chơi xổ số keno trực tuyến

{"appState":{"pageLoadApiCallsStatus":true},"categoryState":{"relatedCategories":{"headers":{"timestamp":"2025-03-04T08:01:13+00:00"},"categoryId":33925,"data":{"title":"General Gardening","slug":"general-gardening","image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Garden & Green Living","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33916"},"slug":"garden-green-living","categoryId":33916},{"name":"Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33917"},"slug":"gardening","categoryId":33917},{"name":"General Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"},"slug":"general-gardening","categoryId":33925}],"parentCategory":{"categoryId":33917,"title":"Gardening","slug":"gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33917"}},"childCategories":[],"description":"What happens to your garden in the winter? How much light do plants need? Can you force bulbs to bloom early? Gardening tips you won't want to miss.","relatedArticles":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles?category=33925&offset=0&size=5"},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":77,"bookCount":1},"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"}},"relatedCategoriesLoadedStatus":"success"},"listState":{"list":{"count":10,"total":77,"items":[{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-04-20T19:49:18+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-08-03T16:38:22+00:00","timestamp":"2024-08-03T18:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Garden & Green Living","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33916"},"slug":"garden-green-living","categoryId":33916},{"name":"Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33917"},"slug":"gardening","categoryId":33917},{"name":"General Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"},"slug":"general-gardening","categoryId":33925}],"title":"How to Create a Vegetable Garden the Right Way","strippedTitle":"how to create a vegetable garden the right way","slug":"how-to-create-a-vegetable-garden-the-right-way","canonicalUrl":"","搜素搜所百度搜字段擎提高":{"metaDescription":"Learn how to clear an area for your new garden, kill weeks and grasses, and strip sod to prepare for growing vegetables.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"After you choose a good sunny spot for your vegetable garden and draw a plan on paper, you need to clean up the area so the soil will be easier to work.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298484\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298484\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/shovel-garden-digging-adobeStock_540440720.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"420\" /> ©New Africa / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n\r\nYou can clear your garden area any time during the year, but the season before planting works best — clear in the fall for spring planting, or clear in the spring for summer or fall planting. You can clear the area the day before you plant, but you may have more weed problems later.\r\n\r\nHere are the basics of initially clearing your garden spot, which I explain in more detail in the sections that follow:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong>Outline the areas of your garden plot that you want to clear.</strong> You outline the areas depending on how you want the plots to be shaped. Follow these guidelines:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li> To get your edges straight for a square or rectangular vegetable plot, stretch a string between sticks and mark the line with a trickle of ground white limestone, which is available at garden centers.</li>\r\n \t<li>For a round garden, use a hose or rope to lay out the area, adjusting the position to create a smooth curve.</li>\r\n \t<li>If you want several individual beds separated by permanent paths, outline each bed independently with string, sticks, and limestone so you don’t waste time improving soil that you’ll never use. But if you think that you may change your garden layout from season to season or year to year, work the entire area within the outline.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Clear the surface by first removing plants, weeds, brush, and rock.</strong> If necessary, mow the site to cut back the grass and weeds close to the surface of the soil. (See the next section for how to handle weeds.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Dig out the roots of small trees and tough weeds with a hoe, shovel, or pick ax.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong>After the vegetation is manageable, remove any sod.</strong> (See the section, “Stripping sod,” later in this article for details on how to do this.)</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Properly preparing the soil before planting is an all-important first step toward a bountiful harvest. To learn how to test and adjust the pH of your soil, read \"<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/home-auto-hobbies/garden-green-living/gardening/vegetables/how-to-test-your-soil-193900/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How To Test and Improve Your Soil</a>.\" Don’t take shortcuts with your soil. You’ll be cheating your plants at their roots, and they won’t like it. You feed your soil, and your soil feeds your plants.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Killing weeds and aggressive grasses</h2>\r\nIf your garden area contains a lot of perennial weeds — like quack grass, that come back year after year — or if you need to clear an area of a warm-season lawn composed of vigorous grasses (like Bermuda grass), make sure that you first kill these weeds or grasses.\r\n\r\nYou can pull out or heavily mulch over seedlings, but many aggressive weeds and turf spread by underground roots as well as seeds; these underground roots can haunt you forever.\r\n\r\nIf you have an existing garden, you have to be diligent about weeding, or you may need to start all over again with tilling and removing as much of the weed’s root system as you can.\r\n\r\nYou can kill weeds and aggressive grasses two ways:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Hand dig and sift:</strong> For a small garden, dig up the earth and carefully sift the soil, removing sod and root parts that may come back next year as weeds.</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><strong>Apply a covering:</strong> An easy, chemical-free way to clear your garden is to cover it with clear or black plastic, cardboard, or even old rugs. After a month under these impermeable coverings, existing plants die from the lack of sunlight. You must plan ahead to use this method, and it may not look pretty, but it works like a charm — especially on annual weeds.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">For perennial weeds, you may need to dig out their roots, too, after applying the plastic. You can buy plastic in rolls at hardware stores or home improvement centers; check department stores for old pieces of cardboard. Use the thickest plastic or cardboard you can find — it should be at least 2 millimeters, but 4 millimeters is even better.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nControlling weeds and grasses by applying a covering to your garden area is easy. Just follow these steps:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Spread the covering over your entire garden area, securing the edges with spare rocks, bricks, or boards.</strong> Let neighboring pieces overlap by several inches so light can’t penetrate. If you’re using old rugs, place them nap side down.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> After a month, remove the covering and strip off any grass or weeds. </strong>Use a shovel to cut off any grass or weeds at the root level (just below the soil surface). If they aren’t too thick, rototill them into the ground.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Wet the area and wait about 10 days for weeds to sprout. </strong>Leave the covering off; you want weeds to sprout. You should get some growth because you haven’t removed weed seeds.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Use a hoe to kill the weeds. </strong>Hoeing the weeds down is sufficient to kill annual weeds, but if you have perennial weeds, you need to dig out the roots. Check out the <a href=\"//garden.org/learn/library/weeds/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">National Gardening Association’s Weed Library</a> for help identifying the weeds in your garden.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n<h3>Organic approach to killing weeds</h3>\r\nFor an organic approach to killing weeds while also building your garden soil, try a no-till layered garden technique (see the figure below). It’s like making lasagna:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> The season before planting, lay down cardboard over the garden area.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Water the cardboard generously to keep it in place.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Cover the cardboard with a 6-inch-thick layer of hay or straw.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Top that with a 1- to 2-inch-thick layer of compost.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298465\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298465\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/no-till-layered-garden-illulstration.jpg\" alt=\"Illustration showing the parts of a no-till layered garden\" width=\"630\" height=\"575\" /> ©John Wiley & Sons, Inc.<br />Creating a no-till, layered garden[/caption]\r\n\r\nBy the next planting season, the layers will have killed the grass and most of the annual and perennial weeds in your garden. You can hand pull any tenacious perennial weeds that survived.\r\n\r\nEarthworms will have munched up much of the cardboard, turning it into valuable compost. You can plant your seedlings right into the mulched layers, and they’ll grow like weeds (even better).\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Stripping sod</h2>\r\nIf you don’t want to try the techniques in the preceding section, you can immediately remove the lawn grass by stripping the <em>sod</em> (grass and roots) before planting.\r\n\r\nIf your lawn consists of bluegrass and other less-spreading grasses, you can strip the sod without first killing the grass; most lawns in the northern United States consist of these types of grasses. But you should kill weedier grasses, like Bermuda grass, before you strip the sod (see the preceding section for details on killing weedier grass).\r\n\r\nStripping sod takes a lot of effort, but it works. Just follow these steps, and have your wheelbarrow or garden cart handy:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Water the area that you want to clear for 15 minutes for each of the 2 days prior to digging up your sod. </strong>I suggest watering this way because stripping sod is easier when the ground is slightly moist.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Starting at one end of your plot, slip a spade under the grass and slide it under the sod. </strong>An easier method is to precut the sod into square or rectangular sections and then loosen each section with a spade. Either way, don’t dig too deep; you just want to remove the sod and 1 to 2 inches of roots. You also can use a rented sod stripper to cut the sod into rows that you roll up and remove.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Pivot your spade up and let the sod flip off the spade and back onto the ground; use your spade to slice off the sod section, toss the sod into a wheelbarrow or garden cart, and take it to a compost pile. </strong>If your sod has healthy grass with few weeds, and you don’t want to compost it, use it to patch bare spots in your lawn. Keep it well watered, and it should root and blend in with the existing grasses.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Repeat Steps 2 and 3 until your garden is cleared of sod. </strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\nThese steps should clear all the grass in your garden. You’ll get new growth only if you have an aggressive grass like Bermuda and don’t kill all the roots.","description":"After you choose a good sunny spot for your vegetable garden and draw a plan on paper, you need to clean up the area so the soil will be easier to work.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298484\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298484\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/shovel-garden-digging-adobeStock_540440720.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"420\" /> ©New Africa / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n\r\nYou can clear your garden area any time during the year, but the season before planting works best — clear in the fall for spring planting, or clear in the spring for summer or fall planting. You can clear the area the day before you plant, but you may have more weed problems later.\r\n\r\nHere are the basics of initially clearing your garden spot, which I explain in more detail in the sections that follow:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong>Outline the areas of your garden plot that you want to clear.</strong> You outline the areas depending on how you want the plots to be shaped. Follow these guidelines:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li> To get your edges straight for a square or rectangular vegetable plot, stretch a string between sticks and mark the line with a trickle of ground white limestone, which is available at garden centers.</li>\r\n \t<li>For a round garden, use a hose or rope to lay out the area, adjusting the position to create a smooth curve.</li>\r\n \t<li>If you want several individual beds separated by permanent paths, outline each bed independently with string, sticks, and limestone so you don’t waste time improving soil that you’ll never use. But if you think that you may change your garden layout from season to season or year to year, work the entire area within the outline.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Clear the surface by first removing plants, weeds, brush, and rock.</strong> If necessary, mow the site to cut back the grass and weeds close to the surface of the soil. (See the next section for how to handle weeds.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Dig out the roots of small trees and tough weeds with a hoe, shovel, or pick ax.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong>After the vegetation is manageable, remove any sod.</strong> (See the section, “Stripping sod,” later in this article for details on how to do this.)</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Properly preparing the soil before planting is an all-important first step toward a bountiful harvest. To learn how to test and adjust the pH of your soil, read \"<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/home-auto-hobbies/garden-green-living/gardening/vegetables/how-to-test-your-soil-193900/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How To Test and Improve Your Soil</a>.\" Don’t take shortcuts with your soil. You’ll be cheating your plants at their roots, and they won’t like it. You feed your soil, and your soil feeds your plants.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Killing weeds and aggressive grasses</h2>\r\nIf your garden area contains a lot of perennial weeds — like quack grass, that come back year after year — or if you need to clear an area of a warm-season lawn composed of vigorous grasses (like Bermuda grass), make sure that you first kill these weeds or grasses.\r\n\r\nYou can pull out or heavily mulch over seedlings, but many aggressive weeds and turf spread by underground roots as well as seeds; these underground roots can haunt you forever.\r\n\r\nIf you have an existing garden, you have to be diligent about weeding, or you may need to start all over again with tilling and removing as much of the weed’s root system as you can.\r\n\r\nYou can kill weeds and aggressive grasses two ways:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Hand dig and sift:</strong> For a small garden, dig up the earth and carefully sift the soil, removing sod and root parts that may come back next year as weeds.</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><strong>Apply a covering:</strong> An easy, chemical-free way to clear your garden is to cover it with clear or black plastic, cardboard, or even old rugs. After a month under these impermeable coverings, existing plants die from the lack of sunlight. You must plan ahead to use this method, and it may not look pretty, but it works like a charm — especially on annual weeds.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">For perennial weeds, you may need to dig out their roots, too, after applying the plastic. You can buy plastic in rolls at hardware stores or home improvement centers; check department stores for old pieces of cardboard. Use the thickest plastic or cardboard you can find — it should be at least 2 millimeters, but 4 millimeters is even better.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nControlling weeds and grasses by applying a covering to your garden area is easy. Just follow these steps:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Spread the covering over your entire garden area, securing the edges with spare rocks, bricks, or boards.</strong> Let neighboring pieces overlap by several inches so light can’t penetrate. If you’re using old rugs, place them nap side down.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> After a month, remove the covering and strip off any grass or weeds. </strong>Use a shovel to cut off any grass or weeds at the root level (just below the soil surface). If they aren’t too thick, rototill them into the ground.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Wet the area and wait about 10 days for weeds to sprout. </strong>Leave the covering off; you want weeds to sprout. You should get some growth because you haven’t removed weed seeds.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Use a hoe to kill the weeds. </strong>Hoeing the weeds down is sufficient to kill annual weeds, but if you have perennial weeds, you need to dig out the roots. Check out the <a href=\"//garden.org/learn/library/weeds/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">National Gardening Association’s Weed Library</a> for help identifying the weeds in your garden.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n<h3>Organic approach to killing weeds</h3>\r\nFor an organic approach to killing weeds while also building your garden soil, try a no-till layered garden technique (see the figure below). It’s like making lasagna:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> The season before planting, lay down cardboard over the garden area.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Water the cardboard generously to keep it in place.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Cover the cardboard with a 6-inch-thick layer of hay or straw.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Top that with a 1- to 2-inch-thick layer of compost.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298465\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298465\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/no-till-layered-garden-illulstration.jpg\" alt=\"Illustration showing the parts of a no-till layered garden\" width=\"630\" height=\"575\" /> ©John Wiley & Sons, Inc.<br />Creating a no-till, layered garden[/caption]\r\n\r\nBy the next planting season, the layers will have killed the grass and most of the annual and perennial weeds in your garden. You can hand pull any tenacious perennial weeds that survived.\r\n\r\nEarthworms will have munched up much of the cardboard, turning it into valuable compost. You can plant your seedlings right into the mulched layers, and they’ll grow like weeds (even better).\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Stripping sod</h2>\r\nIf you don’t want to try the techniques in the preceding section, you can immediately remove the lawn grass by stripping the <em>sod</em> (grass and roots) before planting.\r\n\r\nIf your lawn consists of bluegrass and other less-spreading grasses, you can strip the sod without first killing the grass; most lawns in the northern United States consist of these types of grasses. But you should kill weedier grasses, like Bermuda grass, before you strip the sod (see the preceding section for details on killing weedier grass).\r\n\r\nStripping sod takes a lot of effort, but it works. Just follow these steps, and have your wheelbarrow or garden cart handy:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Water the area that you want to clear for 15 minutes for each of the 2 days prior to digging up your sod. </strong>I suggest watering this way because stripping sod is easier when the ground is slightly moist.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Starting at one end of your plot, slip a spade under the grass and slide it under the sod. </strong>An easier method is to precut the sod into square or rectangular sections and then loosen each section with a spade. Either way, don’t dig too deep; you just want to remove the sod and 1 to 2 inches of roots. You also can use a rented sod stripper to cut the sod into rows that you roll up and remove.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Pivot your spade up and let the sod flip off the spade and back onto the ground; use your spade to slice off the sod section, toss the sod into a wheelbarrow or garden cart, and take it to a compost pile. </strong>If your sod has healthy grass with few weeds, and you don’t want to compost it, use it to patch bare spots in your lawn. Keep it well watered, and it should root and blend in with the existing grasses.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Repeat Steps 2 and 3 until your garden is cleared of sod. </strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\nThese steps should clear all the grass in your garden. You’ll get new growth only if you have an aggressive grass like Bermuda and don’t kill all the roots.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9170,"name":"Charlie Nardozzi","slug":"charlie-nardozzi","description":"<b>Charlie Nardozzi</b> is a nationally recognized garden writer, radio and TV show host, consultant, and speaker. Charlie delights in making gardening information simple, easy, fun, and accessible to everyone.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9170"}},{"authorId":10266,"name":"National Gardening Association","slug":"national-gardening-association","description":"The National Gardening Association is the leading garden-based educational nonprofit organization in the United States, providing resources at garden.org and kidsgardening.org.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10266"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33925,"title":"General Gardening","slug":"general-gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Killing weeds and aggressive grasses","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Stripping sod","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":299905,"title":"How to Harvest, Store, & Preserve Your Garden Vegetables","slug":"how-to-harvest-store-and-preserve-your-garden-vegetables","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","vegetables"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/299905"}},{"articleId":193900,"title":"How to Test and Improve Your Soil","slug":"how-to-test-your-soil","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","vegetables"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193900"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":298558,"title":"Collecting & Storing Water for Your Yard","slug":"collecting-storing-water-for-your-yard","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298558"}},{"articleId":236815,"title":"How to Grow and Care for Succulents","slug":"grow-care-succulents","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/236815"}},{"articleId":209364,"title":"Sustainable Gardening For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sustainable-gardening-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209364"}},{"articleId":209195,"title":"Gardening Basics For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209195"}},{"articleId":209067,"title":"Gardening Basics For Canadians For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-canadians-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209067"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282731,"slug":"vegetable-gardening-for-dummies-3rd-edition","isbn":"9781119782070","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","vegetables"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119782074/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119782074/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119782074-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119782074/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119782074/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/vegetable-gardening-for-dummies-3rd-edition-cover-9781119782070-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Vegetable Gardening For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"9170\">Charlie Nardozzi</b></b> is a nationally recognized garden writer, radio and TV show host, consultant, and speaker. Charlie delights in making gardening information simple, easy, fun, and accessible to everyone. The <b data-author-id=\"10266\">National Gardening Association</b> is the leading garden-based educational nonprofit organization in the United States, providing resources at garden.org and kidsgardening.org.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9170,"name":"Charlie Nardozzi","slug":"charlie-nardozzi","description":"<b>Charlie Nardozzi</b> is a nationally recognized garden writer, radio and TV show host, consultant, and speaker. Charlie delights in making gardening information simple, easy, fun, and accessible to everyone.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9170"}},{"authorId":10266,"name":"National Gardening Association","slug":"national-gardening-association","description":"The National Gardening Association is the leading garden-based educational nonprofit organization in the United States, providing resources at garden.org and kidsgardening.org.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10266"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119782070&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64cbeb5fd0bd5\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119782070&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64cbeb5fd10f9\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-04-20T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":298462},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-04-26T18:41:00+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-04-27T14:51:19+00:00","timestamp":"2024-04-27T15:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Garden & Green Living","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33916"},"slug":"garden-green-living","categoryId":33916},{"name":"Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33917"},"slug":"gardening","categoryId":33917},{"name":"General Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"},"slug":"general-gardening","categoryId":33925}],"title":"Collecting & Storing Water for Your Yard","strippedTitle":"collecting & storing water for your yard","slug":"collecting-storing-water-for-your-yard","canonicalUrl":"","搜素搜所百度搜字段擎提高":{"metaDescription":"You can conserve water by collecting and storing it in rain barrels, cisterns, and other containers for use in your garden and yard.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"If you're trying to conserve water for your yard and garden, it's worth looking into the various ways you can grab and save this precious resource — thereby not having to turn on the house spigot.\r\n\r\nWater collection is easy, convenient, affordable … and smart. The two main options are rain barrels and cisterns. You may hear these projects referred to as <em>rainwater harvesting.</em>\r\n\r\nThe main source of water is rainwater routed from your home’s gutter system, so you want good gutter coverage of your rooflines, complete with screens or filters. Make a practice of cleaning out the gutters yearly, ideally in a dry season (because it’s easier).\r\n\r\nOther possible sources include runoff from other impervious hardscape in your home landscape, such as an elevated patio or deck where you can route and collect that runoff.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Before proceeding, find out if the government in your area has limitations — that is, limits on how much water you can collect from your own home and landscape. Colorado’s regulations are a case in point. Presently, most homeowners in that state are limited to a maximum of two rain barrels with a combined maximum storage capacity of 110 gallons. Permitting may apply.</p>\r\nYou might want to check whether there are local tax incentives, rebates, or discounted equipment suppliers. Many municipalities offer incentives to encourage water conservation and stormwater control in their communities.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Rain barrels</h2>\r\nNot all rain barrels are created equal — they’re usually made of some kind of heavy-duty plastic; some are larger, some are smaller. Colors and styles, as well as capacity, varies. Household barrels are typically 50 gallons (though larger ones are available). They range in price from about $100 to $400. Look around at what your neighbors are using and shop around locally and online to locate the many choices.\r\n\r\nYou get what you pay for. The best rain barrels are made of UV-resistant resin, with seamless rotational molding and spin weld fittings. They aren’t cheap, but they’re long-lasting and work beautifully.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298561\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298561\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/rain-barrel-parts-diagram.jpg\" alt=\"Diagram showing the parts of a rain barrel\" width=\"630\" height=\"801\" /> ©Lincoln, California Stormwater Program<br />Your rain barrel should have certain key features, especially a secure lid and an access spigot.[/caption]\r\n\r\nYou can also make your own rain barrel. Use a large, clean, sturdy plastic barrel and install a lid (with an opening for the incoming gutter water) and spigot. Heed the following information — features that good, purchased rain barrels should also have. Figure 2-2 shows a good example of a rain barrel.\r\n\r\nUnless your area is fortunate enough to receive regular rainfall (uncertain or unlikely, to be honest, for most households in water-scarce areas), rainwater collection isn’t a dependable or year-round source of water for your home landscape. Consider it supplemental and, of course, make the most of it.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Recycled barrels may be tempting, but you must find out what the original use was; solvents, oils, and farm chemicals are all no-nos. Old garbage cans may be leaky or not strong enough to support a full volume of water without buckling.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Seeking certain features</h3>\r\nRain barrels work best when they have the following practical features:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>A sealable lid:</strong> A securely fitted lid keeps out debris, bugs (including mosquito larvae, definitely unwelcome), and animals (including birds and snakes). Screening may not be sufficient because pollen and dust can still get through (and if the water will be directed into an irrigation system, tiny materials like those items can clog emitters). Use a solid lid such as a board, piece of metal, or plastic. A good, non-flimsy, secured cover is also a safety matter, if you have a curious outdoor cat on the premises or small children playing outdoors.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Outlet spigot:</strong> It needs to sit low-down on the side of the barrel. Otherwise water sits below it and becomes stagnant.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Overflow pipe:</strong> When a barrel gets really full, it will overflow. A pipe inserted near the top can carry off excess water — it should be long enough to be routed to a nearby plant or bed. Thus no water is lost or wasted!</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Sturdy construction and fittings:</strong> These prevent leaks.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nSome store-bought ones come with a flat side/flat back, making it easier to wedge against a wall of your house — a nice option.\r\n<h3>Installing your rain barrel</h3>\r\nWhen you install your rain barrel, remember these pointers:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Place your rain barrel on an ample and level spot, ideally a concrete pad or pavers.</li>\r\n \t<li>If you can elevate it, gravity will help with water pressure. (However, not too high — you don’t want it to topple.)</li>\r\n \t<li>Site it in a spot that’s handy to your garden and plants.</li>\r\n \t<li>Make sure the spot is comfortable and accessible <em>for you</em> (checking on it, hooking up a hose, filling a watering can, and occasionally cleaning it).</li>\r\n \t<li>Route a downspout or downspouts into it; add a filter/filters if there’s the potential for lots of debris.</li>\r\n \t<li>Consider multiple barrels because if all downspouts lead to just one barrel you have the potential for overflow/wasted water.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h3>Using the water from your rain barrel</h3>\r\nWhen you’re ready to use the water in your barrel in your yard, keep the following in mind:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>You can hook up a hose to the spigot.</li>\r\n \t<li>You can simply fill a watering can at the spigot and make repeated trips into the garden or to your potted plant collection.</li>\r\n \t<li>You can even hook up an inground irrigation system to it</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Don’t hook up a soaker hose to a rain barrel’s spigot. There isn’t enough water pressure for the soaker hose to operate effectively, particularly at its farthest reaches.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Maintaining your rain barrel</h3>\r\nClean out your rain barrel and perhaps replace the spigot, and any filters, once or twice a year. Otherwise silt may build up in the bottom, and/or the interior may get a stinky film.\r\n\r\nIf your winters have freezing weather, completely empty the barrel beforehand. Freezing water in a spigot can ruin it, and residual water in a frozen barrel expands and can damage it. Store it in a garage, shed, or barn over the winter months.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Water that runs off your roof, into your gutters, and then into your rain barrel is untreated and may pick up chemicals and debris from your roofing material. It may also be contaminated by anything from bird droppings to microbes, or contain impurities absorbed from the air, such as arsenic and mercury. Even if you have filters in place or flush off the first few collected gallons, <em>don’t drink it.</em> Only use this water on your plants and lawn!</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Supplemental water for your rain barrel</h3>\r\nWhat if there’s a period of no rain? Your rain barrel stands empty and unused, which is unfortunate.\r\n\r\nYou can supply it with household water, then. Collect kitchen-sink water, veggie-rinsing water, bathtub/shower water, even dehumidifier water. Avoid water that has particles in it or soaps that may contain microbeads. Use pitchers or buckets in the house, and once they’re full, make a delivery to the rain barrel, replacing the lid afterward.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Cisterns and tanks</h2>\r\nCisterns are large tanks for storing as much as 20,000 gallons (75,708 liters) of water. Many farmers and market gardeners, as well as public parks and gardens, use such things, but residential homeowners can use cisterns to stockpile water for later use, too.\r\n\r\nA homeowner-size cistern is about 10 feet by 20 feet and 3 feet deep (3 x 6.1 and 0.9 m), with a capacity of around 4,000 gallons (15,141 liters).\r\n\r\nCheck with your local authorities to see if cistern use is permitted or regulated in any way. Areas with severe water restrictions ban these.\r\n\r\nIf you do get the green light, new challenges lie ahead, including location, materials, cost, delivery, and setup. You also want to consider how you can protect it from heat and sun (overheated water or algae growth being the problems) and what types of filters and pumps to use, if any. If you’re determined to proceed, consult the supplier — whether a home-improvement store or an ag-supply outlet.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Other ideas</h2>\r\nWater directed from downspouts from your roof, or an upper deck or balcony area, and routed directly into your garden can bring needed water to your plants — assuming it rains. Although this isn’t a viable year-round watering strategy, it’s safe and legal.\r\n\r\nYou may want to consider a rain garden. Chapter 16 discusses rain gardens in greater detail.\r\n\r\nAnother option is a relatively new technology called <em>rain walls.</em> They’re basically slender vertical water-storage tanks, made of strong, UV-stabilized, food-grade plastic. Pioneered in Australia, they come in building blocks, so they're stackable or can be set up as interlocking forms. You can fit one or more into a very narrow side yard, for example, or make a fence or wall out of several or many. Installation is straightforward. One example of these is <a href=\"//www.rainwaterhog.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Rainwater Hog</a>.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Is using gray water a good idea?</h2>\r\nGray water (sometimes spelled “grey”) may be another source of water you can collect and give to your landscape plants. <em>Gray water</em> is water from inside your home, basically anything but toilet-flushed water bound for the sewer or septic tank. Also avoid collecting utility-sink water. Gray water is wastewater from household sinks, showers and tubs, and laundry.\r\n\r\nUtilizing it is, indeed, water-wise. You’ve paid for it once if you get your water from your municipality, yet you’re using it twice (for those with well water, similar point: you’re using it twice). Thus you’re conserving water and conserving energy. By not sending this wastewater into the sewer or your septic tank, you’re lightening their load, too.\r\n\r\nThere may be incentives to use it, or there may be restrictions. Check your city, county, or state websites and/or confirm with phone calls before proceeding.\r\n\r\nHere are the best ways to get it into your garden, where it’s needed:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Collect in buckets and pitchers.</strong> Leave them in the tub and sinks at all times so everyone in the household gets in the habit of dumping gray water in them.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Route directly.</strong> An outflow pipe from the kitchen sink or washing machine goes straight out to the yard.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">An on-off valve is a good idea, for those days when you run three loads of wash, which may be too much water for your plants, especially if you’re growing drought-tolerant natives.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Rig an irrigation system, complete with storage tank, filters, and outgoing lines.</strong> This sort of thing takes some expertise, and some municipalities don’t allow DIY installations; you must hire a trained and licensed professional to install it.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nBecause people use soap products in all of these areas, and some soaps are harmful to the environment (to soils, to plants, and to groundwater), find out what’s allowed and what’s best. Basically, you want to favor soap products that don’t contain microbeads, phosphates, salts, boron, or oils. You may have to change brands in order to collect maximum gray water. Also, use common sense: don’t reuse household water that contains bleach or cleaning products, or laundry water that rinsed diapers or a mechanic’s work clothes.\r\n\r\nOut of an abundance of caution, don’t use gray water on certain plants, including anything you’ll eat — for example, salad greens and melons. However, watering tomato and pepper plants, berry plants, and trees (including fruit and nut trees) with gray water is considered okay.\r\n\r\n ","description":"If you're trying to conserve water for your yard and garden, it's worth looking into the various ways you can grab and save this precious resource — thereby not having to turn on the house spigot.\r\n\r\nWater collection is easy, convenient, affordable … and smart. The two main options are rain barrels and cisterns. You may hear these projects referred to as <em>rainwater harvesting.</em>\r\n\r\nThe main source of water is rainwater routed from your home’s gutter system, so you want good gutter coverage of your rooflines, complete with screens or filters. Make a practice of cleaning out the gutters yearly, ideally in a dry season (because it’s easier).\r\n\r\nOther possible sources include runoff from other impervious hardscape in your home landscape, such as an elevated patio or deck where you can route and collect that runoff.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Before proceeding, find out if the government in your area has limitations — that is, limits on how much water you can collect from your own home and landscape. Colorado’s regulations are a case in point. Presently, most homeowners in that state are limited to a maximum of two rain barrels with a combined maximum storage capacity of 110 gallons. Permitting may apply.</p>\r\nYou might want to check whether there are local tax incentives, rebates, or discounted equipment suppliers. Many municipalities offer incentives to encourage water conservation and stormwater control in their communities.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Rain barrels</h2>\r\nNot all rain barrels are created equal — they’re usually made of some kind of heavy-duty plastic; some are larger, some are smaller. Colors and styles, as well as capacity, varies. Household barrels are typically 50 gallons (though larger ones are available). They range in price from about $100 to $400. Look around at what your neighbors are using and shop around locally and online to locate the many choices.\r\n\r\nYou get what you pay for. The best rain barrels are made of UV-resistant resin, with seamless rotational molding and spin weld fittings. They aren’t cheap, but they’re long-lasting and work beautifully.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298561\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298561\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/rain-barrel-parts-diagram.jpg\" alt=\"Diagram showing the parts of a rain barrel\" width=\"630\" height=\"801\" /> ©Lincoln, California Stormwater Program<br />Your rain barrel should have certain key features, especially a secure lid and an access spigot.[/caption]\r\n\r\nYou can also make your own rain barrel. Use a large, clean, sturdy plastic barrel and install a lid (with an opening for the incoming gutter water) and spigot. Heed the following information — features that good, purchased rain barrels should also have. Figure 2-2 shows a good example of a rain barrel.\r\n\r\nUnless your area is fortunate enough to receive regular rainfall (uncertain or unlikely, to be honest, for most households in water-scarce areas), rainwater collection isn’t a dependable or year-round source of water for your home landscape. Consider it supplemental and, of course, make the most of it.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Recycled barrels may be tempting, but you must find out what the original use was; solvents, oils, and farm chemicals are all no-nos. Old garbage cans may be leaky or not strong enough to support a full volume of water without buckling.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Seeking certain features</h3>\r\nRain barrels work best when they have the following practical features:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>A sealable lid:</strong> A securely fitted lid keeps out debris, bugs (including mosquito larvae, definitely unwelcome), and animals (including birds and snakes). Screening may not be sufficient because pollen and dust can still get through (and if the water will be directed into an irrigation system, tiny materials like those items can clog emitters). Use a solid lid such as a board, piece of metal, or plastic. A good, non-flimsy, secured cover is also a safety matter, if you have a curious outdoor cat on the premises or small children playing outdoors.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Outlet spigot:</strong> It needs to sit low-down on the side of the barrel. Otherwise water sits below it and becomes stagnant.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Overflow pipe:</strong> When a barrel gets really full, it will overflow. A pipe inserted near the top can carry off excess water — it should be long enough to be routed to a nearby plant or bed. Thus no water is lost or wasted!</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Sturdy construction and fittings:</strong> These prevent leaks.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nSome store-bought ones come with a flat side/flat back, making it easier to wedge against a wall of your house — a nice option.\r\n<h3>Installing your rain barrel</h3>\r\nWhen you install your rain barrel, remember these pointers:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Place your rain barrel on an ample and level spot, ideally a concrete pad or pavers.</li>\r\n \t<li>If you can elevate it, gravity will help with water pressure. (However, not too high — you don’t want it to topple.)</li>\r\n \t<li>Site it in a spot that’s handy to your garden and plants.</li>\r\n \t<li>Make sure the spot is comfortable and accessible <em>for you</em> (checking on it, hooking up a hose, filling a watering can, and occasionally cleaning it).</li>\r\n \t<li>Route a downspout or downspouts into it; add a filter/filters if there’s the potential for lots of debris.</li>\r\n \t<li>Consider multiple barrels because if all downspouts lead to just one barrel you have the potential for overflow/wasted water.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h3>Using the water from your rain barrel</h3>\r\nWhen you’re ready to use the water in your barrel in your yard, keep the following in mind:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>You can hook up a hose to the spigot.</li>\r\n \t<li>You can simply fill a watering can at the spigot and make repeated trips into the garden or to your potted plant collection.</li>\r\n \t<li>You can even hook up an inground irrigation system to it</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Don’t hook up a soaker hose to a rain barrel’s spigot. There isn’t enough water pressure for the soaker hose to operate effectively, particularly at its farthest reaches.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Maintaining your rain barrel</h3>\r\nClean out your rain barrel and perhaps replace the spigot, and any filters, once or twice a year. Otherwise silt may build up in the bottom, and/or the interior may get a stinky film.\r\n\r\nIf your winters have freezing weather, completely empty the barrel beforehand. Freezing water in a spigot can ruin it, and residual water in a frozen barrel expands and can damage it. Store it in a garage, shed, or barn over the winter months.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Water that runs off your roof, into your gutters, and then into your rain barrel is untreated and may pick up chemicals and debris from your roofing material. It may also be contaminated by anything from bird droppings to microbes, or contain impurities absorbed from the air, such as arsenic and mercury. Even if you have filters in place or flush off the first few collected gallons, <em>don’t drink it.</em> Only use this water on your plants and lawn!</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Supplemental water for your rain barrel</h3>\r\nWhat if there’s a period of no rain? Your rain barrel stands empty and unused, which is unfortunate.\r\n\r\nYou can supply it with household water, then. Collect kitchen-sink water, veggie-rinsing water, bathtub/shower water, even dehumidifier water. Avoid water that has particles in it or soaps that may contain microbeads. Use pitchers or buckets in the house, and once they’re full, make a delivery to the rain barrel, replacing the lid afterward.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Cisterns and tanks</h2>\r\nCisterns are large tanks for storing as much as 20,000 gallons (75,708 liters) of water. Many farmers and market gardeners, as well as public parks and gardens, use such things, but residential homeowners can use cisterns to stockpile water for later use, too.\r\n\r\nA homeowner-size cistern is about 10 feet by 20 feet and 3 feet deep (3 x 6.1 and 0.9 m), with a capacity of around 4,000 gallons (15,141 liters).\r\n\r\nCheck with your local authorities to see if cistern use is permitted or regulated in any way. Areas with severe water restrictions ban these.\r\n\r\nIf you do get the green light, new challenges lie ahead, including location, materials, cost, delivery, and setup. You also want to consider how you can protect it from heat and sun (overheated water or algae growth being the problems) and what types of filters and pumps to use, if any. If you’re determined to proceed, consult the supplier — whether a home-improvement store or an ag-supply outlet.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Other ideas</h2>\r\nWater directed from downspouts from your roof, or an upper deck or balcony area, and routed directly into your garden can bring needed water to your plants — assuming it rains. Although this isn’t a viable year-round watering strategy, it’s safe and legal.\r\n\r\nYou may want to consider a rain garden. Chapter 16 discusses rain gardens in greater detail.\r\n\r\nAnother option is a relatively new technology called <em>rain walls.</em> They’re basically slender vertical water-storage tanks, made of strong, UV-stabilized, food-grade plastic. Pioneered in Australia, they come in building blocks, so they're stackable or can be set up as interlocking forms. You can fit one or more into a very narrow side yard, for example, or make a fence or wall out of several or many. Installation is straightforward. One example of these is <a href=\"//www.rainwaterhog.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Rainwater Hog</a>.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Is using gray water a good idea?</h2>\r\nGray water (sometimes spelled “grey”) may be another source of water you can collect and give to your landscape plants. <em>Gray water</em> is water from inside your home, basically anything but toilet-flushed water bound for the sewer or septic tank. Also avoid collecting utility-sink water. Gray water is wastewater from household sinks, showers and tubs, and laundry.\r\n\r\nUtilizing it is, indeed, water-wise. You’ve paid for it once if you get your water from your municipality, yet you’re using it twice (for those with well water, similar point: you’re using it twice). Thus you’re conserving water and conserving energy. By not sending this wastewater into the sewer or your septic tank, you’re lightening their load, too.\r\n\r\nThere may be incentives to use it, or there may be restrictions. Check your city, county, or state websites and/or confirm with phone calls before proceeding.\r\n\r\nHere are the best ways to get it into your garden, where it’s needed:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Collect in buckets and pitchers.</strong> Leave them in the tub and sinks at all times so everyone in the household gets in the habit of dumping gray water in them.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Route directly.</strong> An outflow pipe from the kitchen sink or washing machine goes straight out to the yard.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">An on-off valve is a good idea, for those days when you run three loads of wash, which may be too much water for your plants, especially if you’re growing drought-tolerant natives.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Rig an irrigation system, complete with storage tank, filters, and outgoing lines.</strong> This sort of thing takes some expertise, and some municipalities don’t allow DIY installations; you must hire a trained and licensed professional to install it.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nBecause people use soap products in all of these areas, and some soaps are harmful to the environment (to soils, to plants, and to groundwater), find out what’s allowed and what’s best. Basically, you want to favor soap products that don’t contain microbeads, phosphates, salts, boron, or oils. You may have to change brands in order to collect maximum gray water. Also, use common sense: don’t reuse household water that contains bleach or cleaning products, or laundry water that rinsed diapers or a mechanic’s work clothes.\r\n\r\nOut of an abundance of caution, don’t use gray water on certain plants, including anything you’ll eat — for example, salad greens and melons. However, watering tomato and pepper plants, berry plants, and trees (including fruit and nut trees) with gray water is considered okay.\r\n\r\n ","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":34679,"name":"Teri Dunn Chace","slug":"teri-dunn-chace","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/34679"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33925,"title":"General Gardening","slug":"general-gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Rain barrels","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Cisterns and tanks","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Other ideas","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Is using gray water a good idea?","target":"#tab4"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":298566,"title":"Creating a Water-Conserving Meadow Garden","slug":"replacing-your-lawn-with-a-water-conserving-meadow-garden","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","landscaping"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298566"}},{"articleId":296624,"title":"Low-Water Landscaping For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"low-water-landscaping-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","landscaping"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296624"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":298462,"title":"How To Create a Vegetable Garden the Right Way","slug":"how-to-create-a-vegetable-garden-the-right-way","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298462"}},{"articleId":236815,"title":"How to Grow and Care for Succulents","slug":"grow-care-succulents","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/236815"}},{"articleId":209364,"title":"Sustainable Gardening For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sustainable-gardening-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209364"}},{"articleId":209195,"title":"Gardening Basics For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209195"}},{"articleId":209067,"title":"Gardening Basics For Canadians For Dummies Cheat 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Landscaping For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"","authors":[{"authorId":34679,"name":"Teri Dunn Chace","slug":"teri-dunn-chace","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/34679"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119985808&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-644a8e2e94185\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119985808&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-644a8e2e94e46\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-04-26T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":298558},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T23:05:25+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-02-09T18:58:00+00:00","timestamp":"2024-02-09T21:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Garden & Green Living","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33916"},"slug":"garden-green-living","categoryId":33916},{"name":"Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33917"},"slug":"gardening","categoryId":33917},{"name":"General Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"},"slug":"general-gardening","categoryId":33925}],"title":"Conserving Water in Your Garden","strippedTitle":"conserving water in your garden","slug":"conserving-water-in-your-garden","canonicalUrl":"","搜素搜所百度搜字段擎提高":{"metaDescription":"Water conservation is becoming ever more important in sustaining a healthy planet. Paying attention to your water usage in the garden is one way to promote an e","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Water conservation is becoming ever more important in sustaining a healthy planet. Paying attention to your water usage in the garden is one way to promote an eco-friendly lifestyle. You have two primary goals for green watering:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Water your garden as infrequently as possible.</b> By using native plants, you can design the sort of garden that can stay green without a lot of water in the first place.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Be mindful of your water source.</b> You don’t have to rely on the tap if you incorporate alternative water sources like those in the next list.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nSeveral practices can help you attain these goals and water more greenly and efficiently:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Collect rainwater that runs off your roof in rain barrels.</b> Drainpipes can empty directly into barrels, which should have faucets near the bottom to make it easy to get the water out. Be sure to cover the top of the barrel with a screen or some other covering to prevent debris (such as leaves) and insects (such as breeding mosquitoes) from getting into the water.</p>\r\n\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_20093\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"400\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-20093\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/77402.image0.jpg\" alt=\"Water your garden from a rain barrel instead of the tap for a greener garden.\" width=\"400\" height=\"400\" /> Water your garden from a rain barrel instead of the tap for a “greener” garden.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">If your yard is big enough, consider installing a <i>cistern</i>, a large water-storage container that can hold rainwater as well as <i>greywater</i><i>,</i><i> </i>which is water already used for washing, laundry, or showering. Even if you don’t have a rain barrel or cistern, you can use basins or buckets to carry used dishwater or bathwater outside to water your plants.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Water your garden during the coolest part of the day to reduce evaporation.</b> Stick to watering in the early morning or late evening, and water only the areas and plants that need it.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Use a trigger nozzle or soaker hose instead of a sprinkler.</b> A sprinkler can use as much water in an hour as a family of four uses in a day! Trigger nozzles or soaker hoses work better for specific areas such as garden beds. If you just can’t give up your sprinkler, remember that it doesn’t take long for a sprinkler to soak your lawn thoroughly. When you set up the sprinkler, set out an upside-down Frisbee, too; when the Frisbee’s filled with water, turn off the sprinkler.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Resist the temptation to reach for the garden hose at the first appearance of a brown patch.</b> Once a week is all the watering your lawn needs — even in the hottest weather. Overwatering can actually damage your lawn, weakening it by encouraging roots to seek the surface.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"Water conservation is becoming ever more important in sustaining a healthy planet. Paying attention to your water usage in the garden is one way to promote an eco-friendly lifestyle. You have two primary goals for green watering:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Water your garden as infrequently as possible.</b> By using native plants, you can design the sort of garden that can stay green without a lot of water in the first place.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Be mindful of your water source.</b> You don’t have to rely on the tap if you incorporate alternative water sources like those in the next list.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nSeveral practices can help you attain these goals and water more greenly and efficiently:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Collect rainwater that runs off your roof in rain barrels.</b> Drainpipes can empty directly into barrels, which should have faucets near the bottom to make it easy to get the water out. Be sure to cover the top of the barrel with a screen or some other covering to prevent debris (such as leaves) and insects (such as breeding mosquitoes) from getting into the water.</p>\r\n\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_20093\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"400\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-20093\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/77402.image0.jpg\" alt=\"Water your garden from a rain barrel instead of the tap for a greener garden.\" width=\"400\" height=\"400\" /> Water your garden from a rain barrel instead of the tap for a “greener” garden.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">If your yard is big enough, consider installing a <i>cistern</i>, a large water-storage container that can hold rainwater as well as <i>greywater</i><i>,</i><i> </i>which is water already used for washing, laundry, or showering. Even if you don’t have a rain barrel or cistern, you can use basins or buckets to carry used dishwater or bathwater outside to water your plants.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Water your garden during the coolest part of the day to reduce evaporation.</b> Stick to watering in the early morning or late evening, and water only the areas and plants that need it.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Use a trigger nozzle or soaker hose instead of a sprinkler.</b> A sprinkler can use as much water in an hour as a family of four uses in a day! Trigger nozzles or soaker hoses work better for specific areas such as garden beds. If you just can’t give up your sprinkler, remember that it doesn’t take long for a sprinkler to soak your lawn thoroughly. When you set up the sprinkler, set out an upside-down Frisbee, too; when the Frisbee’s filled with water, turn off the sprinkler.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Resist the temptation to reach for the garden hose at the first appearance of a brown patch.</b> Once a week is all the watering your lawn needs — even in the hottest weather. Overwatering can actually damage your lawn, weakening it by encouraging roots to seek the surface.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33925,"title":"General Gardening","slug":"general-gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":236815,"title":"How to Grow and Care for Succulents","slug":"grow-care-succulents","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/236815"}},{"articleId":209364,"title":"Sustainable Gardening For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sustainable-gardening-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209364"}},{"articleId":209195,"title":"Gardening Basics For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209195"}},{"articleId":209067,"title":"Gardening Basics For Canadians For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-canadians-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209067"}},{"articleId":208914,"title":"Gardening All-in-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/208914"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63e55f0f1a577\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63e55f0f1ae53\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Solve","lifeExpectancy":"Two years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-02-09T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":202367},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-27T16:55:48+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-02-07T15:55:04+00:00","timestamp":"2024-02-07T18:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Garden & Green Living","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33916"},"slug":"garden-green-living","categoryId":33916},{"name":"Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33917"},"slug":"gardening","categoryId":33917},{"name":"General Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"},"slug":"general-gardening","categoryId":33925}],"title":"Gardening All-in-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"gardening all-in-one for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"gardening-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","搜素搜所百度搜字段擎提高":{"metaDescription":"Learn gardening basics with this handy Cheat Sheet. It includes information about growing seasons, fertilizers, garden insects, and more.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"<p>Growing your garden requires the aid and cooperation of many forces including the climate in your hardiness zone; insects, good and bad; fertilizers; and soil amendments.</p>\r\n\r\n<p>Decorative material (such as mulch, stone, sand, and gravel) adds a nice finish, so know how much you need to buy. Adapting each element to your garden's needs — as best you can — leads to a successful gardening experience.</p>","description":"<p>Growing your garden requires the aid and cooperation of many forces including the climate in your hardiness zone; insects, good and bad; fertilizers; and soil amendments.</p>\r\n\r\n<p>Decorative material (such as mulch, stone, sand, and gravel) adds a nice finish, so know how much you need to buy. Adapting each element to your garden's needs — as best you can — leads to a successful gardening experience.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9156,"name":"The National Gardening Association","slug":"the-national-gardening-association","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9156"}},{"authorId":9163,"name":"Bob Beckstrom","slug":"bob-beckstrom","description":" <p><b>The National Gardening Association </b>is the leading garden-based educational organization in the USA. Visit //garden.org.</p> <p><b>Teri Dunn Chace</b> has more than 35 books in publication, including the 2016 AHS award-winner <i>Seeing Seeds</i>. She&#8217;s also written and edited extensively for major consumer gardening/outdoor-living publications (<i>Horticulture, North American Gardener, Backyard Living, Birds and Blooms</i>) and is presently the garden-and-nature columnist for the award-winning &#8220;Bottom Line Personal&#8221; newsletter. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9163"}},{"authorId":9164,"name":"Karan Davis Cutler","slug":"karan-davis-cutler","description":" <p><b>Suzanne DeJohn</b> is an editor with the National Gardening Association.<br/> <b>The National Gardening Association</b> is the leading garden&#45;based educational nonprofit organization in the United States, providing resources at www.garden.org and www.kidsgardening.org. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9164"}},{"authorId":9165,"name":"Kathleen Fisher","slug":"kathleen-fisher","description":" <p><b>Suzanne DeJohn</b> is an editor with the National Gardening Association.<br/> <b>The National Gardening Association</b> is the leading garden&#45;based educational nonprofit organization in the United States, providing resources at www.garden.org and www.kidsgardening.org. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9165"}},{"authorId":9166,"name":"Phillip Giroux","slug":"phillip-giroux","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9166"}},{"authorId":9167,"name":"Judy Glattstein","slug":"judy-glattstein","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9167"}},{"authorId":9168,"name":"Michael MacCaskey","slug":"michael-maccaskey","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9168"}},{"authorId":9169,"name":"Bill Marken","slug":"bill-marken","description":"Bill Marken is the author of the first edition of Container Gardening For Dummies and coauthor of the second edition.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9169"}},{"authorId":9170,"name":"Charlie Nardozzi","slug":"charlie-nardozzi","description":" <p><b>The National Gardening Association </b>is the leading garden-based educational organization in the United States. Visit http//:garden.org.</p> <p><b>Charlie Nardozzi</b> is a nationally recognized garden writer, radio and TV show host, consultant, and speaker. Charlie delights in making gardening information simple, easy, fun, and accessible to everyone.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9170"}},{"authorId":9171,"name":"Sally Roth","slug":"sally-roth","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9171"}},{"authorId":9172,"name":"Marcia Tatroe","slug":"marcia-tatroe","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9172"}},{"authorId":9157,"name":"Lance Walheim","slug":"lance-walheim","description":" <p><b>The National Gardening Association </b>is the leading garden-based educational organization in the USA. Visit //garden.org.</p> <p><b>Teri Dunn Chace</b> has more than 35 books in publication, including the 2016 AHS award-winner <i>Seeing Seeds</i>. She&#8217;s also written and edited extensively for major consumer gardening/outdoor-living publications (<i>Horticulture, North American Gardener, Backyard Living, Birds and Blooms</i>) and is presently the garden-and-nature columnist for the award-winning &#8220;Bottom Line Personal&#8221; newsletter. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9157"}},{"authorId":9173,"name":"Ann Whitman","slug":"ann-whitman","description":" <b>Ann Whitman</b> is the author of the first edition of <i>Organic Gardening For Dummies</i>. <p><b>Suzanne DeJohn</b> is an editor with the National Gardening Association, the leading garden-based educational nonprofit organization in the U.S. NGA's programs and initiatives highlight the opportunities for plant-based education in schools, communities, and backyards across the country. These include award-winning Web sites garden.org and kidsgardening.org.</p> <p><b>The National Gardening Association (NGA)</b> is committed to sustaining and renewing the fundamental links between people, plants, and the earth. Founded in 1972 as &#8220;Gardens for All&#8221; to spearhead the community garden movement, today&#8217;s NGA promotes environmental responsibility, advances multidisciplinary learning and scientifi c literacy, and creates partnerships that restore and enhance communities.<br /> NGA is best known for its garden-based curricula, educational journals, international initiatives, and several youth garden grant programs. Together these reach more than 300,000 children nationwide each year. NGA&#8217;s Web sites, one for home gardeners and another for those who garden with kids, build community and offer a wealth of custom content.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9173"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33925,"title":"General Gardening","slug":"general-gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":236815,"title":"How to Grow and Care for Succulents","slug":"grow-care-succulents","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/236815"}},{"articleId":209364,"title":"Sustainable Gardening For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sustainable-gardening-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209364"}},{"articleId":209195,"title":"Gardening Basics For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209195"}},{"articleId":209067,"title":"Gardening Basics For Canadians For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-canadians-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209067"}},{"articleId":206147,"title":"How to Divide Perennials","slug":"how-to-divide-perennials","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/206147"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63e291dea19c6\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63e291dea23f0\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":191685,"title":"Growing Seasons by Hardiness Zone","slug":"growing-seasons-by-hardiness-zone","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/191685"}},{"articleId":191709,"title":"Good Insects for Your Outdoor Plants","slug":"good-insects-for-your-outdoor-plants","categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/191709"}},{"articleId":191704,"title":"Explaining Gardening Fertilizers","slug":"explaining-gardening-fertilizers","categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/191704"}},{"articleId":191707,"title":"How Much Gravel, Sand, and Mulch to Buy for Your Garden","slug":"how-much-gravel-sand-and-mulch-to-buy-for-your-garden","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/191707"}}],"content":[{"title":"Growing seasons by hardiness zone","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Where you live has a lot to do with what you can grow in your garden and how you can grow it. You can use the following chart to determine the length and time of your growing season according to the <a href=\"//planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">USDA hardiness zone</a> you&#8217;re in.</p>\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<th>Zone</th>\n<th>Minimum Temperature (°F/°C)</th>\n<th>Last Frost Date</th>\n<th>First Frost Date</th>\n<th>Typical # of Frost-Free Days</th>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>1</td>\n<td>Below –50°F/Below –46°C</td>\n<td>Jun 15</td>\n<td>Jul 15</td>\n<td>30</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>2</td>\n<td>–50°F to –40°F/–46°C to<br />\n–40°C</td>\n<td>May 15</td>\n<td>Aug 15</td>\n<td>90</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>3</td>\n<td>–40°F to –30°F/–40°C to<br />\n–34°C</td>\n<td>May 15</td>\n<td>Sep 15</td>\n<td>120</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>4</td>\n<td>–30°F to –20°F/–34°C to<br />\n–29°C</td>\n<td>May 10</td>\n<td>Sep 15</td>\n<td>125</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>5</td>\n<td>–20°F to –10°F/–29°C to<br />\n–23°C</td>\n<td>Apr 30</td>\n<td>Oct 15</td>\n<td>165</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>6</td>\n<td>–10°F to 0°F/–23°C to<br />\n–18°C</td>\n<td>Apr 15</td>\n<td>Oct 15</td>\n<td>180</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>7</td>\n<td>0°F to 10°F/–23°C to –12°C</td>\n<td>Apr 15</td>\n<td>Oct 15</td>\n<td>180</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>8</td>\n<td>10°F to 20°F/–12°C to –7°C</td>\n<td>Mar 10</td>\n<td>Nov 15</td>\n<td>245</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>9</td>\n<td>20°F to 30°F/–7°C to –1°C</td>\n<td>Feb 15</td>\n<td>Dec 15</td>\n<td>265</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>10</td>\n<td>30°F to 40°F/–1°C to 4°C</td>\n<td>Jan 20</td>\n<td>Dec 20</td>\n<td>335</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>11</td>\n<td>40°F and up/4°C and up</td>\n<td>Frost-free</td>\n<td></td>\n<td>365</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n<p class=\"Remember\">Zone 1 is susceptible to frost all year.</p>\n"},{"title":"Good insects for your outdoor plants","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>As a gardener, you know that although you wage war on some insects, you can enlist whole armies of beneficial insects to help your garden grow. You can buy the insects in the following list to help control pests that trouble your outdoor plants:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Lady beetles (or lady bugs):</b> Both the adult and the lizard-like larvae are especially good at feeding on small insects, such as aphids and thrips. Release a few thousand of them in spring as soon as you notice the first aphid.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Green lacewings:</b> Their voracious larvae feed on aphids, mites, thrips, and various insect eggs. Release them in your garden in late spring, after the danger of frost has passed.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Predatory mites:</b> This type of mite feeds on spider mites and thrips. Add them to your garden in spring as soon as frost danger has passed.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Trichogramma wasps:</b> Harmless to humans, these tiny wasps attack moth eggs and butterfly larvae (that is, caterpillars). Release trichogramma when temperatures are above 72°F (22°C).</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Types of garden fertilizers","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Before you buy fertilizer for your garden, be sure that you understand what&#8217;s available. The following list offers the common types of garden fertilizers and explains their components and uses:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Complete fertilizers:</b> These contain all three macronutrients — nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), and potassium (K).</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Incomplete fertilizers:</b> These are missing one or more of the macronutrients, usually the P or the K.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Chelated micronutrients:</b> These are in a form that allows a plant to absorb them quicker than the more commonly available sulfated forms. If your plants just won&#8217;t green up (they stay mottled yellow and green, or just plain yellow), no matter how much nitrogen you apply, you probably have a micronutrient deficiency of iron, zinc, or manganese.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Foliar fertilizers:</b> You apply these to a plant&#8217;s leaves rather than to its roots. You can use most liquid fertilizers as foliar fertilizers, but make sure that the label instructs you accordingly.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Organic fertilizers:</b> These fertilizers derived their nutrients from something that was once alive. Examples include blood meal, fish emulsion, and manure.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Slow-release fertilizers:</b> These provide nutrients to plants at specific rates under particular conditions. Some slow-release fertilizers can deliver the benefits of their nutrients for as long as eight months.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"The amounts of gravel, sand, and mulch you need for your garden","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Gravel, mulch, sand, small rocks, and soil amendments can play a healthy and decorative role in your garden. Gravel, sand, and rocks are generally sold by weight. For coverage that&#8217;s 2 inches (5 centimeters) deep, use the following amounts:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">1 U.S. ton covers approximately 100 square feet.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">1 metric ton covers approximately 10 square meters.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p>Soil amendments and mulch are generally sold by volume. For coverage that&#8217;s 2 inches (5 centimeters) deep, use the following amounts:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">1 cubic yard covers approximately 160 square feet.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">1 cubic meter covers approximately 20 square meters.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p>Use the following table to convert U.S. and metric measurements. In each case, the conversions are approximately equal:</p>\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td>1 centimeter ≈ 0.4 inches</td>\n<td>1 inch ≈ 2.5 centimeters</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>1 meter ≈ 39 inches ≈ 1.1 yards</td>\n<td>1 yard ≈ 0.9 meter</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>1 kilometer ≈ 0.6 mile</td>\n<td>1 mile ≈ 1.6 kilometers</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>1 liter ≈ 1.1 quarts</td>\n<td>1 quart ≈ 0.9 liter</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>1 kilogram ≈ 2.2 pounds</td>\n<td>1 pound ≈ 0.4 kilograms</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>1 gram ≈ 0.04 ounce</td>\n<td>1 ounce ≈ 31 grams</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-03-21T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":208914},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T18:53:39+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-12-14T16:31:06+00:00","timestamp":"2023-12-14T18:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Garden & Green Living","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33916"},"slug":"garden-green-living","categoryId":33916},{"name":"Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33917"},"slug":"gardening","categoryId":33917},{"name":"General Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"},"slug":"general-gardening","categoryId":33925}],"title":"Month-by-Month: Chores for Gardeners in the Pacific Northwest","strippedTitle":"month-by-month: chores for gardeners in the pacific northwest","slug":"month-by-month-chores-for-gardeners-in-the-pacific-northwest","canonicalUrl":"","搜素搜所百度搜字段擎提高":{"metaDescription":"Pacific Northwest, including the milder parts of British Columbia, has a long season from spring through fall. West of the Cascade Range, the lingering cool spr","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"<p class=\"Remember\">Pacific Northwest, including the milder parts of British Columbia, has a long season from spring through fall. West of the Cascade Range, the lingering cool spring tends to favor cool-season annuals, and the relatively cool summers encourage spectacular displays of annuals. East of the Cascades, where winters are longer and much colder, the annual season is shorter, but the heat and the dry climate are terrific for sun-loving annuals.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>January:</b> Order seeds for starting indoors in a few weeks or outdoors in a few months. Prepare an indoor area for starting seeds.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>February:</b> Start seeds of annuals indoors for transplanting in spring. If the ground isn’t too wet, you can start seeding the following hardy annuals directly in the ground late this month: calendula, clarkia, cornflower, dwarf pink, English daisy (Bellis perennis), pansy, stock, and sweet alyssum. Transplanting hardy annuals, such as pansies and primroses, if nurseries offer them and the soil is dry enough, or plant them in containers.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>March:</b> Prepare beds for major spring planting as long as the soil isn’t too wet. Sow sweet peas seeds before midmonth; sow seeds of other hardy annuals. Continue indoor seeding of annuals. Begin sowing warm-season annuals, such as marigolds and zinnias, for transplanting when the weather warms up in May.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>April:</b> Set out transplants of cool-season annuals, such as calendulas, pansies, and snapdragons. Begin transplanting warm-season annuals if the weather and soil have warmed up. Watch for snails and slugs to begin their most damaging season around young annuals.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>May:</b> This is the Northwest’s prime time for planting annuals. Almost anything will grow if planted now. Start feeding annuals two or three weeks after planting. Protect young annuals from snails and slugs. Sow asters, cosmos, marigolds, and zinnias from seed directly in the ground.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>June:</b> Planting season continues, but try to finish soon to get the longest season. Continue to sow seeds of heat-loving annuals, such as marigolds and zinnias. Soon after planting annuals, pinch them back to encourage bushy growth. Continue regular feeding and grooming, and never let them dry out.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>July:</b> Keep annuals going strong by feeding them regularly. If planting beds need extra watering, run a soaker hose between the plants. You can still plant annual seeds for later summer bloom.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>August:</b> Watch for late summer invaders, such as spider mites. If impatiens and lobelia get a bit straggly, cut them back by about a third to encourage a late summer burst of growth.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>September:</b> Extend the summer bloom season by removing dead flowers and watering as needed. For color until frost strikes, set out dwarf pinks, Johnny-jump-ups, pansies, stocks, and kale.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>October:</b> Remove over-the-hill summer annuals. Clean up beds and turn over the soil for fall or spring planting. Keep hardy annuals, such as pansies, going for another few weeks by continuing to feed, water, and groom them. Sow wildflowers and other annuals that get off to an early start in spring. Scatter the seeds, cover them with a thin layer of organic matter, and then water thoroughly.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>November:</b> You still have time to sow seeds of hardy annuals and wildflowers for blooms next spring. Clean up all annual planting beds.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"<p class=\"Remember\">Pacific Northwest, including the milder parts of British Columbia, has a long season from spring through fall. West of the Cascade Range, the lingering cool spring tends to favor cool-season annuals, and the relatively cool summers encourage spectacular displays of annuals. East of the Cascades, where winters are longer and much colder, the annual season is shorter, but the heat and the dry climate are terrific for sun-loving annuals.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>January:</b> Order seeds for starting indoors in a few weeks or outdoors in a few months. Prepare an indoor area for starting seeds.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>February:</b> Start seeds of annuals indoors for transplanting in spring. If the ground isn’t too wet, you can start seeding the following hardy annuals directly in the ground late this month: calendula, clarkia, cornflower, dwarf pink, English daisy (Bellis perennis), pansy, stock, and sweet alyssum. Transplanting hardy annuals, such as pansies and primroses, if nurseries offer them and the soil is dry enough, or plant them in containers.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>March:</b> Prepare beds for major spring planting as long as the soil isn’t too wet. Sow sweet peas seeds before midmonth; sow seeds of other hardy annuals. Continue indoor seeding of annuals. Begin sowing warm-season annuals, such as marigolds and zinnias, for transplanting when the weather warms up in May.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>April:</b> Set out transplants of cool-season annuals, such as calendulas, pansies, and snapdragons. Begin transplanting warm-season annuals if the weather and soil have warmed up. Watch for snails and slugs to begin their most damaging season around young annuals.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>May:</b> This is the Northwest’s prime time for planting annuals. Almost anything will grow if planted now. Start feeding annuals two or three weeks after planting. Protect young annuals from snails and slugs. Sow asters, cosmos, marigolds, and zinnias from seed directly in the ground.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>June:</b> Planting season continues, but try to finish soon to get the longest season. Continue to sow seeds of heat-loving annuals, such as marigolds and zinnias. Soon after planting annuals, pinch them back to encourage bushy growth. Continue regular feeding and grooming, and never let them dry out.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>July:</b> Keep annuals going strong by feeding them regularly. If planting beds need extra watering, run a soaker hose between the plants. You can still plant annual seeds for later summer bloom.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>August:</b> Watch for late summer invaders, such as spider mites. If impatiens and lobelia get a bit straggly, cut them back by about a third to encourage a late summer burst of growth.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>September:</b> Extend the summer bloom season by removing dead flowers and watering as needed. For color until frost strikes, set out dwarf pinks, Johnny-jump-ups, pansies, stocks, and kale.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>October:</b> Remove over-the-hill summer annuals. Clean up beds and turn over the soil for fall or spring planting. Keep hardy annuals, such as pansies, going for another few weeks by continuing to feed, water, and groom them. Sow wildflowers and other annuals that get off to an early start in spring. Scatter the seeds, cover them with a thin layer of organic matter, and then water thoroughly.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>November:</b> You still have time to sow seeds of hardy annuals and wildflowers for blooms next spring. Clean up all annual planting beds.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9156,"name":"The National Gardening Association","slug":"the-national-gardening-association","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9156"}},{"authorId":9163,"name":"Bob Beckstrom","slug":"bob-beckstrom","description":" <p><b>The National Gardening Association </b>is the leading garden-based educational organization in the USA. Visit //garden.org.</p> <p><b>Teri Dunn Chace</b> has more than 35 books in publication, including the 2016 AHS award-winner <i>Seeing Seeds</i>. She&#8217;s also written and edited extensively for major consumer gardening/outdoor-living publications (<i>Horticulture, North American Gardener, Backyard Living, Birds and Blooms</i>) and is presently the garden-and-nature columnist for the award-winning &#8220;Bottom Line Personal&#8221; newsletter. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9163"}},{"authorId":9164,"name":"Karan Davis Cutler","slug":"karan-davis-cutler","description":" <p><b>Suzanne DeJohn</b> is an editor with the National Gardening Association.<br/> <b>The National Gardening Association</b> is the leading garden&#45;based educational nonprofit organization in the United States, providing resources at www.garden.org and www.kidsgardening.org. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9164"}},{"authorId":9165,"name":"Kathleen Fisher","slug":"kathleen-fisher","description":" <p><b>Suzanne DeJohn</b> is an editor with the National Gardening Association.<br/> <b>The National Gardening Association</b> is the leading garden&#45;based educational nonprofit organization in the United States, providing resources at www.garden.org and www.kidsgardening.org. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9165"}},{"authorId":9166,"name":"Phillip Giroux","slug":"phillip-giroux","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9166"}},{"authorId":9167,"name":"Judy Glattstein","slug":"judy-glattstein","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9167"}},{"authorId":9168,"name":"Michael MacCaskey","slug":"michael-maccaskey","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9168"}},{"authorId":9169,"name":"Bill Marken","slug":"bill-marken","description":"Bill Marken is the author of the first edition of Container Gardening For Dummies and coauthor of the second edition.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9169"}},{"authorId":9170,"name":"Charlie Nardozzi","slug":"charlie-nardozzi","description":" <p><b>Paul Simon</b> is a nationally recognized landscape architect, public artist, horticulturist, master gardener, and urban designer. <p><b>Charlie Nardozzi</b> is a nationally recognized garden writer, speaker, and radio and television personality. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9170"}},{"authorId":9171,"name":"Sally Roth","slug":"sally-roth","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9171"}},{"authorId":9172,"name":"Marcia Tatroe","slug":"marcia-tatroe","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9172"}},{"authorId":9157,"name":"Lance Walheim","slug":"lance-walheim","description":" <p><b>The National Gardening Association </b>is the leading garden-based educational organization in the USA. Visit //garden.org.</p> <p><b>Teri Dunn Chace</b> has more than 35 books in publication, including the 2016 AHS award-winner <i>Seeing Seeds</i>. She&#8217;s also written and edited extensively for major consumer gardening/outdoor-living publications (<i>Horticulture, North American Gardener, Backyard Living, Birds and Blooms</i>) and is presently the garden-and-nature columnist for the award-winning &#8220;Bottom Line Personal&#8221; newsletter. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9157"}},{"authorId":9173,"name":"Ann Whitman","slug":"ann-whitman","description":" <b>Ann Whitman</b> is the author of the first edition of <i>Organic Gardening For Dummies</i>. <p><b>Suzanne DeJohn</b> is an editor with the National Gardening Association, the leading garden-based educational nonprofit organization in the U.S. NGA's programs and initiatives highlight the opportunities for plant-based education in schools, communities, and backyards across the country. These include award-winning Web sites garden.org and kidsgardening.org.</p> <p><b>The National Gardening Association (NGA)</b> is committed to sustaining and renewing the fundamental links between people, plants, and the earth. Founded in 1972 as &#8220;Gardens for All&#8221; to spearhead the community garden movement, today&#8217;s NGA promotes environmental responsibility, advances multidisciplinary learning and scientifi c literacy, and creates partnerships that restore and enhance communities.<br /> NGA is best known for its garden-based curricula, educational journals, international initiatives, and several youth garden grant programs. Together these reach more than 300,000 children nationwide each year. NGA&#8217;s Web sites, one for home gardeners and another for those who garden with kids, build community and offer a wealth of custom content.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9173"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33925,"title":"General Gardening","slug":"general-gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":236815,"title":"How to Grow and Care for Succulents","slug":"grow-care-succulents","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/236815"}},{"articleId":209364,"title":"Sustainable Gardening For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sustainable-gardening-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209364"}},{"articleId":209195,"title":"Gardening Basics For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209195"}},{"articleId":209067,"title":"Gardening Basics For Canadians For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-canadians-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209067"}},{"articleId":208914,"title":"Gardening All-in-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/208914"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-639a0f5fb92a1\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-639a0f5fb9b7a\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-12-14T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":180824},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T18:54:01+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-10-18T15:52:26+00:00","timestamp":"2023-10-18T18:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Garden & Green Living","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33916"},"slug":"garden-green-living","categoryId":33916},{"name":"Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33917"},"slug":"gardening","categoryId":33917},{"name":"General Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"},"slug":"general-gardening","categoryId":33925}],"title":"Month-by-Month: Chores for Desert Flower Gardeners at Extreme Altitudes","strippedTitle":"month-by-month: chores for desert flower gardeners at extreme altitudes","slug":"month-by-month-chores-for-desert-gardeners-at-extreme-altitudes","canonicalUrl":"","搜素搜所百度搜字段擎提高":{"metaDescription":"The Southwest deserts encompass mild-winter climates of the low-elevation deserts of Arizona and California. (The mountains of Arizona and New Mexico, as well a","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"The Southwest deserts encompass mild-winter climates of the low-elevation deserts of Arizona and California. (The mountains of Arizona and New Mexico, as well as west Texas, have a more typical cold-winter, summer-only season for growing annuals.)\r\n\r\nGlory time for annuals is late winter and early spring in low-desert Arizona, primarily around Phoenix and Tucson, and California’s Coachella Valley. This calendar starts in September to reflect the true beginning of the planting season:\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">If you live in a temperate, high-altitude climate, follow the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/home-auto-hobbies/garden-green-living/gardening/flowers/month-by-month-chores-for-northern-gardeners-180857/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">calendar recommendations for Northern gardeners</a>.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>September:</b> Prepare planting beds. Midmonth or later, set out nursery transplants for winter and spring bloom — maybe even by Christmas. Provide temporary shade during the hottest weather. Early in the month, you still have time to start annual flower seeds in flats or pots to transplant into the ground later in the fall. If summer annuals are still going strong, keep them watered thoroughly and fertilize every two or four weeks.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>October:</b> Continue to set out annuals for blooms before the end of the year. Water thoroughly after planting and provide temporary shade during extra-hot spells. Sow seeds of low-spreading annuals to cover bare spots in bulb beds. If your timing is good, everything will bloom all at once. Start regular feeding a few weeks after planting annuals.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>November:</b> You still have time to plant for winter and spring bloom. Cooler weather encourages a new crop of aphids, plus slugs and snails.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>December:</b> You still have time to plant seedlings. Watch your soil for signs of dryness, and water as needed.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>January:</b> After the holidays, nurseries stock up with blooming annuals in small pots. Shop for color that you can use right away in pots or in gaps in planting beds. Watch for aphids and take steps to control them. Pull or hoe seasonal weeds, or mulch beds with a layer of organic matter to smother weeds and weed seeds.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>February:</b> Cool-season annuals are peaking this month in the low desert. Maintain top performance by removing dead flowers, watering thoroughly, and feeding regularly. Start seeds of warm-season annuals indoors to transplant into the garden in four to six weeks. Prepare beds for spring planting.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>March:</b> In the low desert, transplant warm-season annuals. Pinch back at planting time and snip off flowers to encourage bushier growth. A few weeks after planting, fertilize young annuals and begin a regular (bi-weekly or monthly) fertilizing schedule.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>April:</b> Plant heat-loving annuals, such as marigolds and zinnias. Adjust the frequency of sprinkler systems as the weather heats up.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>May:</b> Spring flowers are winding down. Pull them out and replace them with heat-lovers. Pinch tips of young annuals for bushier growth.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>June:</b> This is your last chance to plant for summer blooms. Make sure that you choose from among the true heat-lovers: globe amaranth, salvia, and the most reliable of all, vinca rosea.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>July and August:</b> Water and mulch. You don’t do any planting at this time of year. Feed summer annuals regularly. Remove faded flowers.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"The Southwest deserts encompass mild-winter climates of the low-elevation deserts of Arizona and California. (The mountains of Arizona and New Mexico, as well as west Texas, have a more typical cold-winter, summer-only season for growing annuals.)\r\n\r\nGlory time for annuals is late winter and early spring in low-desert Arizona, primarily around Phoenix and Tucson, and California’s Coachella Valley. This calendar starts in September to reflect the true beginning of the planting season:\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">If you live in a temperate, high-altitude climate, follow the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/home-auto-hobbies/garden-green-living/gardening/flowers/month-by-month-chores-for-northern-gardeners-180857/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">calendar recommendations for Northern gardeners</a>.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>September:</b> Prepare planting beds. Midmonth or later, set out nursery transplants for winter and spring bloom — maybe even by Christmas. Provide temporary shade during the hottest weather. Early in the month, you still have time to start annual flower seeds in flats or pots to transplant into the ground later in the fall. If summer annuals are still going strong, keep them watered thoroughly and fertilize every two or four weeks.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>October:</b> Continue to set out annuals for blooms before the end of the year. Water thoroughly after planting and provide temporary shade during extra-hot spells. Sow seeds of low-spreading annuals to cover bare spots in bulb beds. If your timing is good, everything will bloom all at once. Start regular feeding a few weeks after planting annuals.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>November:</b> You still have time to plant for winter and spring bloom. Cooler weather encourages a new crop of aphids, plus slugs and snails.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>December:</b> You still have time to plant seedlings. Watch your soil for signs of dryness, and water as needed.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>January:</b> After the holidays, nurseries stock up with blooming annuals in small pots. Shop for color that you can use right away in pots or in gaps in planting beds. Watch for aphids and take steps to control them. Pull or hoe seasonal weeds, or mulch beds with a layer of organic matter to smother weeds and weed seeds.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>February:</b> Cool-season annuals are peaking this month in the low desert. Maintain top performance by removing dead flowers, watering thoroughly, and feeding regularly. Start seeds of warm-season annuals indoors to transplant into the garden in four to six weeks. Prepare beds for spring planting.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>March:</b> In the low desert, transplant warm-season annuals. Pinch back at planting time and snip off flowers to encourage bushier growth. A few weeks after planting, fertilize young annuals and begin a regular (bi-weekly or monthly) fertilizing schedule.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>April:</b> Plant heat-loving annuals, such as marigolds and zinnias. Adjust the frequency of sprinkler systems as the weather heats up.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>May:</b> Spring flowers are winding down. Pull them out and replace them with heat-lovers. Pinch tips of young annuals for bushier growth.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>June:</b> This is your last chance to plant for summer blooms. Make sure that you choose from among the true heat-lovers: globe amaranth, salvia, and the most reliable of all, vinca rosea.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>July and August:</b> Water and mulch. You don’t do any planting at this time of year. Feed summer annuals regularly. Remove faded flowers.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9156,"name":"The National Gardening Association","slug":"the-national-gardening-association","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9156"}},{"authorId":9163,"name":"Bob Beckstrom","slug":"bob-beckstrom","description":" <p><b>The National Gardening Association </b>is the leading garden-based educational organization in the USA. Visit //garden.org.</p> <p><b>Teri Dunn Chace</b> has more than 35 books in publication, including the 2016 AHS award-winner <i>Seeing Seeds</i>. She&#8217;s also written and edited extensively for major consumer gardening/outdoor-living publications (<i>Horticulture, North American Gardener, Backyard Living, Birds and Blooms</i>) and is presently the garden-and-nature columnist for the award-winning &#8220;Bottom Line Personal&#8221; newsletter. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9163"}},{"authorId":9164,"name":"Karan Davis Cutler","slug":"karan-davis-cutler","description":" <p><b>Suzanne DeJohn</b> is an editor with the National Gardening Association.<br/> <b>The National Gardening Association</b> is the leading garden&#45;based educational nonprofit organization in the United States, providing resources at www.garden.org and www.kidsgardening.org. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9164"}},{"authorId":9165,"name":"Kathleen Fisher","slug":"kathleen-fisher","description":" <p><b>Suzanne DeJohn</b> is an editor with the National Gardening Association.<br/> <b>The National Gardening Association</b> is the leading garden&#45;based educational nonprofit organization in the United States, providing resources at www.garden.org and www.kidsgardening.org. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9165"}},{"authorId":9166,"name":"Phillip Giroux","slug":"phillip-giroux","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9166"}},{"authorId":9167,"name":"Judy Glattstein","slug":"judy-glattstein","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9167"}},{"authorId":9168,"name":"Michael MacCaskey","slug":"michael-maccaskey","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9168"}},{"authorId":9169,"name":"Bill Marken","slug":"bill-marken","description":"Bill Marken is the author of the first edition of Container Gardening For Dummies and coauthor of the second edition.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9169"}},{"authorId":9170,"name":"Charlie Nardozzi","slug":"charlie-nardozzi","description":" <p><b>The National Gardening Association </b>is the leading garden-based educational organization in the United States. Visit http//:garden.org.</p> <p><b>Charlie Nardozzi</b> is a nationally recognized garden writer, radio and TV show host, consultant, and speaker. 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These include award-winning Web sites garden.org and kidsgardening.org.</p> <p><b>The National Gardening Association (NGA)</b> is committed to sustaining and renewing the fundamental links between people, plants, and the earth. Founded in 1972 as &#8220;Gardens for All&#8221; to spearhead the community garden movement, today&#8217;s NGA promotes environmental responsibility, advances multidisciplinary learning and scientifi c literacy, and creates partnerships that restore and enhance communities.<br /> NGA is best known for its garden-based curricula, educational journals, international initiatives, and several youth garden grant programs. Together these reach more than 300,000 children nationwide each year. NGA&#8217;s Web sites, one for home gardeners and another for those who garden with kids, build community and offer a wealth of custom content.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9173"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33925,"title":"General Gardening","slug":"general-gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":236815,"title":"How to Grow and Care for Succulents","slug":"grow-care-succulents","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/236815"}},{"articleId":209364,"title":"Sustainable Gardening For Dummies Cheat 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Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Garden & Green Living","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33916"},"slug":"garden-green-living","categoryId":33916},{"name":"Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33917"},"slug":"gardening","categoryId":33917},{"name":"General Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"},"slug":"general-gardening","categoryId":33925}],"title":"Designing Your Vegetable Garden","strippedTitle":"designing your vegetable garden","slug":"designing-your-vegetable-garden","canonicalUrl":"","搜素搜所百度搜字段擎提高":{"metaDescription":"The best advice for planning your first vegetable garden is to start small. Just be sure you locate your garden in a sunny spot where expansion is possible. As ","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"The best advice for planning your first vegetable garden is to start small. Just be sure you locate your garden in a sunny spot where expansion is possible. As for actual size, it depends on what you want to grow. Here's what you can put in the following standard-size gardens:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">A 6 x 8 foot plot can support a couple tomato plants, maybe some bush beans, and some lettuce.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">A 10 x 18 foot plot can hold all that, plus a couple space-consuming squash plants and cucumbers, and maybe some carrots or beets.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">A 20 x 24 foot plot can hold all that, plus peppers, leeks, broccoli, turnips, and maybe some herbs.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">A 40 x 60 plot allows you more of everything, plus some bigger items, such as corn (corn isn't worth growing unless you can have a dozen or more plants because otherwise they don't pollinate or pollinate completely, and you end up harvesting gap-toothed ears) and asparagus or rhubarb.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nSketch out your vegetable garden plan on paper before planting. Figure out how much space to allot to individual plants — and don't forget to allow for space between the rows, or paths, so you can tend the plants. (Mature sizes of various vegetable varieties are noted on seed packets and often in catalog descriptions.)\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">Allow for <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/home-auto-hobbies/garden-green-living/gardening/vegetables/growing-vegetables-by-succession-planting-and-square-foot-gardening-193739/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">succession planting</a>: If something is harvested early in the summer, lettuce, say, or peas, you can then free up that space for another crop, such as carrots. Succession planting is a good trick, but to pull it off, you may need to do some research as well as some trial and error — and be willing to invest the time and effort.</p>\r\n\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 526px;\">\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"526\"]<img src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/177426.image0.jpg\" alt=\"Garden plan showing succession plantings.\" width=\"526\" height=\"400\" /> Garden plan showing succession plantings[/caption]\r\n\r\n</div>\r\n<p class=\"Remember\">You could also plan for a constant vegetable harvest by <i>i</i><i>ntercropping,</i> or interplanting. This method is simple: Just have two different plants share the same part of the garden in an alternating or checkerboard pattern. This setup can look rather nifty, but it has practical advantages as well. Smaller, faster-maturing plants can grow with larger, slower-growing ones and so you always have something to harvest. And plants that appreciate a little shade can grow in the shelter of taller ones (have pole beans next to lettuce or spinach, for example).</p>\r\n\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 373px;\">\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"373\"]<img src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/177427.image1.jpg\" alt=\"Garden plan showing interplanting.\" width=\"373\" height=\"400\" /> Garden plan showing interplanting[/caption]\r\n\r\n</div>","description":"The best advice for planning your first vegetable garden is to start small. Just be sure you locate your garden in a sunny spot where expansion is possible. As for actual size, it depends on what you want to grow. Here's what you can put in the following standard-size gardens:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">A 6 x 8 foot plot can support a couple tomato plants, maybe some bush beans, and some lettuce.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">A 10 x 18 foot plot can hold all that, plus a couple space-consuming squash plants and cucumbers, and maybe some carrots or beets.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">A 20 x 24 foot plot can hold all that, plus peppers, leeks, broccoli, turnips, and maybe some herbs.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">A 40 x 60 plot allows you more of everything, plus some bigger items, such as corn (corn isn't worth growing unless you can have a dozen or more plants because otherwise they don't pollinate or pollinate completely, and you end up harvesting gap-toothed ears) and asparagus or rhubarb.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nSketch out your vegetable garden plan on paper before planting. Figure out how much space to allot to individual plants — and don't forget to allow for space between the rows, or paths, so you can tend the plants. (Mature sizes of various vegetable varieties are noted on seed packets and often in catalog descriptions.)\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">Allow for <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/home-auto-hobbies/garden-green-living/gardening/vegetables/growing-vegetables-by-succession-planting-and-square-foot-gardening-193739/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">succession planting</a>: If something is harvested early in the summer, lettuce, say, or peas, you can then free up that space for another crop, such as carrots. Succession planting is a good trick, but to pull it off, you may need to do some research as well as some trial and error — and be willing to invest the time and effort.</p>\r\n\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 526px;\">\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"526\"]<img src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/177426.image0.jpg\" alt=\"Garden plan showing succession plantings.\" width=\"526\" height=\"400\" /> Garden plan showing succession plantings[/caption]\r\n\r\n</div>\r\n<p class=\"Remember\">You could also plan for a constant vegetable harvest by <i>i</i><i>ntercropping,</i> or interplanting. This method is simple: Just have two different plants share the same part of the garden in an alternating or checkerboard pattern. This setup can look rather nifty, but it has practical advantages as well. Smaller, faster-maturing plants can grow with larger, slower-growing ones and so you always have something to harvest. And plants that appreciate a little shade can grow in the shelter of taller ones (have pole beans next to lettuce or spinach, for example).</p>\r\n\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 373px;\">\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"373\"]<img src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/177427.image1.jpg\" alt=\"Garden plan showing interplanting.\" width=\"373\" height=\"400\" /> Garden plan showing interplanting[/caption]\r\n\r\n</div>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9155,"name":"Steven A. Frowine","slug":"steven-a-frowine","description":" <p><b>Steven A. Frowine</b> is a noted professional horticulturist and a longtime avid gardener and communicator.</p><p><b> The National Gardening Association</b> is the leading garden-based educational nonprofit in the USA. Visit //garden.org.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9155"}},{"authorId":9156,"name":"The National Gardening Association","slug":"the-national-gardening-association","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9156"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33925,"title":"General Gardening","slug":"general-gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":209195,"title":"Gardening Basics For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209195"}},{"articleId":206147,"title":"How to Divide Perennials","slug":"how-to-divide-perennials","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/206147"}},{"articleId":200692,"title":"Choosing the Right Vines for Your Garden","slug":"choosing-the-right-vines-for-your-garden","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/200692"}},{"articleId":200542,"title":"Deciding Where to Put Your Water Garden","slug":"deciding-where-to-put-your-water-garden","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/200542"}},{"articleId":199075,"title":"Understanding the Benefits of Garden Mulch","slug":"understanding-the-benefits-of-garden-mulch","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/199075"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":236815,"title":"How to Grow and Care for Succulents","slug":"grow-care-succulents","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/236815"}},{"articleId":209364,"title":"Sustainable Gardening For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sustainable-gardening-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209364"}},{"articleId":209195,"title":"Gardening Basics For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209195"}},{"articleId":209067,"title":"Gardening Basics For Canadians For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-canadians-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209067"}},{"articleId":208914,"title":"Gardening All-in-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/208914"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282222,"slug":"gardening-basics-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119782032","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119782031/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119782031/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119782031-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119782031/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119782031/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/gardening-basics-for-dummies-2nd-edition-cover-9781119782032-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Gardening Basics For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"","authors":[{"authorId":34784,"name":"","slug":"","description":" <p><b> Joseph A. 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Visit //garden.org.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9155"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119782032&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b4542af5\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119782032&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b4543531\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-07-28T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":193659},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-27T16:56:28+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-04-18T17:44:11+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:19:38+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Garden & Green Living","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33916"},"slug":"garden-green-living","categoryId":33916},{"name":"Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33917"},"slug":"gardening","categoryId":33917},{"name":"General Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"},"slug":"general-gardening","categoryId":33925}],"title":"Gardening Basics For Canadians For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"gardening basics for canadians for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-canadians-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","搜素搜所百度搜字段擎提高":{"metaDescription":"Learn the basics of growing plants in the Canada's cold climates, including regional frost dates and how to prepare perennials for winter.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Gardening in Canada presents specific challenges due to our cold climate and short growing season. This cheat sheet offers tips for getting the most out of your Canadian garden.\r\n\r\nStart by checking the frost dates in your region and consult some of the many online gardening resources that are available. Protect your perennials through the winter and choose the best grasses for Canada’s climate to maintain a beautiful, thriving lawn and garden year after year. Read on to see how.","description":"Gardening in Canada presents specific challenges due to our cold climate and short growing season. This cheat sheet offers tips for getting the most out of your Canadian garden.\r\n\r\nStart by checking the frost dates in your region and consult some of the many online gardening resources that are available. Protect your perennials through the winter and choose the best grasses for Canada’s climate to maintain a beautiful, thriving lawn and garden year after year. Read on to see how.","blurb":"","authors":[],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33925,"title":"General Gardening","slug":"general-gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":236815,"title":"How to Grow and Care for Succulents","slug":"grow-care-succulents","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/236815"}},{"articleId":209364,"title":"Sustainable Gardening For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sustainable-gardening-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209364"}},{"articleId":209195,"title":"Gardening Basics For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209195"}},{"articleId":208914,"title":"Gardening All-in-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/208914"}},{"articleId":206147,"title":"How to Divide Perennials","slug":"how-to-divide-perennials","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/206147"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b3a2f329\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b3a2fbef\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":192821,"title":"Canadian Gardening Frost Dates by Region","slug":"canadian-gardening-frost-dates-by-region","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/192821"}},{"articleId":192811,"title":"Online Resources for Gardening in Canada","slug":"online-resources-for-gardening-in-canada","categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/192811"}},{"articleId":192820,"title":"Preparing Perennials for Cold Canadian Winters","slug":"preparing-perennials-for-cold-canadian-winters","categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/192820"}},{"articleId":192810,"title":"The Best Grasses to Plant in Canada","slug":"the-best-grasses-to-plant-in-canada","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","landscaping"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/192810"}}],"content":[{"title":"Canadian gardening frost dates by region","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Canadian gardeners need to know when the growing season in their area begins and ends so they can avoid losing plants to frost. This chart provides frost dates across Canada.</p>\n<p>To be extra careful, plant or transplant temperature-sensitive plants ten days after the dates below. For more Canadian locations, go to <a href=\"//tdc.ca/canadian_frost_dates.htm\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">tdc’s FarmGate</a>.</p>\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<th>Location</th>\n<th>Last Frost Date</th>\n<th>First Frost Date</th>\n<th>Typical Number of Frost-Free Days</th>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>St. John’s</td>\n<td>June 2</td>\n<td>October 12</td>\n<td>132</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Halifax</td>\n<td>May 6</td>\n<td>October 20</td>\n<td>167</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Montreal</td>\n<td>May 3</td>\n<td>October 7</td>\n<td>157</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Toronto</td>\n<td>May 9</td>\n<td>October 6</td>\n<td>150</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Winnipeg</td>\n<td>May 25</td>\n<td>September 22</td>\n<td>120</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Regina</td>\n<td>May 21</td>\n<td>September 10</td>\n<td>112</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Calgary</td>\n<td>May 23</td>\n<td>September 15</td>\n<td>115</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Yellowknife</td>\n<td>May 27</td>\n<td>September 15</td>\n<td>111</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Whitehorse</td>\n<td>June 11</td>\n<td>August 25</td>\n<td>75</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Vancouver</td>\n<td>March 28</td>\n<td>November 5</td>\n<td>222</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Victoria</td>\n<td>March 1</td>\n<td>December 1</td>\n<td>275</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n"},{"title":"Online resources for gardening in Canada","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>If you’re looking for reliable Canadian gardening websites, you’ve come to the right spot. The following sites offer interesting Canadian gardening blogs, excellent gardening tips, Canadian gardening communities, upcoming regional gardening events, and more.</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><a href=\"//planthardiness.gc.ca/?m=1\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Plant Hardiness Zones of Canada</a></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><a href=\"//www.rbg.ca/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Canadian Botanical Conservation Network</a></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i></i><a href=\"//www.cwf-fcf.org/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Canadian Wildlife Federation</a></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><a href=\"//www.coldclimategardening.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Cold Climate Gardening</a></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><a href=\"//www.communitiesinbloom.ca/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Communities in Bloom</a></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><a href=\"//www.compost.org\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Compost Council of Canada</a></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><a href=\"//www.growarow.org/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Plant a Row; Grow a Row</a></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><a href=\"//www.seeds.ca/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Seeds of Diversity Canada</a></p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Preparing perennials for cold Canadian winters","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>In Canada, tender perennials like geraniums, impatiens, and gerbera need to be kept alive with good winter protection — otherwise they become one-hit wonders. To overwinter your tender perennial plants during Canada’s cold winter months, follow these steps:</p>\n<ol class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Dig up the roots or entire plant.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Bring them indoors to a nonfreezing spot for the next few months (where they will become dormant or semidormant houseplants).</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Pot the plants in any good soil, and grow them in a cool (5°C-10°C, or 40°F-50°F) and bright area.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Keep them barely moist through the winter, just keeping them alive.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Once replanted in the spring, they’ll spring back to life with the help of warmer temperatures and brighter light.</p>\n</li>\n</ol>\n<p class=\"Tip\">You can also trim and prune your perennials and use mulch to protect them through the winter.</p>\n"},{"title":"The best grasses to plant in Canada","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Growing and maintaining a lush green lawn in Canada can be a challenge. It starts with choosing the best type of grass. The best types of grasses to grow in Canada are cool-season grasses because our summers are short and our winters are cold – and usually snowy.</p>\n<p>Cool-season grasses grow actively in spring and fall, slow down in summer, and go dormant in the winter. They do best at temperatures between 16°C and 27°C (60°F and 80°F) and can survive freezing winter temperatures. The following cool-season grasses thrive in Canada’s cooler climate.</p>\n<table>\n<caption>Cool-Season, Northern Grasses</caption>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<th>Type of Grass</th>\n<th>Appearance</th>\n<th>Ideal Mow-to Height</th>\n<th>Description and Care</th>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Kentucky bluegrass</td>\n<td>Fine to medium texture.<br />\nCanoe-shaped.<br />\nDark blue-green.</td>\n<td>6 to 8 cm</td>\n<td>Hardy but not drought-tolerant so water generously.<br />\nDisease resistant.<br />\nNeeds more fertilizer.<br />\nShallow roots make it a good showpiece lawn but unsuitable for<br />\nheavy foot traffic.</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Fescues, fine and tall</td>\n<td>Fine texture.<br />\nBristle-leaved.<br />\nMedium green.</td>\n<td>6 to 8 cm</td>\n<td>Water deeply and infrequently (do not soak or make soggy).<br />\nShade-tolerant.<br />\nTolerates foot traffic very well.<br />\nCan perform well in poor soil.<br />\nIs often mixed with other grasses.</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Bent grass</td>\n<td>Fine texture.<br />\nBlades begin to bends at a couple of centimeters tall (hence the<br />\nname).</td>\n<td>3 to 4 cm</td>\n<td>Needs generous watering (weekly during the height of the<br />\ngrowing season).<br />\nCut regularly to avoid stems from forming thick mats and<br />\nthatching.<br />\nPopular for golf and tennis courses.<br />\nUse a mower with very sharp blades.</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Perennial ryegrass</td>\n<td>Fine texture.<br />\nGlossy.<br />\nDark green.</td>\n<td>6 to 8 cm</td>\n<td>Has shallow roots, likes consistent water.<br />\nDisease resistant.<br />\nTolerates foot traffic well.<br />\nNice in full sun or shade (but not reliably hardy).<br />\nGerminates and grows quickly and is often used in blends.</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Two years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-04-18T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":209067},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-27T16:58:00+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-04-08T19:00:38+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:19:35+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Garden & Green Living","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33916"},"slug":"garden-green-living","categoryId":33916},{"name":"Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33917"},"slug":"gardening","categoryId":33917},{"name":"General Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"},"slug":"general-gardening","categoryId":33925}],"title":"Sustainable Gardening For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"sustainable gardening for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"sustainable-gardening-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","搜素搜所百度搜字段擎提高":{"metaDescription":"Discover what tools you need to create a sustainable garden, and learn some tips to make your garden grow.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Gardening sustainably just makes sense in our fragile world. Doing it in your own backyard takes a little effort, but more and more gardeners are finding that every step is worth it to create a sustainable garden that not only looks after your plants and you, but also helps the whole planet.","description":"Gardening sustainably just makes sense in our fragile world. Doing it in your own backyard takes a little effort, but more and more gardeners are finding that every step is worth it to create a sustainable garden that not only looks after your plants and you, but also helps the whole planet.","blurb":"","authors":[],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33925,"title":"General Gardening","slug":"general-gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":236815,"title":"How to Grow and Care for Succulents","slug":"grow-care-succulents","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/236815"}},{"articleId":209195,"title":"Gardening Basics For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209195"}},{"articleId":209067,"title":"Gardening Basics For Canadians For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-canadians-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209067"}},{"articleId":208914,"title":"Gardening All-in-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/208914"}},{"articleId":206147,"title":"How to Divide Perennials","slug":"how-to-divide-perennials","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/206147"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b37b3636\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b37b4098\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":194884,"title":"Reducing Your Environmental Footprint in the Garden","slug":"reducing-your-environmental-footprint-in-the-garden","categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/194884"}},{"articleId":194866,"title":"A Few Essential Tools for Your Sustainable Garden","slug":"a-few-essential-tools-for-your-sustainable-garden","categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/194866"}},{"articleId":194828,"title":"Some Sustainable Plants for a Coastal Temperate Climate","slug":"some-sustainable-plants-for-a-coastal-temperate-climate","categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/194828"}},{"articleId":194859,"title":"Top Tips for Small Sustainable Gardens","slug":"top-tips-for-small-sustainable-gardens","categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/194859"}}],"content":[{"title":"Reducing your environmental footprint in the garden","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Switching over to sustainable gardening practices goes a long way to building a garden that you can enjoy, admire and even eat. At the same time, you reduce your environmental footprint, by increasing carbon storage, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and contributing to plant and animal biodiversity. Here are a few tips to create your sustainable garden:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Plant trees.</b> Planting trees helps to store carbon from the atmosphere into the soil. Trees can also cool your home in summer and let in the winter sun. If you don’t have room for trees at your place, volunteer with a local landcare group.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Grow your own organic food. </b>Not only does this help to reduce the distance your food travels before it hits your plate, but it also helps to save water and fossil fuels.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Compost your waste. </b>The less green garden waste and food scraps going into landfill the better, and you get to use the compost in your sustainable garden.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Take responsibility for your gardening practices.</b> Think very carefully before you reach for the bug spray or synthetic fertiliser! So many good, sustainable alternatives exist — use your compost to help feed your plants, and get worms and insects working for you.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Help stop the spread of environmental weeds.</b> Find out what plants have become weeds in your area and, if you have them or they pop up, either get rid of them safely or contain them.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Minimise your use of powered tools. </b>Mowers, blowers and brush-cutters can make life easier, but think about their environmental impact. Buy an energy-efficient mower, mow less often and keep the grass height to about 4 to 5 centimetres — it’s better for your sustainable lawn as well.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Start a list of groups of like-minded people you can join or learn from.</b> Local knowledge goes a long way in establishing sustainable practices.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Get the kids into sustainable gardening.</b> At home, at school or in the community, if kids learn the right way from the beginning, they’re sure to keep gardening sustainably into the future.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Only use renewable resources in the garden. </b>Check the source of gardening materials, and make sure you reuse, recycle and renew. Think about where your pavers, sleepers and mulch come from and how they’re manufactured.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Create a haven with a diverse range of plants.</b> Not only do you help increase plant biodiversity, but you also provide a habitat for animals, beneficial insects and birds.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Build your garden for the future, not for fashion.</b> Make your garden climate-friendly and water-wise. Understand your environment, weather patterns and the plants that thrive where you live, not what the magazines dictate.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"A few essential tools for your sustainable garden","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>To create your sustainable garden, some things are just too good to pass up. Compost, mulch and worms all help to condition your soil and retain moisture, and you can get beneficial insects to work with you to keep your plants healthy, sustainably.</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>A compost heap or bin: </b>Choose whatever type suits your garden — a three-bay heap for a large property, a classic upside-down-bin style to place in an average garden, a tumble-type bin that neatly sits on a paved area or a bokashi bucket to keep in your kitchen. Mature compost ends up as a delightful humus to use as a soil conditioner in your sustainable garden, or, for the bokashi method, a delicious pickle your plants love.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>An insectary:</b> A garden plot, or even a series of pots on a balcony, with at least seven different plant species of varying heights attracts various beneficial bugs to your sustainable garden. Good candidates to plant include amaranthus, coriander, cosmos, dill, lemon balm, parsley, tansy and yarrow.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mulch:</b> To help keep in precious moisture, cover the soil around your plants with the finished humus from your compost or an organic mulch, such as matured manure, pea straw, pine bark, seaweed or sugar cane. Inorganic mulch, such as pebbles or granitic sand, should be use sparingly in a sustainable garden.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Worms: </b>You can buy or build a worm farm or simply attract earthworms to your soil. Either way, worms produce a fantastic by-product, commonly known as worm castings, or vermicasts, that attracts microorganisms, such as good bacteria and fungi, to your soil so your plants thrive. If you have a worm farm, the worm wee, actually the liquid that accumulates at the bottom, is an added bonus for your garden.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Some sustainable plants for a coastal temperate climate","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>These plants are climate-friendly (that is, sustainable) in a Victorian seaside garden in the temperate climate of Australia’s southern coast. Some are indigenous to that region, some are native to Australia and some come from elsewhere.</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Blue fescue (<i>Festuca glauca</i>):</b> These small, blue, tufted grass plants provide a nice contrast in the garden and lizards love to hang around them.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Common correa (<i>Correa reflexa</i>):</b> This lovely little shrub grows wild in the region, with little hanging bell flowers all over it, some red and others a dusty pink.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Common heath (<i>Epacris impressa</i>):</b> The dark green, short pointy leaves and clusters of narrow little bell flowers along the stem, which are sometimes pink, sometimes white, are a Victorian classic.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Geraldton wax (<i>Chamelaucium uncinatum</i>):</b> This magnificent Western Australian shrub, with its masses of pale pink, waxy flowers in spring also suit this region of Victoria.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Grampians thryptomene (<i>Thryptomene calycina</i>):</b> Tiny, tiny aromatic leaves and weeny white flowers packed on the stem in spring make this a favourite in many gardens in the area.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Hebe, particularly the ‘Icing Sugar’ variety:</b> This shrub is tough as old boots and grows all over the place, and the tough green leaves and pink and white flowers make it stand out in any sustainable garden.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Liriope (<i>Liriope muscari</i>):</b> A clumping, strappy plant with shiny green leaves that always deserves a spot in the garden; the flower spikes in blue or white are an added bonus.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>New Zealand Christmas tree (<i>Metrosideros excelsa</i>): </b>A New Zealand favourite, this great tough tree, with bright red flowers in summer, is just right for a garden near the sea.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sage, or salvia: </b>All kinds of salvia in all kinds of colours, some tougher than others, are terrific in just about any sustainable garden — you can find at least one, if not six or seven, for your garden.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Toothed lancewood (<i>Pseudopanax ferox</i>):</b> Another Kiwi plant, this one starts off with long-toothed narrow leaves pointing downward, and then matures into a large, rounded, spectacular tree — often loved for its weirdness.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Top tips for small sustainable gardens","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Modern urban living poses many challenges, not the least being how to create and maintain a sustainable garden in a small space. If you’re a gardener at heart and only have a small backyard or even just a balcony, here are a few tips to get you growing, sustainably.</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Grow beans, peas or cucumbers on a trellis or tripod in large decorative pots.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Plant dwarf fruit trees.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Espalier your trees along a fence or a wall.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Grow herbs and cherry tomatoes in hanging baskets.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Pay attention to detail; it’s easy to make a small garden look cluttered.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"One year","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-04-08T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":209364},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-27T16:57:05+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-04-01T13:13:34+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:19:33+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Garden & Green Living","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33916"},"slug":"garden-green-living","categoryId":33916},{"name":"Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33917"},"slug":"gardening","categoryId":33917},{"name":"General Gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"},"slug":"general-gardening","categoryId":33925}],"title":"Gardening Basics For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"gardening basics for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","搜素搜所百度搜字段擎提高":{"metaDescription":"Get ready for gardening with this handy Cheat Sheet, which includes plant hardiness zones, measurement conversions, fertilizers, and more.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"To have the garden of your dreams, make sure you pick the right plants for your hardiness zone and select the right fertilizers for your plants. If your garden is shady, this Cheat Sheet offers a list of plants made for the shade. When you're planning and measuring your garden use the handy conversion chart for metric and standard measurements.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275476\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275476\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/gardening-basics.jpg\" alt=\"gardening\" width=\"556\" height=\"344\" /> © Bobex-73 / Shutterstock.com[/caption]","description":"To have the garden of your dreams, make sure you pick the right plants for your hardiness zone and select the right fertilizers for your plants. If your garden is shady, this Cheat Sheet offers a list of plants made for the shade. When you're planning and measuring your garden use the handy conversion chart for metric and standard measurements.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275476\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-275476\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/gardening-basics.jpg\" alt=\"gardening\" width=\"556\" height=\"344\" /> © Bobex-73 / Shutterstock.com[/caption]","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9155,"name":"Steven A. Frowine","slug":"steven-a-frowine","description":" <p><b>Steven A. Frowine</b> is a noted professional horticulturist and a longtime avid gardener and communicator.</p><p><b> The National Gardening Association</b> is the leading garden-based educational nonprofit in the USA. Visit //garden.org.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9155"}},{"authorId":9156,"name":"The National Gardening Association","slug":"the-national-gardening-association","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9156"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33925,"title":"General Gardening","slug":"general-gardening","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33925"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":206147,"title":"How to Divide Perennials","slug":"how-to-divide-perennials","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/206147"}},{"articleId":200692,"title":"Choosing the Right Vines for Your Garden","slug":"choosing-the-right-vines-for-your-garden","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/200692"}},{"articleId":200542,"title":"Deciding Where to Put Your Water Garden","slug":"deciding-where-to-put-your-water-garden","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/200542"}},{"articleId":199075,"title":"Understanding the Benefits of Garden Mulch","slug":"understanding-the-benefits-of-garden-mulch","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/199075"}},{"articleId":199017,"title":"How to Choose a Garden Hose","slug":"how-to-choose-a-garden-hose","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/199017"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":236815,"title":"How to Grow and Care for Succulents","slug":"grow-care-succulents","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/236815"}},{"articleId":209364,"title":"Sustainable Gardening For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"sustainable-gardening-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209364"}},{"articleId":209067,"title":"Gardening Basics For Canadians For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-basics-for-canadians-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209067"}},{"articleId":208914,"title":"Gardening All-in-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"gardening-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/208914"}},{"articleId":206147,"title":"How to Divide Perennials","slug":"how-to-divide-perennials","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/206147"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282222,"slug":"gardening-basics-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119782032","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119782031/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119782031/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119782031-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119782031/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119782031/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/gardening-basics-for-dummies-2nd-edition-cover-9781119782032-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Gardening Basics For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"","authors":[{"authorId":34784,"name":"","slug":"","description":" <p><b> Joseph A. Allen, PhD</b> is a professor of industrial and organizational (I/O) psychology at the University of Utah. His articles have appeared in <i>Human Relations, Journal of Business Psychology</i>, and more.</p> <p><b>Karin M. Reed</b> is CEO of Speaker Dynamics, a corporate communications training firm. She is an Emmy award-winning broadcast journalist. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/34784"}},{"authorId":9155,"name":"Steven A. Frowine","slug":"steven-a-frowine","description":" <p><b>Steven A. Frowine</b> is a noted professional horticulturist and a longtime avid gardener and communicator.</p><p><b> The National Gardening Association</b> is the leading garden-based educational nonprofit in the USA. Visit //garden.org.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9155"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[{"title":"Making Things Grow","slug":"making-things-grow","collectionId":291872}],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119782032&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b359a057\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;garden-green-living&quot;,&quot;gardening&quot;,&quot;general-gardening&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119782032&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b359aac9\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":193575,"title":"Gardening by USDA Plant Hardiness Zones","slug":"gardening-by-usda-plant-hardiness-zones","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","garden-green-living","gardening","general-gardening"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193575"}}],"content":[{"title":"Gardening by USDA Plant Hardiness Zones","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>When choosing plants for your garden, select the plants best suited to your climate. Know your <a href=\"//planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) hardiness zone</a> and use this chart to determine the time and length of your growing season. Of course, the climate is changing, and apparently, warming up, so you may be able to move a half or 1 zone colder and still be safe.</p>\n<table width=\"727\">\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td><strong>Zone</strong></td>\n<td><strong>Minimum Temperature</strong><br />\n<strong>(°F/°C)</strong></td>\n<td><strong>Last Frost Date</strong></td>\n<td><strong>First Frost Date</strong></td>\n<td><strong>Typical Number of<br />\nFrost-Free Days</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>1</td>\n<td>Below –50°F<br />\nBelow –46°C</td>\n<td>June 15</td>\n<td width=\"95\">July 15</td>\n<td>30</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>2</td>\n<td>–50°F to –40°F<br />\n–46°C to –40°C</td>\n<td>May 15</td>\n<td width=\"95\">August 15</td>\n<td>90</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>3</td>\n<td>–40°F to –30°F<br />\n–40°C to –34°C</td>\n<td>May 15</td>\n<td width=\"95\">September 15</td>\n<td>120</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>4</td>\n<td>–30F to –20F<br />\n–34° to –29°C</td>\n<td>May 10</td>\n<td width=\"95\">September 15</td>\n<td>125</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>5</td>\n<td>–20°F to –10°F<br />\n–29°C to –23°C</td>\n<td>April 30</td>\n<td width=\"95\">October 15</td>\n<td>165</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>6</td>\n<td>–10°F to 0°F<br />\n–23°C to –18°C</td>\n<td>April 15</td>\n<td width=\"95\">October 15</td>\n<td>180</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>7</td>\n<td>0°F to 10°F<br />\n–23°C to –12°C</td>\n<td>April 15</td>\n<td width=\"95\">October 15</td>\n<td>180</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>8</td>\n<td>10°F to 20°F<br />\n–12°C to –7°C</td>\n<td>March 10</td>\n<td width=\"95\">November 15</td>\n<td>245</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>9</td>\n<td>20°F to 30°F<br />\n–7°C to –1°C</td>\n<td>February 15</td>\n<td width=\"95\">December 15</td>\n<td>265</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>10</td>\n<td>30°F to 40°F<br />\n–1°C to 4°C</td>\n<td>January 20</td>\n<td width=\"95\">December 20</td>\n<td>335</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>11</td>\n<td>40°F and up<br />\n4°C and up</td>\n<td>Frost free</td>\n<td width=\"95\">Frost free</td>\n<td>365</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n"},{"title":"Plants That Grow in the Shade","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Don’t fret if your garden gets more shade than sun; plenty of plants thrive in the shade. This chart names annuals and <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/home-auto-hobbies/garden-green-living/gardening/flowers/how-to-grow-perennials-from-seed-205435/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">perennials</a> that do well in the shade, so keep this list handy and you can decide which plants you want for your shady garden oasis.</p>\n<table width=\"727\">\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td><strong>Annuals</strong></td>\n<td><strong>Perennials</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Wax begonia (<em>Begonia semperflorens-cultorum</em>)</td>\n<td>Bear’s breeches (<em>Acanthus mollis</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Amethyst flower (<em>Browallia</em>)</td>\n<td>Beebalm (Monarda didyma)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Canterbury bells (<em>Campanula medium</em>)</td>\n<td>Bellflower (<em>Campanula portenschlagiana</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Coleus (<em>Coleus spp.)</em></td>\n<td>Bergenia (<em>Bergenia crassifolia</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Impatiens <em>Impatiens spp</em>.)</td>\n<td>Bleeding heart (<em>Dicentra spectabilis</em>, recently changed to <em>Lamprocapnos spectabilis</em> )</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Lobelia (<em>Lobelia ssp.)</em></td>\n<td>Columbine (<em>Aquilegia</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Monkey flower (<em>Mimulus</em>)</td>\n<td>False spirea <em>(Astilbe</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Forget-me-not (<em>Myosotis sylvatica</em>)</td>\n<td>Globeflower (<em>Trollius</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Flowering tobacco (<em>Nicotiana alata</em>)</td>\n<td>Hosta (<em>Hosta spp</em>.)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Love-in-a-mist (<em>Nigella damascena</em>)</td>\n<td>Lady’s mantle (<em>Alchemilla mollis</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Scarlet sage (<em>Salvia splendens</em>)</td>\n<td>Lungwort (<em>Pulmonaria</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Black-eyed Susan vine (<em>Thunbergia alata</em>)</td>\n<td>Meadow-rue (<em>Thalictrum</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Wishbone flower (<em>Torenia fournieri</em>)</td>\n<td>Siberian iris (<em>Iris sibirica</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n"},{"title":"Key Measurement Conversions for Gardening","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Surprisingly, a great deal of measuring goes into garden planning. If you need to change between metric and English (U.S. standard) units, use this basic conversion chart to make sense of it all when planning your garden.</p>\n<table width=\"727\">\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td>T<strong>ype of Measurement</strong></td>\n<td><strong>Metric to English</strong></td>\n<td><strong>English to Metric</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Distance</td>\n<td>1 centimeter = 0.4 inch</td>\n<td>1 inch = 2.5 centimeters</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td></td>\n<td>1 meter = 39 inches = 1.1 yards</td>\n<td>1 yard = 0.9 meter</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td></td>\n<td>1 kilometer = 0.6 mile</td>\n<td>1 mile = 1.6 kilometers</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Volume</td>\n<td>1 liter = 1.1 quarts</td>\n<td>1 quart = 0.9 liter</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Mass/weight</td>\n<td>1 kilogram = 2.2 pounds</td>\n<td>1 pound = 0.4 kilogram</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td></td>\n<td>1 gram = 0.04 ounce</td>\n<td>1 ounce = 31 grams</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n"},{"title":"Fertilizers for Your Garden","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Fertilizing is an important part of gardening because given at the right time, fertilizers can really give your plants a boost. When you’re trying to decide on which fertilizer to use, keep this list handy to make sense of fertilizer terminology:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Complete fertilizers:</strong> These fertilizers contain all three macronutrients: nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K).</li>\n<li><strong>Incomplete fertilizers:</strong> Incomplete fertilizers are missing one or more of the macronutrients, usually the P or the K.</li>\n<li><strong>Chelated micronutrients: </strong>If your plants don’t get nicely green (they remain mottled yellow and green, or just yellow), no matter how much nitrogen you apply, you probably have a deficiency of micronutrients — iron, manganese, or zinc. These fertilizers are in a form that allows a plant to absorb them more quickly than the more commonly available sulfated forms.</li>\n<li><strong>Organic fertilizers:</strong> <em>Organic</em> means these fertilizers derive their nutrients from something that was once alive. Examples include blood meal, fish emulsion, and manure.</li>\n<li><strong>Slow-release fertilizers:</strong> These fertilizers provide nutrients to plants at specific rates under particular conditions. Some slow-release fertilizers can deliver the benefits of their nutrients for as long as eight months.</li>\n<li><strong>Foliar fertilizers:</strong> Apply this plant food to leaves rather than to the roots (ground). You can use most liquid fertilizers as foliar fertilizers, but make sure the label says you can.</li>\n</ul>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Two 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