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{"appState":{"pageLoadApiCallsStatus":true},"categoryState":{"relatedCategories":{"headers":{"timestamp":"2025-01-31T04:01:15+00:00"},"categoryId":34232,"data":{"title":"Business Communication","slug":"business-communication","image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Business, Careers, & Money","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34224"},"slug":"business-careers-money","categoryId":34224},{"name":"Business","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34225"},"slug":"business","categoryId":34225},{"name":"Business Communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"},"slug":"business-communication","categoryId":34232}],"parentCategory":{"categoryId":34225,"title":"Business","slug":"business","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34225"}},"childCategories":[],"description":"From mastering difficult conversations to sharpening your business writing, here's how to tune up your professional communication skills.","relatedArticles":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles?category=34232&offset=0&size=5"},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":312,"bookCount":11},"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"}},"relatedCategoriesLoadedStatus":"success"},"listState":{"list":{"count":10,"total":312,"items":[{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-10-13T16:58:49+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-10-30T13:50:32+00:00","timestamp":"2024-10-30T15:01:09+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Business, Careers, & Money","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34224"},"slug":"business-careers-money","categoryId":34224},{"name":"Business","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34225"},"slug":"business","categoryId":34225},{"name":"Business Communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"},"slug":"business-communication","categoryId":34232}],"title":"How to Create Truly Engaging Presentations","strippedTitle":"how to create truly engaging presentations","slug":"how-to-create-an-engaging-presentation","canonicalUrl":"","搜检索擎组件简化":{"metaDescription":"Learn the presentation concept of storyopia, which involves telling the story of a journey from what is now to what could be in the future.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"It’s in our nature to tell stories and share our life’s events. And you probably use hyperboles (exaggerations) to make your stories more engaging — peppering them with statements such as, “I nearly died of embarrassment” or “My feet were killing me.” While this casual sharing is different from being in front of an audience, you do know how to tell stories. You have lots of them. After all, you started telling stories when you made babbling sounds as a baby.\r\n\r\nYou can use this innate storytelling ability to create presentations that engage your audience, rather than put them to sleep.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tldr\">Don't have time to read the entire article?\r\n<a href=\"#summary\" data-analytics-id=\"product-test-2\">Jump to the quick read summary.</a></p>\r\n\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_300885\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-300885\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/woman-presenting-speaking-adobeStock_368229821.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"420\" /> ©Jacob Lund / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n\r\nWhat do we think of when we hear \"presentation?\" PowerPoint slides. And, yes, slides are helpful — but they're helpful as visual aids, not as the main storyteller.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Good storytelling can make your presentations sizzle in ways that slides can’t.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >An introduction to storyopia</h2>\r\nWhen people ask or search for \"how to create a presentation,\" or \"how to create a PowerPoint presentation,\" they're focusing on the technical aspect of the process. Of course, that's important. However, there's something even more critical to consider before you get down to creating your slides: Storyopia.\r\n\r\nMy concept of <em>Storyopia</em> represents the ideal. It's marriage of the words \"story\" and \"utopia.\" It’s the ideal story that takes the audience on a journey from what <em>is</em> to what <em>could be; a</em> journey to where they see themselves as heroes along that same path.\r\n\r\nTry to recall presentations you’ve attended. What drove the presentation? Bullet points? Charts? Tables? The monotonous drone of a facilitator plodding through a dry rendition of data? My guess is all of them. (A pretty tedious experience.)\r\n\r\nSince people began to communicate, storytelling has been the lifeblood to getting points or ideas across and making them memorable. Stories make ideas and words come alive. They explain examples or points of view in a way that resonates. People naturally connect emotionally with stories, associating their feelings with their learning.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Stories aren’t meant to be objective. They’re meant to sway emotions, generate suspense, add surprise, create wonder, facilitate the call to action, and take your audience on a journey to success.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Using the story arc</h2>\r\nWhen you create a presentation, keep the story arc in mind. The figure below shows the typical story arc (also known as dramatic arc or narrative arc). It represents storyopia. When creating a story using the arc as a guide, your story will have a natural, connected flow:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong>Cite the incident (the plot) telling what is.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Build rising tension toward the climax.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Work towards the resolution, which is what could be.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_300883\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-300883\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/story-arc-storytelling-presentations.jpg\" alt=\"Line graph showing the story arc from beginning to end\" width=\"630\" height=\"367\" /> ©John Wiley & Sons, Inc.<br />The story arc[/caption]\r\n\r\nAlways create tension in your story. It’s critical but often overlooked. If the tension isn’t obvious, this is a good opportunity to embellish with a story. After you’ve filled out a <em>start-up brief </em> — a tool for <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/know-your-audience-to-make-engaging-presentations-300913/\">identifying your audience</a> — you’ll have a good idea of your audience’s pain and what matters to them. Focus on storyopia: the gap between what is and what can be. Take them on that journey so they see themselves as heroes on the same path.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">To learn more about the start-up brief, as well as storyboarding and other helpful tools for preparing excellent presentations, grab a copy of my book/eBook <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/book/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/storytelling-in-presentations-for-dummies-300450/\"><em>Storytelling in Presentations For Dummies</em></a>.</p>\r\nAs part of creating presentations, your story will have characters: people, companies, or things, such as processes or equipment. There will be goals, struggles, challenges, and a positive or negative outcome. Either outcome serves as a valuable lesson. Let’s see how beginnings, middles, and ends can become a story:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Beginning:</strong> Introduce characters with the same challenge, problem, complication, or issue your audience is facing — the reason they’re attending. You’ll hook them because they’ll feel like they’re in the same situation. Edit the details to keep the story simple and relatable. You may start with, “One of my customers was dealing with your exact issue(s).”</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Middle:</strong> You’ve already sparked their curiosity. Now focus on the characters’ problems and how your solution brought the change they needed. Don’t merely go from Point A to Point B. The long cuts and shortcuts are what make the journey interesting, worthwhile, and relatable.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>End:</strong> This is where you tie it together, targeted to the CTA. Deliver the main takeaways and lessons your audience should remember based on the success of your characters. Let your audience see the happy ending where they imagine themselves as heroes achieving these same positive outcomes.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Always give your characters names to make them more relatable, but change the names for the purpose of anonymity. People don’t identify with words such as <em>attendee, coworker, colleague,</em> or <em>manager.</em> Also, provide a vivid description of your main character and the setting so your audience can envision the scenario and place themselves in the situation.</p>\r\nFor example, if you’re presenting to a group about sales strategies because sales have been slumping, you may share a story of [name] who worked for [company for x years] and how he was able to bring his sales and commissions up to a much higher level by [strategy].\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Pitting the heroes against the villains</h2>\r\nFrom bedtime stories when we were kids to great novels and movies as we became older, a good story draws us. We love heroes. They display qualities we admire. They show us how to overcome challenges. We can recall superhero caped crusaders: Batman, Batgirl, Superman, Zorro, Shazam, Wonder Woman, Scarlet Witch, Thor, and others. We all want to be superheroes and live happily ever after in our worlds of family, friends, and business.\r\n\r\nAre there heroes in business presentations? Absolutely — the audience! This is how heroes and villains play a role in happy endings:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><strong>Heroes:</strong> Think of the character Yoda from the <em>Star Wars</em> series. Yoda was the legendary Jedi Master who trained Jedi Knights for 800 years. Yoda was cool. He was a hero in addition to being a mentor and instructor. He unlocked the path to immortality in characters such as Han Solo, Luke Skywalker, Obi-Wan Kenobi, and others who became heroes in their own rights. You can be the Yoda in your presentation, unlocking the path to slaying the villain and guiding your audience toward success.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">Heroes can even be antiheroes — people who display true human nature. People who make poor decisions that may harm those around them, intentionally or not. Some are even well intentioned, such as Robin Hood, the classical literary antihero. He stole from the rich (bad) and gave to the poor (good). Even Donald Duck has been labeled antihero for his short and often explosive temper.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><strong>Villains:</strong> Without villains (often the most interesting characters) there would be no stories and no heroes. For example, if not for Cruella De Vil, <em>101 Dalmatians</em> would merely feature lots of spotted canines running around. Without Scar in <em>The Lion King</em> scheming to be next in line to seize the throne, there would be no story, and Simba wouldn’t have become a hero.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">In business, the villain is the problem or challenge. That can be unscrupulous people, anti-technology diehards, a combative person, the competition, and so on. A villain may also be a non-person: a specific event, befuddled communication, meager lead generation, declining customer base, poor cash flow, inability to retain valuable employees, failure to balance quality and growth, software that isn’t producing as expected, and so much more.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Happy endings:</strong> You don’t want the victory to be too easy or too predictable — it kills the interest and suspense. At the beginning of every story the villain must be strong, the victim’s problems must seem insurmountable, and the hero’s task must seem challenging. Your story needs an imagined future where the audience puts themselves in the place of slaying their villain and making themselves heroes.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nPerhaps your audience will use the knowledge they learned from you to:\r\n<ul id=\"summary\">\r\n \t<li>Add $$$ to their bottom line</li>\r\n \t<li>Become more innovative</li>\r\n \t<li>Discover the right tools or technology</li>\r\n \t<li>Take a leadership position</li>\r\n \t<li>Communicate with impact</li>\r\n \t<li>Get the big contract signed</li>\r\n \t<li>Procure a grant</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<div class=\"summary-container\" data-testid=\"summarySection\">\r\n<div class=\"wrapper\">\r\n<div class=\"image-block\" data-testid=\"imageBlock\"></div>\r\n<div class=\"details-block\">\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Quick Read Summary</h2>\r\n<ul class=\"summary-list\">\r\n \t<li><p>In our daily lives, we often use hyperboles to add zest to our stories, making them more engaging. But when it comes to presentations, we tend to default to bullet points and charts, which can be monotonous. However, there's a better way to captivate your audience: the art of storytelling.</p></li>\r\n \t<li><p>Think of a presentation, and you might envision PowerPoint slides. While slides have their place as visual aids, the real storyteller should be you. Good storytelling can infuse life into your presentations, leaving a lasting impact on your audience.</p></li>\r\n \t<li><p>Before diving into creating slides, consider \"Storyopia,\" a concept that merges \"story\" and \"utopia.\" Storyopia is the ideal narrative that takes your audience on a journey from the current reality to what could be, casting them as heroes along the way.</p></li>\r\n \t<li><p>Storytelling is a timeless means of communication. It breathes life into ideas and words, resonating emotionally with your audience. Stories are not meant to be objective but to evoke emotions, generate suspense, and facilitate the call to action.</p></li>\r\n \t<li><p>When crafting a presentation, keep the story arc in mind:</p>\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li>Cite the Incident (What Is): Start by presenting the current scenario, laying out the facts.</li>\r\n \t<li>Build Tension: Create rising tension, keeping your audience engaged and curious.</li>\r\n \t<li>Work Towards Resolution (What Could Be): Guide your audience toward a better future, making them see themselves as heroes on the journey.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><p>To make your story relatable, introduce characters facing the same challenges as your audience. In the middle, highlight their struggles and how your solution brought positive change. End with the takeaways and lessons your audience should remember.</p></li>\r\n \t<li><p>Heroes and villains play a crucial role in your narrative. Your audience becomes the hero, looking to you as their guide (like Yoda in Star Wars), helping them overcome the villain (the problem or challenge). The villain can take various forms, from uncooperative individuals to technological obstacles.</p></li>\r\n \t<li><p>To ensure an engaging story, make the victory challenging but achievable. Your audience should envision themselves slaying their own villains and becoming heroes in their respective narratives.</p></li>\r\n \t<li><p>Incorporate storytelling into your presentations to inspire your audience and leave a lasting impact. Whether it's increasing profits, fostering innovation, or solving challenges, your storytelling can guide them to success.</p></li>\r\n \t<li><p>Unleash the power of Storyopia and transform your presentations from mundane to unforgettable. Make your audience the hero in their own story of triumph.</p></li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p>Hungry for more? Go back and <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/how-to-create-an-engaging-presentation-300880/\">read the article</a> or <a href=\"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20\" class=\"amazon-btn\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">check out the book</a>.</p>\r\n</div>\r\n</div>\r\n</div>","description":"It’s in our nature to tell stories and share our life’s events. And you probably use hyperboles (exaggerations) to make your stories more engaging — peppering them with statements such as, “I nearly died of embarrassment” or “My feet were killing me.” While this casual sharing is different from being in front of an audience, you do know how to tell stories. You have lots of them. After all, you started telling stories when you made babbling sounds as a baby.\r\n\r\nYou can use this innate storytelling ability to create presentations that engage your audience, rather than put them to sleep.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tldr\">Don't have time to read the entire article?\r\n<a href=\"#summary\" data-analytics-id=\"product-test-2\">Jump to the quick read summary.</a></p>\r\n\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_300885\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-300885\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/woman-presenting-speaking-adobeStock_368229821.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"420\" /> ©Jacob Lund / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n\r\nWhat do we think of when we hear \"presentation?\" PowerPoint slides. And, yes, slides are helpful — but they're helpful as visual aids, not as the main storyteller.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Good storytelling can make your presentations sizzle in ways that slides can’t.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >An introduction to storyopia</h2>\r\nWhen people ask or search for \"how to create a presentation,\" or \"how to create a PowerPoint presentation,\" they're focusing on the technical aspect of the process. Of course, that's important. However, there's something even more critical to consider before you get down to creating your slides: Storyopia.\r\n\r\nMy concept of <em>Storyopia</em> represents the ideal. It's marriage of the words \"story\" and \"utopia.\" It’s the ideal story that takes the audience on a journey from what <em>is</em> to what <em>could be; a</em> journey to where they see themselves as heroes along that same path.\r\n\r\nTry to recall presentations you’ve attended. What drove the presentation? Bullet points? Charts? Tables? The monotonous drone of a facilitator plodding through a dry rendition of data? My guess is all of them. (A pretty tedious experience.)\r\n\r\nSince people began to communicate, storytelling has been the lifeblood to getting points or ideas across and making them memorable. Stories make ideas and words come alive. They explain examples or points of view in a way that resonates. People naturally connect emotionally with stories, associating their feelings with their learning.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Stories aren’t meant to be objective. They’re meant to sway emotions, generate suspense, add surprise, create wonder, facilitate the call to action, and take your audience on a journey to success.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Using the story arc</h2>\r\nWhen you create a presentation, keep the story arc in mind. The figure below shows the typical story arc (also known as dramatic arc or narrative arc). It represents storyopia. When creating a story using the arc as a guide, your story will have a natural, connected flow:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong>Cite the incident (the plot) telling what is.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Build rising tension toward the climax.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Work towards the resolution, which is what could be.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_300883\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-300883\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/story-arc-storytelling-presentations.jpg\" alt=\"Line graph showing the story arc from beginning to end\" width=\"630\" height=\"367\" /> ©John Wiley & Sons, Inc.<br />The story arc[/caption]\r\n\r\nAlways create tension in your story. It’s critical but often overlooked. If the tension isn’t obvious, this is a good opportunity to embellish with a story. After you’ve filled out a <em>start-up brief </em> — a tool for <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/know-your-audience-to-make-engaging-presentations-300913/\">identifying your audience</a> — you’ll have a good idea of your audience’s pain and what matters to them. Focus on storyopia: the gap between what is and what can be. Take them on that journey so they see themselves as heroes on the same path.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">To learn more about the start-up brief, as well as storyboarding and other helpful tools for preparing excellent presentations, grab a copy of my book/eBook <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/book/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/storytelling-in-presentations-for-dummies-300450/\"><em>Storytelling in Presentations For Dummies</em></a>.</p>\r\nAs part of creating presentations, your story will have characters: people, companies, or things, such as processes or equipment. There will be goals, struggles, challenges, and a positive or negative outcome. Either outcome serves as a valuable lesson. Let’s see how beginnings, middles, and ends can become a story:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Beginning:</strong> Introduce characters with the same challenge, problem, complication, or issue your audience is facing — the reason they’re attending. You’ll hook them because they’ll feel like they’re in the same situation. Edit the details to keep the story simple and relatable. You may start with, “One of my customers was dealing with your exact issue(s).”</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Middle:</strong> You’ve already sparked their curiosity. Now focus on the characters’ problems and how your solution brought the change they needed. Don’t merely go from Point A to Point B. The long cuts and shortcuts are what make the journey interesting, worthwhile, and relatable.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>End:</strong> This is where you tie it together, targeted to the CTA. Deliver the main takeaways and lessons your audience should remember based on the success of your characters. Let your audience see the happy ending where they imagine themselves as heroes achieving these same positive outcomes.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Always give your characters names to make them more relatable, but change the names for the purpose of anonymity. People don’t identify with words such as <em>attendee, coworker, colleague,</em> or <em>manager.</em> Also, provide a vivid description of your main character and the setting so your audience can envision the scenario and place themselves in the situation.</p>\r\nFor example, if you’re presenting to a group about sales strategies because sales have been slumping, you may share a story of [name] who worked for [company for x years] and how he was able to bring his sales and commissions up to a much higher level by [strategy].\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Pitting the heroes against the villains</h2>\r\nFrom bedtime stories when we were kids to great novels and movies as we became older, a good story draws us. We love heroes. They display qualities we admire. They show us how to overcome challenges. We can recall superhero caped crusaders: Batman, Batgirl, Superman, Zorro, Shazam, Wonder Woman, Scarlet Witch, Thor, and others. We all want to be superheroes and live happily ever after in our worlds of family, friends, and business.\r\n\r\nAre there heroes in business presentations? Absolutely — the audience! This is how heroes and villains play a role in happy endings:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><strong>Heroes:</strong> Think of the character Yoda from the <em>Star Wars</em> series. Yoda was the legendary Jedi Master who trained Jedi Knights for 800 years. Yoda was cool. He was a hero in addition to being a mentor and instructor. He unlocked the path to immortality in characters such as Han Solo, Luke Skywalker, Obi-Wan Kenobi, and others who became heroes in their own rights. You can be the Yoda in your presentation, unlocking the path to slaying the villain and guiding your audience toward success.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">Heroes can even be antiheroes — people who display true human nature. People who make poor decisions that may harm those around them, intentionally or not. Some are even well intentioned, such as Robin Hood, the classical literary antihero. He stole from the rich (bad) and gave to the poor (good). Even Donald Duck has been labeled antihero for his short and often explosive temper.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><strong>Villains:</strong> Without villains (often the most interesting characters) there would be no stories and no heroes. For example, if not for Cruella De Vil, <em>101 Dalmatians</em> would merely feature lots of spotted canines running around. Without Scar in <em>The Lion King</em> scheming to be next in line to seize the throne, there would be no story, and Simba wouldn’t have become a hero.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">In business, the villain is the problem or challenge. That can be unscrupulous people, anti-technology diehards, a combative person, the competition, and so on. A villain may also be a non-person: a specific event, befuddled communication, meager lead generation, declining customer base, poor cash flow, inability to retain valuable employees, failure to balance quality and growth, software that isn’t producing as expected, and so much more.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Happy endings:</strong> You don’t want the victory to be too easy or too predictable — it kills the interest and suspense. At the beginning of every story the villain must be strong, the victim’s problems must seem insurmountable, and the hero’s task must seem challenging. Your story needs an imagined future where the audience puts themselves in the place of slaying their villain and making themselves heroes.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nPerhaps your audience will use the knowledge they learned from you to:\r\n<ul id=\"summary\">\r\n \t<li>Add $$$ to their bottom line</li>\r\n \t<li>Become more innovative</li>\r\n \t<li>Discover the right tools or technology</li>\r\n \t<li>Take a leadership position</li>\r\n \t<li>Communicate with impact</li>\r\n \t<li>Get the big contract signed</li>\r\n \t<li>Procure a grant</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<div class=\"summary-container\" data-testid=\"summarySection\">\r\n<div class=\"wrapper\">\r\n<div class=\"image-block\" data-testid=\"imageBlock\"></div>\r\n<div class=\"details-block\">\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Quick Read Summary</h2>\r\n<ul class=\"summary-list\">\r\n \t<li><p>In our daily lives, we often use hyperboles to add zest to our stories, making them more engaging. But when it comes to presentations, we tend to default to bullet points and charts, which can be monotonous. However, there's a better way to captivate your audience: the art of storytelling.</p></li>\r\n \t<li><p>Think of a presentation, and you might envision PowerPoint slides. While slides have their place as visual aids, the real storyteller should be you. Good storytelling can infuse life into your presentations, leaving a lasting impact on your audience.</p></li>\r\n \t<li><p>Before diving into creating slides, consider \"Storyopia,\" a concept that merges \"story\" and \"utopia.\" Storyopia is the ideal narrative that takes your audience on a journey from the current reality to what could be, casting them as heroes along the way.</p></li>\r\n \t<li><p>Storytelling is a timeless means of communication. It breathes life into ideas and words, resonating emotionally with your audience. Stories are not meant to be objective but to evoke emotions, generate suspense, and facilitate the call to action.</p></li>\r\n \t<li><p>When crafting a presentation, keep the story arc in mind:</p>\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li>Cite the Incident (What Is): Start by presenting the current scenario, laying out the facts.</li>\r\n \t<li>Build Tension: Create rising tension, keeping your audience engaged and curious.</li>\r\n \t<li>Work Towards Resolution (What Could Be): Guide your audience toward a better future, making them see themselves as heroes on the journey.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><p>To make your story relatable, introduce characters facing the same challenges as your audience. In the middle, highlight their struggles and how your solution brought positive change. End with the takeaways and lessons your audience should remember.</p></li>\r\n \t<li><p>Heroes and villains play a crucial role in your narrative. Your audience becomes the hero, looking to you as their guide (like Yoda in Star Wars), helping them overcome the villain (the problem or challenge). The villain can take various forms, from uncooperative individuals to technological obstacles.</p></li>\r\n \t<li><p>To ensure an engaging story, make the victory challenging but achievable. Your audience should envision themselves slaying their own villains and becoming heroes in their respective narratives.</p></li>\r\n \t<li><p>Incorporate storytelling into your presentations to inspire your audience and leave a lasting impact. Whether it's increasing profits, fostering innovation, or solving challenges, your storytelling can guide them to success.</p></li>\r\n \t<li><p>Unleash the power of Storyopia and transform your presentations from mundane to unforgettable. Make your audience the hero in their own story of triumph.</p></li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p>Hungry for more? Go back and <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/how-to-create-an-engaging-presentation-300880/\">read the article</a> or <a href=\"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20\" class=\"amazon-btn\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">check out the book</a>.</p>\r\n</div>\r\n</div>\r\n</div>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10232,"name":"Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts","slug":"sheryl-lindsell-roberts","description":" <p><b>Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts MA</b> leads writing seminars across the country, including the popular workshop “Stories and Storyboarding: Building Blocks to Influential Presentations.” Roberts is also the author of over 25 books and is often quoted in national news outlets and magazines. She is the author of <i>Technical Writing For Dummies</i>. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10232"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34232,"title":"Business Communication","slug":"business-communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"An introduction to storyopia","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Using the story arc","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Pitting the heroes against the villains","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Quick Read Summary","target":"#tab4"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":300913,"title":"Know Your Audience to Create Engaging Presentations","slug":"know-your-audience-to-make-engaging-presentations","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300913"}},{"articleId":300906,"title":"Finding Stories for Your Presentations","slug":"incorporating-your-experiences-into-your-presentations","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300906"}},{"articleId":300479,"title":"Storytelling in Presentations For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"storytelling-in-presentations-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300479"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":300913,"title":"Know Your Audience to Create Engaging Presentations","slug":"know-your-audience-to-make-engaging-presentations","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300913"}},{"articleId":300906,"title":"Finding Stories for Your Presentations","slug":"incorporating-your-experiences-into-your-presentations","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300906"}},{"articleId":300479,"title":"Storytelling in Presentations For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"storytelling-in-presentations-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300479"}},{"articleId":296682,"title":"Developing Cultural Awareness, an Important Soft Skill","slug":"developing-cultural-awareness-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296682"}},{"articleId":296680,"title":"How to Be a Better Communicator at Work","slug":"how-to-be-a-better-communicator-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296680"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":300450,"slug":"storytelling-in-presentations-for-dummies","isbn":"9781394201006","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1394201001-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781394201006-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Storytelling in Presentations For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"10232\">Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts</b> MA</b> leads writing seminars across the country, including the popular workshop “Stories and Storyboarding: Building Blocks to Influential Presentations.” Roberts is also the author of over 25 books and is often quoted in national news outlets and magazines. She is the author of <i>Technical Writing For Dummies</i>.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":10232,"name":"Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts","slug":"sheryl-lindsell-roberts","description":" <p><b>Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts MA</b> leads writing seminars across the country, including the popular workshop “Stories and Storyboarding: Building Blocks to Influential Presentations.” Roberts is also the author of over 25 books and is often quoted in national news outlets and magazines. She is the author of <i>Technical Writing For Dummies</i>. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10232"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781394201006&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-653fc53552201\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781394201006&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-653fc5355297f\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-10-13T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":300880},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-10-17T20:30:13+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-10-19T14:52:56+00:00","timestamp":"2024-10-19T15:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Business, Careers, & Money","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34224"},"slug":"business-careers-money","categoryId":34224},{"name":"Business","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34225"},"slug":"business","categoryId":34225},{"name":"Business Communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"},"slug":"business-communication","categoryId":34232}],"title":"Know Your Audience to Create Engaging Presentations","strippedTitle":"know your audience to create engaging presentations","slug":"know-your-audience-to-make-engaging-presentations","canonicalUrl":"","搜检索擎组件简化":{"metaDescription":"To really hit the mark with your presentation, you need to do some research on your audience. Here's what you should know about them.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"In the context of creating presentations, I compare understanding your audience to many of the courtroom scenes you’ve viewed in the movies and on TV. During the trial, attorneys pose leading questions they know will impact the jurors as they intend. They can do that because they’ve had the opportunity to get to know them beforehand through questioning.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_300923\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-300923\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/giving-business-presentation-adobeStock_258229908.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"420\" /> ©.shock / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n\r\nThe attorneys can relate stories aimed at strengthening their clients’ cases to sway the jurors. The jurors become the heroes because they (presumably) reach a fair and equitable judgment. The selection of jurors can contribute to winning or losing the case even before it’s even tried.\r\n\r\nLet’s relate this to presentations. As you are beginning to create a presentation, of course you won’t select your audience, but the same principle of knowing them applies in order to have a winning presentation (for them and you). When you fill out the Start-Up Brief (see the figure below), you learn all you can about your audience <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/incorporating-your-experiences-into-your-presentations-300906/\">so you can target stories</a> and the entire presentation toward the outcome you intend, and they’ll leave as heroes.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_300917\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-300917\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/start-up-brief-storytelling-presentations.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"753\" /> ©John Wiley & Sons, Inc.<br />Use the Start-Up Brief to make sure you know your audience.[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Knowing your audience</h2>\r\nWhen people ask the question \"how to create a presentation?\" or \"how to create a PowerPoint presentation?\" they're often only thinking about the technical aspects, like how to put together slides. You will need to do that, if there's nobody else to do it for you. However, a flashy PowerPoint or Canva slideshow should not be your goal. It's far more important to focus on the substance of the presentation, and one of the first things to consider about the substance is \"who will make up your audience?\"\r\n\r\nThe better you understand your audience, the better you’ll be able to craft messages and stories they care about in terms of their interests, level of understanding, attitudes, and needs. Here's more to consider about each of the questions in the Start-Up Brief:\r\n<h3>1. What’s the key issue — the one takeaway message I want my audience to remember?</h3>\r\nYour audience won’t remember everything you say or show. What’s the one message you want them to remember above all else? This is like an earworm. If you haven’t heard that term, it’s a tune you hear that plays over and over in your head that you can’t seem to shake.\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>What do you want your audience’s earworm to be?</li>\r\n \t<li>What should they do? Think? Feel? Learn?</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Condense the key message into one sentence. Until you can do that, you won’t be focused. Imagine you have just one minute to get your key issue across clearly. What would that message be?</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>2. Who’s my primary audience?</h3>\r\nWhy is it so easy to communicate with friends or close colleagues? Because you know them. You know their preconceived idea, level of expertise, probable reaction, and so forth. The same theory applies to your audience. Understand who they’ll be and whether they’re attending by choice.\r\n\r\nThere are so many types of audiences you may encounter. Here are just a few:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Peers or subordinates</li>\r\n \t<li>Senior-level managers</li>\r\n \t<li>Middle-level managers</li>\r\n \t<li>Technical or non-technical</li>\r\n \t<li>Internal to your company or external</li>\r\n \t<li>Competitors</li>\r\n \t<li>Buyers</li>\r\n \t<li>Merchandisers</li>\r\n \t<li>Sales associates</li>\r\n \t<li>Customers (new and/or potential)</li>\r\n \t<li>Customer service</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nWhen you create presentations, it's helpful to determine the demographics of your audience prior to presenting. While there are limits as to what you can learn, on occasion it’s apparent. For example, if you’re addressing a technical group, you can assume that most are young, educated, and tech savvy.\r\n\r\nIf the makeup of your audience isn’t apparent, here are a few things you might try:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Conduct surveys, questionnaires, or interviews with the event organizers. They may have knowledge of job titles, industries, and even a breakdown of age and gender.</li>\r\n \t<li>Survey the audience before the event. Ask what they hope to do, think, feel, or learn as a result of attending. Also inquire about their knowledge of the subject matter, organizations they belong to, volunteer activities, and so on.</li>\r\n \t<li>Tap into social media. If you have access to the event's social media accounts, check out who’s following or engaging with them.</li>\r\n \t<li>Observe the audience and conduct informal conversations before the presentation starts.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h3>3. What does my audience need to know about the topic?</h3>\r\nPlease pay attention to the words <em>need to know.</em> Too often we give too much or too little information. For example, if you’re discussing a specific aspect of genetic engineering but your audience isn’t familiar with basic genetics, you’ll have missed the mark. On the other hand, drastically underestimating the audience’s knowledge may result in a presentation that sounds condescending. For a mixed audience, consider reviewing important key terms and concepts so everyone starts with baseline knowledge. Here are some things to think about:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Does your audience have any preconceived ideas?</li>\r\n \t<li>Are there any barriers to their understanding (language, cultural, technical, or other)?</li>\r\n \t<li>Will there be any resistance?</li>\r\n \t<li>Will there be any adversaries?</li>\r\n \t<li>Will you have supporters?</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h3>4. What’s in it for my audience?</h3>\r\nHave you ever listened to WIIFM? The answer is “yes,” you listen to it all the time — <strong><u>W</u></strong>hat’s <strong><u>I</u></strong>n <strong><u>I</u></strong>t <strong><u>F</u></strong>or <strong><u>M</u></strong>e? Whenever you listen to something, you unknowingly ask yourself, “Why should I care?” On the job, you might ask if this an opportunity to look good to superiors, make your job easier, solve a problem, or learn a new skill. If you didn’t care, you wouldn’t be listening.\r\n\r\nDial in to WIIFM to make sure you understand what’s in it for your audience. Dig deeply. For example, if you’re teaching them a new skill, will it impact their job performance? Help them look good to management? Ultimately get them a pay raise or promotion? You don’t want anyone sitting in your audience waiting to find out what’s in it for them. Let them know right up front.\r\n<h3>5. Does my presentation need a special angle or point of view?</h3>\r\nManagers typically need the big picture to make big decisions. The lower down the chain of command, the more details may be needed. Technical people want all the details. Salespeople need benefits. Potential customers want to know why they should select you.\r\n\r\nWhen presenting to hybrid audiences, key phrases may be:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>I’d like to take a few minutes to make sure we’re we are all up to speed on the three key aspects of [topic].</li>\r\n \t<li>The crux of the matter is …</li>\r\n \t<li>The big picture is …</li>\r\n \t<li>Let me give you some examples …</li>\r\n \t<li>In practice this means …</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h3>6. What will my audience’s reaction be toward the topic? Positive? Neutral? Negative?</h3>\r\nYou may not tell people what they <em>want</em> to hear, but you must tell them what they <em>need</em> to hear. What will their reaction be? Positive? Neutral? Negative? If you’re not sure, ask yourself the following questions:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Are you disputing existing data?</li>\r\n \t<li>Will you create more work for them?</li>\r\n \t<li>Are they attending by choice, or were they forced (strongly urged)?</li>\r\n \t<li>Are they interested in the topic?</li>\r\n \t<li>Will your information come as a surprise?</li>\r\n \t<li>What is their relationship with you and with each other?</li>\r\n \t<li>How will the presentation help them perform their jobs better?</li>\r\n \t<li>What are the most interesting parts of the topic?</li>\r\n \t<li>How much will the audience know about the topic?</li>\r\n \t<li>Which audience members may be more/less interested?</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThe following are suggestions for positioning positive, neutral, or negative topics:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Delivering a positive or neutral topic:</strong> When your audience will be positive or neutral, use the BLUF (Bottom Line Up Front) approach. Your presentation isn’t a joke where you need to put the punch line at the end. Tell them what they need to know right at the beginning. We’ve all sat through long, boring presentations waiting to hear the most important part we came to learn — the conclusion or findings.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Delivering a negative topic:</strong> Strategically build up to your main message. Create a sandwich with good news, negative news, good news. Give reasons why. Offer options. Make lemonade.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >What is the purpose of your presentation?</h2>\r\nWhether you think your purpose is to communicate, inform, sell, or whatever, chances are you’re trying to “persuade” someone to do, think, feel, or learn something. Once you realize that most of what you present is to persuade — your message will be “strategic,” not generic.\r\n\r\nKeep peeling the onion (as the expression goes) because an underlying or unspoken purpose often boils down to money. For example, assume your presentation is to introduce a new corporate initiative. The unspoken message to those who embrace the initiative may be to perform better, look good to their superiors, increase the company’s earnings, or perhaps be thought of more favorably when raises or promotions are due.\r\n\r\nThe takeaway message you’ll fill in on the second blank line (that follows) is the call to action. What do you want your audience to do, think, or feel, or learn? Your intention must be clear in your own mind so you can make it clear in theirs. What’s their call to action? What’s in it for them? Too many presenters don’t get the action they wanted because they didn’t make the expectation clear.\r\n\r\nTo state your strategic purpose and the call to action, fill in the blanks of the following statement:\r\n\r\n<strong>My purpose is to ________________ so my audience will _____________________________________________.</strong>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Anticipating questions from your audience</h2>\r\nYou may not think of every question your audience may have and need answered, but the following will help you consider as many as you can. They all relate to any or all of the following:\r\n\r\n<strong>What who, what, when, where, why, and how questions will my audience want answered?</strong>\r\n\r\nFor practice, let’s assume I’m inviting you to a meeting. There are questions you’ll undoubtedly have when you receive the invitation, such as:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Who</strong> else will be there?</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>What</strong> is the agenda?</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>When</strong> will the meeting be held?</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Where</strong> will it be held?</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Why</strong> am I being asked to attend?</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>How</strong> can I prepare and contribute?</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThere are two sets of questions to think about when preparing a presentation:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Column 1:</strong> Questions to ask yourself to prepare your presentation.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Column 2:</strong> Questions you anticipate the audience will ask that you should include in your presentation or be prepared to answer.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nPrepare two columns with who, what, when, where, why, and how. The following table provides some possibilities to consider. Delete the questions that don’t pertain to your presentation and add your questions that aren’t listed.\r\n\r\n \r\n<p style=\"text-align: center;\"><strong>Questions to Ask When Preparing for a Presentation</strong></p>\r\n\r\n<table width=\"100%\">\r\n<tbody>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"></td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"><strong>Your Questions</strong></td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"><strong>Audience’s Questions</strong></td>\r\n</tr>\r\n</tbody>\r\n<tbody>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"><strong>Who …</strong></td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...will be supportive and make supportive comments?\r\n\r\n...will be adversarial and make combative comments?\r\n\r\n...may feel threatened by my recommendations?\r\n\r\n...is my contact person for logistical and other issues?\r\n\r\n...should I bring in as a subject matter expert?</td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...is responsible?\r\n\r\n...will be impacted by the change?</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"><strong>What …</strong></td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...are the major concerns of my audience?\r\n\r\n...can I tell or show to help them address those concerns?\r\n\r\n...stories can help them remember key points?\r\n\r\n...do they know about the topic?\r\n\r\n...is my relationship with them?\r\n\r\n...obstacles may I encounter?\r\n\r\n...discussion points should I encourage?\r\n\r\n...tough questions should I expect?</td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...are the alternatives?\r\n\r\n...are the advantages and/or disadvantages?\r\n\r\n...are the next steps?\r\n\r\n...if we do nothing?</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"><strong>When …</strong></td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...is the best time to deliver this presentation?\r\n\r\n...should I distribute the handouts?</td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...does this take effect?\r\n\r\n...do you need a decision?</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"><strong>Where …</strong></td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...can the audience get more information?\r\n\r\n...can I get more information?</td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...will the funding come from?\r\n\r\n...can I get more information?</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"><strong>Why …</strong></td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...is the audience attending?\r\n\r\n...was I chosen to make this presentation?</td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...are you recommending this?</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"><strong>How …</strong></td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...much time should I spend on providing background? (Do they need any background?)\r\n\r\n...will I open/close the presentation?\r\n\r\n...does this relate to the strategic impact on the organization?</td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...will we measure success?</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n</tbody>\r\n</table>\r\n ","description":"In the context of creating presentations, I compare understanding your audience to many of the courtroom scenes you’ve viewed in the movies and on TV. During the trial, attorneys pose leading questions they know will impact the jurors as they intend. They can do that because they’ve had the opportunity to get to know them beforehand through questioning.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_300923\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-300923\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/giving-business-presentation-adobeStock_258229908.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"420\" /> ©.shock / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n\r\nThe attorneys can relate stories aimed at strengthening their clients’ cases to sway the jurors. The jurors become the heroes because they (presumably) reach a fair and equitable judgment. The selection of jurors can contribute to winning or losing the case even before it’s even tried.\r\n\r\nLet’s relate this to presentations. As you are beginning to create a presentation, of course you won’t select your audience, but the same principle of knowing them applies in order to have a winning presentation (for them and you). When you fill out the Start-Up Brief (see the figure below), you learn all you can about your audience <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/incorporating-your-experiences-into-your-presentations-300906/\">so you can target stories</a> and the entire presentation toward the outcome you intend, and they’ll leave as heroes.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_300917\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-300917\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/start-up-brief-storytelling-presentations.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"753\" /> ©John Wiley & Sons, Inc.<br />Use the Start-Up Brief to make sure you know your audience.[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Knowing your audience</h2>\r\nWhen people ask the question \"how to create a presentation?\" or \"how to create a PowerPoint presentation?\" they're often only thinking about the technical aspects, like how to put together slides. You will need to do that, if there's nobody else to do it for you. However, a flashy PowerPoint or Canva slideshow should not be your goal. It's far more important to focus on the substance of the presentation, and one of the first things to consider about the substance is \"who will make up your audience?\"\r\n\r\nThe better you understand your audience, the better you’ll be able to craft messages and stories they care about in terms of their interests, level of understanding, attitudes, and needs. Here's more to consider about each of the questions in the Start-Up Brief:\r\n<h3>1. What’s the key issue — the one takeaway message I want my audience to remember?</h3>\r\nYour audience won’t remember everything you say or show. What’s the one message you want them to remember above all else? This is like an earworm. If you haven’t heard that term, it’s a tune you hear that plays over and over in your head that you can’t seem to shake.\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>What do you want your audience’s earworm to be?</li>\r\n \t<li>What should they do? Think? Feel? Learn?</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Condense the key message into one sentence. Until you can do that, you won’t be focused. Imagine you have just one minute to get your key issue across clearly. What would that message be?</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>2. Who’s my primary audience?</h3>\r\nWhy is it so easy to communicate with friends or close colleagues? Because you know them. You know their preconceived idea, level of expertise, probable reaction, and so forth. The same theory applies to your audience. Understand who they’ll be and whether they’re attending by choice.\r\n\r\nThere are so many types of audiences you may encounter. Here are just a few:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Peers or subordinates</li>\r\n \t<li>Senior-level managers</li>\r\n \t<li>Middle-level managers</li>\r\n \t<li>Technical or non-technical</li>\r\n \t<li>Internal to your company or external</li>\r\n \t<li>Competitors</li>\r\n \t<li>Buyers</li>\r\n \t<li>Merchandisers</li>\r\n \t<li>Sales associates</li>\r\n \t<li>Customers (new and/or potential)</li>\r\n \t<li>Customer service</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nWhen you create presentations, it's helpful to determine the demographics of your audience prior to presenting. While there are limits as to what you can learn, on occasion it’s apparent. For example, if you’re addressing a technical group, you can assume that most are young, educated, and tech savvy.\r\n\r\nIf the makeup of your audience isn’t apparent, here are a few things you might try:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Conduct surveys, questionnaires, or interviews with the event organizers. They may have knowledge of job titles, industries, and even a breakdown of age and gender.</li>\r\n \t<li>Survey the audience before the event. Ask what they hope to do, think, feel, or learn as a result of attending. Also inquire about their knowledge of the subject matter, organizations they belong to, volunteer activities, and so on.</li>\r\n \t<li>Tap into social media. If you have access to the event's social media accounts, check out who’s following or engaging with them.</li>\r\n \t<li>Observe the audience and conduct informal conversations before the presentation starts.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h3>3. What does my audience need to know about the topic?</h3>\r\nPlease pay attention to the words <em>need to know.</em> Too often we give too much or too little information. For example, if you’re discussing a specific aspect of genetic engineering but your audience isn’t familiar with basic genetics, you’ll have missed the mark. On the other hand, drastically underestimating the audience’s knowledge may result in a presentation that sounds condescending. For a mixed audience, consider reviewing important key terms and concepts so everyone starts with baseline knowledge. Here are some things to think about:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Does your audience have any preconceived ideas?</li>\r\n \t<li>Are there any barriers to their understanding (language, cultural, technical, or other)?</li>\r\n \t<li>Will there be any resistance?</li>\r\n \t<li>Will there be any adversaries?</li>\r\n \t<li>Will you have supporters?</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h3>4. What’s in it for my audience?</h3>\r\nHave you ever listened to WIIFM? The answer is “yes,” you listen to it all the time — <strong><u>W</u></strong>hat’s <strong><u>I</u></strong>n <strong><u>I</u></strong>t <strong><u>F</u></strong>or <strong><u>M</u></strong>e? Whenever you listen to something, you unknowingly ask yourself, “Why should I care?” On the job, you might ask if this an opportunity to look good to superiors, make your job easier, solve a problem, or learn a new skill. If you didn’t care, you wouldn’t be listening.\r\n\r\nDial in to WIIFM to make sure you understand what’s in it for your audience. Dig deeply. For example, if you’re teaching them a new skill, will it impact their job performance? Help them look good to management? Ultimately get them a pay raise or promotion? You don’t want anyone sitting in your audience waiting to find out what’s in it for them. Let them know right up front.\r\n<h3>5. Does my presentation need a special angle or point of view?</h3>\r\nManagers typically need the big picture to make big decisions. The lower down the chain of command, the more details may be needed. Technical people want all the details. Salespeople need benefits. Potential customers want to know why they should select you.\r\n\r\nWhen presenting to hybrid audiences, key phrases may be:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>I’d like to take a few minutes to make sure we’re we are all up to speed on the three key aspects of [topic].</li>\r\n \t<li>The crux of the matter is …</li>\r\n \t<li>The big picture is …</li>\r\n \t<li>Let me give you some examples …</li>\r\n \t<li>In practice this means …</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h3>6. What will my audience’s reaction be toward the topic? Positive? Neutral? Negative?</h3>\r\nYou may not tell people what they <em>want</em> to hear, but you must tell them what they <em>need</em> to hear. What will their reaction be? Positive? Neutral? Negative? If you’re not sure, ask yourself the following questions:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Are you disputing existing data?</li>\r\n \t<li>Will you create more work for them?</li>\r\n \t<li>Are they attending by choice, or were they forced (strongly urged)?</li>\r\n \t<li>Are they interested in the topic?</li>\r\n \t<li>Will your information come as a surprise?</li>\r\n \t<li>What is their relationship with you and with each other?</li>\r\n \t<li>How will the presentation help them perform their jobs better?</li>\r\n \t<li>What are the most interesting parts of the topic?</li>\r\n \t<li>How much will the audience know about the topic?</li>\r\n \t<li>Which audience members may be more/less interested?</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThe following are suggestions for positioning positive, neutral, or negative topics:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Delivering a positive or neutral topic:</strong> When your audience will be positive or neutral, use the BLUF (Bottom Line Up Front) approach. Your presentation isn’t a joke where you need to put the punch line at the end. Tell them what they need to know right at the beginning. We’ve all sat through long, boring presentations waiting to hear the most important part we came to learn — the conclusion or findings.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Delivering a negative topic:</strong> Strategically build up to your main message. Create a sandwich with good news, negative news, good news. Give reasons why. Offer options. Make lemonade.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >What is the purpose of your presentation?</h2>\r\nWhether you think your purpose is to communicate, inform, sell, or whatever, chances are you’re trying to “persuade” someone to do, think, feel, or learn something. Once you realize that most of what you present is to persuade — your message will be “strategic,” not generic.\r\n\r\nKeep peeling the onion (as the expression goes) because an underlying or unspoken purpose often boils down to money. For example, assume your presentation is to introduce a new corporate initiative. The unspoken message to those who embrace the initiative may be to perform better, look good to their superiors, increase the company’s earnings, or perhaps be thought of more favorably when raises or promotions are due.\r\n\r\nThe takeaway message you’ll fill in on the second blank line (that follows) is the call to action. What do you want your audience to do, think, or feel, or learn? Your intention must be clear in your own mind so you can make it clear in theirs. What’s their call to action? What’s in it for them? Too many presenters don’t get the action they wanted because they didn’t make the expectation clear.\r\n\r\nTo state your strategic purpose and the call to action, fill in the blanks of the following statement:\r\n\r\n<strong>My purpose is to ________________ so my audience will _____________________________________________.</strong>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Anticipating questions from your audience</h2>\r\nYou may not think of every question your audience may have and need answered, but the following will help you consider as many as you can. They all relate to any or all of the following:\r\n\r\n<strong>What who, what, when, where, why, and how questions will my audience want answered?</strong>\r\n\r\nFor practice, let’s assume I’m inviting you to a meeting. There are questions you’ll undoubtedly have when you receive the invitation, such as:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Who</strong> else will be there?</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>What</strong> is the agenda?</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>When</strong> will the meeting be held?</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Where</strong> will it be held?</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Why</strong> am I being asked to attend?</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>How</strong> can I prepare and contribute?</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThere are two sets of questions to think about when preparing a presentation:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Column 1:</strong> Questions to ask yourself to prepare your presentation.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Column 2:</strong> Questions you anticipate the audience will ask that you should include in your presentation or be prepared to answer.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nPrepare two columns with who, what, when, where, why, and how. The following table provides some possibilities to consider. Delete the questions that don’t pertain to your presentation and add your questions that aren’t listed.\r\n\r\n \r\n<p style=\"text-align: center;\"><strong>Questions to Ask When Preparing for a Presentation</strong></p>\r\n\r\n<table width=\"100%\">\r\n<tbody>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"></td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"><strong>Your Questions</strong></td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"><strong>Audience’s Questions</strong></td>\r\n</tr>\r\n</tbody>\r\n<tbody>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"><strong>Who …</strong></td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...will be supportive and make supportive comments?\r\n\r\n...will be adversarial and make combative comments?\r\n\r\n...may feel threatened by my recommendations?\r\n\r\n...is my contact person for logistical and other issues?\r\n\r\n...should I bring in as a subject matter expert?</td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...is responsible?\r\n\r\n...will be impacted by the change?</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"><strong>What …</strong></td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...are the major concerns of my audience?\r\n\r\n...can I tell or show to help them address those concerns?\r\n\r\n...stories can help them remember key points?\r\n\r\n...do they know about the topic?\r\n\r\n...is my relationship with them?\r\n\r\n...obstacles may I encounter?\r\n\r\n...discussion points should I encourage?\r\n\r\n...tough questions should I expect?</td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...are the alternatives?\r\n\r\n...are the advantages and/or disadvantages?\r\n\r\n...are the next steps?\r\n\r\n...if we do nothing?</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"><strong>When …</strong></td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...is the best time to deliver this presentation?\r\n\r\n...should I distribute the handouts?</td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...does this take effect?\r\n\r\n...do you need a decision?</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"><strong>Where …</strong></td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...can the audience get more information?\r\n\r\n...can I get more information?</td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...will the funding come from?\r\n\r\n...can I get more information?</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"><strong>Why …</strong></td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...is the audience attending?\r\n\r\n...was I chosen to make this presentation?</td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...are you recommending this?</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td width=\"33%\"><strong>How …</strong></td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...much time should I spend on providing background? (Do they need any background?)\r\n\r\n...will I open/close the presentation?\r\n\r\n...does this relate to the strategic impact on the organization?</td>\r\n<td width=\"33%\">...will we measure success?</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n</tbody>\r\n</table>\r\n ","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10232,"name":"Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts","slug":"sheryl-lindsell-roberts","description":" <p><b>Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts MA</b> leads writing seminars across the country, including the popular workshop “Stories and Storyboarding: Building Blocks to Influential Presentations.” Roberts is also the author of over 25 books and is often quoted in national news outlets and magazines. She is the author of <i>Technical Writing For Dummies</i>. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10232"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34232,"title":"Business Communication","slug":"business-communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Knowing your audience","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"What is the purpose of your presentation?","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Anticipating questions from your audience","target":"#tab3"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":300906,"title":"Finding Stories for Your Presentations","slug":"incorporating-your-experiences-into-your-presentations","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300906"}},{"articleId":300880,"title":"How to Create Truly Engaging Presentations","slug":"how-to-create-an-engaging-presentation","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300880"}},{"articleId":300479,"title":"Storytelling in Presentations For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"storytelling-in-presentations-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300479"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":300906,"title":"Finding Stories for Your Presentations","slug":"incorporating-your-experiences-into-your-presentations","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300906"}},{"articleId":300880,"title":"How to Create Truly Engaging Presentations","slug":"how-to-create-an-engaging-presentation","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300880"}},{"articleId":300479,"title":"Storytelling in Presentations For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"storytelling-in-presentations-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300479"}},{"articleId":296682,"title":"Developing Cultural Awareness, an Important Soft Skill","slug":"developing-cultural-awareness-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296682"}},{"articleId":296680,"title":"How to Be a Better Communicator at Work","slug":"how-to-be-a-better-communicator-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296680"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":300450,"slug":"storytelling-in-presentations-for-dummies","isbn":"9781394201006","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1394201001-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781394201006-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Storytelling in Presentations For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"10232\">Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts</b> MA</b> leads writing seminars across the country, including the popular workshop “Stories and Storyboarding: Building Blocks to Influential Presentations.” Roberts is also the author of over 25 books and is often quoted in national news outlets and magazines. She is the author of <i>Technical Writing For Dummies</i>.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":10232,"name":"Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts","slug":"sheryl-lindsell-roberts","description":" <p><b>Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts MA</b> leads writing seminars across the country, including the popular workshop “Stories and Storyboarding: Building Blocks to Influential Presentations.” Roberts is also the author of over 25 books and is often quoted in national news outlets and magazines. She is the author of <i>Technical Writing For Dummies</i>. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10232"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781394201006&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-653144aee39b8\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781394201006&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-653144aee49d8\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-10-17T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":300913},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-10-16T15:57:05+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-10-18T16:50:55+00:00","timestamp":"2024-10-18T18:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Business, Careers, & Money","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34224"},"slug":"business-careers-money","categoryId":34224},{"name":"Business","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34225"},"slug":"business","categoryId":34225},{"name":"Business Communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"},"slug":"business-communication","categoryId":34232}],"title":"Finding Stories for Your Presentations","strippedTitle":"finding stories for your presentations","slug":"incorporating-your-experiences-into-your-presentations","canonicalUrl":"","搜检索擎组件简化":{"metaDescription":"Learn how to use your own experiences and stories you've heard from others in your presentations to liven them up and engage your audience.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Whether presentations are live, virtual, or hybrid, they’re one of most effective business communication tools of our time. Strong presentation skills are a hallmark of strong leaders and people who aspire to become leaders. When you want to be seen as a subject matter expert (SME) or knowledge source, a presentation can showcase your skills and potential.\r\n\r\nSo, how can you <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/how-to-create-an-engaging-presentation-300880/\">create and deliver engaging and effective presentations</a>? Through storytelling. This article is about how to find stories to incorporate into your presentations.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >How to create stories for a presentation</h2>\r\nBefore you create a presentation, think about how you can create stories. Open your eyes. Open your ears. Open your mind. Stories are all around you. The key is to be aware and pay attention to your life and the lives of others. Be curious. Look about. Observe with all your senses. Try new things. Take up a new hobby. Explore different places. Talk with people. Ask lots of questions. Everyday life offers an endless plethora of experiences — all of which are potential stories.\r\n\r\nSome of the best stories come from just being around people. Schmoozing at networking events. Drumming up conversations at dinners, meetings, and conferences. Even chatting with strangers standing behind you in checkout lines. For example, I was on a long checkout line several years ago and started a conversation with a guy standing in back of me. He wound up being one of my best clients. Serendipity!\r\n\r\nThe more people you speak with — especially people with jobs and backgrounds different from yours — the more stories you’ll find and the more interesting your life will be.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Becoming an active listener</h2>\r\n<em>Active listening</em> is a communication skill that involves going beyond simply hearing the words someone else is saying, as you see in the figure below. It will have a positive impact on your business and social relationships. Active listening can also harvest some interesting stories.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_300905\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-300905\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/active-listening-storytelling-presentations.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"515\" /> ©Dmitry / Adobe Stock<br />Attributes of active listening[/caption]\r\n\r\nWhen I'm talking with people in my workshops about how to create a story for their presenting, people often share their own stories. The following story was shared by someone during one of these workshops. I’m glad I was listening with my <em>ninja ears</em> because it’s a winner. I made a note of this story to use at an appropriate time!\r\n\r\n<strong>Story:</strong> Several years ago Nora attended my email workshop. She told the group of a very embarrassing situation. She’d sent an email to several hundred coworkers. In her rush to leave the office after working late, she didn’t proofread carefully and wrote that she was pubic relations director, instead of public relations director. She learned of her mistake when she reported to work the following morning. Oops! I filed the story away for future use. It has provided a great introduction on the importance of proofreading <em>everything</em>.\r\n\r\n<strong>How and when I use it:</strong> When I get toward the end of the writing workshop and discuss proofreading, I tell the story of Nora, the hapless PR director. I don’t use the word pubic because I want the audience to use their imaginations. I merely say … <em>and she left the l out of public. Think about that for a moment.</em> People think momentarily, then chuckles start. Of course, I don’t mention her name or company, but the story proves a valuable point about the importance of proofreading — <em>everything</em>.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Part of the process of creating an engaging presentation is storyboarding. Learn how to create a story board and all the other aspects of creating engaging, effective presentations in my book <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/book/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/storytelling-in-presentations-for-dummies-300450/\"><em>Storytelling in Presentations For Dummies</em></a>.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Honing your skills of observation</h2>\r\n\"How to create a story\" for your presentation might be weighing on your mind. But stories are all around you. We often go about our days on autopilot, not noticing what’s around and in front of us. By consciously observing our surroundings, we can grow our awareness and flex our <em>noticing muscles,</em> thereby perceiving the world with higher resolution, detail, and clarity.\r\n\r\n<strong>Story:</strong> I was stopped at a red light and noticed a sign posted on a poll. In large letters it said, MISSING DOG. Underneath was a small picture and some text, neither of which could be seen by passing in a car. The poster completely missed the mark. Had the owner put a larger photo of the dog and the type of breed in large print, passersby would have known what kind of dog too look for. For example, MISSING DALMATIAN, would have told passersby immediately the breed of dog to spot (pun intended).\r\n\r\n<strong>How and when I use it:</strong> During my writing workshops I focus heavily on creating robust headlines. I tell the missing dog poster story to emphasize the importance of delivering key information at a glance. Here’s the difference between a strong and a weak headline.\r\n\r\n<strong>Strong headline:</strong> Status report indicates 2 percent rise in sales\r\n\r\n<strong>Weak headline:</strong> Status report\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Noticing when an experience sparks a reaction</h2>\r\nWhen you have a reaction to something that happens or a reaction to something you hear or see, that could be fodder for a story. Whether it’s funny, scary, heedless, upsetting, informational, negative, positive, or whatever, it may have story potential.\r\n\r\n<strong>Story:</strong> I was sitting at my computer a little over a year ago writing a book. An email popped up on my screen from my friend Pam asking me to meet her for lunch. That message sparked such a strong reaction that my heart skipped several beats. Why? Pam had died six months earlier after a long bout with cancer. Her message must have been floating in cyberspace, and she probably wondered why I never responded.\r\n\r\n<strong>How and when I use it:</strong> During my email workshop, I relate this story to convey how you should never assume someone received your message. Emails can get lost, wind up in the recipient’s spam or junk folder, get blocked by the server, have an invalid address, or who knows what else. If you don’t get an expected reply within a reasonable amount of time, either send another message or (better yet) phone the recipient.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >Noting when you (or someone you know) beat the odds</h2>\r\nYou can create your own story out of an experience in which you “just knew” that you (or someone else) couldn’t do something. It was too difficult, too strenuous, too farfetched, too whatever. Discuss how you (or someone) wouldn’t take “no” for an answer but kept on plugging away.\r\n\r\n<strong>Story:</strong> Before I got my first book published eons ago, I sent manuscripts over a period of several years to dozens of publishers and got dozens of refusals. I had read that writers have a better chance of getting struck by lightning than getting a book published. However, I believed in myself and refused to give up. After several years of getting one rejection after another, I finally got a “yes.” I’ve had 25-plus books professionally published.\r\n\r\n<strong>How and when I use it:</strong> I host a writing group for seven other people; we call ourselves the Scribe Tribe. They aren’t professional writers, yet they’re wonderful scribes. I’ve reminded them of my long journey to getting published as I encourage them to submit their work. Many of them started submitting their work (and after many rejections) have gotten articles published. One even published a book. I’m so delighted that my experience of beating the odds has inspired them.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab6\" >Drawing upon what you’ve read</h2>\r\nThe stories we heard as kids taught us many lifelong lessons: Laugh at your mistakes; be a true friend; make yourself heard; there’s no place like home; you can’t always get what you want; everyone has a special gift; pick your battles wisely; be a good sharer; good things come to those who wait; and so much more.\r\n\r\nAs adults, our stories aren’t that simple and they don’t necessarily start with “Once upon a time.” But the stories we opt to share will instill valuable teaching and learning lessons. In addition to your own stories, you’ll find stories in newspapers, magazines, and on social media.\r\n\r\nWhen creating a story, a presenter should feel comfortable telling other people’s stories, as long as they give credit where credit is due. Here are two examples I include as a contrast:\r\n\r\n<strong>Story example 1:</strong> When the Affordable Care Act (also known as ACA or Obamacare) was enacted in 2010, it was several thousand pages long. (The numbers vary depending on which site you look at, but it was veeeeery long.) The frightening truth is that our representatives routinely vote on huge, complex bills without having read anything more than an executive summary.\r\n\r\nThis isn’t a political statement. Most reps admit they never read more than the summary in the ACA, and the same is true for many other lengthy bills. Now, contrast that with the United States Constitution, often called the supreme laws of the land. It’s only four pages long.\r\n\r\n<strong>Story example 2:</strong> One of the shortest letters ever written was from Cornelius Vanderbilt, (business magnate who built his wealth in railroads and shipping). It read, “Gentlemen, You have undertaken to cheat me. I won’t sue you, for the law is too slow. I’ll ruin you.” (19 harsh words)\r\n\r\n<strong>How and when I used them:</strong> I make reference to these two examples when I’m presenting the workshop segment on <em>keeping it short and simple</em> (KISS) while stressing how to find a good balance and using tact. In all writing and speaking, include what’s necessary and ditch what’s not.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab7\" >Avoiding story overload and clutter</h2>\r\nStorytelling is like salt. If you don’t include any, the dish is bland. If you include too much, you ruin the dish. Just the right amount makes for a delish dish. So, how many stories should you tell? There’s no magic formula, but there’s one constant: Space stories out so audiences have time to absorb and reflect on each one. Here are some guidelines:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>If your presentation brings together many different layers, such as scientific data, evidence, or other hard content, interjecting stories makes the data more digestible — somewhat like sherbet served as a palate cleanser between courses. Each story should bring your point to life and transition from one topic to another.</li>\r\n \t<li>Consider a solid story for each major section of your presentation. However, don’t include a story for the sake of telling one. It’s better to tell no story than tell a weak or irrelevant one.</li>\r\n \t<li>If the presentation is less than a half hour or it’s to share one specific idea, one story should suffice. Tell it near the beginning of your presentation to engage the audience.</li>\r\n \t<li>If the purpose of your presentation is to describe (for example) how people from different walks of life have benefited from a situation, you might think of sprinkling stories in two or three places.</li>\r\n \t<li>Referencing your opening story at the end is a really great way to tie the presentation together and lead into your call to action.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nRegardless of how many stories you tell, cut the clutter. This relates to anything that doesn’t increase understanding, such as inconsequential facts or figures. Remember that not all data are equally important.\r\n\r\nAsk yourself what you need to express the essence of your message and eliminate what’s not relevant. As Blaise Pascal (French mathematician, physicist, inventor, and philosopher) famously said in the 1600s, “If I had more time, I would have written a shorter letter.”\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Make sure to use the most current facts, figures, and statistics because data can change quickly.</p>","description":"Whether presentations are live, virtual, or hybrid, they’re one of most effective business communication tools of our time. Strong presentation skills are a hallmark of strong leaders and people who aspire to become leaders. When you want to be seen as a subject matter expert (SME) or knowledge source, a presentation can showcase your skills and potential.\r\n\r\nSo, how can you <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/how-to-create-an-engaging-presentation-300880/\">create and deliver engaging and effective presentations</a>? Through storytelling. This article is about how to find stories to incorporate into your presentations.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >How to create stories for a presentation</h2>\r\nBefore you create a presentation, think about how you can create stories. Open your eyes. Open your ears. Open your mind. Stories are all around you. The key is to be aware and pay attention to your life and the lives of others. Be curious. Look about. Observe with all your senses. Try new things. Take up a new hobby. Explore different places. Talk with people. Ask lots of questions. Everyday life offers an endless plethora of experiences — all of which are potential stories.\r\n\r\nSome of the best stories come from just being around people. Schmoozing at networking events. Drumming up conversations at dinners, meetings, and conferences. Even chatting with strangers standing behind you in checkout lines. For example, I was on a long checkout line several years ago and started a conversation with a guy standing in back of me. He wound up being one of my best clients. Serendipity!\r\n\r\nThe more people you speak with — especially people with jobs and backgrounds different from yours — the more stories you’ll find and the more interesting your life will be.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Becoming an active listener</h2>\r\n<em>Active listening</em> is a communication skill that involves going beyond simply hearing the words someone else is saying, as you see in the figure below. It will have a positive impact on your business and social relationships. Active listening can also harvest some interesting stories.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_300905\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-300905\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/active-listening-storytelling-presentations.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"515\" /> ©Dmitry / Adobe Stock<br />Attributes of active listening[/caption]\r\n\r\nWhen I'm talking with people in my workshops about how to create a story for their presenting, people often share their own stories. The following story was shared by someone during one of these workshops. I’m glad I was listening with my <em>ninja ears</em> because it’s a winner. I made a note of this story to use at an appropriate time!\r\n\r\n<strong>Story:</strong> Several years ago Nora attended my email workshop. She told the group of a very embarrassing situation. She’d sent an email to several hundred coworkers. In her rush to leave the office after working late, she didn’t proofread carefully and wrote that she was pubic relations director, instead of public relations director. She learned of her mistake when she reported to work the following morning. Oops! I filed the story away for future use. It has provided a great introduction on the importance of proofreading <em>everything</em>.\r\n\r\n<strong>How and when I use it:</strong> When I get toward the end of the writing workshop and discuss proofreading, I tell the story of Nora, the hapless PR director. I don’t use the word pubic because I want the audience to use their imaginations. I merely say … <em>and she left the l out of public. Think about that for a moment.</em> People think momentarily, then chuckles start. Of course, I don’t mention her name or company, but the story proves a valuable point about the importance of proofreading — <em>everything</em>.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Part of the process of creating an engaging presentation is storyboarding. Learn how to create a story board and all the other aspects of creating engaging, effective presentations in my book <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/book/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/storytelling-in-presentations-for-dummies-300450/\"><em>Storytelling in Presentations For Dummies</em></a>.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Honing your skills of observation</h2>\r\n\"How to create a story\" for your presentation might be weighing on your mind. But stories are all around you. We often go about our days on autopilot, not noticing what’s around and in front of us. By consciously observing our surroundings, we can grow our awareness and flex our <em>noticing muscles,</em> thereby perceiving the world with higher resolution, detail, and clarity.\r\n\r\n<strong>Story:</strong> I was stopped at a red light and noticed a sign posted on a poll. In large letters it said, MISSING DOG. Underneath was a small picture and some text, neither of which could be seen by passing in a car. The poster completely missed the mark. Had the owner put a larger photo of the dog and the type of breed in large print, passersby would have known what kind of dog too look for. For example, MISSING DALMATIAN, would have told passersby immediately the breed of dog to spot (pun intended).\r\n\r\n<strong>How and when I use it:</strong> During my writing workshops I focus heavily on creating robust headlines. I tell the missing dog poster story to emphasize the importance of delivering key information at a glance. Here’s the difference between a strong and a weak headline.\r\n\r\n<strong>Strong headline:</strong> Status report indicates 2 percent rise in sales\r\n\r\n<strong>Weak headline:</strong> Status report\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Noticing when an experience sparks a reaction</h2>\r\nWhen you have a reaction to something that happens or a reaction to something you hear or see, that could be fodder for a story. Whether it’s funny, scary, heedless, upsetting, informational, negative, positive, or whatever, it may have story potential.\r\n\r\n<strong>Story:</strong> I was sitting at my computer a little over a year ago writing a book. An email popped up on my screen from my friend Pam asking me to meet her for lunch. That message sparked such a strong reaction that my heart skipped several beats. Why? Pam had died six months earlier after a long bout with cancer. Her message must have been floating in cyberspace, and she probably wondered why I never responded.\r\n\r\n<strong>How and when I use it:</strong> During my email workshop, I relate this story to convey how you should never assume someone received your message. Emails can get lost, wind up in the recipient’s spam or junk folder, get blocked by the server, have an invalid address, or who knows what else. If you don’t get an expected reply within a reasonable amount of time, either send another message or (better yet) phone the recipient.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >Noting when you (or someone you know) beat the odds</h2>\r\nYou can create your own story out of an experience in which you “just knew” that you (or someone else) couldn’t do something. It was too difficult, too strenuous, too farfetched, too whatever. Discuss how you (or someone) wouldn’t take “no” for an answer but kept on plugging away.\r\n\r\n<strong>Story:</strong> Before I got my first book published eons ago, I sent manuscripts over a period of several years to dozens of publishers and got dozens of refusals. I had read that writers have a better chance of getting struck by lightning than getting a book published. However, I believed in myself and refused to give up. After several years of getting one rejection after another, I finally got a “yes.” I’ve had 25-plus books professionally published.\r\n\r\n<strong>How and when I use it:</strong> I host a writing group for seven other people; we call ourselves the Scribe Tribe. They aren’t professional writers, yet they’re wonderful scribes. I’ve reminded them of my long journey to getting published as I encourage them to submit their work. Many of them started submitting their work (and after many rejections) have gotten articles published. One even published a book. I’m so delighted that my experience of beating the odds has inspired them.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab6\" >Drawing upon what you’ve read</h2>\r\nThe stories we heard as kids taught us many lifelong lessons: Laugh at your mistakes; be a true friend; make yourself heard; there’s no place like home; you can’t always get what you want; everyone has a special gift; pick your battles wisely; be a good sharer; good things come to those who wait; and so much more.\r\n\r\nAs adults, our stories aren’t that simple and they don’t necessarily start with “Once upon a time.” But the stories we opt to share will instill valuable teaching and learning lessons. In addition to your own stories, you’ll find stories in newspapers, magazines, and on social media.\r\n\r\nWhen creating a story, a presenter should feel comfortable telling other people’s stories, as long as they give credit where credit is due. Here are two examples I include as a contrast:\r\n\r\n<strong>Story example 1:</strong> When the Affordable Care Act (also known as ACA or Obamacare) was enacted in 2010, it was several thousand pages long. (The numbers vary depending on which site you look at, but it was veeeeery long.) The frightening truth is that our representatives routinely vote on huge, complex bills without having read anything more than an executive summary.\r\n\r\nThis isn’t a political statement. Most reps admit they never read more than the summary in the ACA, and the same is true for many other lengthy bills. Now, contrast that with the United States Constitution, often called the supreme laws of the land. It’s only four pages long.\r\n\r\n<strong>Story example 2:</strong> One of the shortest letters ever written was from Cornelius Vanderbilt, (business magnate who built his wealth in railroads and shipping). It read, “Gentlemen, You have undertaken to cheat me. I won’t sue you, for the law is too slow. I’ll ruin you.” (19 harsh words)\r\n\r\n<strong>How and when I used them:</strong> I make reference to these two examples when I’m presenting the workshop segment on <em>keeping it short and simple</em> (KISS) while stressing how to find a good balance and using tact. In all writing and speaking, include what’s necessary and ditch what’s not.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab7\" >Avoiding story overload and clutter</h2>\r\nStorytelling is like salt. If you don’t include any, the dish is bland. If you include too much, you ruin the dish. Just the right amount makes for a delish dish. So, how many stories should you tell? There’s no magic formula, but there’s one constant: Space stories out so audiences have time to absorb and reflect on each one. Here are some guidelines:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>If your presentation brings together many different layers, such as scientific data, evidence, or other hard content, interjecting stories makes the data more digestible — somewhat like sherbet served as a palate cleanser between courses. Each story should bring your point to life and transition from one topic to another.</li>\r\n \t<li>Consider a solid story for each major section of your presentation. However, don’t include a story for the sake of telling one. It’s better to tell no story than tell a weak or irrelevant one.</li>\r\n \t<li>If the presentation is less than a half hour or it’s to share one specific idea, one story should suffice. Tell it near the beginning of your presentation to engage the audience.</li>\r\n \t<li>If the purpose of your presentation is to describe (for example) how people from different walks of life have benefited from a situation, you might think of sprinkling stories in two or three places.</li>\r\n \t<li>Referencing your opening story at the end is a really great way to tie the presentation together and lead into your call to action.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nRegardless of how many stories you tell, cut the clutter. This relates to anything that doesn’t increase understanding, such as inconsequential facts or figures. Remember that not all data are equally important.\r\n\r\nAsk yourself what you need to express the essence of your message and eliminate what’s not relevant. As Blaise Pascal (French mathematician, physicist, inventor, and philosopher) famously said in the 1600s, “If I had more time, I would have written a shorter letter.”\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Make sure to use the most current facts, figures, and statistics because data can change quickly.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10232,"name":"Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts","slug":"sheryl-lindsell-roberts","description":" <p><b>Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts MA</b> leads writing seminars across the country, including the popular workshop “Stories and Storyboarding: Building Blocks to Influential Presentations.” Roberts is also the author of over 25 books and is often quoted in national news outlets and magazines. She is the author of <i>Technical Writing For Dummies</i>. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10232"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34232,"title":"Business Communication","slug":"business-communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"How to create stories for a presentation","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Becoming an active listener","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Honing your skills of observation","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Noticing when an experience sparks a reaction","target":"#tab4"},{"label":"Noting when you (or someone you know) beat the odds","target":"#tab5"},{"label":"Drawing upon what you’ve read","target":"#tab6"},{"label":"Avoiding story overload and clutter","target":"#tab7"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":300913,"title":"Know Your Audience to Create Engaging Presentations","slug":"know-your-audience-to-make-engaging-presentations","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300913"}},{"articleId":300880,"title":"How to Create Truly Engaging Presentations","slug":"how-to-create-an-engaging-presentation","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300880"}},{"articleId":300479,"title":"Storytelling in Presentations For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"storytelling-in-presentations-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300479"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":300913,"title":"Know Your Audience to Create Engaging Presentations","slug":"know-your-audience-to-make-engaging-presentations","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300913"}},{"articleId":300880,"title":"How to Create Truly Engaging Presentations","slug":"how-to-create-an-engaging-presentation","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300880"}},{"articleId":300479,"title":"Storytelling in Presentations For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"storytelling-in-presentations-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/300479"}},{"articleId":296682,"title":"Developing Cultural Awareness, an Important Soft Skill","slug":"developing-cultural-awareness-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296682"}},{"articleId":296680,"title":"How to Be a Better Communicator at Work","slug":"how-to-be-a-better-communicator-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296680"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":300450,"slug":"storytelling-in-presentations-for-dummies","isbn":"9781394201006","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1394201001-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781394201006-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Storytelling in Presentations For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"10232\">Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts</b> MA</b> leads writing seminars across the country, including the popular workshop “Stories and Storyboarding: Building Blocks to Influential Presentations.” Roberts is also the author of over 25 books and is often quoted in national news outlets and magazines. She is the author of <i>Technical Writing For Dummies</i>.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":10232,"name":"Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts","slug":"sheryl-lindsell-roberts","description":" <p><b>Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts MA</b> leads writing seminars across the country, including the popular workshop “Stories and Storyboarding: Building Blocks to Influential Presentations.” Roberts is also the author of over 25 books and is often quoted in national news outlets and magazines. She is the author of <i>Technical Writing For Dummies</i>. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10232"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781394201006&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-65301d5f1bd54\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781394201006&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-65301d5f1c282\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-10-16T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":300906},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-09-05T17:36:06+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-09-05T17:40:01+00:00","timestamp":"2024-09-05T18:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Business, Careers, & Money","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34224"},"slug":"business-careers-money","categoryId":34224},{"name":"Business","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34225"},"slug":"business","categoryId":34225},{"name":"Business Communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"},"slug":"business-communication","categoryId":34232}],"title":"Storytelling in Presentations For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"storytelling in presentations for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"storytelling-in-presentations-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","搜检索擎组件简化":{"metaDescription":"Storytelling is one of the most effective tools in presentations for several reasons: Stories engage the audience and evoke emotion responses. They make informa","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Storytelling is one of the most effective tools in presentations for several reasons:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Stories engage the audience and evoke emotion responses.</li>\r\n \t<li>They make information more relatable and memorable.</li>\r\n \t<li>They can increase retention and make messages more compelling.</li>\r\n \t<li>And they help build trust between the presenter and the audience.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThis handy Cheat Sheet provides some guidelines to make your presentations more interesting and powerful.","description":"Storytelling is one of the most effective tools in presentations for several reasons:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Stories engage the audience and evoke emotion responses.</li>\r\n \t<li>They make information more relatable and memorable.</li>\r\n \t<li>They can increase retention and make messages more compelling.</li>\r\n \t<li>And they help build trust between the presenter and the audience.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThis handy Cheat Sheet provides some guidelines to make your presentations more interesting and powerful.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10232,"name":"Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts","slug":"sheryl-lindsell-roberts","description":" Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts runs business-writing seminars for Fortune 500 companies and is the author of several books, including For Dummies guides to business writing and business letters.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10232"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34232,"title":"Business Communication","slug":"business-communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":296682,"title":"Developing Cultural Awareness, an Important Soft Skill","slug":"developing-cultural-awareness-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296682"}},{"articleId":296680,"title":"How to Be a Better Communicator at Work","slug":"how-to-be-a-better-communicator-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296680"}},{"articleId":296553,"title":"Top 10 Soft Skills Employers Seek","slug":"the-10-soft-skills-employers-seek","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296553"}},{"articleId":296176,"title":"Soft Skills For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"soft-skills-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296176"}},{"articleId":283575,"title":"How to Write Effective Business Letters","slug":"how-to-write-effective-business-letters","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/283575"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":300450,"slug":"storytelling-in-presentations-for-dummies","isbn":"9781394201006","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1394201001-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1394201001/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781394201006-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Storytelling in Presentations For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b data-author-id=\"10232\">Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts</b> runs business-writing seminars for Fortune 500 companies and is the author of several books, including For Dummies guides to business writing and business letters.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":10232,"name":"Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts","slug":"sheryl-lindsell-roberts","description":" Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts runs business-writing seminars for Fortune 500 companies and is the author of several books, including For Dummies guides to business writing and business letters.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10232"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781394201006&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64f76cdf8f9df\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781394201006&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64f76cdf9022f\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":0,"title":"","slug":null,"categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/"}}],"content":[{"title":"Guidelines for a great presentation","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>The first order of business is to build up your repertoire of stories. Once you’ve done that, here are some guidelines for a powerful delivery:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Name your characters.</strong> Audiences identify with actual names more than titles.\n<ul>\n<li> Say: <em>Genna, our wonderful presenter, suggested . . .</em></li>\n<li>Rather than: <em>The presenter suggested . . .</em></li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><strong>Give a brief description of the person or surroundings to make the story real.</strong>\n<ul>\n<li>Say: <em>The room wasn’t brightly lit, but I found a seat near the window.</em></li>\n<li>Rather than: <em>I entered the room and sat down quietly.</em></li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><strong>Speak in the present to make your narrative more immediate.</strong>\n<ul>\n<li>Say: <em>I walk into the room, and what do you think happens?</em></li>\n<li>Rather than: <em>When I walked into the room and what do you think happened?</em></li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><strong>Include sensory information (what you saw, felt, tasted, heard, or smelled).</strong>\n<ul>\n<li>Say: <em>The cold air felt like shards of glass in my lungs.</em></li>\n<li>Rather than: <em>It was cold outside.</em></li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><strong>Talk about what is and what can be.</strong>\n<ul>\n<li>Say: <em>The Q4 numbers must be stronger than 5% for robust year-end bonuses.</em></li>\n<li>Rather than: <em>We missed our Q3 forecast by just 5%.</em></li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><strong>Show or describe, don’t just tell.</strong>\n<ul>\n<li>Say: <em>With the sizzling heat of the midday sun on my forehead, I wish had brought my sunhat.</em></li>\n<li>Rather than: <em>It was very hot outside.</em></li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p>Here are some more guidelines about what your audience sees:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Gesture with your hands to coordinate with your words.</strong> If you’re not talking with your hands, you’re not talking. Use gestures as naturally as you would during a conversation with friends.</li>\n<li><strong>Maintain eye contact</strong><strong>. </strong>This builds rapport between you and your audience and keeps them engaged.</li>\n<li><strong>Listen to your audience.</strong> Listen with your eyes as well as with your ears.\n<ul>\n<li>Are they alert?</li>\n<li>Are they checking their phones?</li>\n<li>Are they having side conversations?</li>\n<li>Do you hear wood sawing (another way of saying snoring) around the room?</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><strong>Be present, organized, animated, energetic, poised, and focused.</strong> Be aware of these qualities in other presenters. If you don’t go to many presentations, view a few TED talks.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Avoid the seven deadly slide sins","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Eliminating the following chronic blunders gives you a leg up in nailing your next important talk. Here are the top seven deadly sins of slide presentations:</p>\n<ol>\n<li><strong> Slide transitions: </strong>You know the fade-ins, fade-outs, wipes, blinds, dissolves, checkerboards, cuts, covers and splits, and builds. It’s fine to use a few appropriately, but focus on your message, not on gimmickry.</li>\n<li><strong> Too much clipart:</strong> You may find an appropriate piece of clipart that “just says it,” and that will work. But don’t use too many because clipart has become a visual cliché and lacks creativity. There are many photo sites from which you can grab appropriate visuals. For free check out Unsplash, Pixabay, Pexels, and Burst. For a fee check out Adobe Images, Shutterstock, and Getty.</li>\n<li><strong> Distracting templates:</strong> Templates force you to fit your presentation into a pre-packaged mode. Create your own distinctive look and use your company logo in a corner of the screen. (If your company has a prescribed template, you must go along to get along.)</li>\n<li><strong> Test-laden slidezillas:</strong> Avoid paragraphs, long quotations, and complete sentences. Limit each slide to one point and no more than 5 lines of text.</li>\n<li><strong> Bad color schemes:</strong> If you use inappropriate or flashy colors, your presentation will look tacky. Stick with grays and dark shades of blue or green. Use what’s professional for your audience, your company, and your theme while also providing accessibility for all.</li>\n<li><strong> Too many elements:</strong> Charts, tables, graphs, and bullets are fine, but don’t go overboard. Your audience won’t have patience for deciphering all sorts of colors, trend lines, and one bulleted list after another.</li>\n<li><strong> Too many charts and tables:</strong> Nothing kills a presentation like data overload. Keep charts and tables to a minimum and show only those that are necessary to make a key point.</li>\n</ol>\n"},{"title":"The start-up brief","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Every presenter must remember four important words: <em>It’s not about me!</em> When your audience walks into the room, they’re thinking, “What’s in it for me?”</p>\n<p>Perhaps you think you already know your audience, but do you actually understand their (hidden) agendas or what keeps them up at night?</p>\n<p><a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/9781394201006-fgcs01.pdf\">This Start-Up Brief</a> (also shown below) can help you find out how to better understand your audience, their purpose and key issue, and the questions you need to address to create a presentation that will make each person feel like you’re speaking directly to them.</p>\n<p><strong>Start-Up Brief</strong></p>\n<p><strong>Audience:</strong></p>\n<ol>\n<li>What’s the key issue — the one takeaway message I want my audience to remember?</li>\n<li>Who’s my primary audience?</li>\n<li>What does my audience need to know about the topic?</li>\n<li>What’s in it for my audience?</li>\n<li>Does my story need a special angle or point of view?</li>\n<li>What will my audience’s reaction be toward the topic? Positive? Neutral? Negative?</li>\n</ol>\n<p><strong>Purpose</strong></p>\n<p>My purpose is to___________________ so my audience will ___________________.</p>\n<p><strong>Questions</strong></p>\n<p>What <em>who, what, when, where, why,</em> and <em>how</em> questions will my audience want answered?</p>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-09-05T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":300479},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-01-11T18:55:12+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-08-03T16:52:12+00:00","timestamp":"2024-08-03T18:01:04+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Business, Careers, & Money","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34224"},"slug":"business-careers-money","categoryId":34224},{"name":"Business","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34225"},"slug":"business","categoryId":34225},{"name":"Business Communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"},"slug":"business-communication","categoryId":34232}],"title":"How to Be a Better Communicator at Work","strippedTitle":"how to be a better communicator at work","slug":"how-to-be-a-better-communicator-an-important-soft-skill","canonicalUrl":"","搜检索擎组件简化":{"metaDescription":"Learn how to improve your communication skills, primarily by being a good listener and avoiding behaviors that hinder connection with others.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Effective <em>interpersonal communication</em> is a critical <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/the-10-soft-skills-employers-seek-296553/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">soft skill</a>, both in professional and personal interactions. It's the process by which people exchange information, feelings, and intention through active listening and verbal and nonverbal messages.\r\n\r\nTo successfully communicate with others both at work and in life, you must first be able to connect with them. I want to repeat that because it’s so important: Connect first. Communicate second.\r\n\r\nThat means you have to listen. Listen first and talk second. Wait. What? Who does that? People with effective interpersonal communication skills, that’s who.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Interpersonal communication is all about making connections; it focuses on building meaningful relationships.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Listening first, talking second</h2>\r\nHuman beings have one mouth and two ears for a reason: so I would listen twice as much as I speak. Sadly, that’s not the way it works most of the time. Our ears may work perfectly well, and we may <em>hear</em> just fine. The problem is I don’t put them to work often enough. I don’t really <em>listen</em>.\r\n\r\nThe difference between hearing and listening is important:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><em>Hearing</em> is what happens when you receive the auditory stimulus of someone else speaking, and you go through motions of listening: nodding your head and/or changing your expressions while your mind and/or your fingers are busy doing something else.</li>\r\n \t<li><em>Listening</em> is what happens when you receive the auditory stimulus but you also connect and communicate with your entire person and keep your mind focused on the message the speaker is conveying. Listening tells the person speaking to you, “I’m here, front and center, and I hear you. I get it.”</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Framing the walls of disconnection</h2>\r\nMaking a connection with someone when you’re hearing but not listening is hard. If you’re doing something other than focusing on the conversation happening right in front of you — for example, thinking about what you want for lunch or what you want to do this weekend — rather than building an effective relationship, you’re erecting a wall of disconnection blocks that keeps you from really communicating and connecting.\r\n\r\nWe need to talk about those pesky disconnection blocks and how people build walls with them. As they say, knowledge is power.\r\n\r\nThe following are common disconnection blocks that get in the way of successful communication. Not all of them come into play in every personal and professional communication situation, but being aware of them when communicating with others at work and in life is essential. Think about your listening skills as you review each block.\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Rehearsing:</strong> When someone is talking and you’re busy silently rehearsing or planning your own reply, you’re breaking your listening concentration and blocking the opportunity for a real connection.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Judging:</strong> If you’re focused on how the person you’re communicating with is dressed or how they look or speak, you can prejudge the speaker, dismiss their idea as unimportant or uninformed, and put up a disconnect block.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Identifying:</strong> When you’re listening to someone tell a story but are so occupied thinking about your own experience that you launch into your own story before the person is finished telling theirs, you may lose sight of what the other person was trying to communicate, and you definitely miss the connection.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Advising:</strong> If you try to offer advice before a person has finished explaining a situation, you may not fully understand the situation.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Sparring:</strong> If you’re focused on disagreeing with what someone is saying, you’re probably not giving that person an honest chance to fully express their thoughts.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Put-downs:</strong> When you use sarcastic comments to put down someone’s point of view, you can draw that person into an argumentative conversation in which neither of you hears a word the other says. The result: <em>dis</em>-connection.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Being right:</strong> If you’re so intent on proving your point or adamantly refusing to admit to any wrongdoing, you may end up twisting the facts, shouting, and making excuses. These actions may confuse and upset both you and the person you’re talking to.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Derailing:</strong> When you suddenly change the subject while someone is talking or joke about what they’re saying, you’re likely to weaken that speaker’s trust in both you and your ability to show understanding.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Smoothing over:</strong> When you’ll do anything to avoid conflict or often choose to agree with what someone is saying simply because you want others to like you, you may appear to be supportive. However, never expressing a personal point of view is an obvious signal that you aren’t fully engaged in the conversation.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Daydreaming:</strong> If you tune out while someone is talking to you and let your mind wander from random thought to random thought, you’ve completely disconnected from the conversation.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Listen with curiosity. Speak with honesty. Act with integrity. The greatest problem with communication is that people don’t listen to understand. They listen to reply. When you listen with curiosity, you don’t listen with the intent to reply. You listen for what’s behind the words.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Completing the connection with the three Vs</h2>\r\nEffective interpersonal communication is less about how well you’re able to converse and more about how well you’re able to be understood. Your ability to make that oh-so-important connection comes into play.\r\n\r\nConnecting and communicating effectively with others is as easy as the three Vs: the <em>visual</em>, the <em>vocal</em>, and the <em>verbal</em> components of a conversation. The three Vs represent how much information you give and receive when you communicate with others. When you incorporate all three Vs into your interpersonal communication skill set, your personal and professional interactions can be amazingly easy, effective, and successful.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">To create and cultivate effective interpersonal communication skills and to make a 100 percent genuine connection with another person, you must communicate with your entire being: your ears, your eyes, your words, and your heart!</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Doing the math</h2>\r\nMost people probably think “verbal” is the most important of the three Vs for effective communication. After all, if you’re not saying anything, how can you possibly communicate?\r\n\r\nThe real math tells a different story:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><em>Visual interpersonal communication</em> (your body language) controls 55 percent of all interpersonal communication. Talk about actions speaking louder than words!</li>\r\n \t<li><em>Vocal interpersonal communication</em> (the tone, quality, and rate of your speaking voice) controls 38 percent of all interpersonal communication.</li>\r\n \t<li><em>Verbal interpersonal communication</em> (the actual words spoken) controls only 7 percent of all interpersonal communication.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nSurprise, surprise. On the interpersonal communication importance scale, verbal skills come in dead last. Yep. You read that right.\r\n\r\nNinety-three percent of all information given and received in every single conversation is directly related to nonverbal communication skills, proving beyond a shadow of a doubt that for effective and successful communicators, <em>how</em> you say it counts more than <em>what</em> you say.\r\n\r\nLucky for you, you only need to sharpen two tools to cultivate your nonverbal communication skills, and you already have both: your eyes and your ears. When you connect with your ears, you give every conversation a 38 percent interpersonal communication boost. Add in your eyes, and you get an extra 55 percent of successful interpersonal communication and connection power.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >Speaking from the heart</h2>\r\nBecause nonverbal communication elements make up 93 percent of each personal connection, finding a way to make the verbal element — the 7 percent — really, really count is crucial.\r\n\r\nEvery single word matters. And to make the words matter, you also have to connect with your heart by speaking with sincerity and honesty. The ability to share and care matters as much in interpersonal communication as it does with your attitude.","description":"Effective <em>interpersonal communication</em> is a critical <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/the-10-soft-skills-employers-seek-296553/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">soft skill</a>, both in professional and personal interactions. It's the process by which people exchange information, feelings, and intention through active listening and verbal and nonverbal messages.\r\n\r\nTo successfully communicate with others both at work and in life, you must first be able to connect with them. I want to repeat that because it’s so important: Connect first. Communicate second.\r\n\r\nThat means you have to listen. Listen first and talk second. Wait. What? Who does that? People with effective interpersonal communication skills, that’s who.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Interpersonal communication is all about making connections; it focuses on building meaningful relationships.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Listening first, talking second</h2>\r\nHuman beings have one mouth and two ears for a reason: so I would listen twice as much as I speak. Sadly, that’s not the way it works most of the time. Our ears may work perfectly well, and we may <em>hear</em> just fine. The problem is I don’t put them to work often enough. I don’t really <em>listen</em>.\r\n\r\nThe difference between hearing and listening is important:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><em>Hearing</em> is what happens when you receive the auditory stimulus of someone else speaking, and you go through motions of listening: nodding your head and/or changing your expressions while your mind and/or your fingers are busy doing something else.</li>\r\n \t<li><em>Listening</em> is what happens when you receive the auditory stimulus but you also connect and communicate with your entire person and keep your mind focused on the message the speaker is conveying. Listening tells the person speaking to you, “I’m here, front and center, and I hear you. I get it.”</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Framing the walls of disconnection</h2>\r\nMaking a connection with someone when you’re hearing but not listening is hard. If you’re doing something other than focusing on the conversation happening right in front of you — for example, thinking about what you want for lunch or what you want to do this weekend — rather than building an effective relationship, you’re erecting a wall of disconnection blocks that keeps you from really communicating and connecting.\r\n\r\nWe need to talk about those pesky disconnection blocks and how people build walls with them. As they say, knowledge is power.\r\n\r\nThe following are common disconnection blocks that get in the way of successful communication. Not all of them come into play in every personal and professional communication situation, but being aware of them when communicating with others at work and in life is essential. Think about your listening skills as you review each block.\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Rehearsing:</strong> When someone is talking and you’re busy silently rehearsing or planning your own reply, you’re breaking your listening concentration and blocking the opportunity for a real connection.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Judging:</strong> If you’re focused on how the person you’re communicating with is dressed or how they look or speak, you can prejudge the speaker, dismiss their idea as unimportant or uninformed, and put up a disconnect block.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Identifying:</strong> When you’re listening to someone tell a story but are so occupied thinking about your own experience that you launch into your own story before the person is finished telling theirs, you may lose sight of what the other person was trying to communicate, and you definitely miss the connection.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Advising:</strong> If you try to offer advice before a person has finished explaining a situation, you may not fully understand the situation.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Sparring:</strong> If you’re focused on disagreeing with what someone is saying, you’re probably not giving that person an honest chance to fully express their thoughts.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Put-downs:</strong> When you use sarcastic comments to put down someone’s point of view, you can draw that person into an argumentative conversation in which neither of you hears a word the other says. The result: <em>dis</em>-connection.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Being right:</strong> If you’re so intent on proving your point or adamantly refusing to admit to any wrongdoing, you may end up twisting the facts, shouting, and making excuses. These actions may confuse and upset both you and the person you’re talking to.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Derailing:</strong> When you suddenly change the subject while someone is talking or joke about what they’re saying, you’re likely to weaken that speaker’s trust in both you and your ability to show understanding.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Smoothing over:</strong> When you’ll do anything to avoid conflict or often choose to agree with what someone is saying simply because you want others to like you, you may appear to be supportive. However, never expressing a personal point of view is an obvious signal that you aren’t fully engaged in the conversation.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Daydreaming:</strong> If you tune out while someone is talking to you and let your mind wander from random thought to random thought, you’ve completely disconnected from the conversation.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Listen with curiosity. Speak with honesty. Act with integrity. The greatest problem with communication is that people don’t listen to understand. They listen to reply. When you listen with curiosity, you don’t listen with the intent to reply. You listen for what’s behind the words.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Completing the connection with the three Vs</h2>\r\nEffective interpersonal communication is less about how well you’re able to converse and more about how well you’re able to be understood. Your ability to make that oh-so-important connection comes into play.\r\n\r\nConnecting and communicating effectively with others is as easy as the three Vs: the <em>visual</em>, the <em>vocal</em>, and the <em>verbal</em> components of a conversation. The three Vs represent how much information you give and receive when you communicate with others. When you incorporate all three Vs into your interpersonal communication skill set, your personal and professional interactions can be amazingly easy, effective, and successful.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">To create and cultivate effective interpersonal communication skills and to make a 100 percent genuine connection with another person, you must communicate with your entire being: your ears, your eyes, your words, and your heart!</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Doing the math</h2>\r\nMost people probably think “verbal” is the most important of the three Vs for effective communication. After all, if you’re not saying anything, how can you possibly communicate?\r\n\r\nThe real math tells a different story:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><em>Visual interpersonal communication</em> (your body language) controls 55 percent of all interpersonal communication. Talk about actions speaking louder than words!</li>\r\n \t<li><em>Vocal interpersonal communication</em> (the tone, quality, and rate of your speaking voice) controls 38 percent of all interpersonal communication.</li>\r\n \t<li><em>Verbal interpersonal communication</em> (the actual words spoken) controls only 7 percent of all interpersonal communication.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nSurprise, surprise. On the interpersonal communication importance scale, verbal skills come in dead last. Yep. You read that right.\r\n\r\nNinety-three percent of all information given and received in every single conversation is directly related to nonverbal communication skills, proving beyond a shadow of a doubt that for effective and successful communicators, <em>how</em> you say it counts more than <em>what</em> you say.\r\n\r\nLucky for you, you only need to sharpen two tools to cultivate your nonverbal communication skills, and you already have both: your eyes and your ears. When you connect with your ears, you give every conversation a 38 percent interpersonal communication boost. Add in your eyes, and you get an extra 55 percent of successful interpersonal communication and connection power.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >Speaking from the heart</h2>\r\nBecause nonverbal communication elements make up 93 percent of each personal connection, finding a way to make the verbal element — the 7 percent — really, really count is crucial.\r\n\r\nEvery single word matters. And to make the words matter, you also have to connect with your heart by speaking with sincerity and honesty. The ability to share and care matters as much in interpersonal communication as it does with your attitude.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":35219,"name":"Cindi Reiman","slug":"cindi-reiman","description":" <p><b>Cindi Reiman </b>is the President and Founder of the American Hospitality Academy (AHA), a company that has been providing leadership training and internships since 1986. AHA created Soft Skills AHA, which provides curriculums and professional development programs focusing on career readiness and the essential employability traits needed to be successful both in the workplace, and in life. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35219"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34232,"title":"Business Communication","slug":"business-communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Listening first, talking second","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Framing the walls of disconnection","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Completing the connection with the three Vs","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Doing the math","target":"#tab4"},{"label":"Speaking from the heart","target":"#tab5"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":296682,"title":"Developing Cultural Awareness, an Important Soft Skill","slug":"developing-cultural-awareness-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296682"}},{"articleId":296553,"title":"Top 10 Soft Skills Employers Seek","slug":"the-10-soft-skills-employers-seek","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296553"}},{"articleId":296176,"title":"Soft Skills For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"soft-skills-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296176"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":296682,"title":"Developing Cultural Awareness, an Important Soft Skill","slug":"developing-cultural-awareness-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296682"}},{"articleId":296553,"title":"Top 10 Soft Skills Employers Seek","slug":"the-10-soft-skills-employers-seek","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296553"}},{"articleId":296176,"title":"Soft Skills For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"soft-skills-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296176"}},{"articleId":283575,"title":"How to Write Effective Business Letters","slug":"how-to-write-effective-business-letters","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/283575"}},{"articleId":283569,"title":"Business Writing in Email and Group Chat","slug":"business-writing-in-email-and-group-chat","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/283569"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":296141,"slug":"soft-skills-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119906551","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119906555/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119906555/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119906555-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119906555/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119906555/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/soft-skills-for-dummies-cover-9781119906551-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Soft Skills For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"35219\">Cindi Reiman</b> </b>is the President and Founder of the American Hospitality Academy (AHA), a company that has been providing leadership training and internships since 1986. AHA created Soft Skills AHA, which provides curriculums and professional development programs focusing on career readiness and the essential employability traits needed to be successful both in the workplace, and in life.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":35219,"name":"Cindi Reiman","slug":"cindi-reiman","description":" <p><b>Cindi Reiman </b>is the President and Founder of the American Hospitality Academy (AHA), a company that has been providing leadership training and internships since 1986. AHA created Soft Skills AHA, which provides curriculums and professional development programs focusing on career readiness and the essential employability traits needed to be successful both in the workplace, and in life. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35219"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119906551&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64cbeb60517c3\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119906551&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64cbeb6051cde\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-01-11T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":296680},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2019-04-26T15:03:22+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-07-14T12:49:02+00:00","timestamp":"2024-07-14T15:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Business, Careers, & Money","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34224"},"slug":"business-careers-money","categoryId":34224},{"name":"Business","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34225"},"slug":"business","categoryId":34225},{"name":"Business Communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"},"slug":"business-communication","categoryId":34232}],"title":"Increasing Your Influence at Work All-in-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"increasing your influence at work all-in-one for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"increasing-influence-work-one-dummies","canonicalUrl":"","搜检索擎组件简化":{"metaDescription":"In today’s workplace, influence is more important than ever. When you know how to exert influence at work, you can control and more rapidly advance your career ","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"In today’s workplace, influence is more important than ever. When you know how to exert influence at work, you can control and more rapidly advance your career than others can. Four basic steps can help you achieve influence, no matter where you are in your career; if you’re higher up in your company, consider leadership best practices to further boost your impact.","description":"In today’s workplace, influence is more important than ever. When you know how to exert influence at work, you can control and more rapidly advance your career than others can. Four basic steps can help you achieve influence, no matter where you are in your career; if you’re higher up in your company, consider leadership best practices to further boost your impact.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9726,"name":"Christina Tangora Schlachter","slug":"christina-tangora-schlachter","description":" <p><b>Christina Tangora Schlachter, PhD,</b> is a Certified Professional Coach. She has created and taught courses on communication skills, crucial conversations for new managers, communication for professionals, and dealing with difficult conversations. She is the coauthor of <i>Leading Business Change For Dummies </i>and is the Chief Leader of She Leads.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9726"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34232,"title":"Business Communication","slug":"business-communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":296682,"title":"Developing Cultural Awareness, an Important Soft Skill","slug":"developing-cultural-awareness-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296682"}},{"articleId":296680,"title":"How To Be a Better Communicator at Work","slug":"how-to-be-a-better-communicator-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296680"}},{"articleId":296553,"title":"Top 10 Soft Skills Employers Seek","slug":"the-10-soft-skills-employers-seek","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296553"}},{"articleId":296176,"title":"Soft Skills For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"soft-skills-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296176"}},{"articleId":283575,"title":"How to Write Effective Business Letters","slug":"how-to-write-effective-business-letters","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/283575"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282294,"slug":"increasing-your-influence-at-work-all-in-one-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119489061","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119489067/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119489067/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119489067-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119489067/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119489067/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/increasing-your-influence-at-work-all-in-one-for-dummies-cover-9781119489061-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Increasing Your Influence at Work All-in-One For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":"<b data-author-id=\"9726\">Dr. Christina Tangora Schlachter</b>, PhD, is the founder and Chief Leader of She Leads and creator of the Leading Change Guide, which helps leaders reinvent themselves and their companies with a 12-week turnaround process.","authors":[{"authorId":9726,"name":"Christina Tangora Schlachter","slug":"christina-tangora-schlachter","description":" <p><b>Christina Tangora Schlachter, PhD,</b> is a Certified Professional Coach. She has created and taught courses on communication skills, crucial conversations for new managers, communication for professionals, and dealing with difficult conversations. She is the coauthor of <i>Leading Business Change For Dummies </i>and is the Chief Leader of She Leads.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9726"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119489061&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64b1632eceaf7\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119489061&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64b1632ecfbf3\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":251900,"title":"The Basic Steps of Exerting Influence at Work","slug":"basic-steps-exerting-influence-work","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","management"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/251900"}},{"articleId":251905,"title":"Increasing Influence with Leadership Best Practices","slug":"increasing-influence-leadership-best-practices","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","management"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/251905"}}],"content":[{"title":"The Basic Steps of Exerting Influence at Work","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Communicating to engage, inform, and influence at work is easier when a rapport is evident between the communicator and the receiver. <em>Rapport</em> is when you have trust and harmony in a relationship. Influencing is a four-step process:</p>\n<ol>\n<li><strong>Rapport:</strong> Four ways to gain rapport at a behavioral level are\n<ul>\n<li>Matching language patterns</li>\n<li>Matching body movements and gestures</li>\n<li>Matching voice tonality, volume, and tempo</li>\n<li>With dress and attire\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">The purpose of creating rapport is to create a relationship so the receiver feels trust (even at an unconscious level) and understood so he gives permission to be influenced.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><strong>Understanding:</strong> When rapport has been established, trust and harmony are present, so the receiver feels understood.</li>\n<li><strong>Permission:</strong> Because the receiver feels understood, he (unconsciously) gives permission to be led. He is willing to engage in the communication.</li>\n<li><strong>Influence:</strong> The receiver is now more willing to be influenced by the communication.</li>\n</ol>\n"},{"title":"Increasing Influence with Leadership Best Practices","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>There are countless leadership best practices and traps to avoid. As you work to increase your influence and improve your leadership skills, consider the following best practices; they can make an immediate difference, are free to implement, and can be used by leaders at all levels with little training or skill:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Know what your employees like — and hate — both inside and outside of work.</strong> A top engagement driver is showing your employees you care about them as people. It takes all of two seconds to ask an employee how his weekend was, or how his daughter’s dance recital went, or if his wife recovered from the flu. Obtaining and weaving this knowledge into your daily chit-chat with employees goes a long way toward engaging them.</li>\n<li><strong>Make employees feel as though you really care about their careers.</strong> Part of your job is to give your employees experiences at your firm that they couldn’t have elsewhere — experiences that will make them more valuable. Sure, you hope your employees stay with your firm for a long time, but if the day comes when they need to move on to another company, that’s okay.</li>\n</ul>\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">That concept may feel scary. After all, you’re basically saying that your employees should feel free to take what they’ve learned with your organization and move on — maybe even to a competitor. But working to grow your talent, and communicating your efforts, is a great way to foster engagement. The more concern you show for your employees’ growth and development in their careers, the greater the probability you’ll have engaged employees.</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>Stop telling employees what to do; instead, have them help come up with solutions.</strong> Often, when managers spot a performance issue, they simply tell the employee what she needs to do to improve. There’s no interaction, no dialogue, nothing. A better approach is to make an observation and then be quiet and let the employee talk. Whatever the solution turns out to be, you’ll almost certainly get better buy-in with this approach.</li>\n</ul>\n<p style=\"padding-left: 30px;\">Also, avoid describing how to do a project or task. Give your employee the destination but leave the driving directions to her. Employees often have their own ideas about process, and those ideas are often quicker, more innovative, and more efficient than the “tried and true.”</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>When it comes to engaging employees, recognition is one of the most effective weapons in a leader’s arsenal.</strong> Experienced managers have learned what neuroscientists and child psychologists have known for decades: Positive reinforcement and recognition lead to the replication of positive results.</li>\n</ul>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Two years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2022-10-28T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":251908},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-01-04T15:41:37+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-04-14T19:03:16+00:00","timestamp":"2024-04-14T21:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Business, Careers, & Money","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34224"},"slug":"business-careers-money","categoryId":34224},{"name":"Business","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34225"},"slug":"business","categoryId":34225},{"name":"Business Communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"},"slug":"business-communication","categoryId":34232}],"title":"Top 10 Soft Skills Employers Seek","strippedTitle":"top 10 soft skills employers seek","slug":"the-10-soft-skills-employers-seek","canonicalUrl":"","搜检索擎组件简化":{"metaDescription":"Learn about the 10 most important soft skills employers look for when they're hiring employees, and why these skills are so important.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Today’s employers are seeking more from their employees than technical knowledge and expertise. They also are looking for people who are willing to work as team players, who possess strong communication and problem-solving skills, and who demonstrate good character, good work ethic, strong leadership, and a positive attitude in the workplace. In short, they’re looking for employees with soft skills.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_296560\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-296560\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/woman-in-meeting-unsplash.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"420\" /> ©LinkedIn Sales Solutions / Unsplash.com[/caption]\r\n\r\nThink of the difference between hard and soft skills this way: <em>Hard skills</em> are what you do. <em>Soft skills</em> are how you do what you do. They’re the personal character traits, qualities, and habits that make you uniquely you.\r\n\r\nYour work ethic, your attitude, and the way you interact with other people are a few examples of soft skills. They’re the personal and interpersonal skills you bring with you to work and apply to your life every day.\r\n\r\nSome soft skills are somewhat subjective by nature, such as your attitude, your character, and your appearance and etiquette. And some soft skills are more objective or practical, such as time management, work ethic, cultural awareness and critical thinking.\r\n\r\nWhen the subjective and the objective/practical come together, they work in harmony to help you become not only a more well-rounded employee but also a more well-rounded person.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Cultivating strong soft skills</h2>\r\nCultivating a complete, strong soft skills set can make a significant positive impact on both your immediate and long-term career and life success. In fact, after your soft skills set becomes as good as (or better than) your hard skills set, you’re all set to achieve great things. You don’t just survive in the workplace and in the world; you thrive!\r\n\r\nIf you ask people which of the soft skills is most important, you may find that different people rank different skills as number one. However, the general consensus is that the following ten are the essential skills you should work on developing.\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Attitude</strong>: Your attitude, not your aptitude, determines your success in the workplace and in life. A positive attitude is necessary no matter what kind of job you have. Being optimistic and determined are the essence of what you need for career and life achievement, which is why more and more companies today look for attitude among job candidates. The company can later train for aptitude.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Character</strong>: Good character doesn’t just happen. You develop your character every day by the choices you make in all you do.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Diversity and cultural awareness</strong>: Having <em>cultural awareness</em> means you embrace diversity in the workplace and accept and appreciate differences among the people you work with. <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/developing-cultural-awareness-an-important-soft-skill-296682/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Cultivating cultural awareness</a> allows you effectively and successfully socialize and work with people from a wide range of cultural backgrounds.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Communication</strong>: Poor communication can lead to misunderstandings, hurt feelings, and costly errors both in the workplace and in your personal life. To <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/how-to-be-a-better-communicator-an-important-soft-skill-296680/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">effectively communicate with others</a>, you need them to clearly understand both your words and the actions that accompany them.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Appearance and etiquette</strong>: Four seconds — that’s all you take to make a first, and lasting, impression on those you meet. Your appearance and your etiquette are often major factors in that initial impression, so think about what kind of first impression you want to make.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Time management</strong>: Being on time — whether you’re arriving for an appointment or turning in a deadline-driven project — is important both professionally and personally. If you know someone who always arrives late, you may have first-hand experience with the frustration poor time management can cause.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Teamwork</strong>: You may have heard the saying “There’s no <em>I</em> in team.” The ability to work and play well with others is essential because very few people work and live without needing to cooperate with others to reach a goal. After all, the ultimate goal of any company is to achieve overall effectiveness, but this strategy succeeds only when everyone on the team works together toward the same target.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Work ethic</strong>: People aren’t born with a good work ethic. Each person has to make a choice to work hard regardless of whether they love what they’re doing or when it feels like a chore. When you demonstrate a good work ethic, those around you are more likely to notice and reward your effort.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Critical thinking and problem solving</strong>: The ability to think for yourself and take ownership of your choices and decisions leads to a better understanding of the world and your place in it. Having your own point of view helps you make decisions to achieve successful outcomes, solve problems that arise, and communicate more effectively with others.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Leadership</strong>: You demonstrate leadership through your everyday actions and interactions with others. A leader is effective because of who they are on the inside and how their personal qualities reflect on the outside. You don’t necessarily need a special set of talents to take a leadership role, but you do need to have a willingness to step forward to take responsibility for directing and encouraging other people.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >What’s the big deal about soft skills?</h2>\r\nSoft skills go by many different names — people skills, core skills, human skills, 21st-century skills, transitional skills, employability traits, and interpersonal skills. You’ll most likely encounter some or of all of these terms on job applications and in job interviews. The terms may change from company to company, but the meaning behind them is the same, and it’s very simple: Soft skills make the hard skills work.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Soft skills make the hard skills work. This phrase bears repeating, and I use it often throughout this book. I hope you take it to heart so you can demonstrate it confidently and successfully in the workplace and in life.</p>\r\nHere’s one way to look at it: Imagine buying some property at the top of a hill, but after you’ve made the purchase, you realize the path to get there is treacherous and overgrown. To get there, you have to clear the path, which will ultimately make traveling up and down the hill easier and more enjoyable. It will also make your property more appealing to other people. You have the hard skills you need to clear the path to the top, but do you have the personal perseverance to do the hard work? Do you have the positive attitude to enjoy the task? Do you have the character to keep your eye on the prize until you reach the very top?\r\n\r\nWell, that’s where soft skills come in.\r\n\r\nSoft skills can help you polish that ladder and really make it shine. Soft skills can make that ladder — and the goal at the top — look so pretty, so exciting, and so much fun that you can’t wait to start your climb. Soft skills can also make your hard skills shinier and more attractive to prospective employers and to other people.\r\n\r\nThat’s right. Soft skills improve your performance and opportunity for success not only in the workplace but also in life.\r\n\r\nAnd in case you think the focus on soft skills is a hot trend in the business community that will soon burn itself out, I’m here to tell you that they’ve been important to workplace success for many, many years, as the following studies show:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>More than 100 years ago, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching released a study on engineering education authored by Charles Riborg Mann. In this study, 1,500 engineers replied to a questionnaire about what they believed to be the most important factors in determining probable success or failure as an engineer. Overwhelmingly, personal qualities (that is, soft skills) were considered seven times more important than knowledge of engineering science.</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">In the spring of 2006, the Conference Board, Corporate Voices for Working Families, the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, and the Society for Human Resource Management conducted an in-depth study on the corporate perspective new entrants’ readiness for the U.S. workforce.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">The survey results indicated that far too many young people were inadequately prepared to be successful in the workplace. The report found that well over half of new high school–level workforce entrants were insufficiently prepared in the following workplace skills: oral and written communication, professionalism, work ethics, and critical thinking/problem solving.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>In a 2021 review of more than 80 million job postings across 22 industry sectors, the educational nonprofit organization America Succeeds discovered that almost two-thirds of job listings included soft skills among their qualifications, and seven of the ten most in-demand skills were soft. The same report found that certain professions, including management and business operations, actually prioritize soft skills.</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"Today’s employers are seeking more from their employees than technical knowledge and expertise. They also are looking for people who are willing to work as team players, who possess strong communication and problem-solving skills, and who demonstrate good character, good work ethic, strong leadership, and a positive attitude in the workplace. In short, they’re looking for employees with soft skills.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_296560\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-296560\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/woman-in-meeting-unsplash.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"420\" /> ©LinkedIn Sales Solutions / Unsplash.com[/caption]\r\n\r\nThink of the difference between hard and soft skills this way: <em>Hard skills</em> are what you do. <em>Soft skills</em> are how you do what you do. They’re the personal character traits, qualities, and habits that make you uniquely you.\r\n\r\nYour work ethic, your attitude, and the way you interact with other people are a few examples of soft skills. They’re the personal and interpersonal skills you bring with you to work and apply to your life every day.\r\n\r\nSome soft skills are somewhat subjective by nature, such as your attitude, your character, and your appearance and etiquette. And some soft skills are more objective or practical, such as time management, work ethic, cultural awareness and critical thinking.\r\n\r\nWhen the subjective and the objective/practical come together, they work in harmony to help you become not only a more well-rounded employee but also a more well-rounded person.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Cultivating strong soft skills</h2>\r\nCultivating a complete, strong soft skills set can make a significant positive impact on both your immediate and long-term career and life success. In fact, after your soft skills set becomes as good as (or better than) your hard skills set, you’re all set to achieve great things. You don’t just survive in the workplace and in the world; you thrive!\r\n\r\nIf you ask people which of the soft skills is most important, you may find that different people rank different skills as number one. However, the general consensus is that the following ten are the essential skills you should work on developing.\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Attitude</strong>: Your attitude, not your aptitude, determines your success in the workplace and in life. A positive attitude is necessary no matter what kind of job you have. Being optimistic and determined are the essence of what you need for career and life achievement, which is why more and more companies today look for attitude among job candidates. The company can later train for aptitude.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Character</strong>: Good character doesn’t just happen. You develop your character every day by the choices you make in all you do.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Diversity and cultural awareness</strong>: Having <em>cultural awareness</em> means you embrace diversity in the workplace and accept and appreciate differences among the people you work with. <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/developing-cultural-awareness-an-important-soft-skill-296682/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Cultivating cultural awareness</a> allows you effectively and successfully socialize and work with people from a wide range of cultural backgrounds.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Communication</strong>: Poor communication can lead to misunderstandings, hurt feelings, and costly errors both in the workplace and in your personal life. To <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/how-to-be-a-better-communicator-an-important-soft-skill-296680/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">effectively communicate with others</a>, you need them to clearly understand both your words and the actions that accompany them.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Appearance and etiquette</strong>: Four seconds — that’s all you take to make a first, and lasting, impression on those you meet. Your appearance and your etiquette are often major factors in that initial impression, so think about what kind of first impression you want to make.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Time management</strong>: Being on time — whether you’re arriving for an appointment or turning in a deadline-driven project — is important both professionally and personally. If you know someone who always arrives late, you may have first-hand experience with the frustration poor time management can cause.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Teamwork</strong>: You may have heard the saying “There’s no <em>I</em> in team.” The ability to work and play well with others is essential because very few people work and live without needing to cooperate with others to reach a goal. After all, the ultimate goal of any company is to achieve overall effectiveness, but this strategy succeeds only when everyone on the team works together toward the same target.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Work ethic</strong>: People aren’t born with a good work ethic. Each person has to make a choice to work hard regardless of whether they love what they’re doing or when it feels like a chore. When you demonstrate a good work ethic, those around you are more likely to notice and reward your effort.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Critical thinking and problem solving</strong>: The ability to think for yourself and take ownership of your choices and decisions leads to a better understanding of the world and your place in it. Having your own point of view helps you make decisions to achieve successful outcomes, solve problems that arise, and communicate more effectively with others.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Leadership</strong>: You demonstrate leadership through your everyday actions and interactions with others. A leader is effective because of who they are on the inside and how their personal qualities reflect on the outside. You don’t necessarily need a special set of talents to take a leadership role, but you do need to have a willingness to step forward to take responsibility for directing and encouraging other people.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >What’s the big deal about soft skills?</h2>\r\nSoft skills go by many different names — people skills, core skills, human skills, 21st-century skills, transitional skills, employability traits, and interpersonal skills. You’ll most likely encounter some or of all of these terms on job applications and in job interviews. The terms may change from company to company, but the meaning behind them is the same, and it’s very simple: Soft skills make the hard skills work.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Soft skills make the hard skills work. This phrase bears repeating, and I use it often throughout this book. I hope you take it to heart so you can demonstrate it confidently and successfully in the workplace and in life.</p>\r\nHere’s one way to look at it: Imagine buying some property at the top of a hill, but after you’ve made the purchase, you realize the path to get there is treacherous and overgrown. To get there, you have to clear the path, which will ultimately make traveling up and down the hill easier and more enjoyable. It will also make your property more appealing to other people. You have the hard skills you need to clear the path to the top, but do you have the personal perseverance to do the hard work? Do you have the positive attitude to enjoy the task? Do you have the character to keep your eye on the prize until you reach the very top?\r\n\r\nWell, that’s where soft skills come in.\r\n\r\nSoft skills can help you polish that ladder and really make it shine. Soft skills can make that ladder — and the goal at the top — look so pretty, so exciting, and so much fun that you can’t wait to start your climb. Soft skills can also make your hard skills shinier and more attractive to prospective employers and to other people.\r\n\r\nThat’s right. Soft skills improve your performance and opportunity for success not only in the workplace but also in life.\r\n\r\nAnd in case you think the focus on soft skills is a hot trend in the business community that will soon burn itself out, I’m here to tell you that they’ve been important to workplace success for many, many years, as the following studies show:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>More than 100 years ago, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching released a study on engineering education authored by Charles Riborg Mann. In this study, 1,500 engineers replied to a questionnaire about what they believed to be the most important factors in determining probable success or failure as an engineer. Overwhelmingly, personal qualities (that is, soft skills) were considered seven times more important than knowledge of engineering science.</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">In the spring of 2006, the Conference Board, Corporate Voices for Working Families, the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, and the Society for Human Resource Management conducted an in-depth study on the corporate perspective new entrants’ readiness for the U.S. workforce.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">The survey results indicated that far too many young people were inadequately prepared to be successful in the workplace. The report found that well over half of new high school–level workforce entrants were insufficiently prepared in the following workplace skills: oral and written communication, professionalism, work ethics, and critical thinking/problem solving.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>In a 2021 review of more than 80 million job postings across 22 industry sectors, the educational nonprofit organization America Succeeds discovered that almost two-thirds of job listings included soft skills among their qualifications, and seven of the ten most in-demand skills were soft. The same report found that certain professions, including management and business operations, actually prioritize soft skills.</li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":35219,"name":"Cindi Reiman","slug":"cindi-reiman","description":" <p><b>Cindi Reiman </b>is the President and Founder of the American Hospitality Academy (AHA), a company that has been providing leadership training and internships since 1986. AHA created Soft Skills AHA, which provides curriculums and professional development programs focusing on career readiness and the essential employability traits needed to be successful both in the workplace, and in life. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35219"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34232,"title":"Business Communication","slug":"business-communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Cultivating strong soft skills","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"What’s the big deal about soft skills?","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":296682,"title":"Developing Cultural Awareness, an Important Soft Skill","slug":"developing-cultural-awareness-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296682"}},{"articleId":296680,"title":"How To Be a Better Communicator, an Important Soft Skill","slug":"how-to-be-a-better-communicator-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296680"}},{"articleId":296176,"title":"Soft Skills For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"soft-skills-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296176"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":296682,"title":"Developing Cultural Awareness, an Important Soft Skill","slug":"developing-cultural-awareness-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296682"}},{"articleId":296680,"title":"How To Be a Better Communicator, an Important Soft Skill","slug":"how-to-be-a-better-communicator-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296680"}},{"articleId":296176,"title":"Soft Skills For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"soft-skills-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296176"}},{"articleId":283575,"title":"How to Write Effective Business Letters","slug":"how-to-write-effective-business-letters","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/283575"}},{"articleId":283569,"title":"Business Writing in Email and Group Chat","slug":"business-writing-in-email-and-group-chat","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/283569"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":296141,"slug":"soft-skills-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119906551","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119906555/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119906555/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119906555-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119906555/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119906555/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/soft-skills-for-dummies-cover-9781119906551-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Soft Skills For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"35219\">Cindi Reiman</b> </b>is the President and Founder of the American Hospitality Academy (AHA), a company that has been providing leadership training and internships since 1986. AHA created Soft Skills AHA, which provides curriculums and professional development programs focusing on career readiness and the essential employability traits needed to be successful both in the workplace, and in life.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":35219,"name":"Cindi Reiman","slug":"cindi-reiman","description":" <p><b>Cindi Reiman </b>is the President and Founder of the American Hospitality Academy (AHA), a company that has been providing leadership training and internships since 1986. AHA created Soft Skills AHA, which provides curriculums and professional development programs focusing on career readiness and the essential employability traits needed to be successful both in the workplace, and in life. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35219"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119906551&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6439bf0f9d64c\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119906551&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6439bf0f9ded3\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-01-04T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":296553},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-01-11T19:36:18+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-01-27T15:20:29+00:00","timestamp":"2024-01-27T18:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Business, Careers, & Money","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34224"},"slug":"business-careers-money","categoryId":34224},{"name":"Business","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34225"},"slug":"business","categoryId":34225},{"name":"Business Communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"},"slug":"business-communication","categoryId":34232}],"title":"Developing Cultural Awareness, an Important Soft Skill","strippedTitle":"developing cultural awareness, an important soft skill","slug":"developing-cultural-awareness-an-important-soft-skill","canonicalUrl":"","搜检索擎组件简化":{"metaDescription":"Cultural awareness is an important soft skill, professionally and personally. Learn how you can improve this skill in yourself.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"<figure style=\"margin: 0;\"><figcaption style=\"margin-bottom: 10px;\">Listen to the article:</figcaption><audio src=\"/wp-content/uploads/developing-cultural-awareness.mp3\" controls=\"controls\"><a href=\"/wp-content/uploads/developing-cultural-awareness.mp3\">Download audio</a></audio></figure>\r\nUnderstanding and being open to people from different cultural backgrounds is an important <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/the-10-soft-skills-employers-seek-296553/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">soft skill</a> in today's workplace, and an attribute employers look for in job candidates.\r\n\r\nEven when you know that celebrating diversity is important to your personal and professional success, you may sometimes struggle to accept the diversity you encounter, and gravitate toward people who are most like you and provide a sense of familiarity. You may not even be aware that you’re doing so, but you’re not alone.\r\n\r\nDuring childhood, people are conditioned by their experiences and environments to seek out what’s the same and to avoid what’s different. Each person is raised to view and to react to the world around them in certain ways, and these unique differences shape a person’s appearance, language, and behavior.\r\n\r\nThese differences — along with cultural beliefs, traditions, and religion — shape people's views of themselves, others, and the world, which is why learning to understand and accept other cultures can sometimes be difficult.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Because you look at people from another culture through your “me” filter, you may need to work to learn how to see and accept something or someone in a different way.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Accepting that seeing is not always believing</h2>\r\nYou probably believe that you see things as they truly are. However, your mind interprets what your eyes see and gives those things meaning. In other words, what you see is as much in your mind as it is in reality.\r\n\r\nWhen you consider that the mind of a person from one culture is going to assign different meaning to things than the mind of a person from another culture is, you’ve just arrived at the most fundamental of all cross-cultural problems: the fact that two people look at the same situation and see two entirely different things.\r\n\r\nAny behavior observed across the cultural divide has to be interpreted two ways:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>The meaning given to it by the person who performs the action</li>\r\n \t<li>The meaning given to it by the person who observes the action</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nOnly when these two meanings are the same do you have successful cross-cultural communication. And by <em>successful,</em> I’m saying that the meaning the doer intended is the same as the meaning the observer understood.\r\n\r\nUnderstanding interpretation is an important part of cultivating cultural awareness, so here’s a quick exercise to make the concept a little easier to understand:\r\n\r\nRead the following five behavior scenarios and write your immediate interpretation of that behavior in terms of your own cultural values, beliefs, or perceptions. Don’t give your responses too much thought. Just write what immediately comes to mind.\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li>A person comes to a meeting half an hour after the stated starting time. Your interpretation:</li>\r\n \t<li>A person you’re having a conversation with doesn’t look you in the eyes when speaking to you. Your interpretation:</li>\r\n \t<li>Two people are kissing each other while seated on a park bench. Your interpretation:</li>\r\n \t<li>Someone gives you the thumbs-up gesture. Your interpretation:</li>\r\n</ol>\r\nYour personal interpretation of each situation determined where your mind went as you were reading each of these situational sentences. For example, you may have read item 4 and thought that the person was giving you a sign of encouragement or approval. However, in some Middle Eastern countries, giving someone a thumbs-up gesture sends the same message as raising a different finger in the United States. (Yep. <em>That one.</em>)\r\n\r\nPersonal interpretations aren’t right or wrong. They’re personal. Everyone has their own interpretation of any situation, and respecting the fact that their interpretation isn’t right or wrong is important.\r\n\r\nAfter you understand and accept that interpretations are a personal matter, you can begin to cultivate tolerance and respect for others who see things differently than you do.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Saying no to stereotyping</h2>\r\nFostering the ability to understand, embrace, and respect the differences you see in others is critical to your success in the workplace and in life. One of the first and most significant steps in the process is to admit that you have personal biases, prejudices, and the tendency to apply stereotypes to others.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">All people have some biases and prejudices. Biases, prejudices, and the tendency to stereotype are culturally divisive behaviors that many (or maybe even most) people are prone to. After you become culturally aware and work not to act on those biases and prejudices, you can make positive and permanent work and life changes.</p>\r\nPrejudice is being down on something you’re not up on.\r\n\r\n<em>Stereotyping</em> is the practice of assuming that similar people or groups of people think, act, look, feel, and believe the same things simply because they share the same culture. When you stereotype people, you prejudge them.\r\n\r\nStereotyping tends to dehumanize people by lumping them all together. And no one wants that. Every person wants to be seen for who they are as an individual. Feeling negative about a certain person or avoiding a certain group of people simply because they’re different from you can minimize your worldview and affect your ability to work well with others.\r\n\r\nYou may believe that you always treat others you meet as equals, but this ideal probably isn’t true at times, and you may not even realize you’re violating it. According to stereotyping studies, most people have biases and prejudices they aren’t even aware of that can have a major influence on the way they interact with others.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Stepping on the stereotyping scale</h2>\r\nThe first step to avoiding unconscious stereotyping behaviors is to identify the ways you may be practicing stereotyping. Grab your pen and paper and write your first thought that completes the following statements:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>All famous movie and television stars…</li>\r\n \t<li>All professional athletes…</li>\r\n \t<li>All vegetarians…</li>\r\n \t<li>All men with long hair…</li>\r\n \t<li>All women with tattoos…</li>\r\n \t<li>All politicians…</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nTake a look at your responses. Did they come easily to you? If so, you may have a tendency to stereotype the people you meet at work and in life. Were most of your responses positive or negative? If they were mostly negative, you may have a tendency to be prejudiced and biased when meeting someone new and different from you.\r\n\r\nAny sentence about people that begins with the word <em>all</em> is stereotypical from the start.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Recognizing how you stereotype</h2>\r\nEducation is the key to change, and right here and now is a great opportunity to start educating yourself. After you begin to recognize your biases, prejudices, and tendency to stereotype, you can use your newly acquired knowledge to develop and practice a culture of tolerance, acceptance, and celebration both in the workplace and in life.\r\n\r\nThe power of daily active practice, practice, practice improves your diversity and cultural awareness skills and leads to career and life success. Employers want to hire and promote people who work well with others.\r\n\r\nUse the following three simple exercises for daily practice in respecting diversity and developing cultural awareness:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Become aware.</strong> Take the time to acknowledge your cultural conditioning and identify your stereotypes, biases, and prejudices. Be brave enough to reflect on both the positive and negative aspects of your own diversity and examine why you think the way you do. This process has you question things that you may never have questioned before.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Educate yourself.</strong> Make an effort to learn more about cultural practices from other countries — their etiquette, traditions, and acceptable forms of communication. Make a genuine effort with your culturally diverse co-workers to learn about and respect your differences and to find similarities you can build on.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Show respect.</strong> When you demonstrate the same respect to others that you want to receive from them, you’re acknowledging that you value all people, not only those who look, think, talk, and act the way you do. Each person is a unique individual, and everyone has much to contribute.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nDifferences will always exist. Diversity will always be a part of the workplace and life. And that’s a good thing! All you have to do to learn how to respect diversity and cultivate cultural awareness is to remember that your mind is like a parachute: It works best when it’s open.\r\n\r\n ","description":"<figure style=\"margin: 0;\"><figcaption style=\"margin-bottom: 10px;\">Listen to the article:</figcaption><audio src=\"/wp-content/uploads/developing-cultural-awareness.mp3\" controls=\"controls\"><a href=\"/wp-content/uploads/developing-cultural-awareness.mp3\">Download audio</a></audio></figure>\r\nUnderstanding and being open to people from different cultural backgrounds is an important <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/business-careers-money/business/business-communication/the-10-soft-skills-employers-seek-296553/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">soft skill</a> in today's workplace, and an attribute employers look for in job candidates.\r\n\r\nEven when you know that celebrating diversity is important to your personal and professional success, you may sometimes struggle to accept the diversity you encounter, and gravitate toward people who are most like you and provide a sense of familiarity. You may not even be aware that you’re doing so, but you’re not alone.\r\n\r\nDuring childhood, people are conditioned by their experiences and environments to seek out what’s the same and to avoid what’s different. Each person is raised to view and to react to the world around them in certain ways, and these unique differences shape a person’s appearance, language, and behavior.\r\n\r\nThese differences — along with cultural beliefs, traditions, and religion — shape people's views of themselves, others, and the world, which is why learning to understand and accept other cultures can sometimes be difficult.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Because you look at people from another culture through your “me” filter, you may need to work to learn how to see and accept something or someone in a different way.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Accepting that seeing is not always believing</h2>\r\nYou probably believe that you see things as they truly are. However, your mind interprets what your eyes see and gives those things meaning. In other words, what you see is as much in your mind as it is in reality.\r\n\r\nWhen you consider that the mind of a person from one culture is going to assign different meaning to things than the mind of a person from another culture is, you’ve just arrived at the most fundamental of all cross-cultural problems: the fact that two people look at the same situation and see two entirely different things.\r\n\r\nAny behavior observed across the cultural divide has to be interpreted two ways:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>The meaning given to it by the person who performs the action</li>\r\n \t<li>The meaning given to it by the person who observes the action</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nOnly when these two meanings are the same do you have successful cross-cultural communication. And by <em>successful,</em> I’m saying that the meaning the doer intended is the same as the meaning the observer understood.\r\n\r\nUnderstanding interpretation is an important part of cultivating cultural awareness, so here’s a quick exercise to make the concept a little easier to understand:\r\n\r\nRead the following five behavior scenarios and write your immediate interpretation of that behavior in terms of your own cultural values, beliefs, or perceptions. Don’t give your responses too much thought. Just write what immediately comes to mind.\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li>A person comes to a meeting half an hour after the stated starting time. Your interpretation:</li>\r\n \t<li>A person you’re having a conversation with doesn’t look you in the eyes when speaking to you. Your interpretation:</li>\r\n \t<li>Two people are kissing each other while seated on a park bench. Your interpretation:</li>\r\n \t<li>Someone gives you the thumbs-up gesture. Your interpretation:</li>\r\n</ol>\r\nYour personal interpretation of each situation determined where your mind went as you were reading each of these situational sentences. For example, you may have read item 4 and thought that the person was giving you a sign of encouragement or approval. However, in some Middle Eastern countries, giving someone a thumbs-up gesture sends the same message as raising a different finger in the United States. (Yep. <em>That one.</em>)\r\n\r\nPersonal interpretations aren’t right or wrong. They’re personal. Everyone has their own interpretation of any situation, and respecting the fact that their interpretation isn’t right or wrong is important.\r\n\r\nAfter you understand and accept that interpretations are a personal matter, you can begin to cultivate tolerance and respect for others who see things differently than you do.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Saying no to stereotyping</h2>\r\nFostering the ability to understand, embrace, and respect the differences you see in others is critical to your success in the workplace and in life. One of the first and most significant steps in the process is to admit that you have personal biases, prejudices, and the tendency to apply stereotypes to others.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">All people have some biases and prejudices. Biases, prejudices, and the tendency to stereotype are culturally divisive behaviors that many (or maybe even most) people are prone to. After you become culturally aware and work not to act on those biases and prejudices, you can make positive and permanent work and life changes.</p>\r\nPrejudice is being down on something you’re not up on.\r\n\r\n<em>Stereotyping</em> is the practice of assuming that similar people or groups of people think, act, look, feel, and believe the same things simply because they share the same culture. When you stereotype people, you prejudge them.\r\n\r\nStereotyping tends to dehumanize people by lumping them all together. And no one wants that. Every person wants to be seen for who they are as an individual. Feeling negative about a certain person or avoiding a certain group of people simply because they’re different from you can minimize your worldview and affect your ability to work well with others.\r\n\r\nYou may believe that you always treat others you meet as equals, but this ideal probably isn’t true at times, and you may not even realize you’re violating it. According to stereotyping studies, most people have biases and prejudices they aren’t even aware of that can have a major influence on the way they interact with others.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Stepping on the stereotyping scale</h2>\r\nThe first step to avoiding unconscious stereotyping behaviors is to identify the ways you may be practicing stereotyping. Grab your pen and paper and write your first thought that completes the following statements:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>All famous movie and television stars…</li>\r\n \t<li>All professional athletes…</li>\r\n \t<li>All vegetarians…</li>\r\n \t<li>All men with long hair…</li>\r\n \t<li>All women with tattoos…</li>\r\n \t<li>All politicians…</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nTake a look at your responses. Did they come easily to you? If so, you may have a tendency to stereotype the people you meet at work and in life. Were most of your responses positive or negative? If they were mostly negative, you may have a tendency to be prejudiced and biased when meeting someone new and different from you.\r\n\r\nAny sentence about people that begins with the word <em>all</em> is stereotypical from the start.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Recognizing how you stereotype</h2>\r\nEducation is the key to change, and right here and now is a great opportunity to start educating yourself. After you begin to recognize your biases, prejudices, and tendency to stereotype, you can use your newly acquired knowledge to develop and practice a culture of tolerance, acceptance, and celebration both in the workplace and in life.\r\n\r\nThe power of daily active practice, practice, practice improves your diversity and cultural awareness skills and leads to career and life success. Employers want to hire and promote people who work well with others.\r\n\r\nUse the following three simple exercises for daily practice in respecting diversity and developing cultural awareness:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Become aware.</strong> Take the time to acknowledge your cultural conditioning and identify your stereotypes, biases, and prejudices. Be brave enough to reflect on both the positive and negative aspects of your own diversity and examine why you think the way you do. This process has you question things that you may never have questioned before.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Educate yourself.</strong> Make an effort to learn more about cultural practices from other countries — their etiquette, traditions, and acceptable forms of communication. Make a genuine effort with your culturally diverse co-workers to learn about and respect your differences and to find similarities you can build on.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Show respect.</strong> When you demonstrate the same respect to others that you want to receive from them, you’re acknowledging that you value all people, not only those who look, think, talk, and act the way you do. Each person is a unique individual, and everyone has much to contribute.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nDifferences will always exist. Diversity will always be a part of the workplace and life. And that’s a good thing! All you have to do to learn how to respect diversity and cultivate cultural awareness is to remember that your mind is like a parachute: It works best when it’s open.\r\n\r\n ","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":35219,"name":"Cindi Reiman","slug":"cindi-reiman","description":" <p><b>Cindi Reiman </b>is the President and Founder of the American Hospitality Academy (AHA), a company that has been providing leadership training and internships since 1986. AHA created Soft Skills AHA, which provides curriculums and professional development programs focusing on career readiness and the essential employability traits needed to be successful both in the workplace, and in life. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35219"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34232,"title":"Business Communication","slug":"business-communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Accepting that seeing is not always believing","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Saying no to stereotyping","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Stepping on the stereotyping scale","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Recognizing how you stereotype","target":"#tab4"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":296680,"title":"How To Be a Better Communicator, an Important Soft Skill","slug":"how-to-be-a-better-communicator-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296680"}},{"articleId":296553,"title":"The Top 10 Soft Skills Employers Seek in Job Candidates","slug":"the-10-soft-skills-employers-seek","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296553"}},{"articleId":296176,"title":"Soft Skills For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"soft-skills-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296176"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":296680,"title":"How To Be a Better Communicator, an Important Soft Skill","slug":"how-to-be-a-better-communicator-an-important-soft-skill","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296680"}},{"articleId":296553,"title":"The Top 10 Soft Skills Employers Seek in Job Candidates","slug":"the-10-soft-skills-employers-seek","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296553"}},{"articleId":296176,"title":"Soft Skills For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"soft-skills-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296176"}},{"articleId":283575,"title":"How to Write Effective Business Letters","slug":"how-to-write-effective-business-letters","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/283575"}},{"articleId":283569,"title":"Business Writing in Email and Group Chat","slug":"business-writing-in-email-and-group-chat","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/283569"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":296141,"slug":"soft-skills-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119906551","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119906555/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119906555/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119906555-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119906555/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119906555/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/soft-skills-for-dummies-cover-9781119906551-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Soft Skills For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"35219\">Cindi Reiman</b> </b>is the President and Founder of the American Hospitality Academy (AHA), a company that has been providing leadership training and internships since 1986. 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","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35219"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119906551&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63d4115eac911\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119906551&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63d4115ead32a\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-01-11T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":296682},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2023-12-07T21:32:25+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-12-07T21:33:49+00:00","timestamp":"2023-12-08T00:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Business, Careers, & Money","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34224"},"slug":"business-careers-money","categoryId":34224},{"name":"Business","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34225"},"slug":"business","categoryId":34225},{"name":"Business Communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"},"slug":"business-communication","categoryId":34232}],"title":"Soft Skills For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"soft skills for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"soft-skills-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","搜检索擎组件简化":{"metaDescription":"This Cheat Sheet includes information on how you can make soft skill behaviors a habit in your work and personal life.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Today’s employers want more from their employees than technical knowledge and expertise. They’re looking for people who are willing to work as team players, have strong communication and problem-solving skills, and demonstrate good character, good work ethic, leadership, and a positive workplace attitude.\r\n\r\n<em>Soft skills</em> (also called <em>life skills</em>) help you create a powerful, positive, and productive life outside of work. In fact, professional success starts with personal success, and a strong set of soft skills can go a long way to making both happen.","description":"Today’s employers want more from their employees than technical knowledge and expertise. They’re looking for people who are willing to work as team players, have strong communication and problem-solving skills, and demonstrate good character, good work ethic, leadership, and a positive workplace attitude.\r\n\r\n<em>Soft skills</em> (also called <em>life skills</em>) help you create a powerful, positive, and productive life outside of work. In fact, professional success starts with personal success, and a strong set of soft skills can go a long way to making both happen.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":35219,"name":"Cindi Reiman","slug":"cindi-reiman","description":"Cindi Reiman is the President and Founder of the American Hospitality Academy (AHA), a company that has been providing leadership training and internships since 1986. AHA created Soft Skills AHA, which provides curriculums and professional development programs focusing on career readiness and the essential employability traits needed to be successful both in the workplace, and in life.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35219"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34232,"title":"Business Communication","slug":"business-communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":283575,"title":"How to Write Effective Business Letters","slug":"how-to-write-effective-business-letters","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/283575"}},{"articleId":283569,"title":"Business Writing in Email and Group Chat","slug":"business-writing-in-email-and-group-chat","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/283569"}},{"articleId":283572,"title":"Business Writing: How to Connect to Readers","slug":"business-writing-how-to-connect-to-readers","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/283572"}},{"articleId":256767,"title":"Public Speaking and Stuttering","slug":"public-speaking-and-stuttering","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/256767"}},{"articleId":256762,"title":"Public Speaking: Avoid Pushing Your Speech","slug":"public-speaking-avoid-pushing-your-speech","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/256762"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":296141,"slug":"soft-skills-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119906551","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","business-communication"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119906555/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119906555/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119906555-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119906555/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119906555/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/soft-skills-for-dummies-cover-9781119906551-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Soft Skills For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b data-author-id=\"35219\">Cindi Reiman</b> is the President and Founder of the American Hospitality Academy (AHA), a company that has been providing leadership training and internships since 1986. AHA created Soft Skills AHA, which provides curriculums and professional development programs focusing on career readiness and the essential employability traits needed to be successful both in the workplace, and in life.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":35219,"name":"Cindi Reiman","slug":"cindi-reiman","description":"Cindi Reiman is the President and Founder of the American Hospitality Academy (AHA), a company that has been providing leadership training and internships since 1986. AHA created Soft Skills AHA, which provides curriculums and professional development programs focusing on career readiness and the essential employability traits needed to be successful both in the workplace, and in life.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35219"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119906551&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6391293f223c5\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;business-careers-money&quot;,&quot;business&quot;,&quot;business-communication&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119906551&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6391293f22c7e\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":0,"title":"","slug":null,"categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/"}}],"content":[{"title":"Defining soft skills","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>If hard skills are what you do, soft skills are how you do what you do. <em>Soft skills</em> are the personal character traits, qualities, and habits that make you uniquely you.</p>\n<p>Your work ethic, attitude, and way of interacting with other people are a few examples of soft skills. They’re the personal and interpersonal skills you bring with you to work and apply to your life every day.</p>\n<p>The following are considered the ten essential soft skills:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>Attitude</li>\n<li>Character</li>\n<li>Diversity and cultural awareness</li>\n<li>Communication</li>\n<li>Appearance and etiquette</li>\n<li>Time management</li>\n<li>Teamwork</li>\n<li>Work ethic</li>\n<li>Critical thinking and problem solving</li>\n<li>Leadership</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Making soft skills a habit","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>People speculate that forming a new habit can take anywhere from 18 to 254 days. There’s no one-size-fits-all amount of time, which is why this time frame is so broad, but the average is 66 days for a new behavior to become automatic.</p>\n<p>However, if you start working on your soft skills today, you’ll see the payoff sooner rather than later.</p>\n<p>As you get more and more in touch with the person and employee you want to be, you find that work and life offer you daily opportunities to learn and grow personally and professionally.</p>\n<p>The following are ten habits you can work on to make soft skills work for you.</p>\n<h3>Attitude</h3>\n<p>Having a positive thinking habit can help you overcome challenging situations. Instead of worrying about the aspects of a situation you can’t control, turn your energy to what you can control and do your best to affect those elements of the situation.</p>\n<p>People who see things from the positive side tend to get positive results out of most of their endeavors. You can begin by taking charge of your thoughts, using positive language, showing gratitude, and surrounding yourself with other positive thinkers.</p>\n<h3>Character</h3>\n<p>You develop your character everyday by the choices you make in everything you do. When faced with the daily decisions of life, develop the habit of choosing the path of integrity, honesty, responsibility, forgiveness, and empathy.</p>\n<h3>Diversity and cultural awareness</h3>\n<p>Make a habit of stepping out of your comfort zone and into settings that challenge you to learn about others and what makes them unique. The goal isn’t to make you uncomfortable. It’s to enhance your respect for others and give you opportunities to discover new ways to do and say things.</p>\n<h3>Communication</h3>\n<p>Active listening can take many forms, but at its core, the goal is to listen well enough to be able to restate the other person’s content in a way that they’d agree with. Whether you disagree with that message doesn’t matter. The important factor is that you’ve absorbed it and understand it. Learning to actively listen takes lots of practice.</p>\n<p>Make a plan to start at least one conversation each day by asking a question and then practice actively listening to the answer you receive.</p>\n<h3>Appearance and etiquette</h3>\n<p>Four seconds is all someone takes to look at you and your actions and make an instant first impression of who you are as a person. Your appearance (clean clothes, combed hair) certainly contributes to a first impression, but acting the part (displaying good manners) is important, too.</p>\n<p>Using etiquette that makes a positive impression doesn’t take much effort. Start today by saying please and thank you, and be the best version of yourself.</p>\n<h3>Time management</h3>\n<p>No one will argue with the statement that today’s world is busy. However, being busy isn’t an excuse for having poor time management. People who are the most successful in their career and life roles create a habit of being punctual.</p>\n<p>Whether you’re headed to your job or meeting a friend for coffee, make a point of being on time. The more you’re aware of your time, the better you can manage your life.</p>\n<h3>Teamwork</h3>\n<p>To be part of a successful team, you have to be a good team player, regardless of whether you’re in your workplace, your household, or a community organization.</p>\n<p>Being a good team player means listening, sharing ideas, trying other teammates’ ideas, congratulating others’ success, and lending a hand when needed. When you do these things, you’re on your way to being a team player that contributes to the team’s overall success.</p>\n<h3>Work ethic</h3>\n<p>All soft skills rolled together contribute to a good work ethic, but you also have to add the element of ownership. Taking ownership in your work means being accountable for your daily responsibilities — caring about them and how your work affects others’ responsibilities and the overall business goal.</p>\n<p>People who take ownership of their contributions see the bigger picture and also achieve more rewarding outcomes.</p>\n<h3>Critical thinking and problem solving</h3>\n<p>Critical thinking is the ability to make personal judgments that are logical and well thought out. It’s a way of thinking that involves cultivating a genuinely curious attitude. It requires that you have your own point of view instead of simply mimicing the people around you.</p>\n<p>Every day, you have the opportunity to use the process of critical thinking to make decisions, solve problems, and communicate effectively.</p>\n<h3>Leadership</h3>\n<p>Experience is a great teacher. Stepping into a leadership position — even a small one — is a great way to grow your soft skills overall and your leadership skills in particular.</p>\n<p>You may be in a position to ask to lead a small committee or team at work, but work isn’t the only place to find leadership opportunities. And you don’t necessarily have to lead other employees.</p>\n<p>You can take on a leadership role in a community organization, at your place of worship, in an online community, or any number of other places. You can even take a leadership role in your family by offering to organize family functions and activities.</p>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-12-07T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":296176},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T12:44:55+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-09-19T14:22:32+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-19T18:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Business, Careers, & Money","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34224"},"slug":"business-careers-money","categoryId":34224},{"name":"Business","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34225"},"slug":"business","categoryId":34225},{"name":"Business Communication","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34232"},"slug":"business-communication","categoryId":34232}],"title":"Presentation Evaluation Sheet","strippedTitle":"presentation evaluation sheet","slug":"presentation-evaluation-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","搜检索擎组件简化":{"metaDescription":"To help you improve your presentation skills, ask someone to watch your presentation and answer these questions about your performance.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Whether presenting as part of a team or alone, asking someone to evaluate your performance during rehearsal can help hone your presentation and skills. Ask a trusted colleague or mentor to watch your presentation — ideally someone who is similar to a typical audience member or can put himself in the audience’s state of mind.\r\n\r\nAfter your presentation, the evaluator can either complete this form or give you verbal feedback on the aspects of the presentation. Some of the questions relate to the content, so you can determine if you delivered your desired message, while others are about your specific performance.\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">What was the title of my presentation?</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">What three main points did I make?</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">What is the call to action I want the audience to take?</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">What parts of the presentation were confusing?</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Did I use any jargon or words that you didn’t know or understand?</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Which parts of the presentation are too simplistic or contain information that the audience already knows?</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Were my visuals interesting or boring, helpful or distracting?</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">How did you feel during and after the presentation?</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Objectively describe me — during the presentation — in two or three words, such as professional, nervous, knowledgeable, warm, confident, cold, unorganized, pushy.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Did I do any of the following:</p>\r\n\r\n<ul class=\"level-two\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Talk too fast</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Talk too slow or in a monotone voice</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Pace or shift my weight nervously</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Display a nervous tic, such as grimacing or playing with an object</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"Whether presenting as part of a team or alone, asking someone to evaluate your performance during rehearsal can help hone your presentation and skills. Ask a trusted colleague or mentor to watch your presentation — ideally someone who is similar to a typical audience member or can put himself in the audience’s state of mind.\r\n\r\nAfter your presentation, the evaluator can either complete this form or give you verbal feedback on the aspects of the presentation. Some of the questions relate to the content, so you can determine if you delivered your desired message, while others are about your specific performance.\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">What was the title of my presentation?</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">What three main points did I make?</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">What is the call to action I want the audience to take?</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">What parts of the presentation were confusing?</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Did I use any jargon or words that you didn’t know or understand?</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Which parts of the presentation are too simplistic or contain information that the audience already knows?</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Were my visuals interesting or boring, helpful or distracting?</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">How did 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