chơi xổ số keno trực tuyến

{"appState":{"pageLoadApiCallsStatus":true},"categoryState":{"relatedCategories":{"headers":{"timestamp":"2025-01-31T04:01:09+00:00"},"categoryId":33785,"data":{"title":"GRE","slug":"gre","image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Study Skills & Test Prep","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33772"},"slug":"study-skills-test-prep","categoryId":33772},{"name":"GRE","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"},"slug":"gre","categoryId":33785}],"parentCategory":{"categoryId":33772,"title":"Study Skills & Test Prep","slug":"study-skills-test-prep","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33772"}},"childCategories":[],"description":"Grad school, here you come. Prep in style with test info, multiple-choice strategies, and hints for maximizing your score.","relatedArticles":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles?category=33785&offset=0&size=5"},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":41,"bookCount":4},"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"}},"relatedCategoriesLoadedStatus":"success"},"listState":{"list":{"count":10,"total":41,"items":[{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T08:20:49+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-10-05T20:53:23+00:00","timestamp":"2024-10-05T21:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Study Skills & Test Prep","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33772"},"slug":"study-skills-test-prep","categoryId":33772},{"name":"GRE","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"},"slug":"gre","categoryId":33785}],"title":"Answering GRE Multiple-Choice Questions","strippedTitle":"answering gre multiple-choice questions","slug":"answering-gre-multiple-choice-questions","canonicalUrl":"","百度搜字段擎SEO网站系统改善":{"metaDescription":"When you take the Graduate Record Examinations, be aware that some multiple-choice questions require you to select more than one answer.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Most questions on the GRE are multiple choice. Most require you to select the one best answer choice, but some require you to select two or more answers. The questions that require two or more answers are easy to spot because the answer choices have small check boxes (rather than ovals or words to select) and the directions say, “Pick <u>two</u> answers” or “Pick <u>all</u> applicable answers.”\r\n\r\nTo help you select the correct answer(s), keep these tips in mind:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">If you don’t know the answer, rule out as many obviously incorrect choices as possible and guess from the remaining choices.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Don’t spend more than 2 or 3 minutes on any one question. Guess an answer, mark the question for review, and come back to it at the end of the section. As long as you have time left in that section, you can revisit previous questions.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Guessing an answer is better than leaving the question unanswered. A wrong answer counts the same as no answer, so there’s no harm in guessing. You may as well throw the mental dice and try to get it right—just mark it for review and come back to it later during that section.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"Most questions on the GRE are multiple choice. Most require you to select the one best answer choice, but some require you to select two or more answers. The questions that require two or more answers are easy to spot because the answer choices have small check boxes (rather than ovals or words to select) and the directions say, “Pick <u>two</u> answers” or “Pick <u>all</u> applicable answers.”\r\n\r\nTo help you select the correct answer(s), keep these tips in mind:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">If you don’t know the answer, rule out as many obviously incorrect choices as possible and guess from the remaining choices.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Don’t spend more than 2 or 3 minutes on any one question. Guess an answer, mark the question for review, and come back to it at the end of the section. As long as you have time left in that section, you can revisit previous questions.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Guessing an answer is better than leaving the question unanswered. A wrong answer counts the same as no answer, so there’s no harm in guessing. You may as well throw the mental dice and try to get it right—just mark it for review and come back to it later during that section.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":8978,"name":"Ron Woldoff","slug":"ron-woldoff","description":" <p><b>Ron Woldoff </b>is the founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students achieve their goals on the GMAT, GRE, and SAT. He has taught prep courses at Arizona colleges, and is the author of <i>SAT: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies</i>, previous editions of <i>GRE For Dummies</i>, and <i>GRE: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies.</i></p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8978"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33785,"title":"GRE","slug":"gre","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":263596,"title":"Lines and Angles on the GRE Test","slug":"lines-and-angles-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263596"}},{"articleId":263591,"title":"Know Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots for the GRE","slug":"brush-up-on-prefixes-suffixes-and-roots-for-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263591"}},{"articleId":263586,"title":"The 3 Reading Comprehension Question Formats on the GRE Test","slug":"the-3-reading-comprehension-question-formats-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263586"}},{"articleId":263578,"title":"10 Mistakes You Won’t Make When Taking the GRE","slug":"10-mistakes-you-wont-make-when-taking-the-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263578"}},{"articleId":207605,"title":"GRE 2023 For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gre-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207605"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":298853,"title":"GRE Prep 2024 For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gre-prep-2024-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298853"}},{"articleId":263596,"title":"Lines and Angles on the GRE Test","slug":"lines-and-angles-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263596"}},{"articleId":263591,"title":"Know Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots for the GRE","slug":"brush-up-on-prefixes-suffixes-and-roots-for-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263591"}},{"articleId":263586,"title":"The 3 Reading Comprehension Question Formats on the GRE Test","slug":"the-3-reading-comprehension-question-formats-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263586"}},{"articleId":263578,"title":"10 Mistakes You Won’t Make When Taking the GRE","slug":"10-mistakes-you-wont-make-when-taking-the-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263578"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282251,"slug":"gre-for-dummies-with-online-practice-tests","isbn":"9781119886600","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119886600-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781119886600-199x255.jpg","width":199,"height":255},"title":"GRE Prep 2023 For Dummies with Online Practice","testBankPinActivationLink":"//testbanks.wiley.com/","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"8978\">Ron Woldoff</b> </b>is the founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students achieve their goals on the GMAT, GRE, and SAT. He has taught prep courses at Arizona colleges, and is the author of <i>SAT: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies</i>, previous editions of <i>GRE For Dummies</i>, and <i>GRE: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies.</i></p>","authors":[{"authorId":8978,"name":"Ron Woldoff","slug":"ron-woldoff","description":" <p><b>Ron Woldoff </b>is the founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students achieve their goals on the GMAT, GRE, and SAT. He has taught prep courses at Arizona colleges, and is the author of <i>SAT: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies</i>, previous editions of <i>GRE For Dummies</i>, and <i>GRE: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies.</i></p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8978"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;study-skills-test-prep&quot;,&quot;gre&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119886600&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-651f240f420e5\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;study-skills-test-prep&quot;,&quot;gre&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119886600&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-651f240f42a0e\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-10-05T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":146694},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T22:07:34+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-09-29T19:36:00+00:00","timestamp":"2024-09-29T21:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Study Skills & Test Prep","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33772"},"slug":"study-skills-test-prep","categoryId":33772},{"name":"GRE","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"},"slug":"gre","categoryId":33785}],"title":"Tips for Mastering the Verbal Section of the GRE","strippedTitle":"tips for mastering the verbal section of the gre","slug":"tips-for-mastering-the-verbal-section-of-the-gre-2","canonicalUrl":"","百度搜字段擎SEO网站系统改善":{"metaDescription":"For many, the Verbal section of the Graduate Record Examination is the most intimating. But you'll do a lot better if you learn these tips.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Unless you’re an English geek, the GRE (Graduate Record Examination) Verbal section probably intimidates you more than any other. But you can master the GRE Verbal questions using the following tips and approaches for each section of the test. However, first, pay attention to these general tips:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Use roots, prefixes, and suffixes to determine the gist of an unfamiliar word.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Guess quickly if you’re stumped. The computer won’t let you go on until you’ve marked and confirmed an answer, and believe it or not, answering a few questions incorrectly hurts your score less than not finishing a section.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nApproach <b>Antonym</b> questions by\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Creating an approximate definition of the word in your mind</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Predicting the obvious opposite</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Remembering that words can have more than one meaning</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nAvoid getting stuck on a <b>Reading Comprehension</b> question by following these tips:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Choose positive or neutral answers, not negative ones.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Guess quickly and move on when you encounter Roman numeral and negative/exception questions, because they’re often tricky and time consuming.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Avoid picking an answer simply because it’s true. Always make certain that it answers the question correctly.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nWhen faced with <b>Analogies,</b>\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Create a sentence that shows the relationship between the two words and then use that sentence on each answer choice.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Beware of answers with inverse relationships (for example, part to whole when the question was whole to part).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nFor <b>Sentence Completion</b> questions, be sure to\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Read the entire sentence to get its gist before looking at the individual blanks.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Search for key connector words (such as <i>because, although, </i>and<i> however</i>) that may change the meaning of the sentence from what you’d expect.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Predict whether the blanks need positive or negative words.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nAnd last, but most certainly not least, remember: This test is rated PG — Proctor Guarded. Proctors have been genetically altered to have eyes in the backs of their heads; they’ll catch you if you bring crib notes, so do all your prep before taking the test.","description":"Unless you’re an English geek, the GRE (Graduate Record Examination) Verbal section probably intimidates you more than any other. But you can master the GRE Verbal questions using the following tips and approaches for each section of the test. However, first, pay attention to these general tips:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Use roots, prefixes, and suffixes to determine the gist of an unfamiliar word.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Guess quickly if you’re stumped. The computer won’t let you go on until you’ve marked and confirmed an answer, and believe it or not, answering a few questions incorrectly hurts your score less than not finishing a section.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nApproach <b>Antonym</b> questions by\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Creating an approximate definition of the word in your mind</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Predicting the obvious opposite</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Remembering that words can have more than one meaning</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nAvoid getting stuck on a <b>Reading Comprehension</b> question by following these tips:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Choose positive or neutral answers, not negative ones.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Guess quickly and move on when you encounter Roman numeral and negative/exception questions, because they’re often tricky and time consuming.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Avoid picking an answer simply because it’s true. Always make certain that it answers the question correctly.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nWhen faced with <b>Analogies,</b>\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Create a sentence that shows the relationship between the two words and then use that sentence on each answer choice.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Beware of answers with inverse relationships (for example, part to whole when the question was whole to part).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nFor <b>Sentence Completion</b> questions, be sure to\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Read the entire sentence to get its gist before looking at the individual blanks.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Search for key connector words (such as <i>because, although, </i>and<i> however</i>) that may change the meaning of the sentence from what you’d expect.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Predict whether the blanks need positive or negative words.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nAnd last, but most certainly not least, remember: This test is rated PG — Proctor Guarded. Proctors have been genetically altered to have eyes in the backs of their heads; they’ll catch you if you bring crib notes, so do all your prep before taking the test.","blurb":"","authors":[],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33785,"title":"GRE","slug":"gre","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":298853,"title":"GRE Prep 2024 For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gre-prep-2024-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298853"}},{"articleId":263596,"title":"Lines and Angles on the GRE 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Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Study Skills & Test Prep","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33772"},"slug":"study-skills-test-prep","categoryId":33772},{"name":"GRE","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"},"slug":"gre","categoryId":33785}],"title":"Answering Text Completion/Sentence Equivalence GRE Questions","strippedTitle":"answering text completion/sentence equivalence gre questions","slug":"how-text-completionsentence-equivalence-questions-work-on-the-gre","canonicalUrl":"","百度搜字段擎SEO网站系统改善":{"metaDescription":"Use these key strategies to breeze through the test questions in the Text Completion/Sentence Equivalence section of the GRE.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"On the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Text Completion and Sentence Equivalence questions hold all the clues you need to answer them correctly. By using key strategies and avoiding common mistakes, you can breeze through these GRE test questions and rack up points in a hurry.\r\n\r\nBecause Text Completion and Sentence Equivalence questions are so similar, the strategy is the same for both:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Text Completion:</strong> A Text Completion question consists of a sentence or paragraph with one, two, or three missing words or phrases, along with a short list of word or phrase choices to complete the text. If the text has one word missing, the list has five choices, while if the text has two or three words missing, each has a list of three choices.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">Each choice gives the text a different meaning. Your job is to choose the word or words that best support the meaning of the sentence. If the text is missing more than one word, you don’t get partial credit for choosing only one correct word.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Text Completion questions tend to have slightly easier vocabulary but are more challenging to interpret.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Sentence Equivalence:</strong> A Sentence Equivalence question consists of a single sentence with exactly one word missing and a list of six choices to complete it. Your job is to select the two words that fit the sentence <em>and</em> mean the same thing, and, as with the Text Completion questions, you don’t get partial credit for choosing only one correct word.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Sentence Completion questions tend to be easier to interpret but have more challenging vocabulary. The correct answers are <em>always synonyms,</em> so if you find a word that supports the meaning but doesn’t have a match, then you’ve found a trap word.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Both question types:</strong> The answer choices always fit perfectly and have perfect grammar: Make your choice based on the <em>meaning</em> of the words. Each word you plug in gives the sentence a different meaning, so find the meaning of the text <em>without</em> the answer choices, and then eliminate the wrong answer choices.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >How many answers are expected?</h2>\r\nDon’t worry about knowing how many answers to select. When you're taking the GRE it’s clear, and just to be sure, at the top of the screen is always an instruction that reads something like, “Pick one answer for each missing word (in Text Completion),” or “Pick two answer choices that create sentences most alike in meaning (in Sentence Equivalence).”\r\n\r\nAlso, the one-answer questions allow you to select only one answer, and the two-answer questions allow you to select more than one. Go through it once and you’ll be fine.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Trying it out</h2>\r\nThe following example of a Text Completion question shows how all answer choices appear to fit perfectly but only two specific words actually make logical sense.\r\n<blockquote><strong><em>Directions:</em></strong> For each blank, select one entry from the corresponding column of choices. Fill all blanks in the way that best completes the text.\r\n\r\nFrustrated that the GRE question was actually so easy, Faye (i) _____ her book out the window with such (ii) _____ that it soared high into the sky, prompting three of her neighbors to grab their phones and post the video on Instagram.</blockquote>\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263582\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/text-completion-example.jpg\" alt=\"text completion example\" width=\"535\" height=\"183\" />\r\n\r\nThe key word in this example is <em>frustrated,</em> which conveys a strong negative emotion. Choices (B) and (D), <strong><em>hurled</em></strong> and <strong><em>ferocity,</em></strong> are the only choices that support such a negative emotion. Note that this is a single, two-part question. You may select any of the three answer choices for each blank, but you must choose <em>both</em> correct answers to earn credit for the question.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Develop your skills for finding the correct answers</h2>\r\nText Completion and Sentence Equivalence questions are designed to measure two core proficiencies: interpreting the text and using the vocabulary. These are two distinct skills that you build separately but must use together.\r\n\r\nMost of the vocab words that you encounter on the GRE are used commonly in most professional industries, including business and journalism. One student came in with a <em>New York Times</em> article that had three of the vocab words that we’d reviewed in class! Such words as <strong><em>ephemeral</em></strong> (fleeting), <strong><em>abscond</em></strong> (sneak away), and <strong><em>imbroglio</em></strong> (entanglement) stump exam takers every day but appear regularly in publications.\r\n<h3>Interpreting the Text 101</h3>\r\nInterpreting the text means discerning its meaning in the absence of the key words. Doing this prior to looking at the answer choices is the best way to quickly eliminate choices that don’t make sense, and the GRE-makers have fun trying to trick you.\r\n<h3>Getting the gist of the text</h3>\r\nOne way to figure out the meaning of a challenging sentence is to see whether it has a positive or negative connotation. This high-level perspective can help you find words that convey the correct meaning.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Take the best and only approach</h2>\r\nWhether you’re taking on a Text Completion or Sentence Equivalence question, your approach is the same. These steps are the <em>only</em> way to knock out these questions so you can ace the exam and get on with your life.\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Interpret the text without looking at the answer choices.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Complete the text with your own words.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Eliminate wrong answer choices.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\nThe following sections explain these steps in detail.\r\n<h3>Interpret the text without looking at the answer choices</h3>\r\nFirst, figure out what the sentence is saying. If you know this, then you know the meanings of the words that go in the blanks. How else do you know which answer choices work, and more importantly, which choices don’t work?\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">While interpreting the text, don’t look at the answer choices! Each answer choice not only seems to fit perfectly but also gives the sentence a very different meaning. Then, you have no idea what the sentence is trying to say, and you’ve turned a relatively workable question into something that’s impossible. Whoa, right into the trap. Instead, get the meaning of the sentence <em>first</em> and <em>then</em> look at the answer choices!</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">To avoid involuntarily glancing at the answer choices, cover them up with your scratch paper. Hold that scratch paper right up on the computer screen. (You’re not working math now, anyway.) Silly? Yes. Effective? Absolutely. Students tell me it’s a lifesaver.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Complete the text with your own words</h3>\r\nThe next step is finding your own words to complete the text. Your words don’t have to be perfect — you’re not writing the sentence — but they do have to support the meaning of the sentence. This way, you know exactly what to look for and can eliminate answer choices (which is the following step). Right now, you’re still covering up the answer choices with your scratch paper.\r\n\r\nTry to picture what’s happening in the text. Even though you may arrange it differently, your key words will match the missing words in the question.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Your own words may not fit perfectly or match the answer choices — but they don’t have to. Instead, they serve a more important purpose. <em>They make the wrong answers clearly stand out.</em> Now you go to the next step: Eliminate wrong answer choices.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Eliminate wrong answer choices</h3>\r\nThe final step to knocking out these questions is eliminating the wrong answer choices. Now that you know what the sentence is saying, the wrong answers are clear.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">These questions can be challenging, so if you’re not sure whether an answer choice should be crossed off, don’t spend time on it. Instead, mark it as “maybe” and go on to the next answer choice. Usually, you’ll finish reviewing the answer choices with one marked “maybe” and the others eliminated. Go with the “maybe” choice and move on.</p>\r\nWorst case, if you have to guess, you’ve narrowed down the answers to guess from. Then mark the question for review and return to it later.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">These verbal questions should take you less than a minute each, saving you valuable time for the time-intensive Reading Comprehension questions.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >Interpreting trickier sentences</h2>\r\nIf every Text Completion and Sentence Equivalence question were as easy, everyone would get a perfect 170 on the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/test-prep/gre/tips-for-mastering-the-verbal-section-of-the-gre/\">Verbal section</a>, and testing would be pointless. However, the actual GRE questions can be more challenging to interpret. When you come across these sentences, start with the three basic strategies mentioned earlier and build on them with these steps:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Use transition words to get the gist of the phrases.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Start with the second or third missing word.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\n<h3>Use transition words to get the gist of the phrases</h3>\r\nTransition words exist in almost all Text Completion and Sentence Equivalence questions (and other sentences) and serve as valuable clues to interpreting the meaning of a sentence. (<em>Transition words</em> connect two ideas in a sentence or paragraph and tell you whether the two ideas in the sentence agree or contradict one another.) Transition words help you decipher the meaning of a sentence with key words missing.\r\n\r\nFor example, changing the transition word in the following sentence completely alters its meaning:\r\n<blockquote><em>Although</em> he ran as fast as he could, Eric _____ the bus.</blockquote>\r\nThe transition word <em>although,</em> indicating contrast, tells you that Eric missed the bus. Consider the same sentence with a different transition word:\r\n<blockquote><em>Because</em> he ran as fast as he could, Eric _____ the bus.</blockquote>\r\nThe transition word <em>because,</em> indicating cause-and-effect, tells you that Eric caught the bus.\r\n\r\nWith a little practice, transition words become easy to identify and use to your advantage. They’re helpful when breaking the sentence into pieces (which is the next step) and are used frequently in the Analytical Writing portion of the GRE.\r\n\r\nCommon transition words include the following:\r\n<table>\r\n<tbody>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"120\">although</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">and</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">because</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">but</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"120\">despite</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">either/or</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">however</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">in spite of</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"120\">moreover</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">nonetheless</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">therefore</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">or</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n</tbody>\r\n</table>\r\nThe English language has hundreds of transition words. Fortunately, you don’t need to memorize them, but you do need to be able to spot them.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Most transition words can be divided into two categories: continuing and contrasting. Continuing transition words — <em>and, because, moreover,</em> and <em>therefore</em> — indicate that the one part of the sentence will continue the thought of the other part. Contrasting transition words — <em>although, but, despite, however, in spite of,</em> and <em>nonetheless</em> — indicate that one part of the sentence will contrast the other part.</p>\r\nIn the previous example with Eric and the bus, changing the transition from a <em>continuing</em> to a <em>contrasting</em> word (in this case, <em>although</em> to <em>because</em>) directly changes the meaning of the sentence. Note that the transition word isn’t always in the middle of the sentence. Now to work on the second step.\r\n<h3>Start with the second or third missing word</h3>\r\nMany Text Completion questions have two or three words missing. Often the first missing word could be anything, and the second (or third) missing word tells you the first one. Look at this example:\r\n<blockquote>Although she usually was of a (i) _____ nature, Patty was (ii) _____ when the professor assigned a paper due the day after spring break.</blockquote>\r\nThe transition word <em>although</em> clues you in to the gist of the first phrase. It tells you that Patty’s usual nature is different from the way she felt when receiving her assignment. But this isn’t enough — Patty could usually be of any nature: good, bad, <strong><em>cantankerous</em></strong> (cranky), <strong><em>sanguine</em></strong> (cheerful), <strong><em>capricious</em></strong> (fickle). You need the gist of the <em>second</em> missing word to find the first one.\r\n<blockquote>Second missing word: Patty was _____ when the professor assigned a paper due the day after spring break.</blockquote>\r\nFrom the second missing word, you can infer that she was <em>annoyed</em> when the professor assigned a paper. It could be different, but probably not. Most people are usually some form of disappointed when assigned papers, especially over spring break. Anyway, knowing she wasn’t happy, the continuing transition word <em>although</em> tells you that she’s usually the opposite:\r\n<blockquote>First missing word: Although she usually was of a _____ nature,</blockquote>\r\nThe opposite of <em>annoyed</em> is <em>happy.</em> Patty is usually <em>happy</em> but today is <em>annoyed.</em> Now take on the whole question:\r\n<blockquote>Although she usually was of a (i) _____ nature, Patty was (ii) _____ when the professor assigned a paper due the day after spring break.</blockquote>\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263581\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/missing-word-answers.jpg\" alt=\"Answer choices for missing word problems\" width=\"535\" height=\"183\" />\r\n\r\nEliminate answer choices that don’t match the words you used (<em>happy</em> and <em>annoyed</em>) to complete the text. Start with the second missing word.\r\n\r\nUsing the word clue <em>annoyed,</em> which words from the second column can you eliminate? <strong><em>Enigmatic</em></strong> means mysterious or cryptic, which doesn’t match <em>annoyed</em>. If you don’t know what <em>lugubrious</em> and <em>ebullient</em> mean, you can guess that <em>lugubrious</em> is heavy and <em>ebullient</em> means upbeat, based on how the words sound. (<strong><em>Ebullient</em></strong> means very happy, and <strong><em>lugubrious</em></strong> means sad. Eliminate <em>ebullient</em> for not matching <em>annoyed,</em> so <em>lugubrious</em> remains and is the second missing word.\r\n\r\nNow for the first missing word. Using the word clue <em>happy,</em> which words from the first column can you eliminate? <strong><em>Frugal</em></strong> doesn’t fit based solely on its meaning (economical), and it has no opposite in the second column. <strong><em>Keen,</em></strong> which means <em>intense,</em> also doesn’t fit, so <em>cheerful</em> seems to be the remaining choice for the first blank. The correct answers are Choices (C) and (E).","description":"On the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Text Completion and Sentence Equivalence questions hold all the clues you need to answer them correctly. By using key strategies and avoiding common mistakes, you can breeze through these GRE test questions and rack up points in a hurry.\r\n\r\nBecause Text Completion and Sentence Equivalence questions are so similar, the strategy is the same for both:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Text Completion:</strong> A Text Completion question consists of a sentence or paragraph with one, two, or three missing words or phrases, along with a short list of word or phrase choices to complete the text. If the text has one word missing, the list has five choices, while if the text has two or three words missing, each has a list of three choices.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">Each choice gives the text a different meaning. Your job is to choose the word or words that best support the meaning of the sentence. If the text is missing more than one word, you don’t get partial credit for choosing only one correct word.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Text Completion questions tend to have slightly easier vocabulary but are more challenging to interpret.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Sentence Equivalence:</strong> A Sentence Equivalence question consists of a single sentence with exactly one word missing and a list of six choices to complete it. Your job is to select the two words that fit the sentence <em>and</em> mean the same thing, and, as with the Text Completion questions, you don’t get partial credit for choosing only one correct word.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Sentence Completion questions tend to be easier to interpret but have more challenging vocabulary. The correct answers are <em>always synonyms,</em> so if you find a word that supports the meaning but doesn’t have a match, then you’ve found a trap word.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Both question types:</strong> The answer choices always fit perfectly and have perfect grammar: Make your choice based on the <em>meaning</em> of the words. Each word you plug in gives the sentence a different meaning, so find the meaning of the text <em>without</em> the answer choices, and then eliminate the wrong answer choices.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >How many answers are expected?</h2>\r\nDon’t worry about knowing how many answers to select. When you're taking the GRE it’s clear, and just to be sure, at the top of the screen is always an instruction that reads something like, “Pick one answer for each missing word (in Text Completion),” or “Pick two answer choices that create sentences most alike in meaning (in Sentence Equivalence).”\r\n\r\nAlso, the one-answer questions allow you to select only one answer, and the two-answer questions allow you to select more than one. Go through it once and you’ll be fine.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Trying it out</h2>\r\nThe following example of a Text Completion question shows how all answer choices appear to fit perfectly but only two specific words actually make logical sense.\r\n<blockquote><strong><em>Directions:</em></strong> For each blank, select one entry from the corresponding column of choices. Fill all blanks in the way that best completes the text.\r\n\r\nFrustrated that the GRE question was actually so easy, Faye (i) _____ her book out the window with such (ii) _____ that it soared high into the sky, prompting three of her neighbors to grab their phones and post the video on Instagram.</blockquote>\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263582\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/text-completion-example.jpg\" alt=\"text completion example\" width=\"535\" height=\"183\" />\r\n\r\nThe key word in this example is <em>frustrated,</em> which conveys a strong negative emotion. Choices (B) and (D), <strong><em>hurled</em></strong> and <strong><em>ferocity,</em></strong> are the only choices that support such a negative emotion. Note that this is a single, two-part question. You may select any of the three answer choices for each blank, but you must choose <em>both</em> correct answers to earn credit for the question.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Develop your skills for finding the correct answers</h2>\r\nText Completion and Sentence Equivalence questions are designed to measure two core proficiencies: interpreting the text and using the vocabulary. These are two distinct skills that you build separately but must use together.\r\n\r\nMost of the vocab words that you encounter on the GRE are used commonly in most professional industries, including business and journalism. One student came in with a <em>New York Times</em> article that had three of the vocab words that we’d reviewed in class! Such words as <strong><em>ephemeral</em></strong> (fleeting), <strong><em>abscond</em></strong> (sneak away), and <strong><em>imbroglio</em></strong> (entanglement) stump exam takers every day but appear regularly in publications.\r\n<h3>Interpreting the Text 101</h3>\r\nInterpreting the text means discerning its meaning in the absence of the key words. Doing this prior to looking at the answer choices is the best way to quickly eliminate choices that don’t make sense, and the GRE-makers have fun trying to trick you.\r\n<h3>Getting the gist of the text</h3>\r\nOne way to figure out the meaning of a challenging sentence is to see whether it has a positive or negative connotation. This high-level perspective can help you find words that convey the correct meaning.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Take the best and only approach</h2>\r\nWhether you’re taking on a Text Completion or Sentence Equivalence question, your approach is the same. These steps are the <em>only</em> way to knock out these questions so you can ace the exam and get on with your life.\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Interpret the text without looking at the answer choices.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Complete the text with your own words.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Eliminate wrong answer choices.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\nThe following sections explain these steps in detail.\r\n<h3>Interpret the text without looking at the answer choices</h3>\r\nFirst, figure out what the sentence is saying. If you know this, then you know the meanings of the words that go in the blanks. How else do you know which answer choices work, and more importantly, which choices don’t work?\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">While interpreting the text, don’t look at the answer choices! Each answer choice not only seems to fit perfectly but also gives the sentence a very different meaning. Then, you have no idea what the sentence is trying to say, and you’ve turned a relatively workable question into something that’s impossible. Whoa, right into the trap. Instead, get the meaning of the sentence <em>first</em> and <em>then</em> look at the answer choices!</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">To avoid involuntarily glancing at the answer choices, cover them up with your scratch paper. Hold that scratch paper right up on the computer screen. (You’re not working math now, anyway.) Silly? Yes. Effective? Absolutely. Students tell me it’s a lifesaver.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Complete the text with your own words</h3>\r\nThe next step is finding your own words to complete the text. Your words don’t have to be perfect — you’re not writing the sentence — but they do have to support the meaning of the sentence. This way, you know exactly what to look for and can eliminate answer choices (which is the following step). Right now, you’re still covering up the answer choices with your scratch paper.\r\n\r\nTry to picture what’s happening in the text. Even though you may arrange it differently, your key words will match the missing words in the question.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Your own words may not fit perfectly or match the answer choices — but they don’t have to. Instead, they serve a more important purpose. <em>They make the wrong answers clearly stand out.</em> Now you go to the next step: Eliminate wrong answer choices.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Eliminate wrong answer choices</h3>\r\nThe final step to knocking out these questions is eliminating the wrong answer choices. Now that you know what the sentence is saying, the wrong answers are clear.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">These questions can be challenging, so if you’re not sure whether an answer choice should be crossed off, don’t spend time on it. Instead, mark it as “maybe” and go on to the next answer choice. Usually, you’ll finish reviewing the answer choices with one marked “maybe” and the others eliminated. Go with the “maybe” choice and move on.</p>\r\nWorst case, if you have to guess, you’ve narrowed down the answers to guess from. Then mark the question for review and return to it later.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">These verbal questions should take you less than a minute each, saving you valuable time for the time-intensive Reading Comprehension questions.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >Interpreting trickier sentences</h2>\r\nIf every Text Completion and Sentence Equivalence question were as easy, everyone would get a perfect 170 on the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/test-prep/gre/tips-for-mastering-the-verbal-section-of-the-gre/\">Verbal section</a>, and testing would be pointless. However, the actual GRE questions can be more challenging to interpret. When you come across these sentences, start with the three basic strategies mentioned earlier and build on them with these steps:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Use transition words to get the gist of the phrases.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Start with the second or third missing word.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\n<h3>Use transition words to get the gist of the phrases</h3>\r\nTransition words exist in almost all Text Completion and Sentence Equivalence questions (and other sentences) and serve as valuable clues to interpreting the meaning of a sentence. (<em>Transition words</em> connect two ideas in a sentence or paragraph and tell you whether the two ideas in the sentence agree or contradict one another.) Transition words help you decipher the meaning of a sentence with key words missing.\r\n\r\nFor example, changing the transition word in the following sentence completely alters its meaning:\r\n<blockquote><em>Although</em> he ran as fast as he could, Eric _____ the bus.</blockquote>\r\nThe transition word <em>although,</em> indicating contrast, tells you that Eric missed the bus. Consider the same sentence with a different transition word:\r\n<blockquote><em>Because</em> he ran as fast as he could, Eric _____ the bus.</blockquote>\r\nThe transition word <em>because,</em> indicating cause-and-effect, tells you that Eric caught the bus.\r\n\r\nWith a little practice, transition words become easy to identify and use to your advantage. They’re helpful when breaking the sentence into pieces (which is the next step) and are used frequently in the Analytical Writing portion of the GRE.\r\n\r\nCommon transition words include the following:\r\n<table>\r\n<tbody>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"120\">although</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">and</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">because</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">but</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"120\">despite</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">either/or</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">however</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">in spite of</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"120\">moreover</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">nonetheless</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">therefore</td>\r\n<td width=\"120\">or</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n</tbody>\r\n</table>\r\nThe English language has hundreds of transition words. Fortunately, you don’t need to memorize them, but you do need to be able to spot them.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Most transition words can be divided into two categories: continuing and contrasting. Continuing transition words — <em>and, because, moreover,</em> and <em>therefore</em> — indicate that the one part of the sentence will continue the thought of the other part. Contrasting transition words — <em>although, but, despite, however, in spite of,</em> and <em>nonetheless</em> — indicate that one part of the sentence will contrast the other part.</p>\r\nIn the previous example with Eric and the bus, changing the transition from a <em>continuing</em> to a <em>contrasting</em> word (in this case, <em>although</em> to <em>because</em>) directly changes the meaning of the sentence. Note that the transition word isn’t always in the middle of the sentence. Now to work on the second step.\r\n<h3>Start with the second or third missing word</h3>\r\nMany Text Completion questions have two or three words missing. Often the first missing word could be anything, and the second (or third) missing word tells you the first one. Look at this example:\r\n<blockquote>Although she usually was of a (i) _____ nature, Patty was (ii) _____ when the professor assigned a paper due the day after spring break.</blockquote>\r\nThe transition word <em>although</em> clues you in to the gist of the first phrase. It tells you that Patty’s usual nature is different from the way she felt when receiving her assignment. But this isn’t enough — Patty could usually be of any nature: good, bad, <strong><em>cantankerous</em></strong> (cranky), <strong><em>sanguine</em></strong> (cheerful), <strong><em>capricious</em></strong> (fickle). You need the gist of the <em>second</em> missing word to find the first one.\r\n<blockquote>Second missing word: Patty was _____ when the professor assigned a paper due the day after spring break.</blockquote>\r\nFrom the second missing word, you can infer that she was <em>annoyed</em> when the professor assigned a paper. It could be different, but probably not. Most people are usually some form of disappointed when assigned papers, especially over spring break. Anyway, knowing she wasn’t happy, the continuing transition word <em>although</em> tells you that she’s usually the opposite:\r\n<blockquote>First missing word: Although she usually was of a _____ nature,</blockquote>\r\nThe opposite of <em>annoyed</em> is <em>happy.</em> Patty is usually <em>happy</em> but today is <em>annoyed.</em> Now take on the whole question:\r\n<blockquote>Although she usually was of a (i) _____ nature, Patty was (ii) _____ when the professor assigned a paper due the day after spring break.</blockquote>\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263581\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/missing-word-answers.jpg\" alt=\"Answer choices for missing word problems\" width=\"535\" height=\"183\" />\r\n\r\nEliminate answer choices that don’t match the words you used (<em>happy</em> and <em>annoyed</em>) to complete the text. Start with the second missing word.\r\n\r\nUsing the word clue <em>annoyed,</em> which words from the second column can you eliminate? <strong><em>Enigmatic</em></strong> means mysterious or cryptic, which doesn’t match <em>annoyed</em>. If you don’t know what <em>lugubrious</em> and <em>ebullient</em> mean, you can guess that <em>lugubrious</em> is heavy and <em>ebullient</em> means upbeat, based on how the words sound. (<strong><em>Ebullient</em></strong> means very happy, and <strong><em>lugubrious</em></strong> means sad. Eliminate <em>ebullient</em> for not matching <em>annoyed,</em> so <em>lugubrious</em> remains and is the second missing word.\r\n\r\nNow for the first missing word. Using the word clue <em>happy,</em> which words from the first column can you eliminate? <strong><em>Frugal</em></strong> doesn’t fit based solely on its meaning (economical), and it has no opposite in the second column. <strong><em>Keen,</em></strong> which means <em>intense,</em> also doesn’t fit, so <em>cheerful</em> seems to be the remaining choice for the first blank. The correct answers are Choices (C) and (E).","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":8978,"name":"Ron Woldoff","slug":"ron-woldoff","description":" <p><b>Ron Woldoff is founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students succeed on the GMAT, GRE, SAT, ACT, and PSAT. He&#8217;s the author of numerous Dummies test prep titles, including <i>GRE 2022 For Dummies</i> and <i>SAT: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies.</i></p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8978"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33785,"title":"GRE","slug":"gre","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"How many answers are expected?","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Trying it out","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Develop your skills for finding the correct answers","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Take the best and only approach","target":"#tab4"},{"label":"Interpreting trickier sentences","target":"#tab5"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":263596,"title":"Lines and Angles on the GRE Test","slug":"lines-and-angles-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263596"}},{"articleId":263591,"title":"Know Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots for the GRE","slug":"brush-up-on-prefixes-suffixes-and-roots-for-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263591"}},{"articleId":263586,"title":"The 3 Reading Comprehension Question Formats on the GRE Test","slug":"the-3-reading-comprehension-question-formats-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263586"}},{"articleId":263578,"title":"10 Mistakes You Won’t Make When Taking the GRE","slug":"10-mistakes-you-wont-make-when-taking-the-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263578"}},{"articleId":207605,"title":"GRE 2023 For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gre-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207605"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":298853,"title":"GRE Prep 2024 For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gre-prep-2024-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298853"}},{"articleId":263596,"title":"Lines and Angles on the GRE Test","slug":"lines-and-angles-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263596"}},{"articleId":263591,"title":"Know Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots for the GRE","slug":"brush-up-on-prefixes-suffixes-and-roots-for-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263591"}},{"articleId":263586,"title":"The 3 Reading Comprehension Question Formats on the GRE Test","slug":"the-3-reading-comprehension-question-formats-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263586"}},{"articleId":263578,"title":"10 Mistakes You Won’t Make When Taking the GRE","slug":"10-mistakes-you-wont-make-when-taking-the-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263578"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282251,"slug":"gre-for-dummies-with-online-practice-tests","isbn":"9781119886600","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119886600-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781119886600-199x255.jpg","width":199,"height":255},"title":"GRE Prep 2023 For Dummies with Online Practice","testBankPinActivationLink":"//testbanks.wiley.com/","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"8978\">Ron Woldoff</b> is founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students succeed on the GMAT, GRE, SAT, ACT, and PSAT. 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He&#8217;s the author of numerous Dummies test prep titles, including <i>GRE 2022 For Dummies</i> and <i>SAT: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies.</i></p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8978"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;study-skills-test-prep&quot;,&quot;gre&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119886600&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64a852e152133\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;study-skills-test-prep&quot;,&quot;gre&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119886600&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64a852e152a2b\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-07-07T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":143110},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-05-17T13:43:42+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-05-17T13:43:42+00:00","timestamp":"2024-05-17T15:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Study Skills & Test Prep","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33772"},"slug":"study-skills-test-prep","categoryId":33772},{"name":"GRE","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"},"slug":"gre","categoryId":33785}],"title":"GRE Prep 2024 For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"gre prep 2024 for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"gre-prep-2024-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","百度搜字段擎SEO网站系统改善":{"metaDescription":"This Cheat Sheet tells you what to expect when taking the GRE, what to bring to the testing center, and advice for multiple-choice questions.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"The Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) is your gateway to getting into the graduate school of your choice, maybe even with a scholarship, which then opens the doors to your career path.\r\n\r\nThis Cheat Sheet is a collection of tips and key information that can help you score well on the GRE, get into graduate school, and further your career goals.","description":"The Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) is your gateway to getting into the graduate school of your choice, maybe even with a scholarship, which then opens the doors to your career path.\r\n\r\nThis Cheat Sheet is a collection of tips and key information that can help you score well on the GRE, get into graduate school, and further your career goals.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":8978,"name":"Ron Woldoff","slug":"ron-woldoff","description":" <p><b>Ron Woldoff </b>is the founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students achieve their goals on the GMAT, GRE, and SAT. 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Other test-takers may also be at the testing center, working on the GRE or a different exam, but you’ll be immersed in your own test. At about four hours, the GRE challenges your stamina as well as your skills.</p>\n<p>Below are the sections of the GRE, along with the number of questions and time limits. Essays are always first, but the other sections can be in any order.</p>\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"623\">\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td><strong>Section</strong></td>\n<td><strong>Number of Questions</strong></td>\n<td><strong>Time Allotted</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Analyze an Issue</td>\n<td>1 essay</td>\n<td>30 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Analyze an Argument</td>\n<td>1 essay</td>\n<td>30 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Verbal Reasoning</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>30 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Break</td>\n<td>—</td>\n<td>10 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Quantitative Reasoning</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>35 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Verbal Reasoning</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>30 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Quantitative Reasoning</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>35 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Unscored Verbal or Quantitative Reasoning</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>30 or 35 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Possible Unscored Research Section</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>30 or 35 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><strong>Total Testing Time</strong></td>\n<td></td>\n<td><strong>About four hours</strong></td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n"},{"title":"Taking the GRE at a testing center","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>If you&#8217;ll be taking the GRE at a testing center, make sure you’re prepared by bringing <em>all</em> of these things:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong><a href=\"//www.ets.org/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">ETS</a> authorization voucher:</strong> Bring the verification that says you’ve signed up for the exam on this day, at this time, at this location. If the testing center makes a mistake and loses your reservation, you need to show that you’ve actually reserved this time.</li>\n<li><strong>Comfortable clothes:</strong> Testing centers tend to crank the AC, and the last thing you want is to be shivering during the exam. Wear two layers of long-sleeved clothing, and you can always remove one if you’re warm. Note that you’re not allowed to wear a jacket in the testing center.</li>\n<li><strong>Testing center address:</strong> Put the testing center address in your phone, or write it on a note, or print it out so that you can grab it in the morning. You may also want to scope out the area ahead of time and find parking: A map satellite view is great for this.</li>\n<li><strong>Photo ID:</strong> The GRE testing centers sport some tight security. You may not be allowed to take the test unless you can verify who you are.</li>\n<li><strong>Water and a snack: </strong>Your break is 10 minutes, some of which is spent checking back in when you return from the restroom. You don’t have time to go buy a snack, and you may not want the drinking fountain water. Bring your own water and a snack so you can use your precious few minutes getting refreshed. Some testing centers give you access to your locker during your break, and some don’t. But the proctors always tell you where you can leave your personal items.</li>\n</ul>\n<p>The GRE proctors are also strict about the items you can’t bring into the testing center. If you have any of these items with you, you’ll be asked to keep them in your locker while taking the exam:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Books and study notes: </strong>You’re not allowed to use books or notes, so why bring them? Leave them in your car or at home. One student almost had his scores cancelled because he took a text book out of his locker during his break. Fortunately, he didn’t <em>open </em>the book, so he was allowed to keep his scores.</li>\n<li><strong>Phone, wallet, and purse: </strong>These stay in the locker while you’re taking the GRE.</li>\n<li><strong>Calculator: </strong>If you bring a calculator, it too stays in the locker. The GRE provides an on-screen calculator for the quantitative reasoning sections, so you don’t need to bring one.</li>\n<li><strong>Your own scratch paper: </strong>The proctors will take anything you bring and provide their own scratch paper for you to use.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Computer tips for the GRE","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>You’ve taken a couple computer-based practice exams, right? Just remember these key points:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>You can go back and forth through the section. </strong>Within each section, each question is worth the same. If you’re stuck on a question, take a guess, mark it for review, and come back to it later.</li>\n<li><strong>Keep an eye on the clock. </strong>On the GRE, with 35 minutes per quantitative section and 30 minutes per verbal, it’s easy to get distracted by your work and run out of time. Stick with one minute per question, which allows a little time to slip, and you should be about halfway through each section at about 15 minutes.</li>\n<li><strong>Practice using the software. </strong>Practice GRE software is available for free from <a href=\"//www.ets.org/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>ETS</strong></a>, and it perfectly mimics the actual exam, so be sure to explore that and see how it works <em>before</em> the day of the exam.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Answering multiple-choice questions","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Most GRE questions are multiple choice, and some may have more than one possible answer. These questions with more than one possible answer are easy to spot, because the answer choices are marked with squares instead of ovals, and the directions say, “Pick <u>two</u> answers” or “Pick <u>all</u> correct answers,” or you may have to complete text that has two or three missing words.</p>\n<p>Either way, keep these tips in mind:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>If you don’t know the answer, rule out as many obviously incorrect choices as possible and guess from the remaining choices.</li>\n<li>Again, because students forget, Don’t spend more than one minute on any one question. Guess an answer, mark the question for review, and come back to it at the end of the section. As long as you have time left, you can go back to any questions in that section.</li>\n<li>Guessing an answer is better than leaving the question unanswered. A wrong answer counts the same as no answer, so there’s no harm in guessing. You may as well throw the mental dice and try to get it right — just mark it for review and come back to it later.</li>\n</ul>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"One year","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-05-17T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":298853},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2020-08-27T03:39:42+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-04-18T21:27:34+00:00","timestamp":"2024-04-19T00:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Study Skills & Test Prep","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33772"},"slug":"study-skills-test-prep","categoryId":33772},{"name":"GRE","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"},"slug":"gre","categoryId":33785}],"title":"Know Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots for the GRE","strippedTitle":"know prefixes, suffixes, and roots for the gre","slug":"brush-up-on-prefixes-suffixes-and-roots-for-the-gre-test","canonicalUrl":"","百度搜字段擎SEO网站系统改善":{"metaDescription":"Before taking the GRE, be sure you've strengthened your vocabulary and can identify most of the basic prefixes, suffixes, and word roots you'll encounter.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"You can’t get around it: You absolutely <em>must</em> know vocabulary to do well on the graduate record examination (GRE). The GRE tests your grasp of commonly used academic and intellectual vocabulary words.\r\n\r\nMastering prefixes, suffixes, and word roots can bump up your <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/test-prep/gre/tips-for-mastering-the-verbal-section-of-the-gre/\">Verbal score</a> significantly. Although prefixes and suffixes abound, the ones discussed here are the most common. Take the time to memorize them.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">If English isn’t your first language, vocabulary may be the hardest part of the exam for you. Using roots, prefixes, and suffixes to tell a word’s meaning can help you.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Prefixes to know when taking the GRE</h2>\r\nA <em>prefix</em> is one or more letters at the beginning of a word that alters its meaning. For example, if a feat is <em>possible,</em> then you can do it. With a simple prefix, you can change that feat to <em>im</em>possible, meaning you can’t do it. Knowing that in this case <em>im-</em> means not, you can narrow down the possible meanings of a word starting with <em>im-,</em> such as <em>impermeable.</em> Whatever the word is, the <em>im-</em> usually stands for not. (Because <em>permeate</em> means to pass through, <em>impermeable</em> means not capable of being passed through.)\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_263592\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"535\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-263592\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/prefix-illustration.jpg\" alt=\"prefix illustration\" width=\"535\" height=\"357\" /> ©By TungCheung/Shutterstock.com[/caption]\r\n\r\nFollowing are the most common prefixes you need to know with several related examples:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>a-/an-</em></strong> = not or without: Someone <em>amoral</em> is without morals or conscience; someone <em>atypical</em> isn’t typical or normal. Someone <em>apathetic</em> is uncaring or without feeling. Similarly, an <em>anaerobic</em> environment is without oxygen, and <em>anarchy</em> is without rule or government.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>ambi-</em></strong> = dual: Someone <em>ambidextrous</em> uses both left and right hands equally well; an <em>ambivert</em> is both introverted and extroverted. Something <em>ambiguous</em> has dual meanings, but that word typically refers to something that’s unclear.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>ante-</em></strong> = before: When the clock reads 5 a.m., the <em>m.</em> stands for <em>ante meridiem,</em> which means before the middle of the day. <em>Antebellum</em> means before the war. Tara in <em>Gone with the Wind</em> was an antebellum mansion, built before the Civil War.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>ben-/bon-</em></strong> = good: A <em>benefit</em> is something that has a good result, an advantage. Someone <em>benevolent</em> is good and kind. <em>Bon voyage</em> means have a good voyage; a <em>bon vivant</em> is a person who lives the good life.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>contra-</em></strong> = against: A medical treatment that’s <em>contraindicated</em> for a certain condition is something that would make the condition worse, not better. <em>Contravene</em> means to deny or oppose.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>de-</em></strong> = down from, away from (to put down): To <em>descend</em> or <em>depart</em> is to go down from or away from. To <em>denounce</em> is to put down or to speak badly of, and <em>demote</em> means to reduce in rank or stature.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">Many unknown words on the GRE that start with <em>de-</em> mean to put down in the sense of to criticize or bad-mouth. Here are a few more: <em>demean, denounce, denigrate, derogate, deprecate,</em> and <em>decry.</em></p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>eu-</em></strong> = good: A <em>eulogy</em> is a good speech, usually given for the dearly departed at a funeral. A <em>euphemism</em> is a good way of saying something or a polite expression, like saying, “Oh, dang!” instead of using certain other words.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>ex-</em></strong> = out of, away from: An <em>exit</em> is literally out of or away from <em>it — ex</em>-it. (The word <em>exit</em> is probably one of the most logical words around.) To <em>extricate</em> is to get out of something. To <em>exculpate</em> is to let off the hook — literally to make away from guilt, as <em>culp</em> means guilt.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>im-/in-</em></strong> = not: Something <em>impossible</em> isn’t possible — it just can’t happen. Someone <em>immortal</em> isn’t going to die but will live forever, because <em>mortal</em> means able to die. Someone <em>implacable</em> can’t be calmed down, because <em>placate</em> means to ease one’s anger. Similarly, something <em>inappropriate</em> isn’t appropriate, and someone <em>inept</em> isn’t adept, meaning he’s not skillful. Someone who’s <em>insolvent</em> has no money and is bankrupt, like most students after four years of college.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">Note that <em>im-</em> and <em>in-</em> can also mean into — (<em>immerse</em> means to put into), inside (<em>innate</em> means something born inside of you), or beginning (as in <em>initial</em>) — but these meanings are less common.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>ne-/mal-</em></strong> = bad: Something <em>negative</em> is bad, like a negative attitude. Someone <em>nefarious</em> is full of bad, or wicked and evil; you may read about a nefarious wizard in a fantasy novel. Something <em>malicious</em> also is full of bad, or wicked and harmful, such as a malicious rumor.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>post-</em></strong> = after: When the clock reads 5 p.m., the <em>m.</em> stands for <em>post meridiem,</em> which means after the middle of the day. Something <em>postmortem</em> occurs after death.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">There’s an exception to every prefix. For example, <em>a-/an-</em> may mean the opposite in most contexts, but with the word <em>aver</em>, it does not refer to the opposite of <em>ver</em>, which means truth. The prefix <em>ambi-</em> may refer to dual, but someone <em>ambitious</em> doesn’t necessarily have dual goals.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Suffixes you should know before taking the GRE</h2>\r\nA <em>suffix</em> is usually three or four letters at the end of a word that give the word a specific inflection or change its type, such as from a verb to an adjective; for example, to transform the verb <em>study</em> into the adjective <em>studious,</em> you change the <em>y</em> to <em>i</em> and add the suffix <em>-ous.</em> Following are some common suffixes along with related examples:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>-ate</em></strong> = to make: To <em>duplicate</em> is to make double. To <em>renovate</em> is to make new again (<em>nov</em> means new). To <em>placate</em> is to make peaceful or calm (<em>plac</em> means peace or calm).</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>-ette</em></strong> = little: A <em>cigarette</em> is a little cigar. A <em>dinette</em> table is a little dining table. A <em>coquette</em> is a little flirt (literally, a little chicken, but that doesn’t sound as pretty).</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>-illo</em></strong> = little: An <em>armadillo</em> is a little armored animal. A <em>peccadillo</em> is a little sin. (You might know that <em>pecar</em> means “to sin.”)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>-ify (-efy)</em></strong> = to make: To <em>beautify</em> is to make beautiful. To <em>ossify</em> is to become rigid or make bone. (If you break your wrist, it takes weeks to ossify again, or for the bone to regenerate.) To <em>deify</em> is to make into a deity, a god. To <em>liquefy</em> is to turn a solid into a liquid.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>-ist</em></strong> = a person: A <em>typist</em> is a person who types. A <em>pugilist</em> is a person who fights, a boxer (<em>pug</em> means war or fight). A <em>pacifist</em> is a person who believes in peace, a noncombatant (<em>pac</em> means peace or calm).</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>-ity</em></strong> = a noun suffix that doesn’t actually mean anything; it just turns a word into a noun: <em>Anxiety</em> is the noun form of anxious. <em>Serenity</em> is the noun form of serene. <em>Timidity</em> is the noun form of timid.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>-ize</em></strong> = to make: To <em>alphabetize</em> is to make alphabetical. To <em>immunize</em> is to make immune. To <em>ostracize</em> is to make separate from the group, or to shun.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>-ous</em></strong> = full of (very): Someone <em>joyous</em> is full of joy. Someone <em>amorous</em> is full of <em>amour,</em> or love. Someone <em>pulchritudinous</em> is full of beauty and, therefore, beautiful. Try saying that to your loved one.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Word roots to know for the GRE test</h2>\r\nThe <em>root</em> of a word is the core part of a word that gives the word its basic meaning. Recognizing a common root helps you discern the meaning of an unfamiliar word. For example, knowing that <em>ver</em> means truth, as in <em>verify,</em> you can recognize that the unfamiliar word <em>aver</em> has something to do with truth. <strong><em>Aver</em></strong> means to hold true or affirm the truth. Following are some common roots along with related examples:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>ambu</em></strong> = walk, move: In a hospital, patients are either bedridden (they can’t move) or <em>ambulatory</em> (they can walk and move about). A <em>somnambulist</em> is a sleepwalker. <em>Som-</em> means sleep, <em>-ist</em> is a person, and <em>ambu</em> is to walk or move.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>andro</em></strong> = man: An <em>android</em> is a robot shaped like a man. Someone <em>androgynous</em> exhibits both male <em>(andro)</em> and female <em>(gyn)</em></li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>anthro</em></strong> = human or mankind: <em>Anthropology</em> is the study of humans, and a <em>misanthrope</em> hates humans.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>bellu, belli</em></strong> = war, fight: If you’re <em>belligerent,</em> you’re ready to fight — and an <em>antebellum</em> mansion, mentioned above with prefixes, was created before the Civil War. (Remember that <em>ante-</em> means before.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>cred</em></strong> = trust or belief: Something <em>incredible</em> is unbelievable, such as the excuse “I would’ve picked you up on time, but there was a 15-car pileup on the freeway. I barely got out of there!” Saying something is <em>incredible</em> is like saying it’s unbelievable, and if you’re <em>credulous,</em> you’re trusting and <em>naive</em> (literally, full of trust).</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">Be careful not to confuse the words <em>credible</em> and <em>credulous.</em> Something <em>credible</em> is trustable or believable. A credible excuse can get you out of trouble if you turn a paper in late. <em>Credulous,</em> on the other hand, means full of trust, naive, or gullible. The more credulous your professor is, the less credible that excuse needs to be. Furthermore, if you’re <em>incredulous,</em> then you doubt something is true.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>gnos</em></strong> = knowledge: A doctor shows his or her knowledge by making a <em>diagnosis</em> (analysis of the situation) or a <em>prognosis</em> (prediction about the future of the illness). An <em>agnostic</em> is a person who doesn’t know whether a god exists. Differentiate an agnostic from an atheist: An <em>atheist</em> is literally without god, a person who believes there’s no god. An <em>agnostic</em> hasn’t decided yet.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>greg</em></strong> = group, herd: A <em>congregation</em> is a group of people. A <em>gregarious</em> person likes to be part of a group — he or she is sociable. To <em>segregate</em> is literally to make away from the group. (<em>Se-</em> means apart or away from, as in <em>separate, sever, sequester,</em> and )</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>gyn</em></strong> = woman: A <em>gynecologist</em> is a physician who treats conditions and ailments specific to women. A <em>misogynist</em> is a person who hates women.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>loq, log, loc, lix</em></strong> = speech or talk: Someone <em>prolix</em> or <em>loquacious</em> talks a lot. A <em>dialogue</em> is talk or conversation between two or more people. <em>Elocution</em> is proper speech.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>luc, lum, lus</em></strong> = light, clear: Something <em>luminous</em> is shiny and full of light. Ask the teacher to <em>elucidate</em> something you don’t understand (literally, to make clear). <em>Lustrous</em> hair reflects the light and is sleek and glossy.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>meta</em></strong> = beyond, after: A <em>metamorphosis</em> is a change of shape beyond the present shape.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>morph</em></strong> = shape: Something <em>amorphous</em> is without shape, while <em>morphology</em> is the study of shape.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>mut</em></strong> = change: Something <em>mutates</em> from one state to the next, and something <em>immutable</em> isn’t changeable; it remains constant. Don’t confuse <em>mut</em> (change) with <em>mute</em> (silent).</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>pac</em></strong> = peace, calm: Why do you give a baby a <em>pacifier?</em> To calm him or her down. To get its name, the <em>Pacific</em> Ocean must have appeared calm at the time it was discovered.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>path</em></strong> = feeling: Something <em>pathetic</em> arouses feeling or pity. To <em>sympathize</em> is to share the feelings (literally, to make the same feeling). <em>Antipathy</em> is a dislike — literally, a feeling against.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>phon</em></strong> = sound: <em>Phonics</em> helps you to sound out words. <em>Cacophony</em> is bad sound; <em>euphony</em> is good sound. <em>Homophones</em> are words that sound the same, such as <em>red</em> and And of course, there’s the <em>phone</em> you use to talk to someone.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>plac</em></strong> = peace, calm: To <em>placate</em> someone is to calm him or her down or to make peace with that person. Someone <em>implacable</em> can’t be calmed down.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>pro</em></strong> = big, much: <em>Profuse</em> apologies are big, or much — in essence, a <em>lot</em> of apologies. A <em>prolific</em> writer produces a great deal of material.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\"><em>Pro</em> has two additional meanings less commonly used on the GRE. It can mean before, as in “A <em>prologue</em> comes before a play.” Similarly, to <em>prognosticate</em> is to make knowledge before, or to predict. A <em>prognosticator</em> is a fortune-teller. <em>Pro</em> can also mean for. Someone who is <em>pro</em> freedom of speech is in favor of freedom of speech. Someone with a <em>proclivity</em> toward a certain activity is for that activity or has a natural tendency toward it.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>pug</em></strong> = war, fight: Someone <em>pugnacious</em> is ready to fight. A <em>pugilist</em> is a person who likes to fight, such as a professional boxer. Also, the large sticks that marines train with in hand-to-hand combat are called <em>pugil sticks.</em></li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>scien</em></strong> = knowledge: A <em>scientist</em> is a person with knowledge. Someone <em>prescient</em> has forethought or knowledge ahead of time — for example, a prognosticator. (A fortune-teller, remember?) One who is <em>omniscient</em> is all-knowing.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>somn</em></strong> = sleep: If you have <em>insomnia,</em> you can’t sleep. (The prefix <em>in-</em> means not.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>son</em></strong> = sound: A <em>sonic</em> boom breaks the sound barrier. <em>Dissonance</em> is clashing sounds. A <em>sonorous</em> voice has a good sound.</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"You can’t get around it: You absolutely <em>must</em> know vocabulary to do well on the graduate record examination (GRE). The GRE tests your grasp of commonly used academic and intellectual vocabulary words.\r\n\r\nMastering prefixes, suffixes, and word roots can bump up your <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/test-prep/gre/tips-for-mastering-the-verbal-section-of-the-gre/\">Verbal score</a> significantly. Although prefixes and suffixes abound, the ones discussed here are the most common. Take the time to memorize them.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">If English isn’t your first language, vocabulary may be the hardest part of the exam for you. Using roots, prefixes, and suffixes to tell a word’s meaning can help you.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Prefixes to know when taking the GRE</h2>\r\nA <em>prefix</em> is one or more letters at the beginning of a word that alters its meaning. For example, if a feat is <em>possible,</em> then you can do it. With a simple prefix, you can change that feat to <em>im</em>possible, meaning you can’t do it. Knowing that in this case <em>im-</em> means not, you can narrow down the possible meanings of a word starting with <em>im-,</em> such as <em>impermeable.</em> Whatever the word is, the <em>im-</em> usually stands for not. (Because <em>permeate</em> means to pass through, <em>impermeable</em> means not capable of being passed through.)\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_263592\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"535\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-263592\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/prefix-illustration.jpg\" alt=\"prefix illustration\" width=\"535\" height=\"357\" /> ©By TungCheung/Shutterstock.com[/caption]\r\n\r\nFollowing are the most common prefixes you need to know with several related examples:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>a-/an-</em></strong> = not or without: Someone <em>amoral</em> is without morals or conscience; someone <em>atypical</em> isn’t typical or normal. Someone <em>apathetic</em> is uncaring or without feeling. Similarly, an <em>anaerobic</em> environment is without oxygen, and <em>anarchy</em> is without rule or government.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>ambi-</em></strong> = dual: Someone <em>ambidextrous</em> uses both left and right hands equally well; an <em>ambivert</em> is both introverted and extroverted. Something <em>ambiguous</em> has dual meanings, but that word typically refers to something that’s unclear.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>ante-</em></strong> = before: When the clock reads 5 a.m., the <em>m.</em> stands for <em>ante meridiem,</em> which means before the middle of the day. <em>Antebellum</em> means before the war. Tara in <em>Gone with the Wind</em> was an antebellum mansion, built before the Civil War.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>ben-/bon-</em></strong> = good: A <em>benefit</em> is something that has a good result, an advantage. Someone <em>benevolent</em> is good and kind. <em>Bon voyage</em> means have a good voyage; a <em>bon vivant</em> is a person who lives the good life.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>contra-</em></strong> = against: A medical treatment that’s <em>contraindicated</em> for a certain condition is something that would make the condition worse, not better. <em>Contravene</em> means to deny or oppose.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>de-</em></strong> = down from, away from (to put down): To <em>descend</em> or <em>depart</em> is to go down from or away from. To <em>denounce</em> is to put down or to speak badly of, and <em>demote</em> means to reduce in rank or stature.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">Many unknown words on the GRE that start with <em>de-</em> mean to put down in the sense of to criticize or bad-mouth. Here are a few more: <em>demean, denounce, denigrate, derogate, deprecate,</em> and <em>decry.</em></p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>eu-</em></strong> = good: A <em>eulogy</em> is a good speech, usually given for the dearly departed at a funeral. A <em>euphemism</em> is a good way of saying something or a polite expression, like saying, “Oh, dang!” instead of using certain other words.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>ex-</em></strong> = out of, away from: An <em>exit</em> is literally out of or away from <em>it — ex</em>-it. (The word <em>exit</em> is probably one of the most logical words around.) To <em>extricate</em> is to get out of something. To <em>exculpate</em> is to let off the hook — literally to make away from guilt, as <em>culp</em> means guilt.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>im-/in-</em></strong> = not: Something <em>impossible</em> isn’t possible — it just can’t happen. Someone <em>immortal</em> isn’t going to die but will live forever, because <em>mortal</em> means able to die. Someone <em>implacable</em> can’t be calmed down, because <em>placate</em> means to ease one’s anger. Similarly, something <em>inappropriate</em> isn’t appropriate, and someone <em>inept</em> isn’t adept, meaning he’s not skillful. Someone who’s <em>insolvent</em> has no money and is bankrupt, like most students after four years of college.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">Note that <em>im-</em> and <em>in-</em> can also mean into — (<em>immerse</em> means to put into), inside (<em>innate</em> means something born inside of you), or beginning (as in <em>initial</em>) — but these meanings are less common.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>ne-/mal-</em></strong> = bad: Something <em>negative</em> is bad, like a negative attitude. Someone <em>nefarious</em> is full of bad, or wicked and evil; you may read about a nefarious wizard in a fantasy novel. Something <em>malicious</em> also is full of bad, or wicked and harmful, such as a malicious rumor.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>post-</em></strong> = after: When the clock reads 5 p.m., the <em>m.</em> stands for <em>post meridiem,</em> which means after the middle of the day. Something <em>postmortem</em> occurs after death.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">There’s an exception to every prefix. For example, <em>a-/an-</em> may mean the opposite in most contexts, but with the word <em>aver</em>, it does not refer to the opposite of <em>ver</em>, which means truth. The prefix <em>ambi-</em> may refer to dual, but someone <em>ambitious</em> doesn’t necessarily have dual goals.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Suffixes you should know before taking the GRE</h2>\r\nA <em>suffix</em> is usually three or four letters at the end of a word that give the word a specific inflection or change its type, such as from a verb to an adjective; for example, to transform the verb <em>study</em> into the adjective <em>studious,</em> you change the <em>y</em> to <em>i</em> and add the suffix <em>-ous.</em> Following are some common suffixes along with related examples:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>-ate</em></strong> = to make: To <em>duplicate</em> is to make double. To <em>renovate</em> is to make new again (<em>nov</em> means new). To <em>placate</em> is to make peaceful or calm (<em>plac</em> means peace or calm).</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>-ette</em></strong> = little: A <em>cigarette</em> is a little cigar. A <em>dinette</em> table is a little dining table. A <em>coquette</em> is a little flirt (literally, a little chicken, but that doesn’t sound as pretty).</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>-illo</em></strong> = little: An <em>armadillo</em> is a little armored animal. A <em>peccadillo</em> is a little sin. (You might know that <em>pecar</em> means “to sin.”)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>-ify (-efy)</em></strong> = to make: To <em>beautify</em> is to make beautiful. To <em>ossify</em> is to become rigid or make bone. (If you break your wrist, it takes weeks to ossify again, or for the bone to regenerate.) To <em>deify</em> is to make into a deity, a god. To <em>liquefy</em> is to turn a solid into a liquid.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>-ist</em></strong> = a person: A <em>typist</em> is a person who types. A <em>pugilist</em> is a person who fights, a boxer (<em>pug</em> means war or fight). A <em>pacifist</em> is a person who believes in peace, a noncombatant (<em>pac</em> means peace or calm).</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>-ity</em></strong> = a noun suffix that doesn’t actually mean anything; it just turns a word into a noun: <em>Anxiety</em> is the noun form of anxious. <em>Serenity</em> is the noun form of serene. <em>Timidity</em> is the noun form of timid.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>-ize</em></strong> = to make: To <em>alphabetize</em> is to make alphabetical. To <em>immunize</em> is to make immune. To <em>ostracize</em> is to make separate from the group, or to shun.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>-ous</em></strong> = full of (very): Someone <em>joyous</em> is full of joy. Someone <em>amorous</em> is full of <em>amour,</em> or love. Someone <em>pulchritudinous</em> is full of beauty and, therefore, beautiful. Try saying that to your loved one.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Word roots to know for the GRE test</h2>\r\nThe <em>root</em> of a word is the core part of a word that gives the word its basic meaning. Recognizing a common root helps you discern the meaning of an unfamiliar word. For example, knowing that <em>ver</em> means truth, as in <em>verify,</em> you can recognize that the unfamiliar word <em>aver</em> has something to do with truth. <strong><em>Aver</em></strong> means to hold true or affirm the truth. Following are some common roots along with related examples:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>ambu</em></strong> = walk, move: In a hospital, patients are either bedridden (they can’t move) or <em>ambulatory</em> (they can walk and move about). A <em>somnambulist</em> is a sleepwalker. <em>Som-</em> means sleep, <em>-ist</em> is a person, and <em>ambu</em> is to walk or move.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>andro</em></strong> = man: An <em>android</em> is a robot shaped like a man. Someone <em>androgynous</em> exhibits both male <em>(andro)</em> and female <em>(gyn)</em></li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>anthro</em></strong> = human or mankind: <em>Anthropology</em> is the study of humans, and a <em>misanthrope</em> hates humans.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>bellu, belli</em></strong> = war, fight: If you’re <em>belligerent,</em> you’re ready to fight — and an <em>antebellum</em> mansion, mentioned above with prefixes, was created before the Civil War. (Remember that <em>ante-</em> means before.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>cred</em></strong> = trust or belief: Something <em>incredible</em> is unbelievable, such as the excuse “I would’ve picked you up on time, but there was a 15-car pileup on the freeway. I barely got out of there!” Saying something is <em>incredible</em> is like saying it’s unbelievable, and if you’re <em>credulous,</em> you’re trusting and <em>naive</em> (literally, full of trust).</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">Be careful not to confuse the words <em>credible</em> and <em>credulous.</em> Something <em>credible</em> is trustable or believable. A credible excuse can get you out of trouble if you turn a paper in late. <em>Credulous,</em> on the other hand, means full of trust, naive, or gullible. The more credulous your professor is, the less credible that excuse needs to be. Furthermore, if you’re <em>incredulous,</em> then you doubt something is true.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>gnos</em></strong> = knowledge: A doctor shows his or her knowledge by making a <em>diagnosis</em> (analysis of the situation) or a <em>prognosis</em> (prediction about the future of the illness). An <em>agnostic</em> is a person who doesn’t know whether a god exists. Differentiate an agnostic from an atheist: An <em>atheist</em> is literally without god, a person who believes there’s no god. An <em>agnostic</em> hasn’t decided yet.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>greg</em></strong> = group, herd: A <em>congregation</em> is a group of people. A <em>gregarious</em> person likes to be part of a group — he or she is sociable. To <em>segregate</em> is literally to make away from the group. (<em>Se-</em> means apart or away from, as in <em>separate, sever, sequester,</em> and )</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>gyn</em></strong> = woman: A <em>gynecologist</em> is a physician who treats conditions and ailments specific to women. A <em>misogynist</em> is a person who hates women.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>loq, log, loc, lix</em></strong> = speech or talk: Someone <em>prolix</em> or <em>loquacious</em> talks a lot. A <em>dialogue</em> is talk or conversation between two or more people. <em>Elocution</em> is proper speech.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>luc, lum, lus</em></strong> = light, clear: Something <em>luminous</em> is shiny and full of light. Ask the teacher to <em>elucidate</em> something you don’t understand (literally, to make clear). <em>Lustrous</em> hair reflects the light and is sleek and glossy.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>meta</em></strong> = beyond, after: A <em>metamorphosis</em> is a change of shape beyond the present shape.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>morph</em></strong> = shape: Something <em>amorphous</em> is without shape, while <em>morphology</em> is the study of shape.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>mut</em></strong> = change: Something <em>mutates</em> from one state to the next, and something <em>immutable</em> isn’t changeable; it remains constant. Don’t confuse <em>mut</em> (change) with <em>mute</em> (silent).</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>pac</em></strong> = peace, calm: Why do you give a baby a <em>pacifier?</em> To calm him or her down. To get its name, the <em>Pacific</em> Ocean must have appeared calm at the time it was discovered.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>path</em></strong> = feeling: Something <em>pathetic</em> arouses feeling or pity. To <em>sympathize</em> is to share the feelings (literally, to make the same feeling). <em>Antipathy</em> is a dislike — literally, a feeling against.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>phon</em></strong> = sound: <em>Phonics</em> helps you to sound out words. <em>Cacophony</em> is bad sound; <em>euphony</em> is good sound. <em>Homophones</em> are words that sound the same, such as <em>red</em> and And of course, there’s the <em>phone</em> you use to talk to someone.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>plac</em></strong> = peace, calm: To <em>placate</em> someone is to calm him or her down or to make peace with that person. Someone <em>implacable</em> can’t be calmed down.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>pro</em></strong> = big, much: <em>Profuse</em> apologies are big, or much — in essence, a <em>lot</em> of apologies. A <em>prolific</em> writer produces a great deal of material.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\"><em>Pro</em> has two additional meanings less commonly used on the GRE. It can mean before, as in “A <em>prologue</em> comes before a play.” Similarly, to <em>prognosticate</em> is to make knowledge before, or to predict. A <em>prognosticator</em> is a fortune-teller. <em>Pro</em> can also mean for. Someone who is <em>pro</em> freedom of speech is in favor of freedom of speech. Someone with a <em>proclivity</em> toward a certain activity is for that activity or has a natural tendency toward it.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>pug</em></strong> = war, fight: Someone <em>pugnacious</em> is ready to fight. A <em>pugilist</em> is a person who likes to fight, such as a professional boxer. Also, the large sticks that marines train with in hand-to-hand combat are called <em>pugil sticks.</em></li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>scien</em></strong> = knowledge: A <em>scientist</em> is a person with knowledge. Someone <em>prescient</em> has forethought or knowledge ahead of time — for example, a prognosticator. (A fortune-teller, remember?) One who is <em>omniscient</em> is all-knowing.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>somn</em></strong> = sleep: If you have <em>insomnia,</em> you can’t sleep. (The prefix <em>in-</em> means not.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong><em>son</em></strong> = sound: A <em>sonic</em> boom breaks the sound barrier. <em>Dissonance</em> is clashing sounds. A <em>sonorous</em> voice has a good sound.</li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":8978,"name":"Ron Woldoff","slug":"ron-woldoff","description":" <p><b>Ron Woldoff </b>is the founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students achieve their goals on the GMAT, GRE, and SAT. He has taught prep courses at Arizona colleges, and is the author of <i>SAT: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies</i>, previous editions of <i>GRE For Dummies</i>, and <i>GRE: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies.</i></p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8978"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33785,"title":"GRE","slug":"gre","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Prefixes to know when taking the GRE","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Suffixes you should know before taking the GRE","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Word roots to know for the GRE test","target":"#tab3"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":263596,"title":"Lines and Angles on the GRE Test","slug":"lines-and-angles-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263596"}},{"articleId":263586,"title":"The 3 Reading Comprehension Question Formats on the GRE Test","slug":"the-3-reading-comprehension-question-formats-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263586"}},{"articleId":263578,"title":"10 Mistakes You Won’t Make When Taking the GRE","slug":"10-mistakes-you-wont-make-when-taking-the-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263578"}},{"articleId":207605,"title":"GRE 2023 For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gre-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207605"}},{"articleId":146699,"title":"Tips for Taking the Computerized GRE","slug":"tips-for-taking-the-computerized-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/146699"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":263596,"title":"Lines and Angles on the GRE Test","slug":"lines-and-angles-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263596"}},{"articleId":263586,"title":"The 3 Reading Comprehension Question Formats on the GRE Test","slug":"the-3-reading-comprehension-question-formats-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263586"}},{"articleId":263578,"title":"10 Mistakes You Won’t Make When Taking the GRE","slug":"10-mistakes-you-wont-make-when-taking-the-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263578"}},{"articleId":207605,"title":"GRE 2023 For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gre-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207605"}},{"articleId":207534,"title":"1,001 GRE Practice Questions For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"1001-gre-practice-questions-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207534"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282251,"slug":"gre-for-dummies-with-online-practice-tests","isbn":"9781119886600","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119886600-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781119886600-199x255.jpg","width":199,"height":255},"title":"GRE Prep 2023 For Dummies with Online Practice","testBankPinActivationLink":"//testbanks.wiley.com/","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"8978\">Ron Woldoff</b> </b>is the founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students achieve their goals on the GMAT, GRE, and SAT. 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Allen, PhD</b> is a professor of industrial and organizational (I/O) psychology at the University of Utah. His articles have appeared in <i>Human Relations, Journal of Business Psychology</i>, and more.</p> <p><b>Karin M. Reed</b> is CEO of Speaker Dynamics, a corporate communications training firm. She is an Emmy award-winning broadcast journalist. 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Other test-takers may also be there, working on the GRE or a different exam, but you&#8217;ll be in a booth, immersed in your own test. Lasting up to four hours, the GRE is a marathon, challenging your stamina as well as your skills. The following table outlines the sections of the GRE, including the number of questions and time limits of each. The essays are always first, but the other sections can be in any order.</p>\n<table>\n<tr>\n<th>Section</th>\n<th>Number of Questions</th>\n<th>Time Allotted</th>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Analyze an Issue</td>\n<td>1 essay</td>\n<td>30 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Analyze an Argument</td>\n<td>1 essay</td>\n<td>30 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Verbal Reasoning</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>30 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Break</td>\n<td>&mdash;</td>\n<td>10 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Quantitative Reasoning</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>35 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Verbal Reasoning</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>30 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Quantitative Reasoning</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>35 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Unscored Verbal or Quantitative Reasoning</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>30 or 35 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Possible Unscored Research Section</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>30 or 35 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>Total testing time</b></td>\n<td><b></b></td>\n<td><b>About</b> <b></b><b>4 hours</b></td>\n</tr>\n</table>\n"},{"title":"What to Bring and Leave at Home on GRE Test Day","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>The GRE proctors are strict about the items you&#8217;re allowed to bring into the testing center. Make sure you come prepared on test day by bringing <i>all</i> of these things:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>ETS authorization voucher:</b> Bring the verification that you&#8217;ve signed up for the exam on this day, at this time, here at this location. If the testing center makes a mistake and loses your reservation, you need to show that you are actually reserved for this time.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Comfortable clothes:</b> Testing centers tend to crank up the A/C. The last thing you want is to be shivering during the exam. Wear two layers of long-sleeve clothing, and you can always remove one if you&#8217;re warm.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Map or directions to the testing center:</b> The GRE is intense enough; let the drive there be easy, especially if your test is in the morning, putting your drive in the midst of rush-hour traffic. You may also want to scope out the area ahead of time and find parking.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Photo ID:</b> The GRE testing centers sport some tight security. You may not be allowed to take the test unless you can verify who you are.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Water and a snack: </b>Your break is 10 minutes, some of which is spent checking back in when you return from the restroom. You don&#8217;t have time to go grab something. Bring water and a snack so you can use your precious few minutes getting refreshed. Some testing centers give you access to your locker during your break, and some don&#8217;t. But the proctors always tell you where you can leave your food and water.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p>The GRE proctors are also strict about the items you <i>can&#8217;t </i>bring into the testing center. If you have any of these items with you, you&#8217;ll be asked to keep them in your locker while taking the exam:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Books and study notes: </b>You&#8217;re not allowed to use books or notes, so why bring them? Leave them in your car or at home. A student almost had his scores cancelled because he took a text book out of his locker during his break. Fortunately, he didn&#8217;t <i>open </i>the book, so he was allowed to keep his scores, which was good, because he had scored well.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Cellphone and wallet: </b>Your cellphone and wallet stay in the locker while you&#8217;re taking the GRE.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Calculator: </b>If you bring a calculator, it too will stay in the locker. The GRE provides a computerized calculator for the Quantitative Reasoning sections, so you don&#8217;t need to bring one.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Your own scratch paper: </b>The proctors will take away anything you bring and provide their own scratch paper for you to use.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Your GRE Study Plan","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Preparing for the GRE can be overwhelming, especially if you haven&#8217;t touched the math for years or are rusty with the verbal. It may seem that there&#8217;s too much to study, and you&#8217;ll never get through it all. The good news is that you mastered these topics at one time: You graduated high school and completed college. You are merely returning to a familiar path.</p>\n<p>The other good news is that the GRE has a specific, limited scope of material that it asks about. For example, on the quantitative side, you&#8217;ll see plenty of square roots but never a cube root. The math questions you see in <i>1,001 GRE Practice </i><i>Questions</i><i> For Dummies</i> are based exactly on this scope of material. Learn to answer these math questions, and you&#8217;ll be prepared for the real thing.</p>\n<p>On the verbal side, the GRE uses many of the same vocab words over again. Learn those words in <i>1,001 GRE Practice </i><i>Questions</i><i> For Dummies</i> and you&#8217;ll know a lot of the words on the exam. You won&#8217;t know them all, but you&#8217;ll know enough to do well.</p>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"One year","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-05-26T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":207534},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-27T16:47:42+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-04-11T21:20:14+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:19:36+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Study Skills & Test Prep","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33772"},"slug":"study-skills-test-prep","categoryId":33772},{"name":"GRE","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"},"slug":"gre","categoryId":33785}],"title":"GRE 2023 For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"gre 2023 for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"gre-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","百度搜字段擎SEO网站系统改善":{"metaDescription":"Want to get into the graduate school of your choice? 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He&#8217;s the author of numerous Dummies test prep titles, including <i>GRE 2022 For Dummies</i> and <i>SAT: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies.</i></p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8978"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33785,"title":"GRE","slug":"gre","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":263596,"title":"Lines and Angles on the GRE Test","slug":"lines-and-angles-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263596"}},{"articleId":263591,"title":"Brush Up on Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots for the GRE Test","slug":"brush-up-on-prefixes-suffixes-and-roots-for-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263591"}},{"articleId":263586,"title":"The 3 Reading Comprehension Question Formats on the GRE Test","slug":"the-3-reading-comprehension-question-formats-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263586"}},{"articleId":263578,"title":"10 Mistakes You Won’t Make When Taking the GRE","slug":"10-mistakes-you-wont-make-when-taking-the-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263578"}},{"articleId":146699,"title":"Tips for Taking the Computerized GRE","slug":"tips-for-taking-the-computerized-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/146699"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":263596,"title":"Lines and Angles on the GRE Test","slug":"lines-and-angles-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263596"}},{"articleId":263591,"title":"Brush Up on Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots for the GRE Test","slug":"brush-up-on-prefixes-suffixes-and-roots-for-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263591"}},{"articleId":263586,"title":"The 3 Reading Comprehension Question Formats on the GRE Test","slug":"the-3-reading-comprehension-question-formats-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263586"}},{"articleId":263578,"title":"10 Mistakes You Won’t Make When Taking the GRE","slug":"10-mistakes-you-wont-make-when-taking-the-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263578"}},{"articleId":207534,"title":"1,001 GRE Practice Questions For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"1001-gre-practice-questions-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207534"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282251,"slug":"gre-for-dummies-with-online-practice-tests","isbn":"9781119886600","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119886600-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781119886600-199x255.jpg","width":199,"height":255},"title":"GRE Prep 2023 For Dummies with Online Practice","testBankPinActivationLink":"//testbanks.wiley.com/","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"8978\">Ron Woldoff</b> is founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students succeed on the GMAT, GRE, SAT, ACT, and PSAT. He&#8217;s the author of numerous Dummies test prep titles, including <i>GRE 2022 For Dummies</i> and <i>SAT: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies.</i></p>","authors":[{"authorId":8978,"name":"Ron Woldoff","slug":"ron-woldoff","description":" <p><b>Ron Woldoff is founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students succeed on the GMAT, GRE, SAT, ACT, and PSAT. He&#8217;s the author of numerous Dummies test prep titles, including <i>GRE 2022 For Dummies</i> and <i>SAT: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies.</i></p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8978"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;study-skills-test-prep&quot;,&quot;gre&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119886600&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b381c412\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;study-skills-test-prep&quot;,&quot;gre&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119886600&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b381d00e\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":146701,"title":"What to Expect When You Take the GRE","slug":"what-to-expect-when-you-take-the-gre-2","categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/146701"}},{"articleId":146700,"title":"What to Bring and Leave at Home on GRE Test Day","slug":"what-to-bring-and-leave-at-home-on-gre-test-day-2","categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/146700"}},{"articleId":146699,"title":"Tips for Taking the Computerized GRE","slug":"tips-for-taking-the-computerized-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/146699"}},{"articleId":146694,"title":"Answering GRE Multiple-Choice Questions","slug":"answering-gre-multiple-choice-questions","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/146694"}}],"content":[{"title":"What to expect when you take the GRE","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>The GRE is a computerized test taken at a local testing center. Other test-takers may also be there, working on the GRE or a different exam, but you’ll be immersed in your own test.</p>\n<p>The GRE lasts about four hours and challenges your stamina as well as your skills. At the time of this writing, the GRE offered an at-home option due to COVID-19, but this option may no longer be available. Either way, the questions and formats stay the same.</p>\n<div class=\"figure-container\"><figure id=\"attachment_261733\" aria-labelledby=\"figcaption_attachment_261733\" class=\"wp-caption alignnone\" style=\"width: 545px\"><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"size-full wp-image-261733\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/gre-test-cubicle.jpg\" alt=\"GRE test cubicle\" width=\"535\" height=\"357\" /><figcaption id=\"figcaption_attachment_261733\" class=\"wp-caption-text\">© Myvisuals/Shutterstock.com</figcaption></figure></div><div class=\"clearfix\"></div>\n<p>The following table outlines the sections of the GRE, including the number of questions and time limits of each. The essays are always first, but the other sections can be in any order.</p>\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<th>Section</th>\n<th>Number of Questions</th>\n<th>Time Allotted</th>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Analyze an Issue</td>\n<td>1 essay</td>\n<td>30 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Analyze an Argument</td>\n<td>1 essay</td>\n<td>30 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Verbal Reasoning</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>30 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Break</td>\n<td>—</td>\n<td>10 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Quantitative Reasoning</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>35 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Verbal Reasoning</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>30 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Quantitative Reasoning</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>35 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Unscored Verbal or Quantitative Reasoning</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>30 or 35 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Possible Unscored Research Section</td>\n<td>20 questions</td>\n<td>30 or 35 minutes</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>Total Testing Time</b></td>\n<td></td>\n<td><b>Almost four hours</b></td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n"},{"title":"What to bring and leave at home on GRE test day","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Make sure you&#8217;re prepared on test day by bringing <em>all</em> of these things:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>ETS authorization voucher:</b> Bring the verification that says you’ve signed up for the exam on this day, at this time, at this location. If the testing center makes a mistake and loses your reservation, you need to show that you’ve actually reserved this time.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Comfortable clothes:</b> Testing centers tend to crank the air conditioning. The last thing you want is to be shivering during the exam. Wear two layers of long-sleeve clothing, and you can always remove one if you’re warm. Note that you are not allowed to wear a jacket in the testing center.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><strong>Testing center address:</strong> Put the testing center address in your phone, or write it on a note, or print it out so that you can grab it in the morning. You may also want to scope out the area ahead of time and find parking: Google Maps satellite view is great for this.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Photo ID:</b> The GRE testing centers sport some tight security. You may not be allowed to take the test unless you can verify who you are.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Water and a snack: </b>Your break is 10 minutes, some of which is spent checking back in when you return from the restroom. You don’t have time to go grab something. Bring water and a snack so you can use your precious few minutes getting refreshed. Some testing centers give you access to your locker during your break, and some don’t. But the proctors always tell you where you can leave your food and water.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p>The GRE proctors are also strict about the items you <i>can’t </i>bring into the testing center. If you have any of these items with you, you’ll be asked to keep them in your locker while taking the exam:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Books and study notes: </b>You’re not allowed to use books or notes, so why bring them? Leave them in your car or at home. One student almost had his scores cancelled because he took a text book out of his locker during his break. Fortunately, he didn’t <i>open</i><i> </i>the book, so he was allowed to keep his scores, which was good, because he ended up doing well.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Phone, wallet, and purse: </b>These items stay in the locker while you’re taking the GRE.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Calculator: </b>If you bring a calculator, it too will stay in the locker. The GRE provides an on-screen calculator for the quantitative reasoning sections, so you don’t need to bring one.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Your own scratch paper: </b>The proctors will take anything you bring and provide their own scratch paper for you to use.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Tips for taking the computerized GRE","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Though <a href=\"//www.ets.org/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">ETS</a>, the nonprofit testing service that administers the GRE, seems to offer both the paper-based and the computer-based GRE, you’ll almost certainly take the computer-based one. The paper-based exam is offered only where computer infrastructure isn’t available. It’s better this way; do you really want to handwrite your essay? Just remember these tips:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>You can go back and forth through each section. </strong>Within a section, each question is worth the same. Within a section, each question is worth the same. If you’re stuck on a question, take a guess, mark it for review, and come back to it later.</li>\n<li><strong>Keep an eye on the clock. </strong>On the GRE, with 35 minutes per quantitative section and 30 minutes per verbal, it’s easy to get distracted by your work and run out of time. Just remember that in each section, at 15 minutes, you should be roughly halfway through.</li>\n<li><strong>Practice using the software. </strong>Practice GRE software is available for free from <a href=\"//www.ets.org/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><strong>ETS</strong></a>, and it perfectly mimics the actual exam, so you want to explore that and see how it works before the day of the exam.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Answering GRE multiple-choice questions","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Most GRE questions are multiple choice, and some require you to select two or more answers. The questions that require two or more answers are easy to spot, because the answer choices have small squares rather than ovals, and the directions say, “Pick <u>two</u> answers” or “Pick <u>all</u> correct answers.”</p>\n<p>To help you select the correct answer(s), keep these tips in mind:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">If you don’t know the answer, rule out as many obviously incorrect choices as possible and guess from the remaining choices.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Don’t spend more than one minute on any one question. Guess an answer, mark the question for review, and come back to it at the end of the section. As long as you have time left in that section, you can revisit previous questions.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Guessing an answer is better than leaving the question unanswered. A wrong answer counts the same as no answer, so there’s no harm in guessing. You may as well throw the mental dice and try to get it right — just mark it for review and come back to it later during that section.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"One year","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-04-11T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":207605},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2020-08-27T03:51:04+00:00","modifiedTime":"2020-10-10T21:43:37+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:20+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Study Skills & Test Prep","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33772"},"slug":"study-skills-test-prep","categoryId":33772},{"name":"GRE","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"},"slug":"gre","categoryId":33785}],"title":"Lines and Angles on the GRE Test","strippedTitle":"lines and angles on the gre test","slug":"lines-and-angles-on-the-gre-test","canonicalUrl":"","百度搜字段擎SEO网站系统改善":{"metaDescription":"Familiarize yourself with the angles illustrated and defined here along with the basics of lines and other geometric shapes before taking the GRE.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Geometry is all about shapes: lines, angles, triangles, rectangles, squares, circles, cubes, and more. This article introduces you to the many basic shapes you’re likely to encounter on the graduate record examination (GRE) along with the strategies and equations that you’ll need to answer the questions. You also get hands-on practice answering a few example questions.\r\n\r\nThe main parts of most of these shapes are lines and angles, so start with these.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">GRE images are <em>typically</em> drawn close to scale, well enough for you to get a sense of what’s going on in the drawing. The drawing or the description will always tell you everything that you need (such as side lengths, parallel sides, right-angle boxes), so whether it’s drawn to scale really doesn’t factor in. You wouldn’t eyeball the answer anyway, so always look in the description for clues to unravel the drawing. On that note, if the drawing has a label that reads, “Figure not drawn to scale,” then it’s <em>way</em> off.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Lines</h2>\r\nYou’ve probably heard the term <em>straight line,</em> but in geometry, that’s redundant. By definition, a <em>line</em> is straight. If it curves, it’s not a line. Once in a while the GRE splits lines — er, hairs — and forces you to consider whether the line goes on forever in both directions, is a <em>line segment,</em> or has one <em>endpoint</em> and an arrow at the other end, making it a <em>ray</em> that goes on in one direction<em>.</em> But most of the time, don’t worry about it: You can usually solve the problem without worrying about how far the line goes.\r\n\r\n<em>Parallel lines</em> don’t cross and are represented by the symbol, Ρ. <em>Perpendicular lines</em> cross at right angles and are represented by the symbol\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263608\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/perpendicular-cross.jpg\" alt=\"perpendicular symbol\" width=\"47\" height=\"45\" />.\r\n\r\nA <em>perpendicular bisector</em> is a line that both passes through the midpoint of a line segment and is perpendicular to it.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Angles</h2>\r\nAngles are a common part of GRE geometry problems. An <em>angle</em> is the space between two lines or segments that cross or share an endpoint. Fortunately, there’s not much to understanding angles when you know the different types of angles and a few key concepts.\r\n\r\nFinding an angle is usually a matter of simple addition or subtraction. Besides the rules in the following sections, these three rules apply to the angles on the GRE:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Angles can’t be negative.</li>\r\n \t<li>Angles can’t be 0 degrees or 180 degrees.</li>\r\n \t<li>Fractional angles, such as\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263607\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/GRE-equation.jpg\" alt=\"GRE-equation\" width=\"82\" height=\"78\" />\r\ndegrees or 179.5 degrees, are rare on the GRE. Angles are typically whole numbers, rounded to be easy to work with. If you’re plugging in a number for an angle, plug in a whole number, such as 30, 45, or 90.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h3>Right angle</h3>\r\n<em>Right angles</em> equal 90 degrees and are represented by perpendicular lines with a small box where the two lines meet.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263606\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/right-angles.jpg\" alt=\"right angles\" width=\"281\" height=\"152\" />\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Watch out for lines that appear to be perpendicular but really aren’t. An angle is a right angle <em>only</em> if the description reads, “the lines (or segments) are perpendicular” or you see the box in the angle (which is the most common). Otherwise, you can’t assume the angle is 90 degrees.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Other than the words “right angle” and “bisect,” you will probably not see the following terms, so don’t worry about memorizing words such as “obtuse” or “supplementary.” But, review the <em>definitions</em> so that you understand <em>how the angles work</em>, because that’s the key to solving almost any GRE angle problem.</p>\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263605\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/not-right-angle.jpg\" alt=\"not right angle\" width=\"489\" height=\"148\" />\r\n<h3>Acute angle</h3>\r\nAn <em>acute angle</em> is any angle greater than 0 degrees but less than 90 degrees.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263604\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/acute-angle-yes.jpg\" alt=\"acute angle\" width=\"214\" height=\"155\" />\r\n<h3>Obtuse angle</h3>\r\nAn <em>obtuse angle</em> is any angle greater than 90 degrees but less than 180 degrees.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263603\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/obtuse-angle.jpg\" alt=\"obtuse angle\" width=\"302\" height=\"188\" />\r\n<h3>Complementary angles</h3>\r\nTogether, <em>complementary angles</em> form a right angle: 90 degrees.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263602\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/complementary-angle.jpg\" alt=\"complementary angle\" width=\"393\" height=\"189\" />\r\n<h3>Supplementary angles</h3>\r\nTogether, <em>supplementary angles</em> form a straight line: 180 degrees.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263601\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/supplementary-angle.jpg\" alt=\"supplementary angle\" width=\"379\" height=\"151\" />\r\n<h3>Vertical angles</h3>\r\n<em>Vertical angles</em> are formed when two lines cross, and they <em>always</em> have equal measures.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263600\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/vertical-angle.jpg\" alt=\"vertical angle\" width=\"535\" height=\"235\" />\r\n<h3>Bisectors</h3>\r\nA <em>bisector,</em> or line that <em>bisects,</em> cuts directly down the middle, and this is a term that you need to know. Yes, more vocab. If a line (or segment) <em>bisects</em> an angle, it divides that angle into two equal angles; if a first segment <em>bisects</em> a second segment, the first one cuts the second one perfectly in half. And if the first segment <em>bisects</em> the second segment at 90°, then it is a <em>perpendicular bisector</em> as mentioned previously, and yes, the GRE will expect you to know what that is. Don’t worry though — there will almost always be a drawing.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263599\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/bisectors.jpg\" alt=\"bisectors\" width=\"535\" height=\"327\" />\r\n<h3>Other key points</h3>\r\nAngles around a point total 360 degrees, just as in a circle.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263598\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/angles-around-point.jpg\" alt=\"angles around point\" width=\"258\" height=\"317\" />\r\n\r\nA line that cuts through two parallel lines forms two sets of four equal angles. In this drawing, all the <em>x’</em>s are the same, and all the <em>y’</em>s are the same.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263597\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/equal-angles.jpg\" alt=\"equal angles\" width=\"520\" height=\"206\" />\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">See also, \"<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/test-prep/gre/gre-sample-math-test-questions-geometry/\">GRE Sample Math-Test Questions: Geometry</a>,\" for some practice questions dealing with these concepts.</p>","description":"Geometry is all about shapes: lines, angles, triangles, rectangles, squares, circles, cubes, and more. This article introduces you to the many basic shapes you’re likely to encounter on the graduate record examination (GRE) along with the strategies and equations that you’ll need to answer the questions. You also get hands-on practice answering a few example questions.\r\n\r\nThe main parts of most of these shapes are lines and angles, so start with these.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">GRE images are <em>typically</em> drawn close to scale, well enough for you to get a sense of what’s going on in the drawing. The drawing or the description will always tell you everything that you need (such as side lengths, parallel sides, right-angle boxes), so whether it’s drawn to scale really doesn’t factor in. You wouldn’t eyeball the answer anyway, so always look in the description for clues to unravel the drawing. On that note, if the drawing has a label that reads, “Figure not drawn to scale,” then it’s <em>way</em> off.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Lines</h2>\r\nYou’ve probably heard the term <em>straight line,</em> but in geometry, that’s redundant. By definition, a <em>line</em> is straight. If it curves, it’s not a line. Once in a while the GRE splits lines — er, hairs — and forces you to consider whether the line goes on forever in both directions, is a <em>line segment,</em> or has one <em>endpoint</em> and an arrow at the other end, making it a <em>ray</em> that goes on in one direction<em>.</em> But most of the time, don’t worry about it: You can usually solve the problem without worrying about how far the line goes.\r\n\r\n<em>Parallel lines</em> don’t cross and are represented by the symbol, Ρ. <em>Perpendicular lines</em> cross at right angles and are represented by the symbol\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263608\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/perpendicular-cross.jpg\" alt=\"perpendicular symbol\" width=\"47\" height=\"45\" />.\r\n\r\nA <em>perpendicular bisector</em> is a line that both passes through the midpoint of a line segment and is perpendicular to it.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Angles</h2>\r\nAngles are a common part of GRE geometry problems. An <em>angle</em> is the space between two lines or segments that cross or share an endpoint. Fortunately, there’s not much to understanding angles when you know the different types of angles and a few key concepts.\r\n\r\nFinding an angle is usually a matter of simple addition or subtraction. Besides the rules in the following sections, these three rules apply to the angles on the GRE:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Angles can’t be negative.</li>\r\n \t<li>Angles can’t be 0 degrees or 180 degrees.</li>\r\n \t<li>Fractional angles, such as\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263607\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/GRE-equation.jpg\" alt=\"GRE-equation\" width=\"82\" height=\"78\" />\r\ndegrees or 179.5 degrees, are rare on the GRE. Angles are typically whole numbers, rounded to be easy to work with. If you’re plugging in a number for an angle, plug in a whole number, such as 30, 45, or 90.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h3>Right angle</h3>\r\n<em>Right angles</em> equal 90 degrees and are represented by perpendicular lines with a small box where the two lines meet.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263606\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/right-angles.jpg\" alt=\"right angles\" width=\"281\" height=\"152\" />\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Watch out for lines that appear to be perpendicular but really aren’t. An angle is a right angle <em>only</em> if the description reads, “the lines (or segments) are perpendicular” or you see the box in the angle (which is the most common). Otherwise, you can’t assume the angle is 90 degrees.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Other than the words “right angle” and “bisect,” you will probably not see the following terms, so don’t worry about memorizing words such as “obtuse” or “supplementary.” But, review the <em>definitions</em> so that you understand <em>how the angles work</em>, because that’s the key to solving almost any GRE angle problem.</p>\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263605\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/not-right-angle.jpg\" alt=\"not right angle\" width=\"489\" height=\"148\" />\r\n<h3>Acute angle</h3>\r\nAn <em>acute angle</em> is any angle greater than 0 degrees but less than 90 degrees.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263604\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/acute-angle-yes.jpg\" alt=\"acute angle\" width=\"214\" height=\"155\" />\r\n<h3>Obtuse angle</h3>\r\nAn <em>obtuse angle</em> is any angle greater than 90 degrees but less than 180 degrees.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263603\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/obtuse-angle.jpg\" alt=\"obtuse angle\" width=\"302\" height=\"188\" />\r\n<h3>Complementary angles</h3>\r\nTogether, <em>complementary angles</em> form a right angle: 90 degrees.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263602\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/complementary-angle.jpg\" alt=\"complementary angle\" width=\"393\" height=\"189\" />\r\n<h3>Supplementary angles</h3>\r\nTogether, <em>supplementary angles</em> form a straight line: 180 degrees.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263601\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/supplementary-angle.jpg\" alt=\"supplementary angle\" width=\"379\" height=\"151\" />\r\n<h3>Vertical angles</h3>\r\n<em>Vertical angles</em> are formed when two lines cross, and they <em>always</em> have equal measures.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263600\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/vertical-angle.jpg\" alt=\"vertical angle\" width=\"535\" height=\"235\" />\r\n<h3>Bisectors</h3>\r\nA <em>bisector,</em> or line that <em>bisects,</em> cuts directly down the middle, and this is a term that you need to know. Yes, more vocab. If a line (or segment) <em>bisects</em> an angle, it divides that angle into two equal angles; if a first segment <em>bisects</em> a second segment, the first one cuts the second one perfectly in half. And if the first segment <em>bisects</em> the second segment at 90°, then it is a <em>perpendicular bisector</em> as mentioned previously, and yes, the GRE will expect you to know what that is. Don’t worry though — there will almost always be a drawing.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263599\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/bisectors.jpg\" alt=\"bisectors\" width=\"535\" height=\"327\" />\r\n<h3>Other key points</h3>\r\nAngles around a point total 360 degrees, just as in a circle.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263598\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/angles-around-point.jpg\" alt=\"angles around point\" width=\"258\" height=\"317\" />\r\n\r\nA line that cuts through two parallel lines forms two sets of four equal angles. In this drawing, all the <em>x’</em>s are the same, and all the <em>y’</em>s are the same.\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263597\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/equal-angles.jpg\" alt=\"equal angles\" width=\"520\" height=\"206\" />\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">See also, \"<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/test-prep/gre/gre-sample-math-test-questions-geometry/\">GRE Sample Math-Test Questions: Geometry</a>,\" for some practice questions dealing with these concepts.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":8978,"name":"Ron Woldoff","slug":"ron-woldoff","description":" <p><b>Ron Woldoff is founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students succeed on the GMAT, GRE, SAT, ACT, and PSAT. He&#8217;s the author of numerous Dummies test prep titles, including <i>GRE 2022 For Dummies</i> and <i>SAT: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies.</i></p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8978"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33785,"title":"GRE","slug":"gre","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Lines","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Angles","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":263591,"title":"Brush Up on Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots for the GRE Test","slug":"brush-up-on-prefixes-suffixes-and-roots-for-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263591"}},{"articleId":263586,"title":"The 3 Reading Comprehension Question Formats on the GRE Test","slug":"the-3-reading-comprehension-question-formats-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263586"}},{"articleId":263578,"title":"10 Mistakes You Won’t Make When Taking the GRE","slug":"10-mistakes-you-wont-make-when-taking-the-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263578"}},{"articleId":207605,"title":"GRE 2023 For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gre-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207605"}},{"articleId":146699,"title":"Tips for Taking the Computerized GRE","slug":"tips-for-taking-the-computerized-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/146699"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":263591,"title":"Brush Up on Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots for the GRE Test","slug":"brush-up-on-prefixes-suffixes-and-roots-for-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263591"}},{"articleId":263586,"title":"The 3 Reading Comprehension Question Formats on the GRE Test","slug":"the-3-reading-comprehension-question-formats-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263586"}},{"articleId":263578,"title":"10 Mistakes You Won’t Make When Taking the GRE","slug":"10-mistakes-you-wont-make-when-taking-the-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263578"}},{"articleId":207605,"title":"GRE 2023 For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gre-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207605"}},{"articleId":207534,"title":"1,001 GRE Practice Questions For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"1001-gre-practice-questions-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207534"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282251,"slug":"gre-for-dummies-with-online-practice-tests","isbn":"9781119886600","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119886600-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781119886600-199x255.jpg","width":199,"height":255},"title":"GRE Prep 2023 For Dummies with Online Practice","testBankPinActivationLink":"//testbanks.wiley.com/","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"8978\">Ron Woldoff</b> is founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students succeed on the GMAT, GRE, SAT, ACT, and PSAT. He&#8217;s the author of numerous Dummies test prep titles, including <i>GRE 2022 For Dummies</i> and <i>SAT: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies.</i></p>","authors":[{"authorId":8978,"name":"Ron Woldoff","slug":"ron-woldoff","description":" <p><b>Ron Woldoff is founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students succeed on the GMAT, GRE, SAT, ACT, and PSAT. He&#8217;s the author of numerous Dummies test prep titles, including <i>GRE 2022 For Dummies</i> and <i>SAT: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies.</i></p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8978"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;study-skills-test-prep&quot;,&quot;gre&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119886600&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ab0ca270\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;study-skills-test-prep&quot;,&quot;gre&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119886600&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ab0cab3f\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":null,"lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":263596},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2020-08-27T03:31:01+00:00","modifiedTime":"2020-08-27T03:31:01+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:15+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Study Skills & Test Prep","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33772"},"slug":"study-skills-test-prep","categoryId":33772},{"name":"GRE","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"},"slug":"gre","categoryId":33785}],"title":"The 3 Reading Comprehension Question Formats on the GRE Test","strippedTitle":"the 3 reading comprehension question formats on the gre test","slug":"the-3-reading-comprehension-question-formats-on-the-gre-test","canonicalUrl":"","百度搜字段擎SEO网站系统改善":{"metaDescription":"Become familiar with the question formats for the Reading Comprehension section of the GRE to help you field the questions more confidently.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Reading Comprehension questions on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) comprise about half of the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/test-prep/gre/tips-for-mastering-the-verbal-section-of-the-gre/\">Verbal questions</a> and therefore about half of your Verbal score. Each question concerns a single passage that is sort of like a graduate-level journal article on a science, social sciences, or humanities topic that you’ve probably never considered before and never will again.\r\n\r\nBeing familiar with the question formats for the Reading Comprehension section helps you field the questions more confidently, because you know what to expect. The GRE presents each question in one of the following three formats:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Multiple-choice:</strong> Choose one answer.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Multiple-choice:</strong> Select all correct answers.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Sentence-selection:</strong> Choose a sentence from the passage.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThe following sections describe each question format in greater detail and provide an example of each format based on the following short passage from <em><a href=\"//coursofppt.com/store/product/Food-Allergies-For-Dummies.productCd-0470095849.html\">Food Allergies For Dummies</a></em> by Robert A. Wood, MD, with Joe Kraynak (Wiley):\r\n\r\nAnaphylaxis resulting in death is relatively uncommon among children and young adults, because their cardiovascular systems are so resilient. This does not mean, however, that younger people are immune to severe anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis in younger people typically results in breathing difficulty — a constricted or blocked airway that causes a fatal or near fatal reaction.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Multiple-choice questions: Choose one answer</h2>\r\nThe following format is the traditional multiple-choice question. You get five answers to choose from, and only one is correct.\r\n\r\nBased on the passage, how common is anaphylaxis that results in death in children and young adults?\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Very common</li>\r\n \t<li>Relatively uncommon</li>\r\n \t<li>Practically nonexistent</li>\r\n \t<li>In theory only</li>\r\n \t<li>Not stated in the passage</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nYou pick one and only one answer. In this case, the correct answer is Choice (B), because the first sentence directly answers the question.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Multiple-choice questions: Choose one or more answers</h2>\r\nThe next question format is a spin on the traditional multiple-choice question. Three choices follow the question, and one, two, or all three of them are correct. You must pick <em>all</em> of the correct choices and no incorrect choices to receive credit for your answer. You don’t receive partial credit for picking only some of the correct answers. The GRE treats a partially answered question as a wrong answer.\r\n\r\nWhen anaphylaxis occurs in a child or young adult, what happens? Consider each of the three choices separately and select all that apply.\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Breathing difficulty</li>\r\n \t<li>Blocked airway</li>\r\n \t<li>Result of a bee sting</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nYou pick all answers that are correct. In this case, Choices (A) and (B) are correct.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">You can quickly tell whether to select only one answer or more than one answer by looking at the instruction that accompanies the question: The GRE always instructs you to choose either <em>one</em> or <em>all answers</em> that apply. Also, the selection bubbles near the answer choices are ovals to select one answer or squares to select multiple answers.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Sentence-selection questions: Choose a sentence from the passage</h2>\r\nIn sentence-selection questions, the GRE presents a description or question followed by instructions to click the sentence in the passage that most closely matches the description or answers the question. Clicking any part of the sentence selects the entire sentence.\r\n<blockquote>Choose the sentence in the passage that parents of young children are likely to find most reassuring.</blockquote>\r\nIn the passage, you click the answer sentence, and it highlights on the screen, like this:\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263587\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/reading-comprehension-passage.jpg\" alt=\"reading comprehension passage\" width=\"535\" height=\"150\" />\r\n\r\nThe other sentences in the passage may not be so reassuring to parents of young children.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Strategies for success on the Reading Comprehension questions</h2>\r\nReading Comprehension questions on the GRE test can be the most time-consuming questions of the Verbal section. The best way to ace these questions is to master and use strategies for quickly reading the passages, identifying key facts called for in the questions, and drawing inferences based on subtle implications. Ask yourself the purpose of the passage — why is the author writing this? The following sections explain four useful strategies for effectively and efficiently arriving at the correct answers (and avoiding incorrect answers).\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">The best way to master reading comprehension — meaning you can read the passage quickly and understand it on all its levels — is through practice. Make these graduate-level paragraphs something you read before breakfast, not something you force yourself through every few weeks. They don’t have to be GRE examples, but mobile clips from Instagram and LinkedIn don’t bring your reading skills up to par. Instead, read <em>The Economist, Financial Times</em>, or any number of intellectual publications on a topic you’re interested in, maybe even in your field of study.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >Use the context as your road map</h2>\r\nRead the passage lightly and get a general idea of where the key information is and what is going on in the passage. This helps you figure out where to find the information as you begin to answer questions.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Don’t sweat the details (yet). After reading a question, you can quickly revisit the passage to locate the details for answering the question correctly.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Usually the first paragraph or sentence and/or the last paragraph or sentence tells you what the passage is about (the main idea). The rest of the passage supports or develops this idea. As you read each body paragraph, pay attention to its purpose and how it supports the main idea. This is a key strategy to understanding the passage, and it becomes almost a habit with practice.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Sometimes the entire passage is one giant paragraph. Don’t let that deter you from using this strategy. Look for where one idea ends and another begins and treat that as where the paragraphs should be separated. This can help you map the details as you would for a passage that is actually in separate paragraphs.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab6\" >Grasp the gist of the passage</h2>\r\nUnderstanding the main idea of the passage is the key to establishing the context of the paragraphs within. The main idea is typically the basis of one of the questions. If you can briefly sum up <em>why</em> the author is writing the passage, then you’ve not only developed a contextual understanding of the passage, but also answered one of the questions ahead of time.","description":"Reading Comprehension questions on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) comprise about half of the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/test-prep/gre/tips-for-mastering-the-verbal-section-of-the-gre/\">Verbal questions</a> and therefore about half of your Verbal score. Each question concerns a single passage that is sort of like a graduate-level journal article on a science, social sciences, or humanities topic that you’ve probably never considered before and never will again.\r\n\r\nBeing familiar with the question formats for the Reading Comprehension section helps you field the questions more confidently, because you know what to expect. The GRE presents each question in one of the following three formats:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Multiple-choice:</strong> Choose one answer.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Multiple-choice:</strong> Select all correct answers.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Sentence-selection:</strong> Choose a sentence from the passage.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThe following sections describe each question format in greater detail and provide an example of each format based on the following short passage from <em><a href=\"//coursofppt.com/store/product/Food-Allergies-For-Dummies.productCd-0470095849.html\">Food Allergies For Dummies</a></em> by Robert A. Wood, MD, with Joe Kraynak (Wiley):\r\n\r\nAnaphylaxis resulting in death is relatively uncommon among children and young adults, because their cardiovascular systems are so resilient. This does not mean, however, that younger people are immune to severe anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis in younger people typically results in breathing difficulty — a constricted or blocked airway that causes a fatal or near fatal reaction.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Multiple-choice questions: Choose one answer</h2>\r\nThe following format is the traditional multiple-choice question. You get five answers to choose from, and only one is correct.\r\n\r\nBased on the passage, how common is anaphylaxis that results in death in children and young adults?\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Very common</li>\r\n \t<li>Relatively uncommon</li>\r\n \t<li>Practically nonexistent</li>\r\n \t<li>In theory only</li>\r\n \t<li>Not stated in the passage</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nYou pick one and only one answer. In this case, the correct answer is Choice (B), because the first sentence directly answers the question.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Multiple-choice questions: Choose one or more answers</h2>\r\nThe next question format is a spin on the traditional multiple-choice question. Three choices follow the question, and one, two, or all three of them are correct. You must pick <em>all</em> of the correct choices and no incorrect choices to receive credit for your answer. You don’t receive partial credit for picking only some of the correct answers. The GRE treats a partially answered question as a wrong answer.\r\n\r\nWhen anaphylaxis occurs in a child or young adult, what happens? Consider each of the three choices separately and select all that apply.\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Breathing difficulty</li>\r\n \t<li>Blocked airway</li>\r\n \t<li>Result of a bee sting</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nYou pick all answers that are correct. In this case, Choices (A) and (B) are correct.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">You can quickly tell whether to select only one answer or more than one answer by looking at the instruction that accompanies the question: The GRE always instructs you to choose either <em>one</em> or <em>all answers</em> that apply. Also, the selection bubbles near the answer choices are ovals to select one answer or squares to select multiple answers.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Sentence-selection questions: Choose a sentence from the passage</h2>\r\nIn sentence-selection questions, the GRE presents a description or question followed by instructions to click the sentence in the passage that most closely matches the description or answers the question. Clicking any part of the sentence selects the entire sentence.\r\n<blockquote>Choose the sentence in the passage that parents of young children are likely to find most reassuring.</blockquote>\r\nIn the passage, you click the answer sentence, and it highlights on the screen, like this:\r\n\r\n<img class=\"alignnone size-full wp-image-263587\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/reading-comprehension-passage.jpg\" alt=\"reading comprehension passage\" width=\"535\" height=\"150\" />\r\n\r\nThe other sentences in the passage may not be so reassuring to parents of young children.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Strategies for success on the Reading Comprehension questions</h2>\r\nReading Comprehension questions on the GRE test can be the most time-consuming questions of the Verbal section. The best way to ace these questions is to master and use strategies for quickly reading the passages, identifying key facts called for in the questions, and drawing inferences based on subtle implications. Ask yourself the purpose of the passage — why is the author writing this? The following sections explain four useful strategies for effectively and efficiently arriving at the correct answers (and avoiding incorrect answers).\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">The best way to master reading comprehension — meaning you can read the passage quickly and understand it on all its levels — is through practice. Make these graduate-level paragraphs something you read before breakfast, not something you force yourself through every few weeks. They don’t have to be GRE examples, but mobile clips from Instagram and LinkedIn don’t bring your reading skills up to par. Instead, read <em>The Economist, Financial Times</em>, or any number of intellectual publications on a topic you’re interested in, maybe even in your field of study.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >Use the context as your road map</h2>\r\nRead the passage lightly and get a general idea of where the key information is and what is going on in the passage. This helps you figure out where to find the information as you begin to answer questions.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Don’t sweat the details (yet). After reading a question, you can quickly revisit the passage to locate the details for answering the question correctly.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Usually the first paragraph or sentence and/or the last paragraph or sentence tells you what the passage is about (the main idea). The rest of the passage supports or develops this idea. As you read each body paragraph, pay attention to its purpose and how it supports the main idea. This is a key strategy to understanding the passage, and it becomes almost a habit with practice.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Sometimes the entire passage is one giant paragraph. Don’t let that deter you from using this strategy. Look for where one idea ends and another begins and treat that as where the paragraphs should be separated. This can help you map the details as you would for a passage that is actually in separate paragraphs.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab6\" >Grasp the gist of the passage</h2>\r\nUnderstanding the main idea of the passage is the key to establishing the context of the paragraphs within. The main idea is typically the basis of one of the questions. If you can briefly sum up <em>why</em> the author is writing the passage, then you’ve not only developed a contextual understanding of the passage, but also answered one of the questions ahead of time.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":8978,"name":"Ron Woldoff","slug":"ron-woldoff","description":" <p><b>Ron Woldoff is founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students succeed on the GMAT, GRE, SAT, ACT, and PSAT. He&#8217;s the author of numerous Dummies test prep titles, including <i>GRE 2022 For Dummies</i> and <i>SAT: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies.</i></p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8978"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33785,"title":"GRE","slug":"gre","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Multiple-choice questions: Choose one answer","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Multiple-choice questions: Choose one or more answers","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Sentence-selection questions: Choose a sentence from the passage","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Strategies for success on the Reading Comprehension questions","target":"#tab4"},{"label":"Use the context as your road map","target":"#tab5"},{"label":"Grasp the gist of the passage","target":"#tab6"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":263596,"title":"Lines and Angles on the GRE Test","slug":"lines-and-angles-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263596"}},{"articleId":263591,"title":"Brush Up on Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots for the GRE Test","slug":"brush-up-on-prefixes-suffixes-and-roots-for-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263591"}},{"articleId":263578,"title":"10 Mistakes You Won’t Make When Taking the GRE","slug":"10-mistakes-you-wont-make-when-taking-the-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263578"}},{"articleId":207605,"title":"GRE 2023 For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gre-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207605"}},{"articleId":146699,"title":"Tips for Taking the Computerized GRE","slug":"tips-for-taking-the-computerized-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/146699"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":263596,"title":"Lines and Angles on the GRE Test","slug":"lines-and-angles-on-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263596"}},{"articleId":263591,"title":"Brush Up on Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots for the GRE Test","slug":"brush-up-on-prefixes-suffixes-and-roots-for-the-gre-test","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263591"}},{"articleId":263578,"title":"10 Mistakes You Won’t Make When Taking the GRE","slug":"10-mistakes-you-wont-make-when-taking-the-gre","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/263578"}},{"articleId":207605,"title":"GRE 2023 For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gre-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207605"}},{"articleId":207534,"title":"1,001 GRE Practice Questions For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"1001-gre-practice-questions-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207534"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282251,"slug":"gre-for-dummies-with-online-practice-tests","isbn":"9781119886600","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","study-skills-test-prep","gre"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119886600-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119886600/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781119886600-199x255.jpg","width":199,"height":255},"title":"GRE Prep 2023 For Dummies with Online Practice","testBankPinActivationLink":"//testbanks.wiley.com/","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"8978\">Ron Woldoff</b> is founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students succeed on the GMAT, GRE, SAT, ACT, and PSAT. He&#8217;s the author of numerous Dummies test prep titles, including <i>GRE 2022 For Dummies</i> and <i>SAT: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies.</i></p>","authors":[{"authorId":8978,"name":"Ron Woldoff","slug":"ron-woldoff","description":" <p><b>Ron Woldoff is founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students succeed on the GMAT, GRE, SAT, ACT, and PSAT. He&#8217;s the author of numerous Dummies test prep titles, including <i>GRE 2022 For Dummies</i> and <i>SAT: 1,001 Practice Questions For Dummies.</i></p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/8978"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[{"title":"Make a Commitment to Better Yourself","slug":"make-a-commitment-to-better-yourself","collectionId":290164}],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;study-skills-test-prep&quot;,&quot;gre&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119886600&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221aab85c1e\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;study-skills-test-prep&quot;,&quot;gre&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119886600&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221aab86487\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":null,"lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":263586},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2020-08-27T03:03:24+00:00","modifiedTime":"2020-08-27T03:03:24+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:15+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Study Skills & Test Prep","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33772"},"slug":"study-skills-test-prep","categoryId":33772},{"name":"GRE","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33785"},"slug":"gre","categoryId":33785}],"title":"10 Mistakes You Won’t Make When Taking the GRE","strippedTitle":"10 mistakes you won’t make when taking the gre","slug":"10-mistakes-you-wont-make-when-taking-the-gre","canonicalUrl":"","百度搜字段擎SEO网站系统改善":{"metaDescription":"Take a few minutes to read through the common mistakes people make on the GRE. Prevent these catastrophes by becoming aware of them.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Some common mistakes are made by those taking the Graduate Record Examination (<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/test-prep/gre/gre-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">GRE</a>). Take a few minutes to read through these mistakes to see how other people have tanked the exam. By becoming aware of these catastrophes, you may prevent them from happening to you.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >You won’t cheat</h2>\r\nCheating on the GRE simply doesn’t work, so don’t even consider it. They’re on to you. When you get to the testing center, and before you begin your test, the proctors separate you from anything that you can possibly use to cheat, including your phone, wristwatch, water bottle, jacket, and hat. On top of that, you’re monitored by a camera while taking the test. Any semblance of privacy goes right out the window.\r\n\r\nHow would you cheat anyway? You can’t copy all those vocabulary words or write all the math formulas on anything accessible during the test. Besides, the GRE tests your critical-reasoning and problem-solving skills more than your memorization skills.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Those caught cheating can be banned from taking the test for up to ten years! In the world of careers and education, that’s nearly a lifetime.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >You won’t run out of steam</h2>\r\nThe GRE tests your stamina as much as anything else. Most people aren’t able to maintain these levels of concentration for four straight hours, so they end up petering out. Through preparation and practice, you have a definite edge over the other test-takers.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Like preparing for a marathon, preparing for the GRE means slowly building yourself up. Practice for a few hours at a time and stop when you get tired. Repeat this exercise, and eventually you’ll be able to go the full distance without fail. Don’t push yourself too hard, though, because you’ll burn yourself out. As they say in the weight room, “Train, don’t strain.”</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >You won’t neglect your breaks</h2>\r\nSome people don’t take advantage of the short breaks offered during the GRE. Be sure you don’t miss the opportunity to take a breather. You’re offered short breaks (in one- or ten-minute increments) between sections. If you don’t take these breaks, you’ll be sitting still for hours. Though your stamina may be good (because you practiced), you still want to stay hydrated, eat a power bar, and walk around every now and then to keep your mind clear. Don’t plan on studying during your breaks, though — the review of any GRE-prep materials during breaks is strictly forbidden.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Pack some water bottles and power bars to keep in a locker for your breaks. You won’t have time to go grab something. Don’t drink too much water, though — you can’t pause the exam to run to the restroom.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >You won’t dwell on questions from the previous sections</h2>\r\nWhen skipping a question or marking it for review, let it go until the end of the section so you can focus on the other questions at hand. When you reach the end of the section (but before moving on to the next section or before the time expires), you may return to the questions you skipped or marked and check or change your answers.\r\n\r\nWhen you move on to the next section, however, that’s it: You can’t go back to a previous section. You have no choice but to move forward, so don’t waste mental energy by focusing on past questions you can do nothing about.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >You won’t sweat the time limit</h2>\r\nSome test-takers fret over the clock. The key to success is to be aware of the clock while remaining calm. Practice working with a timer, so you’re used to the timer on the GRE exam screen. As you become more accustomed to working with the clock during practice, you’ll eventually settle into a comfortable pace and be used to the timer on test day.\r\n\r\nThe mistakes you make while relaxed are different from the mistakes you make while under pressure from the clock. Practice with a timer to get used to the pressure and become aware of the timer-pressure mistakes — and fix them <em>before</em> the test.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab6\" >You won’t rush through the questions</h2>\r\nSome test-takers think that they need to rush to answer all the questions in the time limit. This is true, if you want to get them all wrong by missing key details and making careless mistakes.\r\n\r\nI’d rather you get half the questions right and run out of time for the other half than rush through the questions and miss them all. But it shouldn’t come to that anyway: The time that the GRE gives you is more than enough to properly, correctly, and calmly answer all the questions — <em>if you don’t get stuck.</em>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Remember the Other Golden Rule: <em>The secret to working fast and getting it right isn’t rushing — it’s knowing what you’re doing.</em> The way you know what you’re doing is by learning what’s on the exam and practicing it.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab7\" >You definitely won’t choke on the essays</h2>\r\n<em>Choking,</em> by definition (on the GRE), means getting stuck on something and becoming so flustered that you can’t focus on anything after that. This can happen at any point on the test, but because you can flag the multiple-choice questions and go back to them at the end of the section, you’re unlikely to choke on those.\r\n\r\nEssays, however, are another story. On the GRE, you have to write two essays within 30 minutes each. What’s worse, they’re at the beginning of the test, so if you choke on one, you’re toast for the entire exam. Of course, this won’t happen to you, because you have prepared beforehand. This makes writer’s block — and choking — something that happens to others, but not you.\r\n\r\nPractice writing the essays! Like any skill, essay-writing takes practice, and you don’t want to be at the start of the learning curve on test day.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab8\" >You won’t fret over the hard questions</h2>\r\nThe GRE contains some seemingly difficult questions, and most test-takers don’t get perfect scores. Do the best you can, score in the high percentiles, and get accepted to graduate school! No one expects a perfect score, so you shouldn’t, either.\r\n\r\nThe GRE is only one of many parts of the application process. Your GPA, work experience, essays, and any other relevant character-building experience (such as sports participation, military service, volunteer work, or leadership training) also count toward your chances of admission.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab9\" >You won’t take the exam with a friend</h2>\r\nYou and your buddy may be able to schedule your tests for the same time. Big mistake. Two of my students from the same class took the exam at the same time, side by side, and both told me afterward that rather than providing support, the distraction was almost unbearable. Fortunately, they both scored well, but I wonder how different their results would have been had they tested separately. It’s good to <em>study</em> with a friend, and celebrate after, but don’t buddy up to take the test.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab10\" >You won’t change your morning routine</h2>\r\nThe GRE is stressful enough. The last thing you need to do is add more anxiety to the whole nerve-racking experience by changing your morning routine.\r\n\r\nIf you normally have one cup of coffee, should you have an extra cup for more energy or only half a cup to reduce anxiety? Should you have an omelet for more protein or just have toast to avoid the food crash later? Here’s a suggestion: Do what you normally do. It works every other day, and it’ll work just as well the day of the test. Don’t change your routine.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">If you’re tempted to try an energy drink or something unusual for an enhanced test-taking experience, try it first on a practice test! Make sure your new concoction doesn’t upset your stomach or give you a headache. You don’t need that distraction.</p>","description":"Some common mistakes are made by those taking the Graduate Record Examination (<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/test-prep/gre/gre-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">GRE</a>). Take a few minutes to read through these mistakes to see how other people have tanked the exam. By becoming aware of these catastrophes, you may prevent them from happening to you.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >You won’t cheat</h2>\r\nCheating on the GRE simply doesn’t work, so don’t even consider it. They’re on to you. When you get to the testing center, and before you begin your test, the proctors separate you from anything that you can possibly use to cheat, including your phone, wristwatch, water bottle, jacket, and hat. On top of that, you’re monitored by a camera while taking the test. Any semblance of privacy goes right out the window.\r\n\r\nHow would you cheat anyway? You can’t copy all those vocabulary words or write all the math formulas on anything accessible during the test. Besides, the GRE tests your critical-reasoning and problem-solving skills more than your memorization skills.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Those caught cheating can be banned from taking the test for up to ten years! In the world of careers and education, that’s nearly a lifetime.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >You won’t run out of steam</h2>\r\nThe GRE tests your stamina as much as anything else. Most people aren’t able to maintain these levels of concentration for four straight hours, so they end up petering out. Through preparation and practice, you have a definite edge over the other test-takers.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Like preparing for a marathon, preparing for the GRE means slowly building yourself up. Practice for a few hours at a time and stop when you get tired. Repeat this exercise, and eventually you’ll be able to go the full distance without fail. Don’t push yourself too hard, though, because you’ll burn yourself out. As they say in the weight room, “Train, don’t strain.”</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >You won’t neglect your breaks</h2>\r\nSome people don’t take advantage of the short breaks offered during the GRE. Be sure you don’t miss the opportunity to take a breather. You’re offered short breaks (in one- or ten-minute increments) between sections. If you don’t take these breaks, you’ll be sitting still for hours. Though your stamina may be good (because you practiced), you still want to stay hydrated, eat a power bar, and walk around every now and then to keep your mind clear. Don’t plan on studying during your breaks, though — the review of any GRE-prep materials during breaks is strictly forbidden.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Pack some water bottles and power bars to keep in a locker for your breaks. You won’t have time to go grab something. Don’t drink too much water, though — you can’t pause the exam to run to the restroom.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >You won’t dwell on questions from the previous sections</h2>\r\nWhen skipping a question or marking it for review, let it go until the end of the section so you can focus on the other questions at hand. When you reach the end of the section (but before moving on to the next section or before the time expires), you may return to the questions you skipped or marked and check or change your answers.\r\n\r\nWhen you move on to the next section, however, that’s it: You can’t go back to a previous section. You have no choice but to move forward, so don’t waste mental energy by focusing on past questions you can do nothing about.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >You won’t sweat the time limit</h2>\r\nSome test-takers fret over the clock. The key to success is to be aware of the clock while remaining calm. Practice working with a timer, so you’re used to the timer on the GRE exam screen. As you become more accustomed to working with the clock during practice, you’ll eventually settle into a comfortable pace and be used to the timer on test day.\r\n\r\nThe mistakes you make while relaxed are different from the mistakes you make while under pressure from the clock. Practice with a timer to get used to the pressure and become aware of the timer-pressure mistakes — and fix them <em>before</em> the test.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab6\" >You won’t rush through the questions</h2>\r\nSome test-takers think that they need to rush to answer all the questions in the time limit. This is true, if you want to get them all wrong by missing key details and making careless mistakes.\r\n\r\nI’d rather you get half the questions right and run out of time for the other half than rush through the questions and miss them all. But it shouldn’t come to that anyway: The time that the GRE gives you is more than enough to properly, correctly, and calmly answer all the questions — <em>if you don’t get stuck.</em>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Remember the Other Golden Rule: <em>The secret to working fast and getting it right isn’t rushing — it’s knowing what you’re doing.</em> The way you know what you’re doing is by learning what’s on the exam and practicing it.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab7\" >You definitely won’t choke on the essays</h2>\r\n<em>Choking,</em> by definition (on the GRE), means getting stuck on something and becoming so flustered that you can’t focus on anything after that. This can happen at any point on the test, but because you can flag the multiple-choice questions and go back to them at the end of the section, you’re unlikely to choke on those.\r\n\r\nEssays, however, are another story. On the GRE, you have to write two essays within 30 minutes each. What’s worse, they’re at the beginning of the test, so if you choke on one, you’re toast for the entire exam. Of course, this won’t happen to you, because you have prepared beforehand. This makes writer’s block — and choking — something that happens to others, but not you.\r\n\r\nPractice writing the essays! Like any skill, essay-writing takes practice, and you don’t want to be at the start of the learning curve on test day.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab8\" >You won’t fret over the hard questions</h2>\r\nThe GRE contains some seemingly difficult questions, and most test-takers don’t get perfect scores. Do the best you can, score in the high percentiles, and get accepted to graduate school! No one expects a perfect score, so you shouldn’t, either.\r\n\r\nThe GRE is only one of many parts of the application process. Your GPA, work experience, essays, and any other relevant character-building experience (such as sports participation, military service, volunteer work, or leadership training) also count toward your chances of admission.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab9\" >You won’t take the exam with a friend</h2>\r\nYou and your buddy may be able to schedule your tests for the same time. Big mistake. Two of my students from the same class took the exam at the same time, side by side, and both told me afterward that rather than providing support, the distraction was almost unbearable. Fortunately, they both scored well, but I wonder how different their results would have been had they tested separately. It’s good to <em>study</em> with a friend, and celebrate after, but don’t buddy up to take the test.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab10\" >You won’t change your morning routine</h2>\r\nThe GRE is stressful enough. 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You don’t need that distraction.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":8978,"name":"Ron Woldoff","slug":"ron-woldoff","description":" <p><b>Ron Woldoff is founder of National Test Prep, where he helps students succeed on the GMAT, GRE, SAT, ACT, and PSAT. 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