chơi xổ số keno trực tuyến

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When you need a hand with using the Podcasts App, enabling Dark Mode, or anything else, check out these user-friendly guides.","relatedArticles":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles?category=33527&offset=0&size=5"},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":50,"bookCount":8},"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33527"}},"relatedCategoriesLoadedStatus":"success"},"listState":{"list":{"count":10,"total":50,"items":[{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-10-31T18:52:28+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-11-01T16:03:48+00:00","timestamp":"2024-11-01T18:01:10+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Technology","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33512"},"slug":"technology","categoryId":33512},{"name":"Computers","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33513"},"slug":"computers","categoryId":33513},{"name":"Operating Systems","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33524"},"slug":"operating-systems","categoryId":33524},{"name":"MacOS","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33527"},"slug":"macos","categoryId":33527}],"title":"macOS Sonoma For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"macos sonoma for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"macos-sonoma-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","检检索擎调整系统":{"metaDescription":"So, you’re using a Mac running macOS Sonoma? 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To keep your work and leisure projects safe, never do any of these things with your Mac:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Never shut off your Mac by pulling the plug. </strong>Always shut it down properly. Either use the Shut Down command from the Apple menu or press the power button and then click the Shut Down button.</li>\n<li><strong>Never bump, drop, shake, wobble, dribble, drop-kick, or play catch with a Mac.</strong> Even if your Mac has a solid-state drive (SSD) rather than a spinning hard drive, the computer is sensitive to bumps. Treat it gently.</li>\n<li><strong>Never get up from your Mac without saving your work.</strong> Press Command+S to save your work before you leave your Mac. In fact, press Command+S whenever you’ve made any changes that you wouldn’t want to have to make again.</li>\n<li><strong>Never keep only one copy of your important documents. </strong>Make at least two backup copies and keep one of them in another physical location. Period.</li>\n<li><strong>Never clean your Mac’s screen with glass cleaner or any product not specifically designed for a computer display. </strong>And don’t use paper towels or tissues, either. Use a soft cloth, preferably microfiber, to avoid scratching the screen. If you do use a cleaning product designed for computer displays, spray it onto the cloth, not directly onto the screen.</li>\n<li><strong>Never pay attention to anyone who says that Windows is just like the Mac. </strong>Yeah, right. And a Kia is just like a Porsche.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Handy keyboard shortcuts for macOS Sonoma","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Make your work go faster by using these macOS keyboard shortcuts with your flying fingers.</p>\n<table width=\"546\">\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\"><strong>Command</strong></td>\n<td width=\"273\"><strong>Keyboard Shortcut</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Add Selected Item to Dock</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Control+Shift+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Add Selected Item to Sidebar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Control+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Close All Windows</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option+W</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Close Window</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+W</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Copy</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+C</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Cut</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+X</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Duplicate</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+D</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Eject Disk</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+E</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Empty Trash</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+Delete</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Find</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+F</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Get Info (on selected item or items)</p>\n<p>Get Info Inspector (on selected item or items)</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+I</p>\n<p>Command+Option+I</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Go to Recents in Finder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+F</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Go to Applications Folder in Finder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+A</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Go to Desktop in Finder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+D</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Go to Documents Folder in Finder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+O</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Go to Home Folder in Finder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+H</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Help</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+?</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Hide Current Application</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+H</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Hide Other Applications</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option+H</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Log Out Current User</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+Q</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Make Alias</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+L</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Minimize Window</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+M</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Mission Control: All Windows</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Control+Up Arrow (F3 on Apple keyboards)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Mission Control: Application Windows</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Control+Down Arrow (Control+F3 on Apple keyboards)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Mission Control: Show Desktop</td>\n<td width=\"273\">F11 (fn+F11 on laptops; Command+F3 on Apple keyboards)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Move to Trash</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Delete</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">New Finder Window</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+N</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">New Folder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+N</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">New Smart Folder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option+N</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Next Window</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+` (backtick)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Open</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+O</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Paste</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+V</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Quick Look (at selected item)</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Y or Spacebar</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Redo</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+Z</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Select All</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+A</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show Original (of selected alias)</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+R</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show View Options</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+J</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Dock (toggle Dock hiding)</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option+D</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Path Bar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option +P</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Sidebar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option +S</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Status Bar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+/</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Tab Bar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Toolbar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Turn VoiceOver On/Off</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+F5 (fn+F5 on laptops)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Undo</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Z</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">View Window as Columns</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+3</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">View Window as Gallery</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+4</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">View Window as Icons</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+1</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">View Window as List</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+2</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n"},{"title":"Tabbing around Sonoma's 'Save As' dialog","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>In the expanded view of macOS Sonoma&#8217;s Save As dialog, if you press the Tab key while the Save As field is active, it becomes inactive and the Tags field becomes active. Press Tab again, and the Search field becomes active. Press Tab again, and the sidebar becomes active. And if you press Tab again, the Save As field becomes active once more.</p>\n<p>That’s because the Save As field, the Tags and Search fields, and the sidebar are mutually exclusive, and only one can be active at any time. You can always tell which item is active by the thin blue border around it.</p>\n<p>When you want to switch to a different folder to save a file, click the folder in the sidebar or click anywhere in the file list box to make the file list active. Here are the moves you need:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>If you type while the file list box is active, the list box selects the folder that most closely matches the letter(s) that you type.</strong> It’s a little strange because you won’t see what you type — you’ll be typing blind, so to speak.</li>\n<li><strong>When the file list is active, the letters that you type don’t appear in the Save As field.</strong> If you want to type a filename, you have to activate the Save As field again (by clicking in it or navigating with the Tab key) before you can type in it.</li>\n<li><strong>If you type while the sidebar is active, nothing happens.</strong> But you can use the up- and down-arrow keys to move around in the sidebar.</li>\n<li><strong>Pressing Shift reverses the order of the sequence.</strong> If you press Shift+Tab, the active item moves from the Save As field to the Sidebar to the Search box and back to the Save As field again.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Backing up, and backing up your back-up","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>When working in macOS Sonoma, would you like to ensure that you won’t lose more than a little work no matter what happens — even if your office burns to the ground; floods; is destroyed by a tornado, hurricane, or earthquake; or robbed? If so, follow these recommendations.</p>\n<p>Keeping a single backup is not enough. Two backups might be okay. Three is much safer and gives you the option of keeping the third somewhere off-site, such as at a friend or relative’s house or in a safe-deposit box at your bank.</p>\n<p>To make those three backups, you need to create a set-and-forget system that runs automatically in the background without you needing to start them. Consider this type of system:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><strong>Use macOS’s excellent Time Machine feature as your first line of defense.</strong> Time Machine is so easy and so effective that there’s no excuse not to use it. But although Time Machine maintains multiple copies of files, they’re all stored on the same disk. If something’s worth backing up to one place, it’s worth backing up three times.</p>\n<p class=\"child-para\">You can add a second or third backup disk (or even more) to Time Machine if you like. Connect the disk and choose System Settings <strong>→</strong> General <strong>→</strong> Time Machine to display the Time Machine pane in System Settings. Click the Add (+) button, select the disk in the dialog that opens, and click Set Up Disk. Choose backup options — you&#8217;ll probably want to encrypt the backups — and then click Done.</p>\n<p class=\"child-para\">Time Machine then backs up the disks. But (you&#8217;ll have spotted the problem here) both your Time Machine backup disks are in the same place, so a single natural disaster (conflagration, inundation, fulmination &#8230;) or deliberate disaster (your choice) can take them both out. That’s why it’s wise to create a third backup disk and store it somewhere off-site.</p>\n</li>\n<li><strong>Use an online backup service. such as <a href=\"//www.idrive.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">iDrive</a> </strong><strong>or <a href=\"//www.backblaze.com/home-v2\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Backblaze</a> </strong><strong>to back up your Mac to the cloud.</strong></li>\n<li>These services start around the $5 to $10 per month level, so they’re good value. Most can back up your other computers and devices as well as your Mac.</li>\n<li><strong>Use a cloning app such as </strong><a href=\"//www.bombich.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Carbon Copy Cloner</strong></a><strong> ($49.99) or </strong><a href=\"//shirt-pocket.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>SuperDuper</strong></a><strong> ($27.95) to clone your Mac’s startup disk to another hard drive every day (for example, in the early hours of the morning).</strong> This gives you a bootable backup you can use for recovery if your Mac goes south.</li>\n<li><strong>Lastly, store your current work in iCloud or a competitor — such as Dropbox, Microsoft’s OneDrive, or Google Drive — so that you have an instantly accessible online backup, which also allows you to work on your documents no matter where you happen to be.</strong></li>\n</ul>\n<p>You must test the integrity of each backup to make sure it will work when you need it. Just restore a few files and make sure they’re usable. You’ll then be sure you can recover fully should disaster strike.</p>\n"},{"title":"Burning a playlist to a CD","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>If you want to take your music somewhere other than your Mac or share it with others on a physical medium, you can burn your music playlists to CD. While CDs are a premillennial technology nearing the final approach to digital oblivion, they’re still extremely widely used, and a thoughtfully customized CD can make (or break) a relationship.</p>\n<p>Apple has played its part in hastening the demise of the CD and DVD by removing optical drives from Macs, so you’ll normally need to add an external CD or DVD burner to your Mac. Most such burners connect via USB 3 or USB-C, so you should have no problem making the connection to your Mac.</p>\n<p>With the drive connected, you can start burning audio CDs that you can listen to in almost any audio CD player. The only trick is making sure that the total playing time of the songs in the playlist is less than the capacity of the blank CD you’re using, which is usually 74 to 80 minutes.</p>\n<p>Don’t forget to account for the gap between tracks, which is 2 seconds by default. When you have all the songs you want on your CD in the playlist, choose File <strong>→ </strong>Burn Playlist to Disc. The Burn Settings dialog appears.</p>\n<p>The default type of disc Music burns is an audio CD, but it can also burn two other types:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>MP3 CD</strong> is a special format that can be played in many CD audio players and set-top DVD players. The advantage of an MP3 CD is that rather than holding a mere 74 to 80 minutes of music, it can hold more than 100 songs (depending on the bitrate at which they’re encoded). The disadvantage is that many regular audio CD players won’t play MP3 CDs.</li>\n<li><strong>A data CD or DVD</strong> is a disc formatted to be read and mounted by any computer, Mac or Windows.</li>\n</ul>\n<p>If you click the Burn button now, you’ll get an audio CD. To burn an MP3 CD or Data CD or DVD, select the appropriate radio button in the Burn Settings dialog.</p>\n<p>When you’ve made your choice, click the Burn button. In a few minutes, you’ll have an audio CD that contains all the songs on the playlist — and plays the songs in the order in which they appeared in the playlist. Eject the freshly minted CD, label it carefully before you forget, and then take it for a test spin.</p>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Two years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-10-31T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":301128},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2023-11-15T22:07:26+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-05-08T17:49:00+00:00","timestamp":"2024-05-08T18:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Technology","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33512"},"slug":"technology","categoryId":33512},{"name":"Computers","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33513"},"slug":"computers","categoryId":33513},{"name":"Operating Systems","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33524"},"slug":"operating-systems","categoryId":33524},{"name":"MacOS","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33527"},"slug":"macos","categoryId":33527},{"name":"Ventura","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/35291"},"slug":"ventura","categoryId":35291}],"title":"macOS Ventura For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"macos ventura for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"macos-ventura-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","检检索擎调整系统":{"metaDescription":"Whether you’ve purchased a new Mac with macOS Ventura pre-installed or you’ve upgraded from a previous version of macOS, you’ll find that Ventura makes your com","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Whether you’ve purchased a new Mac with macOS Ventura pre-installed or you’ve upgraded from a previous version of macOS, you’ll find that Ventura makes your computer easier to use and offers myriad improvements to make you more productive.\r\n\r\nThis Cheat Sheet includes information on things you should never do to your Mac; a compendium of useful and timesaving keyboard shortcuts; recommendations for backing up data; and website recommendations for smart Ventura users.","description":"Whether you’ve purchased a new Mac with macOS Ventura pre-installed or you’ve upgraded from a previous version of macOS, you’ll find that Ventura makes your computer easier to use and offers myriad improvements to make you more productive.\r\n\r\nThis Cheat Sheet includes information on things you should never do to your Mac; a compendium of useful and timesaving keyboard shortcuts; recommendations for backing up data; and website recommendations for smart Ventura users.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":35211,"name":"Guy Hart-Davis","slug":"guy-hart-davis","description":" <p><b>Guy Hart-Davis is author or coauthor of various technology books, including <i>iPhone For Dummies </i>and<i> Teach Yourself VISUALLY iPhone 14.</i></b> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35211"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":35291,"title":"Ventura","slug":"ventura","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/35291"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":295703,"slug":"macos-ventura-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119912873","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","ventura"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119912873/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119912873/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119912873-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119912873/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119912873/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/macos-ventura-for-dummies-cover-9781119912873-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"macOS Ventura For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"35211\">Guy Hart-Davis</b> is author or coauthor of various technology books, including <i>iPhone For Dummies </i>and<i> Teach Yourself VISUALLY iPhone 14.</i></b></p>","authors":[{"authorId":35211,"name":"Guy Hart-Davis","slug":"guy-hart-davis","description":" <p><b>Guy Hart-Davis is author or coauthor of various technology books, including <i>iPhone For Dummies </i>and<i> Teach Yourself VISUALLY iPhone 14.</i></b> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35211"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;technology&quot;,&quot;computers&quot;,&quot;operating-systems&quot;,&quot;macos&quot;,&quot;ventura&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119912873&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-645938deed0b0\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;technology&quot;,&quot;computers&quot;,&quot;operating-systems&quot;,&quot;macos&quot;,&quot;ventura&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119912873&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-645938deed663\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":0,"title":"","slug":null,"categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/"}}],"content":[{"title":"What not to do with your Mac running Ventura","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Treat your Mac and macOS Ventura with care. To keep your work and leisure projects safe, never do any of these things with your Mac:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Never shut off your Mac by pulling the plug. </strong>Always use the Shut Down command from the Apple menu (or press the power button and then click the Shut Down button).If you’re using a MacBook, you can usually get away with pulling the plug while it’s running because the battery automatically kicks in. The only caveat is that if your battery is totally depleted, damaged, or missing entirely, you could suffer directory damage or data loss by pulling the plug. Just use the Shut Down command, and you’ll sleep well.</li>\n<li><strong>Never bump, drop, shake, wobble, dribble, drop-kick, or play catch with a hard drive while it’s running macOS.</strong> Don’t forget: Your desktop Mac has a hard or solid-state drive inside it, too.</li>\n<li><strong>Never get up from your Mac without saving your work.</strong> Just before your butt leaves the chair, your fingers should press Command+S (the keyboard shortcut in macOS that saves your work). Make it a habit.</li>\n<li><strong>Never keep only one copy of your important documents. </strong>Make at least two backup copies and keep one of them in another physical location. Period.</li>\n<li><strong>Never clean your monitor with a glass cleaner, such as Windex (or another product not designed to be used on a video display). </strong>And nix the paper towels or tissues, too. Use a soft cloth (microfiber is best) to avoid scratching the display.</li>\n<li><strong>Never pay attention to anyone who says that Windows is just like the Mac. </strong>Yeah, right. And a Kia is just like a Porsche.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Handy keyboard shortcuts for macOS Ventura","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Make your work go faster by using these macOS keyboard shortcuts with your flying fingers. Print this chart and refer to it while you work or play.</p>\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td><strong>Command</strong></td>\n<td><strong>Keyboard Shortcut</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Add Selected Item to Dock</td>\n<td>Command+Control+Shift+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Add Selected Item to Sidebar</td>\n<td>Command+Control+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Close All Windows</td>\n<td>Command+Option+W</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Close Window</td>\n<td>Command+W</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Copy</td>\n<td>Command+C</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Cut</td>\n<td>Command+X</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Duplicate</td>\n<td>Command+D</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Eject Disk</td>\n<td>Command+E</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Empty Trash</td>\n<td>Command+Shift+Delete</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Find</td>\n<td>Command+F</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Get Info (on selected item or items)</p>\n<p>Get Info Inspector (on selected item or items)</td>\n<td>Command+I</p>\n<p>Command+Option+I</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Go to Recents</td>\n<td>Command+Shift+F</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Go to Applications Folder</td>\n<td>Command+Shift+A</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Go to Desktop</td>\n<td>Command+Shift+D</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Go to Documents Folder</td>\n<td>Command+Shift+O</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Go to Home Folder</td>\n<td>Command+Shift+H</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Help</td>\n<td>Command+Shift+?</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Hide Current Application</td>\n<td>Command+H</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Hide Other Applications</td>\n<td>Command+Option+H</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Log Out Current User</td>\n<td>Command+Shift+Q</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Make Alias</td>\n<td>Command+L</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Minimize Window</td>\n<td>Command+M</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Mission Control: All Windows</td>\n<td>Control+Up Arrow (F3 on Apple keyboards)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Mission Control: Application Windows</td>\n<td>Control+Down Arrow (Control+F3 on Apple keyboards)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Mission Control: Show Desktop</td>\n<td>F11 (fn+F11 on laptops) (Command+F3 on Apple keyboards)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Move to Trash</td>\n<td>Command+Delete</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>New Finder Window</td>\n<td>Command+N</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>New Folder</td>\n<td>Command+Shift+N</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>New Smart Folder</td>\n<td>Command+Option+N</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Next Window</td>\n<td>Command+` (backtick)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Open</td>\n<td>Command+O</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Paste</td>\n<td>Command+V</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Quick Look (at selected item)</td>\n<td>Command+Y or Spacebar</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Redo</td>\n<td>Command+Shift+Z</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Select All</td>\n<td>Command+A</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Show Original (of selected alias)</td>\n<td>Command+R</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Show View Options</td>\n<td>Command+J</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Show/Hide Dock</td>\n<td>Command+Option+D</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Show/Hide Path Bar</td>\n<td>Command+Option +P</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Show/Hide Sidebar</td>\n<td>Command+Option +S</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Show/Hide Status Bar</td>\n<td>Command+/</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Show/Hide Tab Bar</td>\n<td>Command+Shift+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Show/Hide Toolbar</td>\n<td>Command+Option+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Turn VoiceOver On/Off</td>\n<td>Command+F5 (fn+F5 on laptops)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Undo</td>\n<td>Command+Z</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>View Window as Columns</td>\n<td>Command+3</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>View Window as Gallery</td>\n<td>Command+4</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>View Window as Icons</td>\n<td>Command+1</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>View Window as List</td>\n<td>Command+2</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n"},{"title":"Tabbing around Ventura's Save As dialog","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>In the expanded view of macOS Ventura&#8217;s &#8220;Save As&#8221; dialog, if you press the Tab key while the Save As field is active, it becomes inactive and the Tags field becomes active. Press Tab again, and the Search field becomes active. Press Tab again and the sidebar becomes active. And if you press Tab again, the Save As field will, once again, be active.</p>\n<p>That’s because the Save As field, the Tags and Search fields, and the sidebar are mutually exclusive, and only one can be active at any time. You can always tell which item is active by the thin blue border around it.</p>\n<p>When you want to switch to a different folder to save a file, click the folder in the sidebar or click anywhere in the file list box to make the file list active. The following tricks help you get a hold on this whole active/inactive silliness:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>If you type while the file list box is active, the list box selects the folder that most closely matches the letter(s) that you type.</strong> It’s a little strange because you won’t see what you type: You’ll be typing blind, so to speak.</li>\n<li><strong>When the file list is active, the letters that you type don’t appear in the Save As field. </strong>If you want to type a filename, you have to activate the Save As field again (by clicking in it or using the Tab key) before you can type in it.</li>\n<li><strong>If you type while the sidebar is active, nothing happens.</strong> But you can use the up- and down-arrow keys to move around in the sidebar.</li>\n<li><strong>Pressing Shift reverses the order of the sequence. </strong>If you press Shift+Tab, the active item moves from the Save As field to the Sidebar to the Search box and back to the Save As field again.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Backup made straightforward","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>When working in macOS Ventura, would you like to ensure that you won’t lose more than a little work no matter what happens — even if your office burns, floods, is destroyed by tornado, hurricane, or earthquake, or robbed? If so, follow these recommendations.</p>\n<p>Keeping a single backup is — frankly, my dear — not enough. Two backups might be okay. Three is much safer and gives you the option of keeping the third somewhere offsite, such as at a friend or relative&#8217;s house or in a safe-deposit box at your bank.</p>\n<p>To make those three backups, you need to create a set-and-forget system that runs automatically in the background without you needing to start them. Consider these options:</p>\n<h3>Time Machine</h3>\n<p>Use macOS&#8217;s excellent Time Machine feature as your first line of defense. Time Machine is so easy and so effective that there&#8217;s no excuse not to use it. But although Time Machine maintains multiple copies of files, they’re all stored on the same disk. If something’s worth backing up to one place, it’s worth backing up three times.</p>\n<p>You can add a second or third backup disk (or even more) to Time Machine if you like. Connect the disk and choose System Settings; then choose General; then choose Time Machine to display the Time Machine pane in System Settings.</p>\n<p>Click the Add (+) button, select the disk in the dialog that opens, and click Set Up Disk. Choose backup options — you&#8217;ll probably want to encrypt the backups — and then click Done. Time Machine then backs up to both the disks. But (you&#8217;ll have spotted the problem here) both your Time Machine backup disks are in the same place, so a single natural disaster (conflagration, inundation, fulmination&#8230;) or deliberate disaster (your choice) can take them both out.</p>\n<h3>Online backup services</h3>\n<p>You can use an online backup service, such as iDrive (<a href=\"//www.idrive.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">www.idrive.com</a>) or Backblaze (<a href=\"//www.backblaze.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">www.backblaze.com</a>) to back up your Mac to the cloud.</p>\n<p>These services start around the $5 to $10 per month level, so they&#8217;re good value. Most can back up your other computers and devices as well as your Mac.</p>\n<h3>Cloning apps</h3>\n<p>You can use a cloning app, such as <a href=\"//www.bombich.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Carbon Copy Cloner</a> ($39.99) or <a href=\"//shirt-pocket.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">SuperDuper</a> ($27.99) to clone your Mac&#8217;s startup disk to another hard drive every day (for example, in the early hours of the morning). This gives you a bootable backup you can use for recovery if your Mac goes south.</p>\n<h3>iCloud</h3>\n<p>Another options is to store your current work in iCloud or a competitor, such as Dropbox or Microsoft&#8217;s OneDrive, so that you have an instantly accessible online backup, as well as being able to work on your documents no matter where you happen to be.</p>\n<p>One final thing: You must test the integrity of each backup to make sure it will work when you need it. Just restore a few files and make sure they&#8217;re usable. You&#8217;ll then be sure you can recover fully should disaster strike.</p>\n"},{"title":"10 favorite websites for macOS Ventura users","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>To learn about all things Macintosh and macOS Ventura, check out these sites, and stuff your brain with Mac information:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><a href=\"//www.macobserver.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>The Mac Observer</strong></a> offers insightful opinion pieces in addition to the usual Apple news and product reviews. The quality and depth of the writing at <em>The Mac Observer </em>is superior to most other sites covering the Apple beat.</li>\n<li>The <a href=\"//support.apple.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Apple support site</strong> </a>and <a href=\"//discussions.apple.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Apple support communities</strong></a> are treasure troves of tech notes, software update information, troubleshooting tips, and documentation for most Apple products.</li>\n<li><a href=\"//www.download.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Download.com</strong></a>, the site formerly known as VersionTracker, is the place to go to find freeware, shareware, and software updates for macOS. If this site doesn’t have it, it probably doesn’t exist.</li>\n<li><a href=\"//www.macworld.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Macworld</strong></a> describes itself as, “Your best source for all things Apple,” and it’s not far from the truth. <em>Macworld</em> is especially strong for comparative reviews of Mac and iPhone/iPad products. If you want to find out which inkjet printer or digital camera is the best in its price class, Macworld.com probably has feature comparison charts and real-world test results.</li>\n<li><a href=\"//www.tidbits.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>TidBITS</strong></a> bills itself as “Thoughtful, detailed coverage of everything Apple for 30 years” but there’s much more to <em>TidBITS </em>than just news. You can also find thoughtful commentary, in-depth analysis, and detailed product reviews, written and edited by pros who really know the Apple ecosystem.</li>\n<li><a href=\"//www.sixcolors.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Six Colors</strong></a> is Jason Snell’s magazine on the web. The former editor for <em>Macworld</em> magazine for over a decade, he and his team provide daily coverage of Apple, other technology companies, and the intersection of technology and culture. Six Colors has been around for a few years, and the writing continues to get stronger, more opinionated, and even more fun to read.</li>\n<li><a href=\"//thewirecutter.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Wirecutter</strong> </a>is a great place to learn what experts consider the best peripherals, tech tools, and toys. Now a <em>New York Times</em> company, Wirecutter has the resources to objectively evaluate many products in a category and declare one of them the “best.”</li>\n<li><a href=\"//eshop.macsales.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Other World Computing</strong></a> is a terrific favorite maker of accessories and peripherals for Macs. They have a wide array of storage upgrade kits and memory upgrades that are guaranteed for life, as well as great documentation and instructional videos.</li>\n<li><a href=\"//www.dealmac.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>DealMac</strong></a> is the place to shop for deals on Mac stuff. With a motto like “How to go broke saving money,” this site is often the first to find out about sale prices, rebates, and other bargain opportunities on upgrades, software, peripherals, and more.</li>\n<li><a href=\"//www.apple.com/shop/refurbished\"><strong>Apple’s refurbished and clearance store</strong></a> can save you up to 30 percent on like-new Apple products.</li>\n</ul>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-11-15T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":295750},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2022-09-22T16:22:20+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-11-15T19:58:38+00:00","timestamp":"2023-11-15T21:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Technology","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33512"},"slug":"technology","categoryId":33512},{"name":"Computers","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33513"},"slug":"computers","categoryId":33513},{"name":"Operating Systems","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33524"},"slug":"operating-systems","categoryId":33524},{"name":"MacOS","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33527"},"slug":"macos","categoryId":33527},{"name":"Monterey","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34619"},"slug":"monterey","categoryId":34619}],"title":"MacOS Monterey For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"macos monterey for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"macos-monterey-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","检检索擎调整系统":{"metaDescription":"You'll know Jack with Monterey! This MacOS will make your Mac easier to use if you learn these shortcuts and recommendations.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Whether you’ve purchased a new Mac with macOS Monterey pre-installed or you’ve upgraded from a previous version of macOS, you’ll find that Monterey makes your Mac easier to use and offers myriad improvements to make you more productive.\r\n\r\nThis Cheat Sheet includes information on things you should never do to your Mac; a compendium of useful and timesaving keyboard shortcuts; a discussion of when folders are too full and when (and when not) to create subfolders; recommendations for backing up data; and a short discussion of iDevices and Continuity.","description":"Whether you’ve purchased a new Mac with macOS Monterey pre-installed or you’ve upgraded from a previous version of macOS, you’ll find that Monterey makes your Mac easier to use and offers myriad improvements to make you more productive.\r\n\r\nThis Cheat Sheet includes information on things you should never do to your Mac; a compendium of useful and timesaving keyboard shortcuts; a discussion of when folders are too full and when (and when not) to create subfolders; recommendations for backing up data; and a short discussion of iDevices and Continuity.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":8989,"name":"Bob LeVitus","slug":"bob-levitus","description":" <p><b>Edward C. Baig</b> is the former Personal Technology columnist at <i>USA Today</i> and current contributing writer at AARP. He makes frequent appearances on TV, radio, and podcasts and is the author of <i>Macs For Dummies</i>.</p> <p><b> Bob &#8220;Dr. Mac&#8221; LeVitus</b> has written or cowritten over 90 popular computer books, including <i>macOS Monterey For Dummies</i> and <i>GarageBand For Dummies</i>. He has also written for the <i>Houston Chronicle and Mac Observer</i> for over twenty years. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8989"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34619,"title":"Monterey","slug":"monterey","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34619"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":288172,"slug":"macos-monterey-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119836964","categoryList":["technology","computers","macs"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119836964/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119836964/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119836964-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119836964/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119836964/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/macos-monterey-for-dummies-cover-9781119836964-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"macOS Monterey For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b>Edward C. Baig</b> is the former Personal Technology columnist at <i>USA Today</i> and current contributing writer at AARP. He makes frequent appearances on TV, radio, and podcasts and is the author of <i>Macs For Dummies</i>.</p> <p><b> Bob &#8220;Dr. Mac&#8221; LeVitus</b> has written or cowritten over 90 popular computer books, including <i>macOS Monterey For Dummies</i> and <i>GarageBand For Dummies</i>. He has also written for the <i>Houston Chronicle and Mac Observer</i> for over twenty years.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":8989,"name":"Bob LeVitus","slug":"bob-levitus","description":" <p><b>Edward C. Baig</b> is the former Personal Technology columnist at <i>USA Today</i> and current contributing writer at AARP. He makes frequent appearances on TV, radio, and podcasts and is the author of <i>Macs For Dummies</i>.</p> <p><b> Bob &#8220;Dr. Mac&#8221; LeVitus</b> has written or cowritten over 90 popular computer books, including <i>macOS Monterey For Dummies</i> and <i>GarageBand For Dummies</i>. He has also written for the <i>Houston Chronicle and Mac Observer</i> for over twenty years. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8989"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;technology&quot;,&quot;computers&quot;,&quot;operating-systems&quot;,&quot;macos&quot;,&quot;monterey&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119836964&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6373fe0ebd9ca\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;technology&quot;,&quot;computers&quot;,&quot;operating-systems&quot;,&quot;macos&quot;,&quot;monterey&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119836964&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6373fe0ebe27b\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":0,"title":"","slug":null,"categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/"}}],"content":[{"title":"What not to do with your Mac running Monterey","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Treat your Mac and macOS Monterey with care. To keep your work and leisure projects safe, never do any of these things with your Mac:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Never shut off your Mac by pulling the plug. </strong>Always use the Shut Down command from the Apple menu in Monterey (or press the power button and then click the Shut Down button).\n<p class=\"tip\">If you’re using a laptop, you can usually get away with pulling the plug while it’s running because the battery automatically kicks in. The only caveat is that if your battery is totally depleted, damaged, or missing entirely, you could suffer directory damage or data loss by pulling the plug. Just use the Shut Down command, and you’ll sleep well.</p>\n</li>\n<li><strong>Never bump, drop, shake, wobble, dribble, drop-kick, or play catch with a hard drive while it’s running Monterey.</strong> Don’t forget that your desktop Mac has a hard or solid-state drive inside it, too.</li>\n<li><strong>Never get up from your Mac without saving your work.</strong> Just before your butt leaves the chair, your fingers should press Command+S (the keyboard shortcut in macOS that saves your work). Make it a habit.</li>\n<li><strong>Never keep only one copy of your important documents. </strong>Make at least two backup copies and keep one of them in another physical location. Period.</li>\n<li><strong>Never clean your monitor with a glass cleaner, such as Windex (or another product not designed to be used on a video display). </strong>And nix the paper towels or tissues, too. Use a soft cloth (microfiber is best) to avoid scratching the display.</li>\n<li><strong>Never pay attention to anyone who says that Windows is just like the Mac. </strong>Yeah, right. And a Kia is just like a Porsche.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Handy keyboard shortcuts for macOS Monterey","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Make your work go faster with these macOS Monterey keyboard shortcuts. Print this chart and refer to it while using macOS Monterey.</p>\n<table width=\"546\">\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\"><strong>Command</strong></td>\n<td width=\"273\"><strong>Keyboard Shortcut</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Add Selected Item to Dock</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Control+Shift+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Add Selected Item to Sidebar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Control+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Close All Windows</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option+W</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Close Window</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+W</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Copy</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+C</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Cut</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+X</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Duplicate</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+D</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Eject Disk</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+E</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Empty Trash</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+Delete</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Find</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+F</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Get Info (on selected item or items)</p>\n<p>Get Info Inspector (on multiple selected items)</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+I</p>\n<p>Command+Option+I</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Go to Recents</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+F</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Go to Applications Folder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+A</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Go to Desktop</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+D</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Go to Documents Folder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+O</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Go to Home Folder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+H</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Help</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+?</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Hide Current Application</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+H</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Hide Other Applications</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option+H</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Log Out Current User</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+Q</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Make Alias</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+L</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Minimize Window</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+M</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Mission Control: All Windows</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Control+Up Arrow (F3 on Apple keyboards)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Mission Control: Application Windows</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Control+Down Arrow (Control+F3 on Apple keyboards)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Mission Control: Show Desktop</td>\n<td width=\"273\">F11 (fn+F11 on laptops) (Command+F3 on Apple keyboards)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Move to Trash</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Delete</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">New Finder Window</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+N</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">New Folder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+N</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">New Smart Folder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option+N</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Next Window</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+`</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Open</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+O</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Paste</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+V</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Quick Look (at selected item)</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Y or Spacebar</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Redo</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+Z</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Select All</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+A</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show Original (of selected alias)</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+R</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show View Options</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+J</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Dock</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option+D</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Path Bar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option +P</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Sidebar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option +S</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Status Bar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+/</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Tab Bar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Toolbar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Turn VoiceOver On/Off</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+F5 (fn+F5 on laptops)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Undo</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Z</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">View Window as Columns</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+3</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">View Window as Gallery</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+4</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">View Window as Icons</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+1</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">View Window as List</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+2</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n"},{"title":"Tabbing around Monterey's Save and Save As sheets","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>In the expanded view of macOS Monterey&#8217;s Save or Save As sheets, if you press the Tab key while the Save As field is active, it becomes inactive and the Tags field becomes active. Press Tab again, and the Search field becomes active. Press Tab again and the sidebar becomes active. And if you press Tab again, the Save As field will, once again, be active.</p>\n<p>That’s because the Save As field, the Tags and Search fields, and the sidebar are mutually exclusive, and only one can be active at any time. You can always tell which item is active by the thin blue border around it.</p>\n<p>When you want to switch to a different folder to save a file, click the folder in the sidebar or click anywhere in the file list box to make the file list active. The following tricks help you get a hold on this whole active/inactive silliness:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>If you type while the file list box is active, the list box selects the folder that most closely matches the letter(s) that you type.</strong> It’s a little strange because you won’t see what you type: You’ll be typing blind, so to speak.</li>\n<li><strong>When the file list is active, the letters that you type don’t appear in the Save As field. </strong>If you want to type a filename, you have to activate the Save As field again (by clicking in it or using the Tab key) before you can type in it.</li>\n<li><strong>If you type while the sidebar is active, nothing happens. </strong>You can, however, use the up- and down-arrow keys to move around in the sidebar.</li>\n<li><strong>Pressing Shift reverses the order of the sequence. </strong>If you press Shift+Tab, the active item moves from the Save As field to the Sidebar to the Search box and back to the Save As field again.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Creating subfolders in macOS Monterey . . . or not","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>How full is too full? When should you begin creating subfolders in Monterey? That’s impossible to say, at least in a one-size-fits-all way, but having too many items in a folder can be a nightmare — as can having too many subfolders with just one or two files in each one.</p>\n<p>If you find more than 15 or 20 files in a single folder, begin thinking about ways to subdivide it. On the other hand, some of your biggest subfolders might contain things that you don’t often access, such as a Correspondence 2001 folder. Because you don’t use it often, its overcrowded condition might not bother you.</p>\n<p>Here are some tips to help you decide whether to use subfolders or just leave well enough alone:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Don’t create subfolders until you need them. </strong>That way, you avoid opening an empty folder when you’re looking for something else — a complete waste of time.</li>\n<li><strong>Let your work style decide the file structure. </strong>When you first start working with your Mac, you may want to save everything in your Documents folder for a while. When a decent-size group of documents has accumulated in the Documents folder, consider taking a look at them and creating logical subfolders for them.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Dr. Mac's backup recommendations","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>When working in macOS Monterey, would you like to ensure that you won’t lose more than a little work no matter what happens — even if your office burns, floods, is destroyed by tornado, hurricane, or earthquake, or robbed? If so, you might want to follow the setup described here.</p>\n<p>I am continually testing new backup solutions, so the software I use can change from month to month. I’ve tried most of the popular backup solutions and many of the more obscure ones, but before I say anything about my current setup, here is what I’m trying to accomplish (at a minimum): I want at least three (reasonably) current backup sets with copies of all my files.</p>\n<p>I update two of them every day and keep the third somewhere offsite, such as in a safe deposit box at the bank. Every month or two, I swap the offsite backup for the latest backup from home — and then reuse the older backup disk.<br />\nNote that after I set up the following programs, they run automatically in the background with no further action on my part. Think of this as a “set and forget” feature.</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>My first line of defense is macOS’s excellent Time Machine. </strong>There’s no excuse not to use it. But although Time Machine maintains multiple copies of files, they’re all stored on the same disk. If something’s worth backing up to one place, it’s worth backing up three times.\n<p class=\"tip\">Note that you can add a second or third backup disk (or more) to Time Machine if you like. Just click Select Disk in the Time Machine System Preferences pane, select the disk, and choose Use Both (or All) in the dialog that appears so that Time Machine rotates among the disks. Alas, even if you have two or more Time Machine backup disks, they’re still all stored in the same room.</p>\n</li>\n<li><strong>And so, in addition to Time Machine, I use the excellent <a href=\"//www.backblaze.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Backblaze </a>($6 per month for unlimited cloud storage).</strong> I use it to back up everything that matters, so I have a copy in the cloud, just in case. I consider it a bargain at $6 per month.</li>\n<li><strong>Every night at midnight, </strong><a href=\"//www.bombich.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Carbon Copy Cloner</strong></a><strong> ($39.99) <em>clones</em> (duplicates) my startup disk to another hard drive. </strong>This provides me a bootable backup I can use with almost any other Mac.</li>\n<li><strong>Finally, I use Dropbox to synchronize current projects among several Macs and my iPhone and iPad, giving me additional backup copies of important files. </strong>This also ensures that the most current version of the file is available from all my devices.</li>\n</ul>\n<p>One last thing: I test the integrity of each backup regularly, and so should you. Just restore a few files and confirm they’re usable. Carbon Copy Cloner has a setting that checks every file for corruption, which I use once a month to ensure that the files in my backups aren’t corrupted or damaged and can be restored successfully.</p>\n"},{"title":"10 favorite websites for macOS Monterey users","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>To learn about all things Macintosh and macOS Monterey, hop onto the web, check out these sites, and stuff your brain with Mac information:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><a href=\"//www.macobserver.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>The Mac Observer</strong></a> offers insightful opinion pieces in addition to the usual Apple news and product reviews. The quality and depth of the writing at <em>The Mac Observer </em>is superior to most other sites covering the Apple beat.<br />\nDisclosure: I’m proud to be a columnist at <em>The Mac Observer, </em>and even prouder to have been doing it for nearly two decades.</li>\n<li>The <strong><a href=\"//support.apple.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Apple support site </a></strong>and <a href=\"//discussions.apple.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Apple support communities</strong></a> are treasure troves of tech notes, software update information, troubleshooting tips, and documentation for most Apple products.</li>\n<li><strong><a href=\"//www.download.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Download.com</a></strong>, the site formerly known as VersionTracker is the place to go to find freeware, shareware, and software updates for macOS. If this site doesn’t have it, it probably doesn’t exist.</li>\n<li><a href=\"//www.macworld.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Macworld</strong></a> describes itself as “your best source for all things Apple,” and it’s not far from the truth. <em>Macworld</em> is especially strong for comparative reviews of Mac and iPhone/iPad products. If you want to find out which inkjet printer or digital camera is the best in its price class, Macworld.com probably has feature comparison charts and real-world test results.</li>\n<li><strong><a href=\"//www.tidbits.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">TidBITS</a></strong> bills itself as “thoughtful, detailed coverage of everything Apple for 30 years,” but there’s much more to <em>TidBITS </em>than just news. You can also find thoughtful commentary, in-depth analysis, and detailed product reviews, written and edited by pros who really know the Apple ecosystem.</li>\n<li><a href=\"//www.sixcolors.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Six Colors</strong></a> is Jason Snell’s magazine on the web. The former editor for <em>Macworld</em> magazine for over a decade, he and his team provide daily coverage of Apple, other technology companies, and the intersection of technology and culture. Six Colors has been around for a few years, and the writing continues to get stronger, more opinionated, and even more fun to read.</li>\n<li><strong><a href=\"//thewirecutter.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Wirecutter </a></strong>is where I go to see what experts consider the best peripherals, tech tools, and toys. Now a <em>New York Times</em> company, Wirecutter has the resources to objectively evaluate many products in a category and declare one of them the “best.”</li>\n<li><a href=\"//eshop.macsales.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Other World Computing</strong></a> is my favorite maker of accessories and peripherals for Macs. They have a wide array of storage upgrade kits and memory upgrades that are guaranteed for life, as well as great documentation and instructional videos.</li>\n<li><a href=\"//www.dealmac.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>DealMac</strong></a> is the place to shop for deals on Mac stuff. With a motto like “How to go broke saving money,” this site is often the first to find out about sale prices, rebates, and other bargain opportunities on upgrades, software, peripherals, and more.</li>\n<li><strong><a href=\"//www.apple.com/shop/refurbished\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Apple’s Refurbished and Clearance Store</a></strong> can save you up to 30 percent on like-new Apple products.</li>\n</ul>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"One year","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2022-09-22T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":288510},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2018-09-18T01:12:20+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-04-05T15:27:36+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:19:33+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Technology","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33512"},"slug":"technology","categoryId":33512},{"name":"Computers","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33513"},"slug":"computers","categoryId":33513},{"name":"Operating Systems","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33524"},"slug":"operating-systems","categoryId":33524},{"name":"MacOS","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33527"},"slug":"macos","categoryId":33527},{"name":"High Sierra","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33530"},"slug":"high-sierra","categoryId":33530}],"title":"macOS High Sierra For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"macos high sierra for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"macos-high-sierra-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","检检索擎调整系统":{"metaDescription":"Learn all the ins and outs of the High Sierra operating system, including shortcuts, recommedations for backing up data, and more.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Whether you've purchased a new Mac with macOS High Sierra preinstalled or you've upgraded from a previous version of macOS, you'll find that macOS High Sierra makes your Mac easier to use and offers myriad improvements to make you more productive. Get additional information on things you should never do to your Mac, a compendium of useful and timesaving keyboard shortcuts, a discussion of when folders are too full and when (and when not) to create subfolders, recommendations for backing up data, and a short discussion of iDevices and Continuity.","description":"Whether you've purchased a new Mac with macOS High Sierra preinstalled or you've upgraded from a previous version of macOS, you'll find that macOS High Sierra makes your Mac easier to use and offers myriad improvements to make you more productive. Get additional information on things you should never do to your Mac, a compendium of useful and timesaving keyboard shortcuts, a discussion of when folders are too full and when (and when not) to create subfolders, recommendations for backing up data, and a short discussion of iDevices and Continuity.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":8989,"name":"Bob LeVitus","slug":"bob-levitus","description":" <p><b>Bob LeVitus </B>has written nearly 100 reference books on Apple technologies. He&#8217;s the author or coauthor of<i> macOS For Dummies,</i> <i>iPad For Dummies,</i> and <i>iPhone For Dummies,</i> among others.</p> <p><b>Dwight Spivey</b> probably wrote the rest of the <i>For Dummies</i> books on Apple products, including <i>iPhone For Seniors For Dummies, iPad For Seniors For Dummies,</i> and <i>Apple Watch For Seniors For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8989"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33530,"title":"High Sierra","slug":"high-sierra","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33530"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":244218,"title":"10 Favorite Websites for macOS High Sierra Users","slug":"10-favorite-websites-macos-high-sierra-users","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/244218"}},{"articleId":244213,"title":"iDevices and Continuity in macOS High Sierra","slug":"idevices-continuity-macos-high-sierra","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/244213"}},{"articleId":244210,"title":"Dr. Mac's Backup Recommendations for macOS High Sierra","slug":"dr-macs-backup-recommendations-macos-high-sierra","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/244210"}},{"articleId":244207,"title":"Creating Subfolders in macOS High Sierra . . . or Not","slug":"creating-subfolders-macos-high-sierra-not","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/244207"}},{"articleId":244204,"title":"Tabbing around High Sierra's Save and Save As Sheets","slug":"tabbing-around-high-sierras-save-save-sheets","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/244204"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":244218,"title":"10 Favorite Websites for macOS High Sierra Users","slug":"10-favorite-websites-macos-high-sierra-users","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/244218"}},{"articleId":244213,"title":"iDevices and Continuity in macOS High Sierra","slug":"idevices-continuity-macos-high-sierra","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/244213"}},{"articleId":244210,"title":"Dr. Mac's Backup Recommendations for macOS High Sierra","slug":"dr-macs-backup-recommendations-macos-high-sierra","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/244210"}},{"articleId":244207,"title":"Creating Subfolders in macOS High Sierra . . . or Not","slug":"creating-subfolders-macos-high-sierra-not","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/244207"}},{"articleId":244204,"title":"Tabbing around High Sierra's Save and Save As Sheets","slug":"tabbing-around-high-sierras-save-save-sheets","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/244204"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":281765,"slug":"macos-high-sierra-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119417156","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119417155/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119417155/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119417155-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119417155/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119417155/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/macos-high-sierra-for-dummies-cover-9781119417156-205x255.jpg","width":205,"height":255},"title":"macOS High Sierra For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"8989\">Bob LeVitus</b> </B>has written nearly 100 reference books on Apple technologies. He&#8217;s the author or coauthor of<i> macOS For Dummies,</i> <i>iPad For Dummies,</i> and <i>iPhone For Dummies,</i> among others.</p> <p><b>Dwight Spivey</b> probably wrote the rest of the <i>For Dummies</i> books on Apple products, including <i>iPhone For Seniors For Dummies, iPad For Seniors For Dummies,</i> and <i>Apple Watch For Seniors For Dummies.</i></p>","authors":[{"authorId":8989,"name":"Bob LeVitus","slug":"bob-levitus","description":" <p><b>Bob LeVitus </B>has written nearly 100 reference books on Apple technologies. He&#8217;s the author or coauthor of<i> macOS For Dummies,</i> <i>iPad For Dummies,</i> and <i>iPhone For Dummies,</i> among others.</p> <p><b>Dwight Spivey</b> probably wrote the rest of the <i>For Dummies</i> books on Apple products, including <i>iPhone For Seniors For Dummies, iPad For Seniors For Dummies,</i> and <i>Apple Watch For Seniors For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8989"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;technology&quot;,&quot;computers&quot;,&quot;operating-systems&quot;,&quot;macos&quot;,&quot;high-sierra&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119417156&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b35d30a2\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;technology&quot;,&quot;computers&quot;,&quot;operating-systems&quot;,&quot;macos&quot;,&quot;high-sierra&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119417156&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b35d3b0e\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":243911,"title":"What Not to Do with Your Mac Running High Sierra","slug":"not-mac-running-high-sierra","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/243911"}},{"articleId":243918,"title":"Handy Keyboard Shortcuts for macOS High Sierra","slug":"handy-keyboard-shortcuts-macos-high-sierra","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/243918"}},{"articleId":244204,"title":"Tabbing around High Sierra's Save and Save As Sheets","slug":"tabbing-around-high-sierras-save-save-sheets","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/244204"}},{"articleId":244207,"title":"Creating Subfolders in macOS High Sierra . . . or Not","slug":"creating-subfolders-macos-high-sierra-not","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/244207"}},{"articleId":244210,"title":"Dr. Mac's Backup Recommendations for macOS High Sierra","slug":"dr-macs-backup-recommendations-macos-high-sierra","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/244210"}},{"articleId":244213,"title":"iDevices and Continuity in macOS High Sierra","slug":"idevices-continuity-macos-high-sierra","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/244213"}},{"articleId":244218,"title":"10 Favorite Websites for macOS High Sierra Users","slug":"10-favorite-websites-macos-high-sierra-users","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","high-sierra"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/244218"}}],"content":[{"title":"What not to do with your Mac running High Sierra","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Treat your Mac and macOS High Sierra with care. To keep your work and leisure projects safe, never do any of these things with your Mac:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Never shut off your Mac by pulling the plug. </strong>Always use the Shut Down command from the Apple menu in High Sierra (or press the power button and then click the Shut Down button).
If you&#8217;re using a laptop, you can usually get away with pulling the plug while it&#8217;s running because the battery automatically kicks in. The only caveat is that if your battery is totally depleted, damaged, or missing entirely, you could suffer directory damage or data loss by pulling the plug. Just use the Shut Down command, and you&#8217;ll sleep well.</li>\n<li><strong>Never bump, drop, shake, wobble, dribble, drop-kick, or play catch with a hard drive while it&#8217;s running High Sierra.</strong> Don&#8217;t forget: Your desktop Mac has a hard or solid-state drive inside it, too.</li>\n<li><strong>Never get up from your Mac without saving your work.</strong> Just before your butt leaves the chair, your fingers should press Command+S (the keyboard shortcut in macOS that saves your work). Make it a habit.</li>\n<li><strong>Never keep only one copy of your important documents. </strong>Make at least two backup copies and keep one of them in another physical location. Period.</li>\n<li><strong>Never clean your monitor with a glass cleaner, such as Windex (or another product not designed to be used on a video display). </strong>And nix the paper towels or tissues, too. Use a soft cloth (microfiber is best) to avoid scratching the display.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><b><strong>Never pay attention to anyone who says that Windows 10 is just like the Mac. Yeah, right. And a Kia is just like a BMW.<br />\n</strong></b></p>\n<p><div class=\"figure-container\"><figure id=\"attachment_243912\" aria-labelledby=\"figcaption_attachment_243912\" class=\"wp-caption alignnone\" style=\"width: 397px\"><a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/sierra-desktop.jpg\"><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"size-full wp-image-243912\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/sierra-desktop.jpg\" alt=\"sierra-desktop\" width=\"387\" height=\"400\" /></a><figcaption id=\"figcaption_attachment_243912\" class=\"wp-caption-text\">Photography: Rommel Balcita, Makeup: Gerelyn/Juliet</figcaption></figure></div><div class=\"clearfix\"></div></li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Handy keyboard shortcuts for MacOS High Sierra","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Make your work go faster with these macOS High Sierra keyboard shortcuts. Print the following chart and refer to it while using macOS High Sierra.</p>\n<table width=\"683\">\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\"><strong>Command</strong></td>\n<td width=\"341\"><strong>Keyboard Shortcut</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Add Selected Item to Dock</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+Control+Shift+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Add Selected Item to Sidebar</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+Control+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Close All Windows</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Option+Command+W</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Close Window</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+W</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Copy</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+C</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Cut</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+X</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Duplicate</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+D</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Eject Disk</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+E</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Empty Trash</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Shift+Command+Delete</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Find</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+F</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Get Info (on selected item or items)</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+I</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Go to All My Files</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Shift+Command+F</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Go to Applications Folder</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Shift+Command+A</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Go to Desktop</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Shift+Command+D</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Go to Documents Folder</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Shift+Command+O</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Go to Home Folder</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Shift+Command+H</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Help</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Shift+Command+?</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Hide Current Application</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+H</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Hide Other Applications</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+Shift+H</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Log Out Current User</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Shift+Command+Q</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Make Alias</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+L</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Minimize Window</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+M</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Mission Control: All Windows</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Control+Up Arrow (F3 on Apple keyboards)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Mission Control: Application Windows</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Control+Down Arrow (Control+F3 on Apple keyboards)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Mission Control: Show Desktop</td>\n<td width=\"341\">F11 (fn+F11 on laptops) (Command+F3 on Apple keyboards)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Move to Trash</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+Delete</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">New Finder Window</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+N</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">New Folder</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Shift+Command+N</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">New Smart Folder</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Option+Command+N</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Next Window</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+`</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Open</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+O</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Paste</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+V</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Quick Look (at selected item)</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+Y or Spacebar</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Redo</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+Shift+Z</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Select All</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+A</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Show Inspector (on selected item or items)</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+Option+I</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Show Original (of selected alias)</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+R</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Show View Options</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+J</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Show/Hide Dock</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Option+Command+D</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Show/Hide Path Bar</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Option+Command+P</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Show/Hide Sidebar</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Option+Command+S</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Show/Hide Status Bar</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+/</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Show/Hide Tab Bar</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Shift+Command+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Show/Hide Toolbar</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Option+Command+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Turn VoiceOver On/Off</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+F5 (fn+F5 on laptops)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">Undo</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+Z</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">View Window as Columns</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+3</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">View Window as Cover Flow</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+4</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">View Window as Icons</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+1</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"341\">View Window as List</td>\n<td width=\"341\">Command+2</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n"},{"title":"Tabbing around High Sierra's save and save as sheets","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>In the expanded view of macOS High Sierra, if you press the Tab key while the Save As field is active, it becomes inactive, and the search box becomes active. Press Tab again, and the sidebar becomes active. Press the Tab key one more time, and the file list box (more accurately known as the detail pane — the part with Icon, List, Column, or Cover Flow view buttons in it) becomes active.</p>\n<p>That&#8217;s because the file list box, the search box, the sidebar, and the Save As field are mutually exclusive, and only one can be active at any time. You can always tell which item is active by the thin blue or gray border around it.</p>\n<p>When you want to switch to a different folder to save a file, click the folder in the sidebar or click anywhere in the file list box to make the file list active. The following tricks help you get a hold on this whole active/inactive silliness:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>If you type while the file list box is active, the list box selects the folder that most closely matches the letter(s) that you type.</strong> It&#8217;s a little strange because you won&#8217;t see what you type: You&#8217;ll be typing blind, so to speak.</li>\n<li><strong>When the file list is active, the letters that you type don&#8217;t appear in the Save As field. </strong>If you want to type a filename, you have to activate the Save As field again (by clicking in it or using the Tab key) before you can type in it.</li>\n<li><strong>If you type while the sidebar is active, nothing happens. </strong>You can, however, use the up- and down-arrow keys to move around in the sidebar.</li>\n<li><strong>Pressing Shift reverses the order of the sequence. </strong>If you press Shift+Tab, the active item moves from the Save As field to the file list box to the Sidebar to the Search box and back to the Save As field again.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Creating subfolders in MacOS High Sierra . . . or not","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>How full is too full? When should you begin creating subfolders in High Sierra? That&#8217;s impossible to say, at least in a one-size-fits-all way, but having too many items in a folder can be a nightmare — as can having too many subfolders with just one or two files in each one.</p>\n<p>If you find more than 15 or 20 files in a single folder, begin thinking about ways to subdivide it. On the other hand, some of your biggest subfolders might contain things that you don&#8217;t often access, such as a Correspondence 1992 folder. Because you don&#8217;t use it often, its overcrowded condition might not bother you.</p>\n<p>Here are some tips to help you decide whether to use subfolders or just leave well enough alone:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Don&#8217;t create subfolders until you need them. </strong>That way, you avoid opening an empty folder when you&#8217;re looking for something else — a complete waste of time.</li>\n<li><strong>Let your work style decide the file structure. </strong>When you first start working with your Mac, you may want to save everything in your Documents folder for a while. When a decent-size group of documents has accumulated in the Documents folder, consider taking a look at them and creating logical subfolders for them.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Dr. Mac's backup recommendations for MacOS High Sierra","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>When working in macOS High Sierra, would you like to ensure that you won&#8217;t lose more than a little work no matter what happens — even if your office burns, floods, is destroyed by tornado, hurricane, or earthquake, or robbed? If so, you might want to follow the setup described here.</p>\n<p>I am continually testing new backup solutions, so the software I use can change from month to month. I&#8217;ve tried most of the popular backup solutions and many of the more obscure ones, but before I say anything about my current setup, here is what I&#8217;m trying to accomplish (at a minimum): I want at least three (reasonably) current backup sets with copies of all my files.</p>\n<p>I update two of them every day and keep the third somewhere offsite, such as in a safe deposit box at the bank. Every month or two, I swap the offsite backup for the latest backup from home — and then reuse the older backup disk.</p>\n<p>Note that after I set up the following programs, they run automatically in the background with no further action on my part. Think of this as a &#8220;set and forget&#8221; feature.</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>My first line of defense, of course, is Sierra&#8217;s excellent Time Machine. </strong>There&#8217;s no excuse not to use it. But although Time Machine maintains multiple copies of files, they&#8217;re all stored on the same disk. If something&#8217;s worth backing up to one place, it&#8217;s worth backing up three times.</li>\n<li><strong>And so, in addition to Time Machine, I use the excellent </strong><a href=\"//www.crashplan.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>CrashPlan</strong></a><strong> (free for local backups; $5 per month for unlimited cloud storage).</strong> I might use it to back up my Documents folder four times a day to two different hard drives. It also backs up my Home folder continuously to yet another hard drive, so every time I make a change to a document, the backup copy is updated in real time. Finally, it backs up my Home folder over the Internet to the CrashPlan cloud-based servers. Best of all, it does all that for a mere $5 per month.</li>\n<li><strong>Every night at midnight, </strong><a href=\"//www.bombich.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Carbon Copy Cloner</strong></a><strong> ($39.99) <em>clones</em> (duplicates) my startup disk to another hard drive, which provides me a bootable backup I can use with almost any other Mac.</strong></li>\n<li><strong>Finally, I enable iCloud Desktop &amp; Documents to synchronize current projects among several Macs and my iPhone and iPad, giving me even more backup copies of my most important files.</strong></li>\n</ul>\n<p>One last thing: I test the integrity of each backup regularly, and so should you. It confirms that the files that I think are there are actually there, and it reassures me that the files in that backup set aren&#8217;t corrupted or damaged and are capable of being restored successfully.</p>\n"},{"title":"iDevices and continuity in MacOS High Sierra","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p><em>Continuity</em> is the blanket term for a set of features in High Sierra and iOS 8 or newer that allow you to seamlessly move between your iPhone, iPad, and Mac.</p>\n<p>At present, four features provide Continuity:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Handoff:</strong> Start working on an email or document on one device (your Mac, for example), and pick up where you left off on another Apple device such as an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch.</li>\n<li><strong>Instant hotspot:</strong> Use your iDevice&#8217;s cellular Internet connection to connect your Mac to the Internet.</li>\n<li><strong>Phone calling:</strong> Use your Mac, iPad, or iPod touch to make and receive phone calls using your iPhone.</li>\n<li><strong>SMS:</strong> Use your Mac, iPad, or iPod touch to send and receive SMS and MMS messages (text messages) using your Mac, iPad, or iPod touch.</li>\n</ul>\n<p>They&#8217;re a useful little quartet, but they work only with relatively new Apple devices. So before you get too excited, peruse the system requirements for each feature.</p>\n<h2>Intro and system requirements</h2>\n<p>Handoff and Instant Hotspot are supported by the following Mac models and require Yosemite, macOS Sierra, or macOS High Sierra:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>MacBook (2015)</li>\n<li>MacBook Air (Mid 2012 and later)</li>\n<li>MacBook Pro (Mid 2012 and later)</li>\n<li>Mac (Late 2012 and later)</li>\n<li>Mac mini (Late 2012 and later)</li>\n<li>Mac Pro (Late 2013)</li>\n</ul>\n<p>Instant Hotspot requires one of these iDevices with cellular connectivity and Personal Hotspot service through your wireless carrier:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>iPhone 5 or later</li>\n<li>iPhone 4s (sharing iPhone calls only)</li>\n<li>iPad (4th generation), iPad Air, iPad Air 2, iPad Pro</li>\n<li>iPad mini, iPad mini with Retina display, iPad mini 3, iPad mini 4</li>\n<li>iPod touch (5th generation and later)</li>\n</ul>\n<p>Phone Calling requires an iPhone with at least iOS 8 and an activated carrier plan, and works with any iOS device that supports iOS 8 and any Mac that supports Sierra or High Sierra.</p>\n<p>SMS requires an iPhone with at least iOS 8.1 and an activated carrier plan, and works with any iOS device with iOS 8.1 and any Mac that supports Sierra or High Sierra.</p>\n<p>If your gear isn&#8217;t listed, Continuity isn&#8217;t going to work for you. So, assuming you have at least two or more devices that meet those requirements, here is how to put these useful features to work for you.</p>\n<h2>How to use Handoff</h2>\n<p>Handoff lets you start a document, email, or message on one Apple device and pick up where you left off on another. It works with Apple apps including Mail, Safari, Maps, Messages, Reminders, Calendar, Contacts, Pages, Numbers, and Keynote as well as some third-party apps.</p>\n<p>To use Handoff, do the following:</p>\n<ol>\n<li>Sign in to the same iCloud account on all of your devices.</li>\n<li>Turn on Bluetooth on all the devices you want to use. Make sure your devices are near each other.In this case, <em>near</em> means, <em>in the same room,</em> preferably within a few feet of each other.</li>\n<li>Connect all your devices to the same Wi-Fi network.</li>\n<li>Use one of the aforementioned apps on one of your devices.For the sake of this example, start a new presentation in Keynote on the Mac. When Keynote is open on your Mac, you&#8217;ll see a tiny Keynote icon on your iDevice&#8217;s Lock screen.<br />\n<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/sierra-keynote.jpg\"><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-244214\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/sierra-keynote.jpg\" alt=\"sierra-keynote\" width=\"212\" height=\"400\" /></a></li>\n<li>Swipe up from the bottom-left edge of the Lock screen, where you see the icon.Keynote launches on your iPhone, and you see the presentation you started on your Mac, ready for you to continue working on it.</li>\n</ol>\n<p>Another way to open an app available for Handoff on your iDevice is to double-click the Home button and then tap the app (Keynote in this example) in the multitasking display.</p>\n<p>Going the other direction, if you had started the presentation on your iDevice, you&#8217;d see a Keynote icon on the left side of your dock, as shown. Click the icon to launch Keynote, which will open the presentation that&#8217;s currently open on your iDevice.</p>\n<p><a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/sierra-dock-keynote.jpg\"><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-244215\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/sierra-dock-keynote.jpg\" alt=\"sierra-dock-keynote\" width=\"535\" height=\"136\" /></a></p>\n<p>You can also use High Sierra&#8217;s app switcher (Command-Tab) to open an app that&#8217;s displaying a Handoff icon in your dock.</p>\n<p>If you decide you want to disable Handoff:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><b><strong>On your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch: Tap Settings</strong>→<strong>General</strong>→<strong>Handoff &amp; Suggested Apps, and turn off Handoff.</strong></b></li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>On your Mac: Open System Preferences, click the General icon, and uncheck Allow Handoff.</strong></li>\n</ul>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>Try using Handoff with Safari. If you start reading a web page on one device, as long as you don&#8217;t quit Safari you can pick up reading it on any of your other devices. You might find that you use Handoff more with Safari than with documents, messages, and mail combined. Bottom line: Handoff is a sweet feature when it works.</p>\n<p>Handoff still isn&#8217;t robust for some users, with reports of inconsistent or nonexistent behavior with Handoff appearing a year after its introduction. I&#8217;m sure Apple will get it sorted out in an iOS or High Sierra update. Meanwhile, if it stops working (or never started working) for you, you might have some luck by disabling Handoff, logging out of iCloud on all devices, restarting all the devices, and then reenabling Handoff. It&#8217;s a pain but it works more often than not (assuming all of your gear meets the requirements).</p>\n<h2>How to use Personal Hotspot</h2>\n<p>Another Continuity feature allows you to use the Personal Hotspot on your iPhone or cellular iPad to provide instant Internet access to other iDevices.</p>\n<p>Some cellular operators and data plans don&#8217;t include Personal Hotspot. If you don&#8217;t see a Personal Hotspot in Settings→Cellular Data on your iDevice, contact your wireless operator.</p>\n<p>The first thing to do is enable the hotspot on your cellular device by tapping Settings→Cellular Data and enabling the Personal Hotspot switch.</p>\n<p>Now, to get Internet access on your (non-cellular) device:</p>\n<ol>\n<li>Sign into iCloud using the same Apple ID used on the cellular iDevice.</li>\n<li>Tap Settings→Wi-Fi and select the name of the iPhone or iPad with the Personal Hotspot.</li>\n</ol>\n<p>To get Internet access on your Mac:</p>\n<ol>\n<li>Click the Wi-Fi icon in the menu bar.</li>\n<li>In the menu that appears, select the name of your iPhone or iPad with the cellular connection.</li>\n</ol>\n<p>And that&#8217;s all there is to it!</p>\n<p>The data consumed by the non-cellular devices comes from the cellular device with the Personal Hotspot&#8217;s data plan. If your data plan is unlimited, you&#8217;re golden. For those who pay for data by the gigabyte: Keep an eye on your cellular data usage to avoid unpleasant surprises on your next bill.</p>\n<h2>How to make phone calls with Continuity</h2>\n<p>With Continuity, you can make and receive cellular phone calls from your iPad, iPod touch, or Mac when your iPhone is on the same Wi-Fi network.</p>\n<p>To make and receive phone calls on your Mac, iPad, or iPod touch:</p>\n<ol>\n<li>Sign in to the same iCloud account on all your devices, including your Mac.</li>\n<li>Make sure all devices are on the same Wi-Fi network.</li>\n<li>Make sure all devices are signed in to FaceTime using the same iCloud account.This means that any device using this Apple ID for FaceTime will receive your phone calls. See the instructions for turning off iPhone cellular calling later in this section to disable phone calls on a device.</li>\n<li>Tap Settings→Phone. If you see Wi-Fi Calling, turn it off.</li>\n</ol>\n<p>Now that you have everything configured, here are some details on making a call from your Mac, iPad, or iPod touch:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>Tap or click a phone number in Contacts, Calendar, or Safari, or tap a phone number from a recent contact in the multitasking display of iDevices.</li>\n<li>To answer a call on your iPad or iPod touch, just swipe to answer.</li>\n<li>On a Mac you&#8217;ll see a notification when you receive a call on your iPhone. You can then click to answer the call, send it to voicemail, or send the caller a message.</li>\n<li>To disable iPhone cellular calls on your iPad or iPod touch, tap Settings→FaceTime→Calls from iPhone and then tap the switch to disable it.</li>\n</ul>\n<h2>SMS and Continuity</h2>\n<p>With Continuity, all SMS and MMS text messages that you send and receive on your iPhone appear on your Mac, iPad, and iPod touch, even if the person on the other end is less fortunate and doesn&#8217;t use an iPhone or a Mac.</p>\n<p>Furthermore, you can reply from whichever device is closest to you, including your iPad, iPod touch, or Mac.</p>\n<p>To use Continuity for SMS and MMS with your iPhone and your Mac, iPad, or iPod touch, all of your iDevices need iOS 8.1 or higher and your Macs need macOS 10.10 Yosemite or higher. And all devices need to sign in to iMessage using the same Apple ID.</p>\n<p>Now enable SMS on your iPhone by taping Settings→Messages→Send &amp; Receive→You Can Be Reached by iMessage At and enable the check boxes for both your phone number and your email address.</p>\n<p>Finally, tap Settings→Messages→Text Message Forwarding and enable the devices you would like this iPhone to forward SMS messages to.</p>\n<p>Each device you enable will display a code; just enter the code on your iPhone to verify the SMS feature and you&#8217;re done.</p>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Solve","lifeExpectancy":"Two years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-04-05T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":244221},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2020-11-15T19:00:45+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-02-25T20:09:12+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:19:17+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Technology","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33512"},"slug":"technology","categoryId":33512},{"name":"Computers","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33513"},"slug":"computers","categoryId":33513},{"name":"Operating Systems","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33524"},"slug":"operating-systems","categoryId":33524},{"name":"MacOS","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33527"},"slug":"macos","categoryId":33527},{"name":"Catalina","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33529"},"slug":"catalina","categoryId":33529}],"title":"macOS Catalina For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"macos catalina for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"macos-catalina-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","检检索擎调整系统":{"metaDescription":"Learn how macOS Catalina makes your Mac easier to use and offers myriad improvements to make you more productive—from coursofppt.com.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Whether you’ve purchased a new Mac with macOS Catalina pre-installed or you’ve upgraded from a previous version of macOS, you’ll find that Catalina makes your Mac easier to use and offers myriad improvements to make you more productive.\r\n\r\nGet additional information on things you should never do to your Mac, a list of useful and timesaving keyboard shortcuts, a discussion of when folders are too full and when (and when not) to create subfolders, recommendations for backing up data, and a short discussion of Apple devices and continuity between them.","description":"Whether you’ve purchased a new Mac with macOS Catalina pre-installed or you’ve upgraded from a previous version of macOS, you’ll find that Catalina makes your Mac easier to use and offers myriad improvements to make you more productive.\r\n\r\nGet additional information on things you should never do to your Mac, a list of useful and timesaving keyboard shortcuts, a discussion of when folders are too full and when (and when not) to create subfolders, recommendations for backing up data, and a short discussion of Apple devices and continuity between them.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":8989,"name":"Bob LeVitus","slug":"bob-levitus","description":" <p><b>Bob LeVitus </B>has written nearly 100 reference books on Apple technologies. He&#8217;s the author or coauthor of<i> macOS For Dummies,</i> <i>iPad For Dummies,</i> and <i>iPhone For Dummies,</i> among others.</p> <p><b>Dwight Spivey</b> probably wrote the rest of the <i>For Dummies</i> books on Apple products, including <i>iPhone For Seniors For Dummies, iPad For Seniors For Dummies,</i> and <i>Apple Watch For Seniors For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8989"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33529,"title":"Catalina","slug":"catalina","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33529"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":267787,"title":"Track Productivity with the Screen Time App on Your Mac","slug":"track-productivity-with-the-screen-time-app-on-your-mac","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","catalina"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/267787"}},{"articleId":267781,"title":"How to Use the Podcasts App on Your Mac","slug":"how-to-use-the-podcasts-app-on-your-mac","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","catalina"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/267781"}},{"articleId":259874,"title":"Enable Dark Mode to Adjust Your Mac’s Brightness","slug":"dark-mode-new-in-macos-mojave","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","catalina"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/259874"}},{"articleId":147393,"title":"10 Great Websites for Mac Freaks","slug":"10-great-websites-for-mac-freaks","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","catalina"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/147393"}},{"articleId":147389,"title":"10 Ways to Speed Up Your Mac","slug":"10-ways-to-speed-up-your-mac","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","catalina"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/147389"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":267787,"title":"Track Productivity with the Screen Time App on Your Mac","slug":"track-productivity-with-the-screen-time-app-on-your-mac","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","catalina"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/267787"}},{"articleId":267781,"title":"How to Use the Podcasts App on Your Mac","slug":"how-to-use-the-podcasts-app-on-your-mac","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","catalina"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/267781"}},{"articleId":259874,"title":"Enable Dark Mode to Adjust Your Mac’s Brightness","slug":"dark-mode-new-in-macos-mojave","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","catalina"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/259874"}},{"articleId":147393,"title":"10 Great Websites for Mac Freaks","slug":"10-great-websites-for-mac-freaks","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","catalina"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/147393"}},{"articleId":147389,"title":"10 Ways to Speed Up Your Mac","slug":"10-ways-to-speed-up-your-mac","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","catalina"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/147389"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":281764,"slug":"macos-catalina-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119607885","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","catalina"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119607884/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119607884/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119607884-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119607884/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119607884/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/macos-catalina-for-dummies-cover-9781119607885-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"macOS Catalina For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"8989\">Bob LeVitus</b> </B>has written nearly 100 reference books on Apple technologies. He&#8217;s the author or coauthor of<i> macOS For Dummies,</i> <i>iPad For Dummies,</i> and <i>iPhone For Dummies,</i> among others.</p> <p><b>Dwight Spivey</b> probably wrote the rest of the <i>For Dummies</i> books on Apple products, including <i>iPhone For Seniors For Dummies, iPad For Seniors For Dummies,</i> and <i>Apple Watch For Seniors For Dummies.</i></p>","authors":[{"authorId":8989,"name":"Bob LeVitus","slug":"bob-levitus","description":" <p><b>Bob LeVitus </B>has written nearly 100 reference books on Apple technologies. He&#8217;s the author or coauthor of<i> macOS For Dummies,</i> <i>iPad For Dummies,</i> and <i>iPhone For Dummies,</i> among others.</p> <p><b>Dwight Spivey</b> probably wrote the rest of the <i>For Dummies</i> books on Apple products, including <i>iPhone For Seniors For Dummies, iPad For Seniors For Dummies,</i> and <i>Apple Watch For Seniors For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8989"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;technology&quot;,&quot;computers&quot;,&quot;operating-systems&quot;,&quot;macos&quot;,&quot;catalina&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119607885&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b2574259\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;technology&quot;,&quot;computers&quot;,&quot;operating-systems&quot;,&quot;macos&quot;,&quot;catalina&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119607885&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b257567f\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":0,"title":"","slug":null,"categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/"}}],"content":[{"title":"What not to do with Yyur Mac running Catalina","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Treat your Mac and macOS Catalina with care. To keep your work and leisure projects safe, never do any of these things with your Mac:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Never shut off your Mac by pulling the plug. </strong>Always use the Shut Down command from the Apple menu in Catalina (or press the power button and then click the Shut Down button).</li>\n</ul>\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">If you’re using a laptop, you can usually get away with pulling the plug while it’s running because the battery automatically kicks in. The only caveat is that if your battery is totally depleted, damaged, or missing entirely, you could suffer directory damage or data loss by pulling the plug. Just use the Shut Down command, and you’ll sleep well.</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Never bump, drop, shake, wobble, dribble, drop-kick, or play catch with a hard drive while it’s running Catalina.</strong> Don’t forget: Your desktop Mac has a hard or solid-state drive inside it, too.</li>\n<li><strong>Never get up from your Mac without saving your work.</strong> Just before your butt leaves the chair, your fingers should press Command+S (the keyboard shortcut in macOS that saves your work). Make it a habit.</li>\n<li><strong>Never keep only one copy of your important documents. </strong>Make at least two backup copies and keep one of them in another physical location. Period.</li>\n<li><strong>Never clean your monitor with a glass cleaner, such as Windex (or another product not designed to be used on a video display). </strong>And nix the paper towels or tissues, too. Use a soft cloth (microfiber is best) to avoid scratching the display.</li>\n<li><strong>Never pay attention to anyone who says that Windows is just like the Mac. Yeah, right. And a Kia is just like a Porsche.</strong></li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Handy keyboard shortcuts for macOS Catalina","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Make your work go faster with these macOS Catalina keyboard shortcuts. Print this chart and refer to it while using macOS Catalina.</p>\n<table width=\"546\">\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\"><strong>Command</strong></td>\n<td width=\"273\"><strong>Keyboard Shortcut</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Add Selected Item to Dock</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Control+Shift+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Add Selected Item to Sidebar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Control+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Close All Windows</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option+W</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Close Window</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+W</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Copy</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+C</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Cut</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+X</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Duplicate</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+D</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Eject Disk</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+E</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Empty Trash</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+Delete</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Find</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+F</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Get Info (on selected item or items)</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+I</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Get Info Inspector (on multiple selected items)</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option+I</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Go to Recents</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+F</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Go to Applications Folder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+A</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Go to Desktop</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+D</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Go to Documents Folder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+O</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Go to Home Folder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+H</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Help</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+?</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Hide Current Application</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+H</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Hide Other Applications</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option+H</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Log Out Current User</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+Q</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Make Alias</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+L</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Minimize Window</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+M</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Mission Control: All Windows</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Control+Up Arrow (F3 on Apple keyboards)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Mission Control: Application Windows</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Control+Down Arrow (Control+F3 on Apple keyboards)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Mission Control: Show Desktop</td>\n<td width=\"273\">F11 (fn+F11 on laptops) (Command+F3 on Apple keyboards)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Move to Trash</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Delete</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">New Finder Window</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+N</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">New Folder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+N</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">New Smart Folder</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option+N</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Next Window</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+`</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Open</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+O</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Paste</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+V</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Quick Look (at selected item)</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Y or Spacebar</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Redo</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+Z</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Select All</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+A</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show Original (of selected alias)</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+R</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show View Options</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+J</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Dock</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option+D</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Path Bar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option +P</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Sidebar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option +S</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Status Bar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+/</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Tab Bar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Shift+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Show/Hide Toolbar</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Option+T</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Turn VoiceOver On/Off</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+F5 (fn+F5 on laptops)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">Undo</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+Z</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">View Window as Columns</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+3</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">View Window as Gallery</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+4</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">View Window as Icons</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+1</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"273\">View Window as List</td>\n<td width=\"273\">Command+2</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n"},{"title":"Tabbing around Catalina’s Save and Save As functions","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>In the expanded view of macOS Catalina Save or Save As functions, if you press the Tab key while the Save As field is active, it becomes inactive, and the search box becomes active. Press Tab again, and the sidebar becomes active. Press the Tab key one more time, and the file list box (more accurately known as the detail pane — the part with Icon, List, Column, or Cover Flow view buttons in it) becomes active.</p>\n<p>That’s because the file list box, the search box, the sidebar, and the Save As field are mutually exclusive, and only one can be active at any time. You can always tell which item is active by the thin blue or gray border around it.</p>\n<p>When you want to switch to a different folder to save a file, click the folder in the sidebar or click anywhere in the file list box to make the file list active. The following tricks help you get a hold on this whole active/inactive silliness:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>If you type while the file list box is active, the list box selects the folder that most closely matches the letter(s) that you type.</strong> It’s a little strange because you won’t see what you type: You’ll be typing blind, so to speak.</li>\n<li><strong>When the file list is active, the letters that you type don’t appear in the Save As field. </strong>If you want to type a filename, you have to activate the Save As field again (by clicking in it or using the Tab key) before you can type in it.</li>\n<li><strong>If you type while the sidebar is active, nothing happens. </strong>You can, however, use the up- and down-arrow keys to move around in the sidebar.</li>\n<li><strong>Pressing Shift reverses the order of the sequence. </strong>If you press Shift+Tab, the active item moves from the Save As field to the file list box to the Sidebar to the Search box and back to the Save As field again.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Creating subfolders in macOS Catalina . . . or not","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>How full is too full? When should you begin creating subfolders in Catalina? That’s impossible to say, at least in a one-size-fits-all way, but having too many items in a folder can be a nightmare — as can having too many subfolders with just one or two files in each one.</p>\n<p>If you find more than 15 or 20 files in a single folder, begin thinking about ways to subdivide it. On the other hand, some of your biggest subfolders might contain things that you don’t often access, such as a Correspondence 2001 folder. Because you don’t use it often, its overcrowded condition might not bother you.</p>\n<p>Here are some tips to help you decide whether to use subfolders or just leave well enough alone:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Don’t create subfolders until you need them. </strong>That way, you avoid opening an empty folder when you’re looking for something else — a complete waste of time.</li>\n<li><strong>Let your work style decide the file structure. </strong>When you first start working with your Mac, you may want to save everything in your Documents folder for a while. When a decent-size group of documents has accumulated in the Documents folder, consider taking a look at them and creating logical subfolders for them.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Dr. Mac’s backup recommendations for macOS Catalina","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>When working in macOS Catalina, would you like to ensure that you won’t lose more than a little work no matter what happens — even if your office burns, floods, is destroyed by tornado, hurricane, or earthquake, or robbed? If so, you might want to follow the setup described here.</p>\n<p>I am continually testing new backup solutions, so the software I use can change from month to month. I’ve tried most of the popular backup solutions and many of the more obscure ones, but before I say anything about my current setup, here is what I’m trying to accomplish (at a minimum): I want at least three (reasonably) current backup sets with copies of all my files.</p>\n<p>I update two of them every day and keep the third somewhere offsite, such as in a safe deposit box at the bank. Every month or two, I swap the offsite backup for the latest backup from home — and then reuse the older backup disk.</p>\n<p>Note that after I set up the following programs, they run automatically in the background with no further action on my part. Think of this as a “set and forget” feature.</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>My first line of defense is macOS’s excellent Time Machine. </strong>There’s no excuse not to use it. But although Time Machine maintains multiple copies of files, they’re all stored on the same disk. If something’s worth backing up to one place, it’s worth backing up three times.</li>\n</ul>\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">Note that you can add a second or third backup disk (or more) to Time Machine if you like. Just click Select Disk in the Time Machine System Preferences pane, select the disk, and choose Use Both (or All) in the dialog that appears so that Time Machine rotates among the disks. Alas, even if you have two or more Time Machine backup disks, they’re still all stored in the same room.</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>And so, in addition to Time Machine, I use the excellent <a href=\"//www.backblaze.com/\">Backblaze </a>($6 per month for unlimited cloud storage).</strong> I might use it to back up my Documents folder four times a day to two different hard drives. It also backs up my Home folder continuously to yet another hard drive, so every time I make a change to a document, the backup copy is updated in real time. Finally, it backs up my Home folder over the Internet to the CrashPlan cloud-based servers. Best of all, it does all that for a mere $6 per month.</li>\n<li><strong>Every night at midnight, </strong><a href=\"//www.bombich.com/\"><strong>Carbon Copy Cloner</strong></a><strong> ($39.99) <em>clones</em> (duplicates) my startup disk to another hard drive, which provides me a bootable backup I can use with almost any other Mac.</strong></li>\n<li><strong>Finally, I use Dropbox to synchronize current projects among several Macs and my iPhone and iPad, giving me additional backup copies of important files as well as ensuring that the most current version of the file is available from all my devices.</strong></li>\n</ul>\n<p>One last thing: I test the integrity of each backup regularly, and so should you. It confirms that the files that I think are there are actually there, and it reassures me that the files in that backup set aren’t corrupted or damaged and are capable of being restored successfully.</p>\n"},{"title":"Apple devices and continuity in macOS Catalina","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p><em>Continuity</em> is the blanket term for a set of features in macOS Yosemite or newer and iOS 8 or newer that allow you to seamlessly move between your iPhone, iPad, and Mac.</p>\n<p>At present, four features provide continuity:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Handoff:</strong> Start working on an email or document on one device (your Mac, for example), and pick up where you left off on another Apple device such as an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch.</li>\n<li><strong>Instant hotspot:</strong> Use your iDevice’s cellular Internet connection to connect your Mac to the Internet.</li>\n<li><strong>Phone calling:</strong> Use your Mac, iPad, or iPod touch to make and receive phone calls using your iPhone.</li>\n<li><strong>SMS:</strong> Use your Mac, iPad, or iPod touch to send and receive SMS and MMS messages (text messages) using your Mac, iPad, or iPod touch.</li>\n</ul>\n<p>They’re a useful little quartet, but they work only with newer Apple devices. So, before you get too excited, peruse the system requirements for each feature.</p>\n<h2>Intro and system requirements</h2>\n<p>Handoff and Instant Hotspot are supported by the following Mac models and require Yosemite or later:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>MacBook (2015)</li>\n<li>MacBook Air (Mid 2012 and later)</li>\n<li>MacBook Pro (Mid 2012 and later)</li>\n<li>Mac (Late 2012 and later)</li>\n<li>Mac mini (Late 2012 and later)</li>\n<li>Mac Pro (Late 2013)</li>\n</ul>\n<p>Instant Hotspot requires one of these iDevices with cellular connectivity and Personal Hotspot service through your wireless carrier:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>iPhone 5 or later</li>\n<li>iPhone 4s (sharing iPhone calls only)</li>\n<li>iPad (4th generation), iPad Air, iPad Air 2, iPad Pro</li>\n<li>iPad mini, iPad mini with Retina display, iPad mini 3, iPad mini 4</li>\n<li>iPod touch (5th generation and later)</li>\n</ul>\n<p>Phone Calling requires an iPhone with at least iOS 8 and an activated carrier plan and works with any iOS device that supports iOS 8 and any Mac that supports macOS Sierra or later.</p>\n<p>SMS requires an iPhone with at least iOS 8.1 and an activated carrier plan and works with any iOS device with iOS 8.1 and any Mac that supports macOS Sierra or later.</p>\n<p>If your gear isn’t listed, Continuity isn’t going to work for you. So, assuming you have at least two or more devices that meet those requirements, here is how to put these useful features to work for you.</p>\n<h2>How to use Handoff</h2>\n<p>Handoff lets you start a document, email, or message on one Apple device and pick up where you left off on another. It works with Apple apps including Mail, Safari, Maps, Messages, Reminders, Calendar, Contacts, Pages, Numbers, and Keynote as well as some third-party apps.</p>\n<p>To use Handoff, do the following:</p>\n<ol>\n<li><strong>Sign in to the same iCloud account on all of your devices.</strong></li>\n<li><strong>Turn on Bluetooth on all the devices you want to use. Make sure your devices are near each other.</strong><br />\nIn this case, <em>near</em> means, <em>in the same room,</em> preferably within a few feet of each other.</li>\n<li><strong>Connect all your devices to the same Wi-Fi network.</strong></li>\n<li><strong>Use one of the aforementioned apps on one of your devices.</strong><br />\nFor the sake of this example, start a new presentation in Keynote on the Mac. When Keynote is open on your Mac, you’ll see a tiny Keynote icon on your iDevice’s Lock screen.</li>\n</ol>\n"},{"title":"Favorite websites for macOS Catalina users","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>To learn about all things Macintosh and macOS Mojave, hop on to the web, check out these sites, and stuff your brain with Mac information:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><a href=\"//www.macobserver.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>The Mac Observer</strong></a> offers insightful opinion pieces in addition to the usual Apple news and product reviews. The quality and depth of the writing at <em>The Mac Observer </em>is superior to most other sites covering the Apple beat.</li>\n</ul>\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">Disclosure: I’m proud to be a columnist at <em>The Mac Observer, </em>and even prouder to have been doing it for nearly two decades.</p>\n<ul>\n<li>The <strong><a href=\"//support.apple.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Apple support site </a></strong>and <a href=\"//discussions.apple.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Apple support communities</strong></a> are treasure troves of tech notes, software update information, troubleshooting tips, and documentation for most Apple products.</li>\n<li><a href=\"//www.macworld.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Macworld</strong></a> describes itself as, “Your best source for all things Apple,” and it’s not far from the truth. <em>Macworld</em> is especially strong for comparative reviews of Mac and iPhone/iPad products. If you want to find out which inkjet printer or digital camera is the best in its price class, Macworld.com probably has feature comparison charts and real-world test results.</li>\n<li><strong><a href=\"//www.tidbits.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">TidBITS</a></strong> bills itself as “Thoughtful, detailed coverage of everything Apple for 28 years” but there’s much more to <em>TidBITS </em>than just news. You can also find thoughtful commentary, in-depth analysis, and detailed product reviews, written and edited by pros who really know the Apple ecosystem.</li>\n<li><a href=\"//www.sixcolors.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Six Colors</strong></a> is Jason Snell’s magazine on the web. The former editor for <em>Macworld</em> magazine for over a decade, he and his team provide daily coverage of Apple, other technology companies, and the intersection of technology and culture. Six Colors has been around for a few years, and the writing continues to get stronger, more opinionated, and even more fun to read.</li>\n<li><strong><a href=\"//thewirecutter.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Wirecutter </a></strong>is where I go to see what experts consider the best peripherals, tech tools, and toys. Now a <em>New York Times</em> company, Wirecutter has the resources to objectively evaluate many products in a category and declare one of them the “best.”</li>\n<li><a href=\"//www.macsales.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Other World Computing</strong></a> is my favorite maker of accessories and peripherals for Macs. They have a wide array of storage upgrade kits and memory upgrades that are guaranteed for life, as well as great documentation and instructional videos.</li>\n<li><a href=\"//www.workingsmarterformacusers.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>Working Smarter for Mac Users</strong></a> is my productivity-oriented blog.</li>\n</ul>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Six months","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-02-25T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":265835},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2022-01-19T19:11:05+00:00","modifiedTime":"2022-03-22T18:25:09+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:59+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Technology","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33512"},"slug":"technology","categoryId":33512},{"name":"Computers","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33513"},"slug":"computers","categoryId":33513},{"name":"Operating Systems","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33524"},"slug":"operating-systems","categoryId":33524},{"name":"MacOS","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33527"},"slug":"macos","categoryId":33527},{"name":"Big Sur","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33528"},"slug":"big-sur","categoryId":33528}],"title":"4 Cool macOS Big Sur Tricks","strippedTitle":"4 cool macos big sur tricks","slug":"4-cool-macos-big-sur-tricks","canonicalUrl":"","检检索擎调整系统":{"metaDescription":"Try four macOS Big Sur tricks: a screenshot toolbar, dynamic desktop pictures, recently used apps section, and Gallery view as photo browser.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"macOS Big Sur includes several enhancements, such as a nifty mechanism for capturing still and video images from your <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/computers/macs/mac-operating-systems/macos-big-sur-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">Mac</a> screen, desktop pictures that change to reflect the time of day, the recently used apps section of the dock, and using Gallery view as a photo browser.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Shooting screens</h2>\r\nIf you’ve used a Mac for long, you probably know that you can grab a picture of what’s on your screen by using the shortcuts Command  +Shift+3 for the whole screen or Command  +Shift+4 to select a window or part of the screen. Those shortcuts and features have been around since time immemorial.\r\n\r\nWhen you take a screenshot using your old-school shortcuts — Command  +Shift+3 or Command  +Shift+4 — a thumbnail of the screenshot appears in the lower-right corner of the screen.\r\n\r\nIf you do nothing, the thumbnail disappears after about 5 seconds, and then the screenshot is saved on your desktop. To see additional options, right- or Control-click the thumbnail and choose from the shortcut menu, as shown.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275692\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"503\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275692\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-screenshot.jpg\" alt=\"screenshot in Big Sur\" width=\"503\" height=\"600\" /> After you take a screenshot, a thumbnail appears in the lower-right corner of the screen; right- or Control-click for additional options.[/caption]\r\n\r\nOr just single-click the thumbnail before it disappears and the image opens in a window with Markup tools so you can annotate the image before you save it.\r\n\r\nWhen you have finished annotating, click Done to save the screenshot and annotations to the desktop, or click Revert to close the overlay without saving your annotations.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you don’t want to save a file at all, add the Control key to the keyboard shortcut (Command+Shift+Control+3 or Command+Shift+Control+3). Instead of saving the screenshot to a file, it will be sent to the clipboard, so you can paste it into any document that will accept an image from the clipboard.</p>\r\nBut it gets even better with one more fabulous screen-shooting shortcut that provides even more control over screenshots and adds the capability to record screen movies. This magical shortcut is Command  +Shift+5, and it’s the only shortcut you really have to memorize because its floating toolbar, shown, includes all the functionality of the Command  +Shift+3 and Command  +Shift+4 shortcuts and more.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275691\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275691\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-screenshot-toolbar.jpg\" alt=\"Mac screenshot toolbar\" width=\"556\" height=\"448\" /> The screenshot toolbar appears when you press Command  +Shift+5.[/caption]\r\n\r\nNotice the Options pop-up menu, which lets you do the following:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Change the destination for screenshots from Desktop (the default) to Documents, Clipboard, Mail, Messages, Preview, or Other Location</li>\r\n \t<li>Set a timer for shots</li>\r\n \t<li>Turn on and off the floating thumbnail</li>\r\n \t<li>Remember the last selection you made (or not)</li>\r\n \t<li>Show or hide the mouse pointer</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nAfter configuring the options, you capture screenshots by clicking the Capture icon. If you’ve chosen one of the movie options — Record Entire Screen or Record Selected Portion — the Capture icon becomes the Record icon; click it to begin recording. When you do, the Stop Recording icon appears in the menu bar. Click it to end your recording.\r\n\r\nBottom line: Memorize Big Sur’s one keyboard shortcut to rule them all — Command  +Shift+5 — and use it for all of your screen-capturing needs.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Dynamic desktop images</h2>\r\nWhen you choose your desktop picture, you’ll find a pair of dynamic desktop options above all the normal desktop pictures in the Desktop & Screen Saver System Preferences pane.\r\n\r\nBecause a picture is worth a thousand words, take a gander at this figure, which explains it all.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275690\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"525\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275690\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-dynamic-desktop.jpg\" alt=\"dynamic Mac desktop\" width=\"525\" height=\"600\" /> A dynamic desktop at 4:33 PM (top) and 11:33 PM (bottom).[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Recently used apps in the dock</h2>\r\nA relatively new feature to the dock is the Recently Used Apps section, which displays icons for the last three apps you’ve launched, regardless of whether their icons are in the dock permanently.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Mentions of Gallery view</h2>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Gallery view is great for browsing folders full of images.</p>\r\nClick an image and then use the arrow keys to see the next or previous image; click the Markup, Rotate, or More icon to edit the current image.\r\n\r\nAnd that retires the side, at least as far as features in Big Sur’s Finder are concerned. Onward!","description":"macOS Big Sur includes several enhancements, such as a nifty mechanism for capturing still and video images from your <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/computers/macs/mac-operating-systems/macos-big-sur-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">Mac</a> screen, desktop pictures that change to reflect the time of day, the recently used apps section of the dock, and using Gallery view as a photo browser.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Shooting screens</h2>\r\nIf you’ve used a Mac for long, you probably know that you can grab a picture of what’s on your screen by using the shortcuts Command  +Shift+3 for the whole screen or Command  +Shift+4 to select a window or part of the screen. Those shortcuts and features have been around since time immemorial.\r\n\r\nWhen you take a screenshot using your old-school shortcuts — Command  +Shift+3 or Command  +Shift+4 — a thumbnail of the screenshot appears in the lower-right corner of the screen.\r\n\r\nIf you do nothing, the thumbnail disappears after about 5 seconds, and then the screenshot is saved on your desktop. To see additional options, right- or Control-click the thumbnail and choose from the shortcut menu, as shown.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275692\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"503\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275692\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-screenshot.jpg\" alt=\"screenshot in Big Sur\" width=\"503\" height=\"600\" /> After you take a screenshot, a thumbnail appears in the lower-right corner of the screen; right- or Control-click for additional options.[/caption]\r\n\r\nOr just single-click the thumbnail before it disappears and the image opens in a window with Markup tools so you can annotate the image before you save it.\r\n\r\nWhen you have finished annotating, click Done to save the screenshot and annotations to the desktop, or click Revert to close the overlay without saving your annotations.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you don’t want to save a file at all, add the Control key to the keyboard shortcut (Command+Shift+Control+3 or Command+Shift+Control+3). Instead of saving the screenshot to a file, it will be sent to the clipboard, so you can paste it into any document that will accept an image from the clipboard.</p>\r\nBut it gets even better with one more fabulous screen-shooting shortcut that provides even more control over screenshots and adds the capability to record screen movies. This magical shortcut is Command  +Shift+5, and it’s the only shortcut you really have to memorize because its floating toolbar, shown, includes all the functionality of the Command  +Shift+3 and Command  +Shift+4 shortcuts and more.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275691\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275691\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-screenshot-toolbar.jpg\" alt=\"Mac screenshot toolbar\" width=\"556\" height=\"448\" /> The screenshot toolbar appears when you press Command  +Shift+5.[/caption]\r\n\r\nNotice the Options pop-up menu, which lets you do the following:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Change the destination for screenshots from Desktop (the default) to Documents, Clipboard, Mail, Messages, Preview, or Other Location</li>\r\n \t<li>Set a timer for shots</li>\r\n \t<li>Turn on and off the floating thumbnail</li>\r\n \t<li>Remember the last selection you made (or not)</li>\r\n \t<li>Show or hide the mouse pointer</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nAfter configuring the options, you capture screenshots by clicking the Capture icon. If you’ve chosen one of the movie options — Record Entire Screen or Record Selected Portion — the Capture icon becomes the Record icon; click it to begin recording. When you do, the Stop Recording icon appears in the menu bar. Click it to end your recording.\r\n\r\nBottom line: Memorize Big Sur’s one keyboard shortcut to rule them all — Command  +Shift+5 — and use it for all of your screen-capturing needs.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Dynamic desktop images</h2>\r\nWhen you choose your desktop picture, you’ll find a pair of dynamic desktop options above all the normal desktop pictures in the Desktop & Screen Saver System Preferences pane.\r\n\r\nBecause a picture is worth a thousand words, take a gander at this figure, which explains it all.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275690\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"525\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275690\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-dynamic-desktop.jpg\" alt=\"dynamic Mac desktop\" width=\"525\" height=\"600\" /> A dynamic desktop at 4:33 PM (top) and 11:33 PM (bottom).[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Recently used apps in the dock</h2>\r\nA relatively new feature to the dock is the Recently Used Apps section, which displays icons for the last three apps you’ve launched, regardless of whether their icons are in the dock permanently.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Mentions of Gallery view</h2>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Gallery view is great for browsing folders full of images.</p>\r\nClick an image and then use the arrow keys to see the next or previous image; click the Markup, Rotate, or More icon to edit the current image.\r\n\r\nAnd that retires the side, at least as far as features in Big Sur’s Finder are concerned. Onward!","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":8989,"name":"Bob LeVitus","slug":"bob-levitus","description":" <p><b>Bob LeVitus </B>has written nearly 100 reference books on Apple technologies. He&#8217;s the author or coauthor of<i> macOS For Dummies,</i> <i>iPad For Dummies,</i> and <i>iPhone For Dummies,</i> among others.</p> <p><b>Dwight Spivey</b> probably wrote the rest of the <i>For Dummies</i> books on Apple products, including <i>iPhone For Seniors For Dummies, iPad For Seniors For Dummies,</i> and <i>Apple Watch For Seniors For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8989"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33528,"title":"Big Sur","slug":"big-sur","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33528"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Shooting screens","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Dynamic desktop images","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Recently used apps in the dock","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Mentions of Gallery view","target":"#tab4"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":275686,"title":"How a Mac Reads to You: VoiceOver and Text to Speech","slug":"how-a-mac-reads-to-you-voiceover-and-text-to-speech","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275686"}},{"articleId":275679,"title":"How to Use Voice Control with macOS Big Sur","slug":"how-to-use-voice-control-with-macos-big-sur","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275679"}},{"articleId":275671,"title":"The 4 Window Views of macOS Big Sur","slug":"the-4-window-views-of-macos-big-sur","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275671"}},{"articleId":275664,"title":"The macOS Big Sur Toolbar and Finder Icons","slug":"the-macos-big-sur-toolbar-and-finder-icons","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275664"}},{"articleId":275658,"title":"The macOS Big Sur Desktop","slug":"the-macos-big-sur-desktop","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275658"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = 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id=\"du-slot-63221ad736107\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Six months","lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":275689},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2022-01-19T19:04:18+00:00","modifiedTime":"2022-03-22T18:14:35+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:59+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Technology","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33512"},"slug":"technology","categoryId":33512},{"name":"Computers","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33513"},"slug":"computers","categoryId":33513},{"name":"Operating Systems","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33524"},"slug":"operating-systems","categoryId":33524},{"name":"MacOS","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33527"},"slug":"macos","categoryId":33527},{"name":"Big Sur","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33528"},"slug":"big-sur","categoryId":33528}],"title":"How a Mac Reads to You: VoiceOver and Text to Speech","strippedTitle":"how a mac reads to you: voiceover and text to speech","slug":"how-a-mac-reads-to-you-voiceover-and-text-to-speech","canonicalUrl":"","检检索擎调整系统":{"metaDescription":"With VoiceOver and Text to Speech, your Mac, running macOS Big Sur, can provide narration and can read documents to you.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"With VoiceOver and Text to Speech, your Mac, running macOS Big Sur, can both narrate what's happening on your screen and read documents to you.\r\n\r\nThe camera pans back. A voice tells you what you’ve just seen. And suddenly it all makes sense. Return with me now to those thrilling days of the off-camera narrator … . Wouldn’t it be nice if your Mac had a narrator to provide a blow-by-blow account of what’s happening on your screen?\r\n\r\nOr your eyes are tired from a long day staring at the monitor, but you still have a lengthy document to read. Wouldn’t it be sweet if you could sit back, close your eyes, and let your Mac read the document to you in a (somewhat) natural voice?\r\n\r\nBoth are possible with <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/computers/macs/mac-operating-systems/macos-big-sur-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">macOS Big Sur</a>: the first scenario with VoiceOver, and the second with Text to Speech.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >VoiceOver</h2>\r\nBig Sur’s VoiceOver technology is designed primarily for the visually impaired, but you might find it useful even if your vision is 20/20. VoiceOver not only reads what’s on the screen to you but also integrates with your keyboard so you can navigate around the screen until you <em>hear</em> the item you’re looking for. When you’re there, you can use Keyboard Access to select list items, select check boxes and radio buttons, move scroll bars and sliders, resize windows, and so on — all with just a simple key press or two.\r\n\r\nTo check it out, launch the System Preferences application (from Launchpad, the Applications folder, the Apple menu, or the dock), click the Accessibility icon and then click VoiceOver or press Command  +Fn+F5 on MacBook models and most Apple keyboards (or try Command  +F5).\r\n\r\nAfter VoiceOver is enabled, you can turn it on and off in the Accessibility System Preferences pane or by pressing Command  +Fn+F5 or Command  +F5.\r\n\r\nWhile VoiceOver is on, your Mac talks to you about what is on your screen. For example, if you click the desktop, your Mac might say something along the lines of “Application, Finder; Column View; selected folder, Desktop, contains 8 items.” It’s quite slick. Here’s another example: When you click a menu or item on a menu, you hear its name spoken at once, and when you close a menu, you hear the words “Closing menu.” You even hear the spoken feedback in the Print, Open, and Save (and other) dialogs.\r\n\r\nVoiceOver is kind of cool (talking alerts are fun), but having dialogs actually produce spoken text becomes annoying fast for most folks who aren’t visually impaired. (Those who are visually impaired, however, rave about VoiceOver and say it lets them do things they couldn’t easily do in the past.) In any case, I urge you to check it out. You might like it and find times when you want your Mac to narrate the action onscreen for you.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >The VoiceOver Utility</h2>\r\nThe VoiceOver Utility lets you specify almost every possible option the VoiceOver technology uses. You can adjust its verbosity; specify how it deals with your mouse and keyboard; change its voice, rate, pitch, and/or volume; and more.\r\n\r\nYou can open the VoiceOver Utility by clicking the Open VoiceOver Utility button in the Accessibility System Preferences pane or in the usual way: by double-clicking its icon (which you find in your Utilities folder).\r\n\r\nOf course, you might get the machines-are-taking-over willies when your Mac starts to talk to you or make sounds — but if you give it a try, it could change your mind.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">I wish I had the space to explain further, but I don’t. That’s the bad news. The good news is that VoiceOver Help is extensive and clear, and it helps you harness all the power of VoiceOver and the VoiceOver Utility.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Text to Speech</h2>\r\nThe second way your Mac can speak to you is via Text to Speech, which converts onscreen text to spoken words. If you’ve used Text to Speech in earlier versions of macOS, you’ll find that it’s pretty much unchanged.\r\n\r\nWhy might you need Text to Speech? Because sometimes hearing is better than reading. For example, I sometimes use Text to Speech to read aloud to me a column or page I’ve written before I submit it. If something doesn’t sound quite right, I give it another polish before sending it off to my editor.\r\n\r\nYou can configure this feature in the Accessibility System Preferences pane:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Open System Preferences (from Launchpad or the Applications folder, dock, or Apple menu), click the Accessibility icon, and then click Spoken Content in the list on the left.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> In the System Voice pop-up menu, choose one of the voices to set the voice your Mac uses when it reads to you.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Click the Play button to hear a sample of the voice you selected.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Use the Speaking Rate slider to speed up or slow down the voice.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Click the Play button to hear the voice at its new speed. </strong>I really like Alex, who says, “Most people recognize me by my voice.” My second favorite is Fred, who sounds like the Talking Moose and says, “I sure like being inside this fancy computer.”</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> (Optional) To make your Mac speak the text in alert boxes and dialogs, select the Speak Announcements check box.\r\n</strong>You might hear such alerts as “The application Microsoft Word has quit unexpectedly” or “Paper out or not loaded correctly.”</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> (Optional) To make your Mac speak text you’ve selected in a document, select the Speak Selection check box.\r\n</strong>The default keyboard shortcut for Speak Selection is Option+Esc, but you can assign any key combo you like by clicking the Options button and typing a different keyboard shortcut.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> (Optional) To make your Mac describe whatever is below the pointer, select the Speak Items Under Pointer check box.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> (Optional) To make your Mac speak whatever you type, select the Speak Typing Feedback check box.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> (Optional) To explore additional options for the previous four items, click its Options button.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\nNow, to use Text to Speech to read text to you, copy the text to the Clipboard, launch any app that supports it (I usually choose TextEdit or Pages), paste the text into the empty untitled document, click where you want your Mac to begin reading to you, and then choose Edit → Speech → Start Speaking. To make it stop, choose Edit → Speech → Stop Speaking.\r\n\r\nAnother great place Text to Speech is available is in the Safari web browser. It works the same as TextEdit but you don’t have to paste — just select the text you want to hear and choose Edit → Speech → Start Speaking.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you don’t care for the sound of the default voice, choose a different one in the Accessibility System Preferences pane. First click Spoken Content in the list on the left, and then choose a new voice from the System Voice drop-down menu or choose Customize to download additional voices.</p>","description":"With VoiceOver and Text to Speech, your Mac, running macOS Big Sur, can both narrate what's happening on your screen and read documents to you.\r\n\r\nThe camera pans back. A voice tells you what you’ve just seen. And suddenly it all makes sense. Return with me now to those thrilling days of the off-camera narrator … . Wouldn’t it be nice if your Mac had a narrator to provide a blow-by-blow account of what’s happening on your screen?\r\n\r\nOr your eyes are tired from a long day staring at the monitor, but you still have a lengthy document to read. Wouldn’t it be sweet if you could sit back, close your eyes, and let your Mac read the document to you in a (somewhat) natural voice?\r\n\r\nBoth are possible with <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/computers/macs/mac-operating-systems/macos-big-sur-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">macOS Big Sur</a>: the first scenario with VoiceOver, and the second with Text to Speech.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >VoiceOver</h2>\r\nBig Sur’s VoiceOver technology is designed primarily for the visually impaired, but you might find it useful even if your vision is 20/20. VoiceOver not only reads what’s on the screen to you but also integrates with your keyboard so you can navigate around the screen until you <em>hear</em> the item you’re looking for. When you’re there, you can use Keyboard Access to select list items, select check boxes and radio buttons, move scroll bars and sliders, resize windows, and so on — all with just a simple key press or two.\r\n\r\nTo check it out, launch the System Preferences application (from Launchpad, the Applications folder, the Apple menu, or the dock), click the Accessibility icon and then click VoiceOver or press Command  +Fn+F5 on MacBook models and most Apple keyboards (or try Command  +F5).\r\n\r\nAfter VoiceOver is enabled, you can turn it on and off in the Accessibility System Preferences pane or by pressing Command  +Fn+F5 or Command  +F5.\r\n\r\nWhile VoiceOver is on, your Mac talks to you about what is on your screen. For example, if you click the desktop, your Mac might say something along the lines of “Application, Finder; Column View; selected folder, Desktop, contains 8 items.” It’s quite slick. Here’s another example: When you click a menu or item on a menu, you hear its name spoken at once, and when you close a menu, you hear the words “Closing menu.” You even hear the spoken feedback in the Print, Open, and Save (and other) dialogs.\r\n\r\nVoiceOver is kind of cool (talking alerts are fun), but having dialogs actually produce spoken text becomes annoying fast for most folks who aren’t visually impaired. (Those who are visually impaired, however, rave about VoiceOver and say it lets them do things they couldn’t easily do in the past.) In any case, I urge you to check it out. You might like it and find times when you want your Mac to narrate the action onscreen for you.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >The VoiceOver Utility</h2>\r\nThe VoiceOver Utility lets you specify almost every possible option the VoiceOver technology uses. You can adjust its verbosity; specify how it deals with your mouse and keyboard; change its voice, rate, pitch, and/or volume; and more.\r\n\r\nYou can open the VoiceOver Utility by clicking the Open VoiceOver Utility button in the Accessibility System Preferences pane or in the usual way: by double-clicking its icon (which you find in your Utilities folder).\r\n\r\nOf course, you might get the machines-are-taking-over willies when your Mac starts to talk to you or make sounds — but if you give it a try, it could change your mind.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">I wish I had the space to explain further, but I don’t. That’s the bad news. The good news is that VoiceOver Help is extensive and clear, and it helps you harness all the power of VoiceOver and the VoiceOver Utility.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Text to Speech</h2>\r\nThe second way your Mac can speak to you is via Text to Speech, which converts onscreen text to spoken words. If you’ve used Text to Speech in earlier versions of macOS, you’ll find that it’s pretty much unchanged.\r\n\r\nWhy might you need Text to Speech? Because sometimes hearing is better than reading. For example, I sometimes use Text to Speech to read aloud to me a column or page I’ve written before I submit it. If something doesn’t sound quite right, I give it another polish before sending it off to my editor.\r\n\r\nYou can configure this feature in the Accessibility System Preferences pane:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Open System Preferences (from Launchpad or the Applications folder, dock, or Apple menu), click the Accessibility icon, and then click Spoken Content in the list on the left.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> In the System Voice pop-up menu, choose one of the voices to set the voice your Mac uses when it reads to you.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Click the Play button to hear a sample of the voice you selected.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Use the Speaking Rate slider to speed up or slow down the voice.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Click the Play button to hear the voice at its new speed. </strong>I really like Alex, who says, “Most people recognize me by my voice.” My second favorite is Fred, who sounds like the Talking Moose and says, “I sure like being inside this fancy computer.”</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> (Optional) To make your Mac speak the text in alert boxes and dialogs, select the Speak Announcements check box.\r\n</strong>You might hear such alerts as “The application Microsoft Word has quit unexpectedly” or “Paper out or not loaded correctly.”</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> (Optional) To make your Mac speak text you’ve selected in a document, select the Speak Selection check box.\r\n</strong>The default keyboard shortcut for Speak Selection is Option+Esc, but you can assign any key combo you like by clicking the Options button and typing a different keyboard shortcut.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> (Optional) To make your Mac describe whatever is below the pointer, select the Speak Items Under Pointer check box.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> (Optional) To make your Mac speak whatever you type, select the Speak Typing Feedback check box.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> (Optional) To explore additional options for the previous four items, click its Options button.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\nNow, to use Text to Speech to read text to you, copy the text to the Clipboard, launch any app that supports it (I usually choose TextEdit or Pages), paste the text into the empty untitled document, click where you want your Mac to begin reading to you, and then choose Edit → Speech → Start Speaking. To make it stop, choose Edit → Speech → Stop Speaking.\r\n\r\nAnother great place Text to Speech is available is in the Safari web browser. It works the same as TextEdit but you don’t have to paste — just select the text you want to hear and choose Edit → Speech → Start Speaking.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you don’t care for the sound of the default voice, choose a different one in the Accessibility System Preferences pane. First click Spoken Content in the list on the left, and then choose a new voice from the System Voice drop-down menu or choose Customize to download additional voices.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":8989,"name":"Bob LeVitus","slug":"bob-levitus","description":" <p><b>Bob LeVitus </B>has written nearly 100 reference books on Apple technologies. He&#8217;s the author or coauthor of<i> macOS For Dummies,</i> <i>iPad For Dummies,</i> and <i>iPhone For Dummies,</i> among others.</p> <p><b>Dwight Spivey</b> probably wrote the rest of the <i>For Dummies</i> books on Apple products, including <i>iPhone For Seniors For Dummies, iPad For Seniors For Dummies,</i> and <i>Apple Watch For Seniors For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8989"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33528,"title":"Big Sur","slug":"big-sur","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33528"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"VoiceOver","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"The VoiceOver Utility","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Text to Speech","target":"#tab3"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":275689,"title":"4 Cool macOS Big Sur Tricks","slug":"4-cool-macos-big-sur-tricks","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275689"}},{"articleId":275679,"title":"How to Use Voice Control with macOS Big Sur","slug":"how-to-use-voice-control-with-macos-big-sur","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275679"}},{"articleId":275671,"title":"The 4 Window Views of macOS Big Sur","slug":"the-4-window-views-of-macos-big-sur","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275671"}},{"articleId":275664,"title":"The macOS Big Sur Toolbar and Finder Icons","slug":"the-macos-big-sur-toolbar-and-finder-icons","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275664"}},{"articleId":275658,"title":"The macOS Big Sur Desktop","slug":"the-macos-big-sur-desktop","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275658"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = 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id=\"du-slot-63221ad72ec7e\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Six months","lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":275686},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2022-01-19T18:58:26+00:00","modifiedTime":"2022-03-22T18:05:30+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:59+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Technology","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33512"},"slug":"technology","categoryId":33512},{"name":"Computers","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33513"},"slug":"computers","categoryId":33513},{"name":"Operating Systems","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33524"},"slug":"operating-systems","categoryId":33524},{"name":"MacOS","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33527"},"slug":"macos","categoryId":33527},{"name":"Big Sur","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33528"},"slug":"big-sur","categoryId":33528}],"title":"How to Use Voice Control with macOS Big Sur","strippedTitle":"how to use voice control with macos big sur","slug":"how-to-use-voice-control-with-macos-big-sur","canonicalUrl":"","检检索擎调整系统":{"metaDescription":"Voice Control enables your Mac to recognize and respond to human speech. The only thing you need to use it is a microphone.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Voice Control enables your Mac to recognize and respond to human speech. The only thing you need to use it is a microphone, which most of you have built right into your Mac (unless it’s a Mac Mini or Mac Pro as noted previously).\r\n\r\nVoice Control lets you issue verbal commands such as “Get my mail!” to your Mac (running <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/computers/macs/mac-operating-systems/macos-big-sur-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">macOS Big Sur</a>) and have it actually get your email. You can also create AppleScripts and Automator workflows, and Finder Quick Actions, and trigger them by voice.\r\n\r\nIf you’ve enabled Voice Control, you can use speech commands to instruct your Mac. To see a list of commands your Mac will understand if you speak them, open the Accessibility System Preferences pane, click the Voice Control tab, and then click the Commands button. A sheet appears, in which you can enable or disable the available dictation commands, as shown.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275682\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275682\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-dictation-commands.jpg\" alt=\"Dictation Commands\" width=\"556\" height=\"387\" /> This shows a Dictation Commands sheet displaying some things your Mac will understand if you say them (properly). Usually.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you have a laptop or an iMac, you may get better results from just about any third-party microphone or (better still) a headset with a microphone. The mic built into your Mac is okay, but it’s not great. To select a third-party microphone, first connect the mic to your Mac. Then open the Sound System Preferences pane and select it from the list of sound input devices in the Input tab. Below the list is an input volume control (not available with some third-party mics) and a level meter, as shown. Adjust the Input Volume so that most of the dots in the Input Level meter darken (11 of 15 in the figure).</p>\r\n\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275681\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275681\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-voice-control.jpg\" alt=\"This is a good level for Voice Control.\" width=\"556\" height=\"446\" /> This is a good level for Voice Control.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">You can also choose an external mic in the drop-down menu below the microphone in the Dictation tab of the Keyboard System Preferences pane. However, you’ll need to use the Sound System Preferences pane if you want to adjust your input levels.</p>\r\nTo give Voice Control a try, press Fn twice (or whatever shortcut you set earlier) and speak one of the items from the list of Voice Control commands, such as “Open TextEdit.” If the command is recognized, it will appear in text above the microphone icon, as shown.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275680\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"200\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275680\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-open-textedit.jpg\" alt=\"Open TextEdit\" width=\"200\" height=\"270\" /> Open TextEdit above the mic icon means your command was recognized.[/caption]\r\n\r\nThis technology is clever and kind of fun, but it can also be frustrating when it doesn’t recognize what you say, which occurs too often, if you ask me. And it requires a decent microphone even though the mic built into most Macs works okay. The bottom line is that I’ve never been able to get Voice Control to work well enough to continue using it beyond a few minutes at best. Still, it’s kind of cool (and it’s a freebie), and I’ve heard more than one user profess love for it — which is why it’s included here.","description":"Voice Control enables your Mac to recognize and respond to human speech. The only thing you need to use it is a microphone, which most of you have built right into your Mac (unless it’s a Mac Mini or Mac Pro as noted previously).\r\n\r\nVoice Control lets you issue verbal commands such as “Get my mail!” to your Mac (running <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/computers/macs/mac-operating-systems/macos-big-sur-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">macOS Big Sur</a>) and have it actually get your email. You can also create AppleScripts and Automator workflows, and Finder Quick Actions, and trigger them by voice.\r\n\r\nIf you’ve enabled Voice Control, you can use speech commands to instruct your Mac. To see a list of commands your Mac will understand if you speak them, open the Accessibility System Preferences pane, click the Voice Control tab, and then click the Commands button. A sheet appears, in which you can enable or disable the available dictation commands, as shown.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275682\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275682\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-dictation-commands.jpg\" alt=\"Dictation Commands\" width=\"556\" height=\"387\" /> This shows a Dictation Commands sheet displaying some things your Mac will understand if you say them (properly). Usually.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you have a laptop or an iMac, you may get better results from just about any third-party microphone or (better still) a headset with a microphone. The mic built into your Mac is okay, but it’s not great. To select a third-party microphone, first connect the mic to your Mac. Then open the Sound System Preferences pane and select it from the list of sound input devices in the Input tab. Below the list is an input volume control (not available with some third-party mics) and a level meter, as shown. Adjust the Input Volume so that most of the dots in the Input Level meter darken (11 of 15 in the figure).</p>\r\n\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275681\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275681\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-voice-control.jpg\" alt=\"This is a good level for Voice Control.\" width=\"556\" height=\"446\" /> This is a good level for Voice Control.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">You can also choose an external mic in the drop-down menu below the microphone in the Dictation tab of the Keyboard System Preferences pane. However, you’ll need to use the Sound System Preferences pane if you want to adjust your input levels.</p>\r\nTo give Voice Control a try, press Fn twice (or whatever shortcut you set earlier) and speak one of the items from the list of Voice Control commands, such as “Open TextEdit.” If the command is recognized, it will appear in text above the microphone icon, as shown.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275680\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"200\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275680\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-open-textedit.jpg\" alt=\"Open TextEdit\" width=\"200\" height=\"270\" /> Open TextEdit above the mic icon means your command was recognized.[/caption]\r\n\r\nThis technology is clever and kind of fun, but it can also be frustrating when it doesn’t recognize what you say, which occurs too often, if you ask me. And it requires a decent microphone even though the mic built into most Macs works okay. The bottom line is that I’ve never been able to get Voice Control to work well enough to continue using it beyond a few minutes at best. Still, it’s kind of cool (and it’s a freebie), and I’ve heard more than one user profess love for it — which is why it’s included here.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":8989,"name":"Bob LeVitus","slug":"bob-levitus","description":" <p><b>Bob LeVitus </B>has written nearly 100 reference books on Apple technologies. He&#8217;s the author or coauthor of<i> macOS For Dummies,</i> <i>iPad For Dummies,</i> and <i>iPhone For Dummies,</i> among others.</p> <p><b>Dwight Spivey</b> probably wrote the rest of the <i>For Dummies</i> books on Apple products, including <i>iPhone For Seniors For Dummies, iPad For Seniors For Dummies,</i> and <i>Apple Watch For Seniors For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8989"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33528,"title":"Big Sur","slug":"big-sur","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33528"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":275689,"title":"4 Cool macOS Big Sur Tricks","slug":"4-cool-macos-big-sur-tricks","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275689"}},{"articleId":275686,"title":"How a Mac Reads to You: VoiceOver and Text to Speech","slug":"how-a-mac-reads-to-you-voiceover-and-text-to-speech","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275686"}},{"articleId":275671,"title":"The 4 Window Views of macOS Big Sur","slug":"the-4-window-views-of-macos-big-sur","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275671"}},{"articleId":275664,"title":"The macOS Big Sur Toolbar and Finder Icons","slug":"the-macos-big-sur-toolbar-and-finder-icons","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275664"}},{"articleId":275658,"title":"The macOS Big Sur Desktop","slug":"the-macos-big-sur-desktop","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275658"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;technology&quot;,&quot;computers&quot;,&quot;operating-systems&quot;,&quot;macos&quot;,&quot;big-sur&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ad726b67\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;technology&quot;,&quot;computers&quot;,&quot;operating-systems&quot;,&quot;macos&quot;,&quot;big-sur&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ad7273f2\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Six months","lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":275679},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2022-01-19T18:52:08+00:00","modifiedTime":"2022-03-22T17:57:35+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:59+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Technology","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33512"},"slug":"technology","categoryId":33512},{"name":"Computers","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33513"},"slug":"computers","categoryId":33513},{"name":"Operating Systems","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33524"},"slug":"operating-systems","categoryId":33524},{"name":"MacOS","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33527"},"slug":"macos","categoryId":33527},{"name":"Big Sur","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33528"},"slug":"big-sur","categoryId":33528}],"title":"The 4 Window Views of macOS Big Sur","strippedTitle":"the 4 window views of macos big sur","slug":"the-4-window-views-of-macos-big-sur","canonicalUrl":"","检检索擎调整系统":{"metaDescription":"macOS Big Sur offers four window views to enable you to move through folders on your desktop in whatever way works best for you.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Views are part of what makes your Mac feel like <em>your</em> Mac. <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/computers/macs/mac-operating-systems/macos-big-sur-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">Big Sur</a> offers four views so you can select the best one for any occasion. Some people like one view so much that they rarely (or never) use others. Other people memorize the keyboard shortcuts to switch views instantly without reaching for the mouse. Try ’em all, and use the one(s) you prefer.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Moving through folders fast in Column view</h2>\r\nColumn view is a darn handy way to quickly look through a lot of folders at once, and it’s especially useful when those folders are filled with graphics files. The Column view is my favorite way to display windows in Finder.\r\n\r\nTo display a window in Column view, shown, click the Column view icon on the toolbar (as shown in the margin), choose View → As Columns from Finder’s menu bar, or press Command  +3.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275675\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275675\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-column-view.jpg\" alt=\"A Finder window in Column view.\" width=\"556\" height=\"240\" /> A Finder window in Column view[/caption]\r\n\r\nHere’s how I clicked around in Column view to see the list of folders and files you see in the figure:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li>When I clicked the Documents icon in the sidebar, its contents appeared in the column to the right.</li>\r\n \t<li>When I clicked the folder titled A Folder Full of Pictures in this column, its contents appeared in the second column.</li>\r\n \t<li>When I clicked A & J.jpg in the second column, the contents of that file appeared in the third column along with information about the file, such as its size (159KB) and the date and time it was created, modified, and last opened.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">The third column is displaying a Preview, a feature available in all views by choosing View→ Show/Hide Preview. You can modify the information you see in the Preview by choosing View → Show Preview Options and enabling the items you want displayed in the Preview column.</p>\r\nHere are some helpful tips when you’re poking around Column view:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>You can have as many columns in a Column view window as your screen can handle.</strong> Just drag any edge or corner of the window to enlarge it so new columns have room to open. You can also click the green Zoom (Maximize) button to make the window fill the screen. (<strong><em>Hint:</em></strong> To get out of full-screen mode, press Esc or move your cursor to the top of the screen and click the green Zoom button that appears near the top-left corner.)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you Option-click the green Zoom button, the window will expand just enough to display all columns with content in them.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>You can use the little column divider lines at the bottom of every column to resize the column width.</strong></li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">You’ll see the resizer cursor when your mouse pointer is directly over a column divider line, as shown.</p>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">To be specific:</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li style=\"list-style-type: none;\">\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>If you drag the resizer left or right, the column to its left resizes.</li>\r\n \t<li>If you hold down the Option key when you drag a divider line, <em>all</em> columns resize at the same time.</li>\r\n \t<li>If you double-click a divider line, the column to its left expands to the Right Size, which is the width of the widest item in the column.</li>\r\n \t<li>If you right- or Control-click a divider line, you see a pop-up menu with four or five options: Right Size This Column, Right Size All Columns Individually, Right Size All Columns Equally, and Set Desktop Picture. You’ll see the fifth option, Import from iPhone or iPad, only if an iPhone or iPad is connected to your Mac.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>The preview column displays information about the highlighted item to its left, but only if that item isn’t a folder or disk.</strong> Why? Well, if it were a folder or disk, its contents would be in this column.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">For many items, the picture you see in the preview column is an enlarged view of the file’s icon. You only see a preview when the selected item is saved in a format that Quick Look can interpret (which is to say, most image file formats, including TIFF, JPEG, PNG, GIF, and PDF to name a few, as well as many other file formats, including Microsoft Word and Pages).</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you don’t like having the preview displayed in Column view (but want it to remain in all other views), choose View → Show View Options and deselect the check box for Show Preview Column. You can do the same for any other view, or turn the preview off in all views by choosing View → Hide Preview.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Perusing in Icon view</h2>\r\nIcon view is a free-form view that allows you to move your icons around within a window to your heart’s content. To display a window in Icon view, click the Icon view icon in the toolbar, choose View → As Icons from Finder’s menu bar, or press Command  +1.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">The best part of Icon view, at least in my humble opinion, is the Icon Size slider in the lower-right corner of Icon view windows (or in the top-right corner if the sidebar and toolbar are hidden).</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Listless? Try touring folders in List view</h2>\r\nNow I come to my second-favorite view, List view (shown). I like it so much because of the little angle bracket to the left of each folder. These angle brackets, which were called <em>disclosure triangles </em>in earlier macOS releases, let you see the contents of a folder without actually opening it. This view also allows you to select items from multiple folders at once and move or copy items between folders in a single window. Finally, it’s the view used to present Spotlight search results.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275674\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275674\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-lisst-view.jpg\" alt=\"A window in List view.\" width=\"556\" height=\"349\" /> A window in List view[/caption]\r\n\r\nTo display a window in List view, click the List view icon on the toolbar, choose View→ As List from the Finder menu bar, or press Command  +2.\r\n\r\nWhen you’re in List view, the following tips can help you breeze through your folders to find what you’re looking for:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>To disclose a folder’s contents, click the angle bracket to its left or, if it’s selected, press the right-arrow key.</strong> The figure shows the result of either clicking the angle bracket to the left of the Novels folder or selecting (highlighting) the Novels folder and pressing the right-arrow key.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">I pressed Option+→ in the figure, so all the Novels folder’s subfolders (the Finished Novels and Unfinished Novels folders in this case) also expanded. And if either of these subfolders (or any other subfolder in the Novels folder) had subfolders, they too would have been expanded when I pressed Option+→.</p>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">To close an open folder, click the angle bracket again or select the folder and press left-arrow. To close all open folders in a List view window, choose Edit → Select All (or press Command  +A) and then press Option+←.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">The angle brackets don’t appear if you’re using groups. To see the angle brackets, choose View→Use Groups or the keyboard shortcut Command+Control+0 (zero). These are toggles, and will turn groups off if they’re enabled or on if they’re disabled. You could also choose None from the Group icon/menu in the toolbar.</p>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">Disclosure angle brackets and groups are an either/or situation—you either have disclosure angle brackets or groups but not both at the same time (in the same window).</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Click the column header to sort items in List view.</strong> Note the little upside-down <em>v</em> at the right edge of the selected column (the Name column in the figure). That’s the column’s sorting indicator. If the <em>v</em> points upward, as it does in the figure, the items in the corresponding column are sorted in alphabetical order; if you click the header (Name) again, the triangle will flip upside down and point downward and the items will be listed in the opposite (reverse alphabetical) order. This behavior is true for all columns in List view windows.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>You can change the order in which columns appear in a window.</strong> To do so, press and hold down on a column’s name, and then drag it to the left or right until it’s where you want it. Release the mouse button, and the column moves.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">The exception (isn’t there always an exception?) is that the Name column always appears first in List view windows; you can move all other columns about at will. In fact, you can even hide and show columns other than Name if you like using the View Options window.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">It’s even easier to hide or show columns by right- or Control-clicking anywhere on any column header (as shown below the Date Modified column in the preceding figure). Column names with check marks are displayed; column names that are unchecked are hidden.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">You can fine-tune all four views and the desktop by using the View Options window. Just choose View→ Show View Options or press Command  +J. The options you see apply to the active window or the desktop. Click the Use as Defaults button to apply these options to all windows in that view (that is, Icon, List, Column, or Gallery).</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>To widen or shrink a column, hover the cursor over the dividing line between that column and drag left or right.</strong> When your cursor is over the dividing line in the header, it changes to a double-headed resizer.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Hangin’ in the Gallery (view)</h2>\r\nGallery view is the latest iteration of Cover Flow view in High Sierra and earlier. To display a window in Gallery view, click the Gallery view icon on the toolbar, choose View→ As Gallery from Finder’s menu bar, or press Command  +4. This figure shows Gallery view.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275673\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275673\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-gallery-view.jpg\" alt=\"A window in Gallery view.\" width=\"556\" height=\"326\" /> A window in Gallery view[/caption]\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nAlthough Gallery view is useful only for folders with documents or images, it does offer at least three cool features:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>The selected item (Writers Write Pen.png in the figure) appears in a preview in the top part of the window.</li>\r\n \t<li>The Preview column displays additional information about the selected item.</li>\r\n \t<li>You can quickly flip through the previews by clicking the images to the left or right of the current preview image or by pressing the left- or right-arrow keys.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >What’s next on the (View) menu?</h2>\r\nThe Finder View menu offers several commands in addition to the four views. These commands might help you peruse your icons more easily:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Use Groups:</strong> Active window only. When enabled, it subdivides the items in the active window into groups, as shown, which is grouped by Date Last Opened.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Group By:</strong> This submenu offers nine options for grouping items in the active window:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Name (shortcut: Command  +Control+1)</li>\r\n \t<li>Kind (shortcut: Command  +Control+2)</li>\r\n \t<li>Application (strangely, there’s no shortcut for this command)</li>\r\n \t<li>Date Last Opened (shortcut: Command  +Control+3)</li>\r\n \t<li>Date Added (shortcut: Command  +Control+4)</li>\r\n \t<li>Date Modified (shortcut: Command  +Control+5)</li>\r\n \t<li>Date Created (strangely, there’s no shortcut for this command either)</li>\r\n \t<li>Size (shortcut: Command  +Control+6)</li>\r\n \t<li>Tags (shortcut: Command  +Control+7)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Clean Up:</strong> Clean Up is available only in Icon view or on the desktop when no windows are active. Choose this command to align icons to an invisible grid; you use it to keep your windows and desktop neat and tidy. (If you like this invisible grid, don’t forget that you can turn it on or off for the desktop and individual windows by using View Options.) If no windows are active, the command instead cleans up your desktop. (To deactivate all open windows, just click anywhere on the desktop or close all open windows.)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If any icons are selected (highlighted) when you pull down the View menu, you see Clean Up Selection rather than Clean Up. If you choose this command, it moves only the icons that are currently selected.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Clean Up By:</strong> This command combines the tidiness of the Clean Up command with the organizational yumminess of the Sort By command,.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">This command sorts the icons by your choice of criteria, namely:</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li style=\"list-style-type: none;\">\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Name (shortcut: Command  +Option+1)</li>\r\n \t<li>Kind (shortcut: Command  +Option+2)</li>\r\n \t<li>Date Modified (shortcut: Command  +Option+5)</li>\r\n \t<li>Date Created (no shortcut)</li>\r\n \t<li>Size (shortcut: Command  +Option+6)</li>\r\n \t<li>Tags (shortcut: Command  +Option+7)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">Clean Up By is similar to the Sort By command, but unlike Sort By, Clean Up By is a one-time affair. After you’ve used it, you can once again move icons around and reorganize them any way you like.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Sort By:</strong> This command rearranges the icons in the active window in your choice from among nine ways, which happen to be the same nine options (ten, if you count None) in the Sort By pop-up menu.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">Unlike Clean Up By, which is a one-shot command, Sort By is persistent and will continue to reorganize your icons automatically. In other words, you can’t move icons around manually in an arranged window.</p>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">One last thing: The Clean Up and Clean Up By commands are available only for windows viewed as icons. The Sort By command is available in all four views and remains in effect if you switch to a different view or close the window. To stop Finder from arranging icons in a window, choose None from the View→Sort By submenu or Option + click the toolbar’s Group pop-up menu and choose None.</p>\r\n\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275672\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275672\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-date-last-opened.jpg\" alt=\"grouped by Date Last Opened\" width=\"556\" height=\"470\" /> The items in this window are grouped by Date Last Opened.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">If you’re like me, you’ve taken great pains to place icons carefully in specific places on your desktop. If so, the Clean Up By and Sort By commands will mess up your perfectly arranged desktop icons. And alas, cleaning up your desktop is still not something macOS lets you undo.</p>","description":"Views are part of what makes your Mac feel like <em>your</em> Mac. <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/computers/macs/mac-operating-systems/macos-big-sur-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">Big Sur</a> offers four views so you can select the best one for any occasion. Some people like one view so much that they rarely (or never) use others. Other people memorize the keyboard shortcuts to switch views instantly without reaching for the mouse. Try ’em all, and use the one(s) you prefer.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Moving through folders fast in Column view</h2>\r\nColumn view is a darn handy way to quickly look through a lot of folders at once, and it’s especially useful when those folders are filled with graphics files. The Column view is my favorite way to display windows in Finder.\r\n\r\nTo display a window in Column view, shown, click the Column view icon on the toolbar (as shown in the margin), choose View → As Columns from Finder’s menu bar, or press Command  +3.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275675\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275675\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-column-view.jpg\" alt=\"A Finder window in Column view.\" width=\"556\" height=\"240\" /> A Finder window in Column view[/caption]\r\n\r\nHere’s how I clicked around in Column view to see the list of folders and files you see in the figure:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li>When I clicked the Documents icon in the sidebar, its contents appeared in the column to the right.</li>\r\n \t<li>When I clicked the folder titled A Folder Full of Pictures in this column, its contents appeared in the second column.</li>\r\n \t<li>When I clicked A & J.jpg in the second column, the contents of that file appeared in the third column along with information about the file, such as its size (159KB) and the date and time it was created, modified, and last opened.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">The third column is displaying a Preview, a feature available in all views by choosing View→ Show/Hide Preview. You can modify the information you see in the Preview by choosing View → Show Preview Options and enabling the items you want displayed in the Preview column.</p>\r\nHere are some helpful tips when you’re poking around Column view:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>You can have as many columns in a Column view window as your screen can handle.</strong> Just drag any edge or corner of the window to enlarge it so new columns have room to open. You can also click the green Zoom (Maximize) button to make the window fill the screen. (<strong><em>Hint:</em></strong> To get out of full-screen mode, press Esc or move your cursor to the top of the screen and click the green Zoom button that appears near the top-left corner.)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you Option-click the green Zoom button, the window will expand just enough to display all columns with content in them.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>You can use the little column divider lines at the bottom of every column to resize the column width.</strong></li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">You’ll see the resizer cursor when your mouse pointer is directly over a column divider line, as shown.</p>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">To be specific:</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li style=\"list-style-type: none;\">\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>If you drag the resizer left or right, the column to its left resizes.</li>\r\n \t<li>If you hold down the Option key when you drag a divider line, <em>all</em> columns resize at the same time.</li>\r\n \t<li>If you double-click a divider line, the column to its left expands to the Right Size, which is the width of the widest item in the column.</li>\r\n \t<li>If you right- or Control-click a divider line, you see a pop-up menu with four or five options: Right Size This Column, Right Size All Columns Individually, Right Size All Columns Equally, and Set Desktop Picture. You’ll see the fifth option, Import from iPhone or iPad, only if an iPhone or iPad is connected to your Mac.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>The preview column displays information about the highlighted item to its left, but only if that item isn’t a folder or disk.</strong> Why? Well, if it were a folder or disk, its contents would be in this column.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">For many items, the picture you see in the preview column is an enlarged view of the file’s icon. You only see a preview when the selected item is saved in a format that Quick Look can interpret (which is to say, most image file formats, including TIFF, JPEG, PNG, GIF, and PDF to name a few, as well as many other file formats, including Microsoft Word and Pages).</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you don’t like having the preview displayed in Column view (but want it to remain in all other views), choose View → Show View Options and deselect the check box for Show Preview Column. You can do the same for any other view, or turn the preview off in all views by choosing View → Hide Preview.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Perusing in Icon view</h2>\r\nIcon view is a free-form view that allows you to move your icons around within a window to your heart’s content. To display a window in Icon view, click the Icon view icon in the toolbar, choose View → As Icons from Finder’s menu bar, or press Command  +1.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">The best part of Icon view, at least in my humble opinion, is the Icon Size slider in the lower-right corner of Icon view windows (or in the top-right corner if the sidebar and toolbar are hidden).</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Listless? Try touring folders in List view</h2>\r\nNow I come to my second-favorite view, List view (shown). I like it so much because of the little angle bracket to the left of each folder. These angle brackets, which were called <em>disclosure triangles </em>in earlier macOS releases, let you see the contents of a folder without actually opening it. This view also allows you to select items from multiple folders at once and move or copy items between folders in a single window. Finally, it’s the view used to present Spotlight search results.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275674\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275674\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-lisst-view.jpg\" alt=\"A window in List view.\" width=\"556\" height=\"349\" /> A window in List view[/caption]\r\n\r\nTo display a window in List view, click the List view icon on the toolbar, choose View→ As List from the Finder menu bar, or press Command  +2.\r\n\r\nWhen you’re in List view, the following tips can help you breeze through your folders to find what you’re looking for:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>To disclose a folder’s contents, click the angle bracket to its left or, if it’s selected, press the right-arrow key.</strong> The figure shows the result of either clicking the angle bracket to the left of the Novels folder or selecting (highlighting) the Novels folder and pressing the right-arrow key.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">I pressed Option+→ in the figure, so all the Novels folder’s subfolders (the Finished Novels and Unfinished Novels folders in this case) also expanded. And if either of these subfolders (or any other subfolder in the Novels folder) had subfolders, they too would have been expanded when I pressed Option+→.</p>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">To close an open folder, click the angle bracket again or select the folder and press left-arrow. To close all open folders in a List view window, choose Edit → Select All (or press Command  +A) and then press Option+←.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">The angle brackets don’t appear if you’re using groups. To see the angle brackets, choose View→Use Groups or the keyboard shortcut Command+Control+0 (zero). These are toggles, and will turn groups off if they’re enabled or on if they’re disabled. You could also choose None from the Group icon/menu in the toolbar.</p>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">Disclosure angle brackets and groups are an either/or situation—you either have disclosure angle brackets or groups but not both at the same time (in the same window).</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Click the column header to sort items in List view.</strong> Note the little upside-down <em>v</em> at the right edge of the selected column (the Name column in the figure). That’s the column’s sorting indicator. If the <em>v</em> points upward, as it does in the figure, the items in the corresponding column are sorted in alphabetical order; if you click the header (Name) again, the triangle will flip upside down and point downward and the items will be listed in the opposite (reverse alphabetical) order. This behavior is true for all columns in List view windows.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>You can change the order in which columns appear in a window.</strong> To do so, press and hold down on a column’s name, and then drag it to the left or right until it’s where you want it. Release the mouse button, and the column moves.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">The exception (isn’t there always an exception?) is that the Name column always appears first in List view windows; you can move all other columns about at will. In fact, you can even hide and show columns other than Name if you like using the View Options window.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">It’s even easier to hide or show columns by right- or Control-clicking anywhere on any column header (as shown below the Date Modified column in the preceding figure). Column names with check marks are displayed; column names that are unchecked are hidden.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">You can fine-tune all four views and the desktop by using the View Options window. Just choose View→ Show View Options or press Command  +J. The options you see apply to the active window or the desktop. Click the Use as Defaults button to apply these options to all windows in that view (that is, Icon, List, Column, or Gallery).</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>To widen or shrink a column, hover the cursor over the dividing line between that column and drag left or right.</strong> When your cursor is over the dividing line in the header, it changes to a double-headed resizer.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Hangin’ in the Gallery (view)</h2>\r\nGallery view is the latest iteration of Cover Flow view in High Sierra and earlier. To display a window in Gallery view, click the Gallery view icon on the toolbar, choose View→ As Gallery from Finder’s menu bar, or press Command  +4. This figure shows Gallery view.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275673\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275673\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-gallery-view.jpg\" alt=\"A window in Gallery view.\" width=\"556\" height=\"326\" /> A window in Gallery view[/caption]\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nAlthough Gallery view is useful only for folders with documents or images, it does offer at least three cool features:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>The selected item (Writers Write Pen.png in the figure) appears in a preview in the top part of the window.</li>\r\n \t<li>The Preview column displays additional information about the selected item.</li>\r\n \t<li>You can quickly flip through the previews by clicking the images to the left or right of the current preview image or by pressing the left- or right-arrow keys.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >What’s next on the (View) menu?</h2>\r\nThe Finder View menu offers several commands in addition to the four views. These commands might help you peruse your icons more easily:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Use Groups:</strong> Active window only. When enabled, it subdivides the items in the active window into groups, as shown, which is grouped by Date Last Opened.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Group By:</strong> This submenu offers nine options for grouping items in the active window:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Name (shortcut: Command  +Control+1)</li>\r\n \t<li>Kind (shortcut: Command  +Control+2)</li>\r\n \t<li>Application (strangely, there’s no shortcut for this command)</li>\r\n \t<li>Date Last Opened (shortcut: Command  +Control+3)</li>\r\n \t<li>Date Added (shortcut: Command  +Control+4)</li>\r\n \t<li>Date Modified (shortcut: Command  +Control+5)</li>\r\n \t<li>Date Created (strangely, there’s no shortcut for this command either)</li>\r\n \t<li>Size (shortcut: Command  +Control+6)</li>\r\n \t<li>Tags (shortcut: Command  +Control+7)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Clean Up:</strong> Clean Up is available only in Icon view or on the desktop when no windows are active. Choose this command to align icons to an invisible grid; you use it to keep your windows and desktop neat and tidy. (If you like this invisible grid, don’t forget that you can turn it on or off for the desktop and individual windows by using View Options.) If no windows are active, the command instead cleans up your desktop. (To deactivate all open windows, just click anywhere on the desktop or close all open windows.)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If any icons are selected (highlighted) when you pull down the View menu, you see Clean Up Selection rather than Clean Up. If you choose this command, it moves only the icons that are currently selected.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Clean Up By:</strong> This command combines the tidiness of the Clean Up command with the organizational yumminess of the Sort By command,.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">This command sorts the icons by your choice of criteria, namely:</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li style=\"list-style-type: none;\">\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Name (shortcut: Command  +Option+1)</li>\r\n \t<li>Kind (shortcut: Command  +Option+2)</li>\r\n \t<li>Date Modified (shortcut: Command  +Option+5)</li>\r\n \t<li>Date Created (no shortcut)</li>\r\n \t<li>Size (shortcut: Command  +Option+6)</li>\r\n \t<li>Tags (shortcut: Command  +Option+7)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">Clean Up By is similar to the Sort By command, but unlike Sort By, Clean Up By is a one-time affair. After you’ve used it, you can once again move icons around and reorganize them any way you like.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Sort By:</strong> This command rearranges the icons in the active window in your choice from among nine ways, which happen to be the same nine options (ten, if you count None) in the Sort By pop-up menu.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">Unlike Clean Up By, which is a one-shot command, Sort By is persistent and will continue to reorganize your icons automatically. In other words, you can’t move icons around manually in an arranged window.</p>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">One last thing: The Clean Up and Clean Up By commands are available only for windows viewed as icons. The Sort By command is available in all four views and remains in effect if you switch to a different view or close the window. To stop Finder from arranging icons in a window, choose None from the View→Sort By submenu or Option + click the toolbar’s Group pop-up menu and choose None.</p>\r\n\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275672\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275672\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-date-last-opened.jpg\" alt=\"grouped by Date Last Opened\" width=\"556\" height=\"470\" /> The items in this window are grouped by Date Last Opened.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">If you’re like me, you’ve taken great pains to place icons carefully in specific places on your desktop. If so, the Clean Up By and Sort By commands will mess up your perfectly arranged desktop icons. And alas, cleaning up your desktop is still not something macOS lets you undo.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":8989,"name":"Bob LeVitus","slug":"bob-levitus","description":" <p><b>Bob LeVitus </B>has written nearly 100 reference books on Apple technologies. He&#8217;s the author or coauthor of<i> macOS For Dummies,</i> <i>iPad For Dummies,</i> and <i>iPhone For Dummies,</i> among others.</p> <p><b>Dwight Spivey</b> probably wrote the rest of the <i>For Dummies</i> books on Apple products, including <i>iPhone For Seniors For Dummies, iPad For Seniors For Dummies,</i> and <i>Apple Watch For Seniors For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8989"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33528,"title":"Big Sur","slug":"big-sur","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33528"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Moving through folders fast in Column view","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Perusing in Icon view","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Listless? Try touring folders in List view","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Hangin’ in the Gallery (view)","target":"#tab4"},{"label":"What’s next on the (View) menu?","target":"#tab5"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":275689,"title":"4 Cool macOS Big Sur Tricks","slug":"4-cool-macos-big-sur-tricks","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275689"}},{"articleId":275686,"title":"How a Mac Reads to You: VoiceOver and Text to Speech","slug":"how-a-mac-reads-to-you-voiceover-and-text-to-speech","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275686"}},{"articleId":275679,"title":"How to Use Voice Control with macOS Big Sur","slug":"how-to-use-voice-control-with-macos-big-sur","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275679"}},{"articleId":275664,"title":"The macOS Big Sur Toolbar and Finder Icons","slug":"the-macos-big-sur-toolbar-and-finder-icons","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275664"}},{"articleId":275658,"title":"The macOS Big Sur Desktop","slug":"the-macos-big-sur-desktop","categoryList":["technology","computers","operating-systems","macos","big-sur"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275658"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;technology&quot;,&quot;computers&quot;,&quot;operating-systems&quot;,&quot;macos&quot;,&quot;big-sur&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ad71fd58\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;technology&quot;,&quot;computers&quot;,&quot;operating-systems&quot;,&quot;macos&quot;,&quot;big-sur&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ad7205bc\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Six months","lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":275671},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2022-01-19T18:34:24+00:00","modifiedTime":"2022-03-22T17:44:00+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:59+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Technology","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33512"},"slug":"technology","categoryId":33512},{"name":"Computers","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33513"},"slug":"computers","categoryId":33513},{"name":"Operating Systems","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33524"},"slug":"operating-systems","categoryId":33524},{"name":"MacOS","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33527"},"slug":"macos","categoryId":33527},{"name":"Big Sur","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33528"},"slug":"big-sur","categoryId":33528}],"title":"The macOS Big Sur Toolbar and Finder Icons","strippedTitle":"the macos big sur toolbar and finder icons","slug":"the-macos-big-sur-toolbar-and-finder-icons","canonicalUrl":"","检检索擎调整系统":{"metaDescription":"Get a quick overview of some of the icons you’re likely to encounter as you get to know macOS Big Sur Finder and the desktop.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Icons and windows are the units of currency used by the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/computers/macs/mac-operating-systems/macos-big-sur-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">macOS Big Sur</a> Finder and the desktop. Start with a quick overview of some of the icons you’re likely to encounter as you get to know Finder and the desktop.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Belly up to the toolbar</h2>\r\nIn addition to the sidebar and some good old-fashioned double-clicking, the macOS Finder window offers additional navigation aids on the toolbar — namely, the Back and Forward icons, as well as the extra-helpful view icons. You can find other handy features on the Go menu.\r\n\r\nIn case you didn’t know, the toolbar is the area at the top of all Finder windows, which (among other things) displays the window’s name. On the toolbar you’ll find icons to navigate quickly and act on selected icons.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275668\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275668\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-toolbar.jpg\" alt=\"A Finder window’s default toolbar.\" width=\"556\" height=\"32\" /> A Finder window’s default toolbar[/caption]\r\n\r\nTo activate a toolbar icon, click it once.\r\n\r\nYou say you don’t want to see the toolbar at the top of the window? Okay! Just choose View →Hide Toolbar or use its keyboard shortcut (Command  +Option+T), and it’s gone. (If only life were always so easy!) Want it back? Choose View → Show Toolbar or use the same keyboard shortcut: Command  +Option+T.\r\n\r\nAlas, hiding the toolbar also hides the useful sidebar. If only you could choose to hide them independently… . I find this fact annoying because I use the sidebar a lot but don’t use the toolbar much. To make matters worse, View →Hide Sidebar (shortcut: Command  +Option+S) lets you hide the sidebar without hiding the toolbar. It’s been like this for a long time, and for whatever reason, you <em>still</em> can’t hide the toolbar while keeping the sidebar visible! Boo. Hiss.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">When you hide the toolbar, opening a folder spawns a new Finder window. The default, which is probably what you’re used to, is for folders to open in place, displaying their contents in a tab in the current window.</p>\r\nThe toolbar’s default icons are shown in the preceding figure. So, if you customized your toolbar by choosing View→ Customize Toolbar, yours won’t look exactly like what's shown.\r\n\r\nHere is the lowdown on the toolbar’s default icons, from left to right:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Forward and Back icons:</strong> Clicking the Forward and Back icons displays the folders that you’ve viewed in this window in sequential order. It's a lot like using a web browser.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Here’s an example of how the Back icon works. Say you’re in your Home folder; you click the Favorites icon, and a split-second later, you realize that you actually need something in the Home folder. Just a quick click of the Back icon and — <em>poof!</em> — you’re back Home. As for the Forward icon, well, it moves you in the opposite direction, through folders that you’ve visited in this window. Play around with them both; you’ll find them invaluable. The keyboard shortcuts Command  +[ for Back and Command  +] for Forward are even more useful (in my opinion) than the icons.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>View icons:</strong> The four View icons change the way that the window displays its contents.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">You have four ways to view a window: Icon, List, Column, and Gallery. Some people like columns, some like icons, and others love lists or galleries. To each her own. Play with the four Finder views to see which one works best for you. For what it’s worth, I usually prefer Column view with a dash of List view thrown in when I need a folder’s contents sorted by creation date or size. And the Gallery view is great for folders with documents because you can see the contents of many document types right in the window, as I explain shortly.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Don’t forget that each view also has a handy keyboard shortcut: Command  +1 for Icon view, Command   +2 for List view, Command  +3 for Column view, and Command  +4 for Gallery view.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Group By/Sort By:</strong> Click this icon to see a pop-up menu with options for grouping this window’s contents. Hold down the Option key to change the sort order (within the selected group). Note that the Group By/Sort By menu works in all four views.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Share:</strong> Click here to share the selected items with others. A pop-up menu lets you choose to share via Mail, Messages, AirDrop, or Notes.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">Big Sur’s extensible architecture lets you add other services (such as Vimeo or LinkedIn) and apps (such as Photos and Aperture) to your Share menu. To manage these extensions, choose More from the Share pop-up menu. Alternatively, you can launch the System Preferences application, click the Extensions icon, and then click the Share Menu item on the left side of the window.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Add Tags:</strong> Click here to assign one or more colored tags to selected items.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Action:</strong> Click this icon to see a pop-up menu of all the context-sensitive actions you can perform on selected icons, as shown.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you see angle brackets (>>) at the right edge of the toolbar, at least one toolbar item is not visible. Click the angle brackets and a menu displays all hidden items (Group By, Share. Add Tags, and Action). Or expand the window so it’s wide enough to display all the items in the toolbar.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Search:</strong> Click the little magnifying glass and the Search box appears. This is a nifty way to quickly search for files or folders. Just type a word (or even just a few letters), and in a few seconds, the window fills with a list of files that match. You can also start a search by choosing File --> Find (shortcut: Command  +F).</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275666\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275666\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-action.jpg\" alt=\"Action pop-up menu\" width=\"556\" height=\"352\" /> Use the Action pop-up menu to perform common actions on selected items.[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >What is an icon?</h2>\r\nWhat’s an icon? Glad you asked. Each Finder icon represents an item or a container on your hard drive. <em>Containers</em> — hard drives, USB thumb drives, folders, CDs, DVDs, shared network volumes, and so on — can contain a virtually unlimited number of application files, document files, and folders (which can contain an unlimited number of application files, document files, and folders).\r\n\r\nIcons on the dock and the sidebar of Finder windows are not the same as the Finder icons. They’re simply convenient pointers to actual Finder icons. Technically, dock and sidebar icons are aliases.\r\n\r\nAnyway, working with icons is easy:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Single-click to select.</li>\r\n \t<li>Double-click to open.</li>\r\n \t<li>Click and drag to move.</li>\r\n \t<li>Release mouse button to drop.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nBut enough talk. It’s time to see what these puppies look like.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >The Finder icons in the wild</h2>\r\nAlthough icons all work the same, they come in different kinds, shapes, and sizes. When you’ve been around the Mac for a while, you develop a sixth sense about icons and can guess what an unfamiliar icon contains just by looking at it.\r\n\r\nHere are the major icon types:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Application icons</strong> are <em>programs</em> — the software you use to accomplish tasks on your Mac. Mail, Safari, and Calendar are applications. So are Microsoft Word and Adobe Photoshop.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">Application icons come in a variety of shapes. For example, application icons are often square-ish, diamond-shaped, rectangular, or just oddly shaped. The first row of icons displays application icons of various shapes.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Document icons</strong> are files created by applications. Letters created with TextEdit are documents. This article began life as a document created in Microsoft Word. And spreadsheet, PDF, video, image, and song files are all documents.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">Document icons are often reminiscent of a piece of paper, as shown in the second row of icons.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If your document icons are generic, like the first three icons in the second row of the following figure, but you’d prefer icons that reflect their contents, like the last three icons in the second row, open View Options or use the Command  +J shortcut, and then select the Show Icon Preview check box.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Folder and disk icons</strong> are the Mac’s organizational containers. You can put icons — and the applications or documents they stand for — in folders or disks. You can put folders in disks or in other folders, but you can’t put a disk inside another disk.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Folders look like, well, manila folders (what a concept) and can contain just about any other icon. You use folders to organize your files and applications on your hard drive. You can have as many folders as you want, so don’t be afraid to create new ones. The thought behind the whole folders thing is pretty obvious: If your hard drive is a filing cabinet, folders are its drawers and folders (duh!). The third row in the following figure shows some typical folder icons.</p>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">And while disks behave pretty much like folders, their icons often look like disks, as shown in the last row of the figure.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Alias icons</strong> are wonderful — no, make that <em>fabulous</em> — organizational tools.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275665\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275665\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-icons.jpg\" alt=\"Icons come in many shapes and designs.\" width=\"556\" height=\"305\" /> Icons come in many shapes and designs.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you’re looking for details about how to organize your icons in folders, move them around, delete them, and so on, hang in there.</p>","description":"Icons and windows are the units of currency used by the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/computers/macs/mac-operating-systems/macos-big-sur-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">macOS Big Sur</a> Finder and the desktop. Start with a quick overview of some of the icons you’re likely to encounter as you get to know Finder and the desktop.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Belly up to the toolbar</h2>\r\nIn addition to the sidebar and some good old-fashioned double-clicking, the macOS Finder window offers additional navigation aids on the toolbar — namely, the Back and Forward icons, as well as the extra-helpful view icons. You can find other handy features on the Go menu.\r\n\r\nIn case you didn’t know, the toolbar is the area at the top of all Finder windows, which (among other things) displays the window’s name. On the toolbar you’ll find icons to navigate quickly and act on selected icons.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275668\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275668\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-toolbar.jpg\" alt=\"A Finder window’s default toolbar.\" width=\"556\" height=\"32\" /> A Finder window’s default toolbar[/caption]\r\n\r\nTo activate a toolbar icon, click it once.\r\n\r\nYou say you don’t want to see the toolbar at the top of the window? Okay! Just choose View →Hide Toolbar or use its keyboard shortcut (Command  +Option+T), and it’s gone. (If only life were always so easy!) Want it back? Choose View → Show Toolbar or use the same keyboard shortcut: Command  +Option+T.\r\n\r\nAlas, hiding the toolbar also hides the useful sidebar. If only you could choose to hide them independently… . I find this fact annoying because I use the sidebar a lot but don’t use the toolbar much. To make matters worse, View →Hide Sidebar (shortcut: Command  +Option+S) lets you hide the sidebar without hiding the toolbar. It’s been like this for a long time, and for whatever reason, you <em>still</em> can’t hide the toolbar while keeping the sidebar visible! Boo. Hiss.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">When you hide the toolbar, opening a folder spawns a new Finder window. The default, which is probably what you’re used to, is for folders to open in place, displaying their contents in a tab in the current window.</p>\r\nThe toolbar’s default icons are shown in the preceding figure. So, if you customized your toolbar by choosing View→ Customize Toolbar, yours won’t look exactly like what's shown.\r\n\r\nHere is the lowdown on the toolbar’s default icons, from left to right:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Forward and Back icons:</strong> Clicking the Forward and Back icons displays the folders that you’ve viewed in this window in sequential order. It's a lot like using a web browser.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Here’s an example of how the Back icon works. Say you’re in your Home folder; you click the Favorites icon, and a split-second later, you realize that you actually need something in the Home folder. Just a quick click of the Back icon and — <em>poof!</em> — you’re back Home. As for the Forward icon, well, it moves you in the opposite direction, through folders that you’ve visited in this window. Play around with them both; you’ll find them invaluable. The keyboard shortcuts Command  +[ for Back and Command  +] for Forward are even more useful (in my opinion) than the icons.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>View icons:</strong> The four View icons change the way that the window displays its contents.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">You have four ways to view a window: Icon, List, Column, and Gallery. Some people like columns, some like icons, and others love lists or galleries. To each her own. Play with the four Finder views to see which one works best for you. For what it’s worth, I usually prefer Column view with a dash of List view thrown in when I need a folder’s contents sorted by creation date or size. And the Gallery view is great for folders with documents because you can see the contents of many document types right in the window, as I explain shortly.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Don’t forget that each view also has a handy keyboard shortcut: Command  +1 for Icon view, Command   +2 for List view, Command  +3 for Column view, and Command  +4 for Gallery view.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Group By/Sort By:</strong> Click this icon to see a pop-up menu with options for grouping this window’s contents. Hold down the Option key to change the sort order (within the selected group). Note that the Group By/Sort By menu works in all four views.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Share:</strong> Click here to share the selected items with others. A pop-up menu lets you choose to share via Mail, Messages, AirDrop, or Notes.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">Big Sur’s extensible architecture lets you add other services (such as Vimeo or LinkedIn) and apps (such as Photos and Aperture) to your Share menu. To manage these extensions, choose More from the Share pop-up menu. Alternatively, you can launch the System Preferences application, click the Extensions icon, and then click the Share Menu item on the left side of the window.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Add Tags:</strong> Click here to assign one or more colored tags to selected items.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Action:</strong> Click this icon to see a pop-up menu of all the context-sensitive actions you can perform on selected icons, as shown.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you see angle brackets (>>) at the right edge of the toolbar, at least one toolbar item is not visible. Click the angle brackets and a menu displays all hidden items (Group By, Share. Add Tags, and Action). Or expand the window so it’s wide enough to display all the items in the toolbar.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Search:</strong> Click the little magnifying glass and the Search box appears. This is a nifty way to quickly search for files or folders. Just type a word (or even just a few letters), and in a few seconds, the window fills with a list of files that match. You can also start a search by choosing File --> Find (shortcut: Command  +F).</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275666\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275666\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-action.jpg\" alt=\"Action pop-up menu\" width=\"556\" height=\"352\" /> Use the Action pop-up menu to perform common actions on selected items.[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >What is an icon?</h2>\r\nWhat’s an icon? Glad you asked. Each Finder icon represents an item or a container on your hard drive. <em>Containers</em> — hard drives, USB thumb drives, folders, CDs, DVDs, shared network volumes, and so on — can contain a virtually unlimited number of application files, document files, and folders (which can contain an unlimited number of application files, document files, and folders).\r\n\r\nIcons on the dock and the sidebar of Finder windows are not the same as the Finder icons. They’re simply convenient pointers to actual Finder icons. Technically, dock and sidebar icons are aliases.\r\n\r\nAnyway, working with icons is easy:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Single-click to select.</li>\r\n \t<li>Double-click to open.</li>\r\n \t<li>Click and drag to move.</li>\r\n \t<li>Release mouse button to drop.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nBut enough talk. It’s time to see what these puppies look like.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >The Finder icons in the wild</h2>\r\nAlthough icons all work the same, they come in different kinds, shapes, and sizes. When you’ve been around the Mac for a while, you develop a sixth sense about icons and can guess what an unfamiliar icon contains just by looking at it.\r\n\r\nHere are the major icon types:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Application icons</strong> are <em>programs</em> — the software you use to accomplish tasks on your Mac. Mail, Safari, and Calendar are applications. So are Microsoft Word and Adobe Photoshop.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">Application icons come in a variety of shapes. For example, application icons are often square-ish, diamond-shaped, rectangular, or just oddly shaped. The first row of icons displays application icons of various shapes.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Document icons</strong> are files created by applications. Letters created with TextEdit are documents. This article began life as a document created in Microsoft Word. And spreadsheet, PDF, video, image, and song files are all documents.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">Document icons are often reminiscent of a piece of paper, as shown in the second row of icons.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If your document icons are generic, like the first three icons in the second row of the following figure, but you’d prefer icons that reflect their contents, like the last three icons in the second row, open View Options or use the Command  +J shortcut, and then select the Show Icon Preview check box.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Folder and disk icons</strong> are the Mac’s organizational containers. You can put icons — and the applications or documents they stand for — in folders or disks. You can put folders in disks or in other folders, but you can’t put a disk inside another disk.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Folders look like, well, manila folders (what a concept) and can contain just about any other icon. You use folders to organize your files and applications on your hard drive. You can have as many folders as you want, so don’t be afraid to create new ones. The thought behind the whole folders thing is pretty obvious: If your hard drive is a filing cabinet, folders are its drawers and folders (duh!). The third row in the following figure shows some typical folder icons.</p>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">And while disks behave pretty much like folders, their icons often look like disks, as shown in the last row of the figure.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Alias icons</strong> are wonderful — no, make that <em>fabulous</em> — organizational tools.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275665\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275665\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/big-sur-icons.jpg\" alt=\"Icons come in many shapes and designs.\" width=\"556\" height=\"305\" /> Icons come in many shapes and designs.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you’re looking for details about how to organize your icons in folders, move them around, delete them, and so on, hang in there.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":8989,"name":"Bob LeVitus","slug":"bob-levitus","description":" <p><b>Bob LeVitus </B>has written nearly 100 reference books on Apple technologies. He&#8217;s the author or coauthor of<i> macOS For Dummies,</i> <i>iPad For Dummies,</i> and <i>iPhone For Dummies,</i> among others.</p> <p><b>Dwight Spivey</b> probably wrote the rest of the <i>For Dummies</i> books on Apple products, including <i>iPhone For Seniors For Dummies, iPad For Seniors For Dummies,</i> and <i>Apple Watch For Seniors For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8989"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33528,"title":"Big Sur","slug":"big-sur","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33528"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Belly up to the toolbar","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"What is an icon?","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"The Finder icons in the 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