" \"==d.charAt(0);)d=d.substring(1,d.length);if(0==d.indexOf(a))return d.substring(a.length,d.length)}return null};\r\nthis.set=function(a,c){var b=\"\",b=new Date;b.setTime(b.getTime()+6048E5);b=\"; expires=\"+b.toGMTString();document.cookie=a+\"=\"+c+b+\"; path=/; \"};\r\nthis.check=function(){var a=this.get(f);if(a)a=a.split(\":\");else if(100!=e)\"v\"==h&&(e=Math.random()>=e/100?0:100),a=[h,e,0],this.set(f,a.join(\":\"));else return!0;var c=a[1];if(100==c)return!0;switch(a[0]){case \"v\":return!1;case \"r\":return c=a[2]%Math.floor(100/c),a[2]++,this.set(f,a.join(\":\")),!c}return!0};\r\nthis.go=function(){if(this.check()){var a=document.createElement(\"script\");a.type=\"text/javascript\";a.src=g;document.body&&document.body.appendChild(a)}};\r\nthis.start=function(){var t=this;\"complete\"!==document.readyState?window.addEventListener?window.addEventListener(\"load\",function(){t.go()},!1):window.attachEvent&&window.attachEvent(\"onload\",function(){t.go()}):t.go()};};\r\ntry{(new g(100,\"r\",\"QSI_S_ZN_5o5yqpvMVjgDOuN\",\"//zn5o5yqpvmvjgdoun-wiley.siteintercept.qualtrics.com/SIE/?Q_ZID=ZN_5o5yqpvMVjgDOuN\")).start()}catch(i){}})();\r\n</script><div id='ZN_5o5yqpvMVjgDOuN'><!--DO NOT REMOVE-CONTENTS PLACED HERE--></div>\r\n<!--END WEBSITE FEEDBACK SNIPPET-->","enabled":false},{"pages":["all"],"location":"header","script":"<!-- Hotjar Tracking Code for //www.coursofppt.com -->\r\n<script>\r\n (function(h,o,t,j,a,r){\r\n h.hj=h.hj||function(){(h.hj.q=h.hj.q||[]).push(arguments)};\r\n h._hjSettings={hjid:257151,hjsv:6};\r\n a=o.getElementsByTagName('head')[0];\r\n r=o.createElement('script');r.async=1;\r\n r.src=t+h._hjSettings.hjid+j+h._hjSettings.hjsv;\r\n a.appendChild(r);\r\n })(window,document,'//static.hotjar.com/c/hotjar-','.js?sv=');\r\n</script>","enabled":false},{"pages":["article"],"location":"header","script":"<!-- //Connect Container: dummies --> <script src=\"//get.s-onetag.com/bffe21a1-6bb8-4928-9449-7beadb468dae/tag.min.js\" async defer></script>","enabled":true},{"pages":["homepage"],"location":"header","script":"<meta name=\"facebook-domain-verification\" content=\"irk8y0irxf718trg3uwwuexg6xpva0\" />","enabled":true},{"pages":["homepage","article","category","search"],"location":"footer","script":"<!-- Facebook Pixel Code -->\r\n<noscript>\r\n<img height=\"1\" width=\"1\" src=\"//www.facebook.com/tr?id=256338321977984&ev=PageView&noscript=1\"/>\r\n</noscript>\r\n<!-- End Facebook Pixel Code -->","enabled":true}]}},"pageScriptsLoadedStatus":"success"},"navigationState":{"navigationCollections":[{"collectionId":287568,"title":"BYOB (Be Your Own Boss)","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-entry-level-entrepreneur-287568"},{"collectionId":293237,"title":"Be a Rad Dad","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/be-the-best-dad-293237"},{"collectionId":295890,"title":"Career Shifting","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/career-shifting-295890"},{"collectionId":294090,"title":"Contemplating the Cosmos","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/theres-something-about-space-294090"},{"collectionId":287563,"title":"For Those Seeking Peace of Mind","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-those-seeking-peace-of-mind-287563"},{"collectionId":287570,"title":"For the Aspiring Aficionado","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-bougielicious-287570"},{"collectionId":291903,"title":"For the Budding Cannabis Enthusiast","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-budding-cannabis-enthusiast-291903"},{"collectionId":299891,"title":"For the College Bound","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-college-bound-299891"},{"collectionId":291934,"title":"For the Exam-Season Crammer","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-exam-season-crammer-291934"},{"collectionId":287569,"title":"For the Hopeless Romantic","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-hopeless-romantic-287569"}],"navigationCollectionsLoadedStatus":"success","navigationCategories":{"books":{"0":{"data":[{"categoryId":33512,"title":"Technology","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/books/technology-33512"},{"categoryId":33662,"title":"Academics & The Arts","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/books/academics-the-arts-33662"},{"categoryId":33809,"title":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/books/home-auto-hobbies-33809"},{"categoryId":34038,"title":"Body, Mind, & Spirit","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/books/body-mind-spirit-34038"},{"categoryId":34224,"title":"Business, Careers, & Money","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/books/business-careers-money-34224"}],"breadcrumbs":[],"categoryTitle":"Level 0 Category","mainCategoryUrl":"/category/books/level-0-category-0"}},"articles":{"0":{"data":[{"categoryId":33512,"title":"Technology","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/articles/technology-33512"},{"categoryId":33662,"title":"Academics & The Arts","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/articles/academics-the-arts-33662"},{"categoryId":33809,"title":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/articles/home-auto-hobbies-33809"},{"categoryId":34038,"title":"Body, Mind, & Spirit","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/articles/body-mind-spirit-34038"},{"categoryId":34224,"title":"Business, Careers, & Money","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/articles/business-careers-money-34224"}],"breadcrumbs":[],"categoryTitle":"Level 0 Category","mainCategoryUrl":"/category/articles/level-0-category-0"}}},"navigationCategoriesLoadedStatus":"success"},"searchState":{"searchList":[],"searchStatus":"initial","relatedArticlesList":[],"relatedArticlesStatus":"initial"},"routeState":{"name":"ArticleCategory","path":"/category/articles/performing-arts-33747/","hash":"","query":{},"params":{"category":"performing-arts-33747"},"fullPath":"/category/articles/performing-arts-33747/","meta":{"routeType":"category","breadcrumbInfo":{"suffix":"Articles","baseRoute":"/category/articles"},"prerenderWithAsyncData":true},"from":{"name":null,"path":"/","hash":"","query":{},"params":{},"fullPath":"/","meta":{}}},"profileState":{"auth":{},"userOptions":{},"status":"success"}}
fun88 casino net cách chơi keno trực tuyến game đánh bài baccarat baccarat quốc tế sòng bài trực tuyến