chơi xổ số keno trực tuyến

{"appState":{"pageLoadApiCallsStatus":true},"categoryState":{"relatedCategories":{"headers":{"timestamp":"2025-03-04T08:01:13+00:00"},"categoryId":33886,"data":{"title":"Board Games","slug":"board-games","image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33884"},"slug":"games","categoryId":33884},{"name":"Board Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33886"},"slug":"board-games","categoryId":33886}],"parentCategory":{"categoryId":33884,"title":"Games","slug":"games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33884"}},"childCategories":[{"categoryId":33887,"title":"Backgammon","slug":"backgammon","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33887"},"image":{"src":"/img/background-image-2.fabfbd5c.png","width":0,"height":0},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":5,"bookCount":1},{"categoryId":33889,"title":"Chess","slug":"chess","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33889"},"image":{"src":"/img/background-image-1.daf74cf0.png","width":0,"height":0},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":42,"bookCount":2}],"description":"Fight boredom with board games — chess, checkers, and more. We've got tips to help you engage your brain, entertain friends, and play to win.","relatedArticles":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles?category=33886&offset=0&size=5"},"hasArticle":true,"hasBook":true,"articleCount":47,"bookCount":4},"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33886"}},"relatedCategoriesLoadedStatus":"success"},"listState":{"list":{"count":10,"total":47,"items":[{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T20:18:17+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-10-20T19:42:42+00:00","timestamp":"2024-10-20T21:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33884"},"slug":"games","categoryId":33884},{"name":"Board Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33886"},"slug":"board-games","categoryId":33886},{"name":"Chess","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33889"},"slug":"chess","categoryId":33889}],"title":"Setting Up Your Chessboard","strippedTitle":"setting up your chessboard","slug":"setting-up-your-chessboard","canonicalUrl":"","搜寻归类游戏游戏刹车系统SEO":{"metaDescription":"Here's how to set up your chessboard, including where to place each of the pieces on each side of the board.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Setting up your chessboard is the first step in playing a game of chess. Take your time setting up the board, until you’re confident that you know where everything goes:\r\n<ol class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">The rooks go on the corner squares.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Place the knights next to the rooks.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Put the bishops on the board next to the knights.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">After the bishops come the queens. The queens always start on the square of the same shade — the white queen starts on a light square, and the black queen starts on a dark square.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Place the kings next to the queens, which is only fitting.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Add the pawns straight across the rank in front of the other pieces.</p>\r\n<img src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/281898.image0.jpg\" alt=\"image0.jpg\" width=\"400\" height=\"400\" /></li>\r\n</ol>","description":"Setting up your chessboard is the first step in playing a game of chess. Take your time setting up the board, until you’re confident that you know where everything goes:\r\n<ol class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">The rooks go on the corner squares.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Place the knights next to the rooks.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Put the bishops on the board next to the knights.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">After the bishops come the queens. The queens always start on the square of the same shade — the white queen starts on a light square, and the black queen starts on a dark square.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Place the kings next to the queens, which is only fitting.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Add the pawns straight across the rank in front of the other pieces.</p>\r\n<img src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/281898.image0.jpg\" alt=\"image0.jpg\" width=\"400\" height=\"400\" /></li>\r\n</ol>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10138,"name":"James Eade","slug":"james-eade","description":" <p><b>James Eade</b> is a United States Chess Federation &#40;USCF&#41; chess master as well as a chess writer, tournament organizer, and teacher. He is the author of <i>Chess For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10138"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33889,"title":"Chess","slug":"chess","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33889"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":230276,"title":"10 (or So) Cool Facts about Kids and Chess","slug":"10-cool-facts-kids-chess","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230276"}},{"articleId":230271,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Garry Kasparov (1963–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-garry-kasparov-1963-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230271"}},{"articleId":230265,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Anatoly Karpov (1951–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-anatoly-karpov-1951-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230265"}},{"articleId":230260,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: José Raúl Capablanca (1888–1942), Cuba","slug":"top-10-chess-players-jose-raul-capablanca-1888-1942-cuba","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230260"}},{"articleId":230256,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Robert James Fischer (1943–2008), U.S.","slug":"top-10-chess-players-robert-james-fischer-1943-2008-united-states","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230256"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":275142,"title":"How the Queen’s Gambit Is Played as a Chess Opening","slug":"how-the-queens-gambit-is-played-as-a-chess-opening","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275142"}},{"articleId":230276,"title":"10 (or So) Cool Facts about Kids and Chess","slug":"10-cool-facts-kids-chess","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230276"}},{"articleId":230271,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Garry Kasparov (1963–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-garry-kasparov-1963-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230271"}},{"articleId":230265,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Anatoly Karpov (1951–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-anatoly-karpov-1951-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230265"}},{"articleId":230260,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: José Raúl Capablanca (1888–1942), Cuba","slug":"top-10-chess-players-jose-raul-capablanca-1888-1942-cuba","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230260"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282072,"slug":"chess-for-dummies-4th-edition","isbn":"9781119280019","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/111928001X-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-for-dummies-4th-edition-cover-9781119280019-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Chess For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":"<p><b data-author-id=\"10138\">James Eade</b> became a US Chess Federation Chess Master in 1981. International organizations awarded him the master title in 1990 (for correspondence) and in 1993 (for regular tournament play). Today, he writes about and teaches chess. </p>","authors":[{"authorId":10138,"name":"James Eade","slug":"james-eade","description":" <p><b>James Eade</b> is a United States Chess Federation &#40;USCF&#41; chess master as well as a chess writer, tournament organizer, and teacher. He is the author of <i>Chess For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10138"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;games&quot;,&quot;board-games&quot;,&quot;chess&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119280019&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6532ea8f31889\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;games&quot;,&quot;board-games&quot;,&quot;chess&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119280019&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6532ea8f31d9b\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-10-20T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":186939},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T22:49:35+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-10-20T19:40:38+00:00","timestamp":"2024-10-20T21:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33884"},"slug":"games","categoryId":33884},{"name":"Board Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33886"},"slug":"board-games","categoryId":33886},{"name":"Chess","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33889"},"slug":"chess","categoryId":33889}],"title":"Examining the Material Element in Chess","strippedTitle":"examining the material element in chess","slug":"examining-the-material-element-in-chess","canonicalUrl":"","搜寻归类游戏游戏刹车系统SEO":{"metaDescription":"The material of chess pieces has to do with the power, and therefore value, they hold compared to the other pieces.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Some chess pieces are more powerful than others. Some are stronger than others. The element of <i>material</i> is concerned with this relative strength of the pieces. It is quite common to see advantages in other elements converted into an advantage in material, because an advantage in material is the easiest advantage to convert into a win.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Value your pawns and pieces</h2>\r\nEach pawn or piece has a numerical value. The pawn is the basic unit of chess and is assigned a numerical value of one. The other pieces are evaluated in those same terms. Therefore, if a pawn is worth one point, a knight is worth more: three points. In other words, you lose two points in the element of material if you trade a knight for a pawn. You would need to capture three enemy pawns (or one knight) to compensate for the loss of your knight. The relative values of the pieces are shown in Table 1.\r\n\r\n<b>Table 1: The Relative Values of Chess Pieces (in terms of the pawn)</b>\r\n<table class=\"article-table\" cellpadding=\"7\">\r\n<tbody>\r\n<tr class=\"article-table-row\">\r\n<td valign=\"top\"><b><i>Piece</i></b></td>\r\n<td valign=\"top\"><b><i>Value</i></b></td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr class=\"article-table-row\">\r\n<td valign=\"top\">Pawn</td>\r\n<td valign=\"top\">1</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr class=\"article-table-row\">\r\n<td valign=\"top\">Knight</td>\r\n<td valign=\"top\">3</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr class=\"article-table-row\">\r\n<td valign=\"top\">Bishop</td>\r\n<td valign=\"top\">3</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr class=\"article-table-row\">\r\n<td valign=\"top\">Rook</td>\r\n<td valign=\"top\">5</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr class=\"article-table-row\">\r\n<td valign=\"top\">Queen</td>\r\n<td valign=\"top\">9</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n</tbody>\r\n</table>\r\n<p class=\"Remember\">Assigning a value to the king is not possible because its loss means the loss of the game!</p>\r\nMaterial superiority is decisive when all other things are equal. If you can win one pawn, winning another or forcing further concessions from your opponent is often possible. Things are rarely equal in chess, though, and it's sometimes impossible to correctly evaluate when an advantage in material matters more than an advantage in some other element. Is it worth a pawn to gain space? Usually, only experience can answer this kind of question.\r\n\r\nPieces themselves can gain or lose power depending upon their positioning. Having an advanced pawn deep in enemy territory may be far more important than having a measly knight tucked away in a corner. A bishop locked behind its own pawns may not be worth a fraction of a free roaming knight.\r\n\r\nThese values are relative and can change many times over the course of the game. Nevertheless, remembering the piece's relative value when you consider trading it for another is a useful guide. If you give up your queen for a pawn, you'd better have a darned good reason!\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Material strategies</h2>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">A good rule is to exchange pieces when you have an advantage in material. This strategy is referred to as <i>simplification.</i> For example, if you have an extra pawn, but both you and your opponent have a bishop, it's usually easier to win if you trade your bishop for your opponent's and play the rest of the game with just kings and pawns.</p>\r\nMaterial superiority takes on added importance the closer you come to an endgame. A single pawn advantage may mean little in the opening — but it may be decisive in the endgame. This strategy illustrates how you can force additional concessions from your opponents. If you keep offering to exchange pieces, and your opponents keep refusing, they will be forced to retreat. The result? You wind up with a spatial advantage, too!\r\n<p class=\"Remember\">Because exchanges are desired by the side with an edge in material, it's logical to avoid them if you are behind.</p>\r\nThe intentional loss of material in return for an advantage in another element is referred to as a <i>sacrifice.</i> Sacrifices are near and dear to the heart of chess players who know that — should they not obtain an immediate advantage — time will work against them. The closer you get to an endgame, the more important the extra material becomes. This risky maneuver is considered courageous by some and foolhardy by others. You can often tell a lot about chess players by watching how they risk or conserve their material!\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Material matters</h2>\r\nThe following rules are meant to serve as guidelines and not as rigid rules. Every time chess players try to devise a rigid rule, some smart aleck comes along and breaks it! Nevertheless, it is useful to at least think about the concepts presented here:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>When ahead in material, force exchanges and steer towards the endgame. Simplify!</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Open files and diagonals when possible so that you may use them to engage the enemy and force further concessions.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>If possible, win material without sacrificing in some other element.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Material is usually more important than other elements, so take it if it is offered — unless you have a really good reason not to.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>If you are behind in material, avoid exchanging additional pieces, but do not become passive. You must attack!</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"Some chess pieces are more powerful than others. Some are stronger than others. The element of <i>material</i> is concerned with this relative strength of the pieces. It is quite common to see advantages in other elements converted into an advantage in material, because an advantage in material is the easiest advantage to convert into a win.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Value your pawns and pieces</h2>\r\nEach pawn or piece has a numerical value. The pawn is the basic unit of chess and is assigned a numerical value of one. The other pieces are evaluated in those same terms. Therefore, if a pawn is worth one point, a knight is worth more: three points. In other words, you lose two points in the element of material if you trade a knight for a pawn. You would need to capture three enemy pawns (or one knight) to compensate for the loss of your knight. The relative values of the pieces are shown in Table 1.\r\n\r\n<b>Table 1: The Relative Values of Chess Pieces (in terms of the pawn)</b>\r\n<table class=\"article-table\" cellpadding=\"7\">\r\n<tbody>\r\n<tr class=\"article-table-row\">\r\n<td valign=\"top\"><b><i>Piece</i></b></td>\r\n<td valign=\"top\"><b><i>Value</i></b></td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr class=\"article-table-row\">\r\n<td valign=\"top\">Pawn</td>\r\n<td valign=\"top\">1</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr class=\"article-table-row\">\r\n<td valign=\"top\">Knight</td>\r\n<td valign=\"top\">3</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr class=\"article-table-row\">\r\n<td valign=\"top\">Bishop</td>\r\n<td valign=\"top\">3</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr class=\"article-table-row\">\r\n<td valign=\"top\">Rook</td>\r\n<td valign=\"top\">5</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr class=\"article-table-row\">\r\n<td valign=\"top\">Queen</td>\r\n<td valign=\"top\">9</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n</tbody>\r\n</table>\r\n<p class=\"Remember\">Assigning a value to the king is not possible because its loss means the loss of the game!</p>\r\nMaterial superiority is decisive when all other things are equal. If you can win one pawn, winning another or forcing further concessions from your opponent is often possible. Things are rarely equal in chess, though, and it's sometimes impossible to correctly evaluate when an advantage in material matters more than an advantage in some other element. Is it worth a pawn to gain space? Usually, only experience can answer this kind of question.\r\n\r\nPieces themselves can gain or lose power depending upon their positioning. Having an advanced pawn deep in enemy territory may be far more important than having a measly knight tucked away in a corner. A bishop locked behind its own pawns may not be worth a fraction of a free roaming knight.\r\n\r\nThese values are relative and can change many times over the course of the game. Nevertheless, remembering the piece's relative value when you consider trading it for another is a useful guide. If you give up your queen for a pawn, you'd better have a darned good reason!\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Material strategies</h2>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">A good rule is to exchange pieces when you have an advantage in material. This strategy is referred to as <i>simplification.</i> For example, if you have an extra pawn, but both you and your opponent have a bishop, it's usually easier to win if you trade your bishop for your opponent's and play the rest of the game with just kings and pawns.</p>\r\nMaterial superiority takes on added importance the closer you come to an endgame. A single pawn advantage may mean little in the opening — but it may be decisive in the endgame. This strategy illustrates how you can force additional concessions from your opponents. If you keep offering to exchange pieces, and your opponents keep refusing, they will be forced to retreat. The result? You wind up with a spatial advantage, too!\r\n<p class=\"Remember\">Because exchanges are desired by the side with an edge in material, it's logical to avoid them if you are behind.</p>\r\nThe intentional loss of material in return for an advantage in another element is referred to as a <i>sacrifice.</i> Sacrifices are near and dear to the heart of chess players who know that — should they not obtain an immediate advantage — time will work against them. The closer you get to an endgame, the more important the extra material becomes. This risky maneuver is considered courageous by some and foolhardy by others. You can often tell a lot about chess players by watching how they risk or conserve their material!\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Material matters</h2>\r\nThe following rules are meant to serve as guidelines and not as rigid rules. Every time chess players try to devise a rigid rule, some smart aleck comes along and breaks it! Nevertheless, it is useful to at least think about the concepts presented here:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>When ahead in material, force exchanges and steer towards the endgame. Simplify!</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Open files and diagonals when possible so that you may use them to engage the enemy and force further concessions.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>If possible, win material without sacrificing in some other element.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Material is usually more important than other elements, so take it if it is offered — unless you have a really good reason not to.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>If you are behind in material, avoid exchanging additional pieces, but do not become passive. You must attack!</li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33889,"title":"Chess","slug":"chess","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33889"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Value your pawns and pieces","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Material strategies","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Material matters","target":"#tab3"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":275142,"title":"How the Queen’s Gambit Is Played as a Chess Opening","slug":"how-the-queens-gambit-is-played-as-a-chess-opening","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275142"}},{"articleId":230276,"title":"10 (or So) Cool Facts about Kids and Chess","slug":"10-cool-facts-kids-chess","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230276"}},{"articleId":230271,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Garry Kasparov (1963–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-garry-kasparov-1963-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230271"}},{"articleId":230265,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Anatoly Karpov (1951–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-anatoly-karpov-1951-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230265"}},{"articleId":230260,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: José Raúl Capablanca (1888–1942), Cuba","slug":"top-10-chess-players-jose-raul-capablanca-1888-1942-cuba","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230260"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;games&quot;,&quot;board-games&quot;,&quot;chess&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6532ea8f2b130\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;games&quot;,&quot;board-games&quot;,&quot;chess&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6532ea8f2b620\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-10-20T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":200397},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T20:18:15+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-08-16T15:38:55+00:00","timestamp":"2024-08-16T18:01:22+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33884"},"slug":"games","categoryId":33884},{"name":"Board Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33886"},"slug":"board-games","categoryId":33886},{"name":"Chess","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33889"},"slug":"chess","categoryId":33889}],"title":"Chess Pieces and How They Move","strippedTitle":"chess pieces and how they move","slug":"knowing-the-moves-that-chess-pieces-can-make","canonicalUrl":"","搜寻归类游戏游戏刹车系统SEO":{"metaDescription":"Learn how each of the pieces in the game of chess — pawns, knights, rooks, bishops, the queen, and king — are allowed to move on the board.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Before you can play a game of chess, you need to know how to move the pieces (legally). A chess piece’s power is tied to its mobility. The more mobile a piece is, the more powerful it is. Here's how the various pieces can move:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Pawns:</b> Pawns can only move forward. On their first move, they can move one or two squares. Afterwards, they can move only one square at a time. They can capture an enemy piece by moving one square forward diagonally. They can only move diagonally when capturing an enemy piece.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Bishops:</b> Bishops can move any number of squares diagonally.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Knights:</b> Knights can move only in an L-shape, one square up and two over, or two squares over and one down, or any such combination of one-two or two-one movements in any direction.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Rooks:</b> Rooks can move any number of squares, up and down and side to side.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Queens:</b> Queens can move any number of squares along ranks, files and diagonals.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Kings:</b> Kings can move one square at a time in any direction.</p>\r\n<img src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/281902.image0.jpg\" alt=\"image0.jpg\" width=\"535\" height=\"386\" /></li>\r\n</ul>","description":"Before you can play a game of chess, you need to know how to move the pieces (legally). A chess piece’s power is tied to its mobility. The more mobile a piece is, the more powerful it is. Here's how the various pieces can move:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Pawns:</b> Pawns can only move forward. On their first move, they can move one or two squares. Afterwards, they can move only one square at a time. They can capture an enemy piece by moving one square forward diagonally. They can only move diagonally when capturing an enemy piece.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Bishops:</b> Bishops can move any number of squares diagonally.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Knights:</b> Knights can move only in an L-shape, one square up and two over, or two squares over and one down, or any such combination of one-two or two-one movements in any direction.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Rooks:</b> Rooks can move any number of squares, up and down and side to side.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Queens:</b> Queens can move any number of squares along ranks, files and diagonals.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Kings:</b> Kings can move one square at a time in any direction.</p>\r\n<img src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/281902.image0.jpg\" alt=\"image0.jpg\" width=\"535\" height=\"386\" /></li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10138,"name":"James Eade","slug":"james-eade","description":" <p><b>James Eade</b> is a United States Chess Federation &#40;USCF&#41; chess master as well as a chess writer, tournament organizer, and teacher. He is the author of <i>Chess For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10138"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33889,"title":"Chess","slug":"chess","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33889"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":230276,"title":"10 (or So) Cool Facts about Kids and Chess","slug":"10-cool-facts-kids-chess","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230276"}},{"articleId":230271,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Garry Kasparov (1963–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-garry-kasparov-1963-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230271"}},{"articleId":230265,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Anatoly Karpov (1951–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-anatoly-karpov-1951-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230265"}},{"articleId":230260,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: José Raúl Capablanca (1888–1942), Cuba","slug":"top-10-chess-players-jose-raul-capablanca-1888-1942-cuba","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230260"}},{"articleId":230256,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Robert James Fischer (1943–2008), U.S.","slug":"top-10-chess-players-robert-james-fischer-1943-2008-united-states","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230256"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":275142,"title":"How the Queen’s Gambit Is Played as a Chess Opening","slug":"how-the-queens-gambit-is-played-as-a-chess-opening","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275142"}},{"articleId":230276,"title":"10 (or So) Cool Facts about Kids and Chess","slug":"10-cool-facts-kids-chess","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230276"}},{"articleId":230271,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Garry Kasparov (1963–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-garry-kasparov-1963-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230271"}},{"articleId":230265,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Anatoly Karpov (1951–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-anatoly-karpov-1951-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230265"}},{"articleId":230260,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: José Raúl Capablanca (1888–1942), Cuba","slug":"top-10-chess-players-jose-raul-capablanca-1888-1942-cuba","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230260"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282072,"slug":"chess-for-dummies-4th-edition","isbn":"9781119280019","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/111928001X-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-for-dummies-4th-edition-cover-9781119280019-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Chess For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":"<p><b data-author-id=\"10138\">James Eade</b> became a US Chess Federation Chess Master in 1981. International organizations awarded him the master title in 1990 (for correspondence) and in 1993 (for regular tournament play). Today, he writes about and teaches chess. </p>","authors":[{"authorId":10138,"name":"James Eade","slug":"james-eade","description":" <p><b>James Eade</b> is a United States Chess Federation &#40;USCF&#41; chess master as well as a chess writer, tournament organizer, and teacher. He is the author of <i>Chess For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10138"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[{"title":"Just for the Love of It","slug":"just-for-the-love-of-it","collectionId":296433}],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;games&quot;,&quot;board-games&quot;,&quot;chess&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119280019&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64dd0ef2caf5b\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;games&quot;,&quot;board-games&quot;,&quot;chess&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119280019&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64dd0ef2cb703\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-12-21T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":186936},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-12-13T02:05:37+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-07-10T15:18:10+00:00","timestamp":"2024-07-10T18:01:04+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33884"},"slug":"games","categoryId":33884},{"name":"Board Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33886"},"slug":"board-games","categoryId":33886},{"name":"Chess","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33889"},"slug":"chess","categoryId":33889}],"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Robert James Fischer (1943–2008), U.S.","strippedTitle":"top 10 chess players: robert james fischer (1943–2008), u.s.","slug":"top-10-chess-players-robert-james-fischer-1943-2008-united-states","canonicalUrl":"","搜寻归类游戏游戏刹车系统SEO":{"metaDescription":"Learn about Bobby Fischer's reign as the best player in the world, and follow his moves from his match against Bent Larsen in 1958.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"In 1971, Robert James Fischer (nicknamed Bobby) shocked the chess world by winning 19 consecutive games against an extremely high level of competition. This feat has been compared to throwing back-to-back no-hitters in major league baseball.\r\n\r\nDuring his peak playing period, from the mid 1960s into the early '70s, players spoke of \"Fischer Fever,\" where they felt ill just having to play against him.\r\n\r\nJust as with José Raúl Capablanca, Fischer had an aura of invincibility — which wasn't far from the truth. Fischer was head and shoulders above the best players of his day.\r\n\r\nHis abrupt withdrawal from chess was tragic. Rumors of Fischer sightings were rampant, and the public was often tantalized by stories of his impending reemergence. Unfortunately, Fischer waited more than 20 years before playing in public again. His behavior, always intense, became increasingly odd over the years and prevented him from ever again competing at the highest levels.\r\n\r\nThe position in part a of the following figure occurred in the game Fischer-Bent Larsen at the Portoroz Interzonal Chess Tournament, in Slovenia in 1958. It's white's (Fischer) turn to move. How does white crack black's defense? White plays 22. Rxh5. (Check out <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/games/chess/understanding-chess-notation/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Understanding Chess Notation</a> if you need help with reading the moves.)\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_230257\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"535\"]<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Fischer-sacrifices.jpg\"><img class=\"wp-image-230257 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Fischer-sacrifices.jpg\" alt=\"chess-fischer-sacrifices\" width=\"535\" height=\"276\" /></a> Fischer sacrifices his rook to open lines for his coming attack.[/caption]\r\n\r\nThe white rook captures the black knight on h5, which was unusual because of the material sacrifice involved. In the old pre-internet days, good study material from the games of the masters was hard to come by. This game, however, became famous, and to claim that by the 1970s all serious U.S. students of the game were familiar with this type of sacrifice is no exaggeration.\r\n\r\nThe game continues:\r\n\r\n22. <strong>… gxh5</strong>\r\n\r\n23. <strong>g6e5</strong>\r\n\r\n24. <strong>gxf7+Kf8</strong>\r\n\r\n25. <strong>Be3d5</strong>\r\n\r\nThis is the best try, but it fails to save the game.\r\n\r\n26. <strong>exd5</strong>\r\n\r\nWhite avoids 26. Bxd5 to steer clear of the response 26… Rxc2.\r\n\r\n26. <strong>… Rxf7</strong>\r\n\r\n27. <strong>d6Rf6</strong>\r\n\r\n28. <strong>Bg5Qb7</strong>\r\n\r\n29. <strong>Bxf6Bxf6</strong>\r\n\r\n30. <strong>d7Rd8</strong>\r\n\r\n31. <strong>Qd6+1-0</strong>\r\n\r\nIf 31… . Be7, 32. Qh6#. If 31… . Kg7, then 32. Rg1+ wins the bishop and will mate. Sacrificing the exchange, as Fischer did in this game, in order to open lines of attack against the enemy king, is now part of every serious player's arsenal of weapons.","description":"In 1971, Robert James Fischer (nicknamed Bobby) shocked the chess world by winning 19 consecutive games against an extremely high level of competition. This feat has been compared to throwing back-to-back no-hitters in major league baseball.\r\n\r\nDuring his peak playing period, from the mid 1960s into the early '70s, players spoke of \"Fischer Fever,\" where they felt ill just having to play against him.\r\n\r\nJust as with José Raúl Capablanca, Fischer had an aura of invincibility — which wasn't far from the truth. Fischer was head and shoulders above the best players of his day.\r\n\r\nHis abrupt withdrawal from chess was tragic. Rumors of Fischer sightings were rampant, and the public was often tantalized by stories of his impending reemergence. Unfortunately, Fischer waited more than 20 years before playing in public again. His behavior, always intense, became increasingly odd over the years and prevented him from ever again competing at the highest levels.\r\n\r\nThe position in part a of the following figure occurred in the game Fischer-Bent Larsen at the Portoroz Interzonal Chess Tournament, in Slovenia in 1958. It's white's (Fischer) turn to move. How does white crack black's defense? White plays 22. Rxh5. (Check out <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/games/chess/understanding-chess-notation/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Understanding Chess Notation</a> if you need help with reading the moves.)\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_230257\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"535\"]<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Fischer-sacrifices.jpg\"><img class=\"wp-image-230257 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Fischer-sacrifices.jpg\" alt=\"chess-fischer-sacrifices\" width=\"535\" height=\"276\" /></a> Fischer sacrifices his rook to open lines for his coming attack.[/caption]\r\n\r\nThe white rook captures the black knight on h5, which was unusual because of the material sacrifice involved. In the old pre-internet days, good study material from the games of the masters was hard to come by. This game, however, became famous, and to claim that by the 1970s all serious U.S. students of the game were familiar with this type of sacrifice is no exaggeration.\r\n\r\nThe game continues:\r\n\r\n22. <strong>… gxh5</strong>\r\n\r\n23. <strong>g6e5</strong>\r\n\r\n24. <strong>gxf7+Kf8</strong>\r\n\r\n25. <strong>Be3d5</strong>\r\n\r\nThis is the best try, but it fails to save the game.\r\n\r\n26. <strong>exd5</strong>\r\n\r\nWhite avoids 26. Bxd5 to steer clear of the response 26… Rxc2.\r\n\r\n26. <strong>… Rxf7</strong>\r\n\r\n27. <strong>d6Rf6</strong>\r\n\r\n28. <strong>Bg5Qb7</strong>\r\n\r\n29. <strong>Bxf6Bxf6</strong>\r\n\r\n30. <strong>d7Rd8</strong>\r\n\r\n31. <strong>Qd6+1-0</strong>\r\n\r\nIf 31… . Be7, 32. Qh6#. If 31… . Kg7, then 32. Rg1+ wins the bishop and will mate. Sacrificing the exchange, as Fischer did in this game, in order to open lines of attack against the enemy king, is now part of every serious player's arsenal of weapons.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10138,"name":"James Eade","slug":"james-eade","description":" <p><b>James Eade</b> is a United States Chess Federation &#40;USCF&#41; chess master as well as a chess writer, tournament organizer, and teacher. He is the author of <i>Chess For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10138"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33889,"title":"Chess","slug":"chess","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33889"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":230276,"title":"10 (or So) Cool Facts about Kids and Chess","slug":"10-cool-facts-kids-chess","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230276"}},{"articleId":230271,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Garry Kasparov (1963–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-garry-kasparov-1963-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230271"}},{"articleId":230265,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Anatoly Karpov (1951–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-anatoly-karpov-1951-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230265"}},{"articleId":230260,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: José Raúl Capablanca (1888–1942), Cuba","slug":"top-10-chess-players-jose-raul-capablanca-1888-1942-cuba","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230260"}},{"articleId":230252,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Paul Morphy (1837–1884), United States","slug":"top-10-chess-players-paul-morphy-1837-1884-united-states","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230252"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":275142,"title":"How the Queen’s Gambit Is Played as a Chess Opening","slug":"how-the-queens-gambit-is-played-as-a-chess-opening","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275142"}},{"articleId":230276,"title":"10 (or So) Cool Facts about Kids and Chess","slug":"10-cool-facts-kids-chess","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230276"}},{"articleId":230271,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Garry Kasparov (1963–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-garry-kasparov-1963-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230271"}},{"articleId":230265,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Anatoly Karpov (1951–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-anatoly-karpov-1951-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230265"}},{"articleId":230260,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: José Raúl Capablanca (1888–1942), Cuba","slug":"top-10-chess-players-jose-raul-capablanca-1888-1942-cuba","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230260"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282072,"slug":"chess-for-dummies-4th-edition","isbn":"9781119280019","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/111928001X-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-for-dummies-4th-edition-cover-9781119280019-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Chess For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":"<p><b data-author-id=\"10138\">James Eade</b> became a US Chess Federation Chess Master in 1981. International organizations awarded him the master title in 1990 (for correspondence) and in 1993 (for regular tournament play). Today, he writes about and teaches chess. </p>","authors":[{"authorId":10138,"name":"James Eade","slug":"james-eade","description":" <p><b>James Eade</b> is a United States Chess Federation &#40;USCF&#41; chess master as well as a chess writer, tournament organizer, and teacher. He is the author of <i>Chess For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10138"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;games&quot;,&quot;board-games&quot;,&quot;chess&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119280019&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64ac476074a3a\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;games&quot;,&quot;board-games&quot;,&quot;chess&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119280019&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64ac47607534d\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2022-07-29T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":230256},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-12-12T20:31:30+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-06-06T17:23:51+00:00","timestamp":"2024-06-06T18:01:04+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33884"},"slug":"games","categoryId":33884},{"name":"Board Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33886"},"slug":"board-games","categoryId":33886},{"name":"Chess","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33889"},"slug":"chess","categoryId":33889}],"title":"Accessing Chess-Playing Computer Programs","strippedTitle":"accessing chess-playing computer programs","slug":"little-engines-chess-playing-computer-programs","canonicalUrl":"","搜寻归类游戏游戏刹车系统SEO":{"metaDescription":"You can learn a lot and get in hours of practice with chess-playing computer programs. Here's a summary of some of the most popular ones.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Many commercial chess-playing computer programs (chess players call them <em>engines</em>) are available. Most of them can beat just about anyone. One of the most powerful engines, <a href=\"//stockfishchess.org/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Stockfish</a>, is free to download. Another championship program, <a href=\"//komodochess.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Komodo</a>, offers its latest versions for sale, and its outdated versions (which are still incredibly strong) for free.\r\n\r\nKeep in mind that chess engines don't work by themselves. They're programs that need to be installed into a a graphical user interface (GUI). <a href=\"//en.chessbase.com\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">ChessBase</a> offers the most popular one for sale. <a href=\"//www.playwitharena.de\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Arena</a> is a free GUI. You can even download <a href=\"//www.triplehappy.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Tarrasch Chess</a>, which comes with Stockfish already installed.\r\n\r\nThe chess world is mostly Windows based, but Mac users can have their fun, too. Most engines have a number after their name. This is the version number, with the higher number being the most current version.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Don't be discouraged. These programs beat nearly everyone most of the time. Nevertheless, having a program that's stronger than you are has its advantages. These programs share their evaluations with you so you can see where they think you made a mistake. They also suggest improvements in your play, which can be a very useful tool. By studying where you went wrong and considering a program's suggestions, you may learn some valuable lessons that can elevate your future play.</p>\r\nHere's a summary of some of the most popular chess engines out there:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Fritz</strong> is not the world's strongest chess engine, but it is plenty strong enough. Produced by ChessBase, the program should be well maintained for the foreseeable future. It is relatively easy to learn and fairly intuitive to use.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Houdini</strong> is a state-of-the-art chess engine for Windows. Many of the world's best players have adopted it as their engine of choice. Its name was chosen for its ability to escape seemingly impossible positions.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Crafty</strong> is a Windows-based chess program written by Robert Hyatt — a retired University of Alabama at Birmingham computer science professor — with continual development and assistance from Michael Byrne, Tracy Riegle, and Peter Skinner. Tord Romstad, the author of Stockfish, has described Crafty as \"arguably the most important and influential chess program ever.\" Crafty has been available free for years on the ICC.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Stockfish</strong> has been an open source engine available on various desktop and mobile platforms. It was developed by Tord Romstad, Marco Costalba, Joona Kiiski, and Gary Linscott, with many contributions from a community of open-source developers. Stockfish is consistently ranked first or near the top of most chess engine rating lists and has been the strongest open source chess engine in the world.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Komodo</strong> is a Windows-based engine developed by Don Dailey and Mark Lefler, and supported by chess author, evaluation expert and grandmaster Larry Kaufman. Komodo is a commercial chess engine, but older versions (7 and older) are free for non-commercial use.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nFor Mac:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Stockfish</strong> (See above.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Shredder</strong> is a chess program by Stefan Meyer-Kahlen. It is one of the most powerful engines available to Mac users.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Hiarcs</strong> is another powerful engine available on multiple platforms, including the Mac. It has been around for a number of years and can be expected to continue to well supported for a number of years to come.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nAs for smartphone and tablet apps, Stockfish, Shredder, and Hiarcs are all available as smartphone apps as well. Chess Base is an amazing, simple-to-use, state-of-the-art resource available from both the Android Play Store and Apple App Store that can give you the frequency and winning percentages of any opening line of play. It also gives you access to millions of master games. It provides an available online computer to analyze in any of these modes.","description":"Many commercial chess-playing computer programs (chess players call them <em>engines</em>) are available. Most of them can beat just about anyone. One of the most powerful engines, <a href=\"//stockfishchess.org/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Stockfish</a>, is free to download. Another championship program, <a href=\"//komodochess.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Komodo</a>, offers its latest versions for sale, and its outdated versions (which are still incredibly strong) for free.\r\n\r\nKeep in mind that chess engines don't work by themselves. They're programs that need to be installed into a a graphical user interface (GUI). <a href=\"//en.chessbase.com\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">ChessBase</a> offers the most popular one for sale. <a href=\"//www.playwitharena.de\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Arena</a> is a free GUI. You can even download <a href=\"//www.triplehappy.com/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Tarrasch Chess</a>, which comes with Stockfish already installed.\r\n\r\nThe chess world is mostly Windows based, but Mac users can have their fun, too. Most engines have a number after their name. This is the version number, with the higher number being the most current version.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Don't be discouraged. These programs beat nearly everyone most of the time. Nevertheless, having a program that's stronger than you are has its advantages. These programs share their evaluations with you so you can see where they think you made a mistake. They also suggest improvements in your play, which can be a very useful tool. By studying where you went wrong and considering a program's suggestions, you may learn some valuable lessons that can elevate your future play.</p>\r\nHere's a summary of some of the most popular chess engines out there:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Fritz</strong> is not the world's strongest chess engine, but it is plenty strong enough. Produced by ChessBase, the program should be well maintained for the foreseeable future. It is relatively easy to learn and fairly intuitive to use.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Houdini</strong> is a state-of-the-art chess engine for Windows. Many of the world's best players have adopted it as their engine of choice. Its name was chosen for its ability to escape seemingly impossible positions.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Crafty</strong> is a Windows-based chess program written by Robert Hyatt — a retired University of Alabama at Birmingham computer science professor — with continual development and assistance from Michael Byrne, Tracy Riegle, and Peter Skinner. Tord Romstad, the author of Stockfish, has described Crafty as \"arguably the most important and influential chess program ever.\" Crafty has been available free for years on the ICC.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Stockfish</strong> has been an open source engine available on various desktop and mobile platforms. It was developed by Tord Romstad, Marco Costalba, Joona Kiiski, and Gary Linscott, with many contributions from a community of open-source developers. Stockfish is consistently ranked first or near the top of most chess engine rating lists and has been the strongest open source chess engine in the world.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Komodo</strong> is a Windows-based engine developed by Don Dailey and Mark Lefler, and supported by chess author, evaluation expert and grandmaster Larry Kaufman. Komodo is a commercial chess engine, but older versions (7 and older) are free for non-commercial use.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nFor Mac:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Stockfish</strong> (See above.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Shredder</strong> is a chess program by Stefan Meyer-Kahlen. It is one of the most powerful engines available to Mac users.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Hiarcs</strong> is another powerful engine available on multiple platforms, including the Mac. It has been around for a number of years and can be expected to continue to well supported for a number of years to come.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nAs for smartphone and tablet apps, Stockfish, Shredder, and Hiarcs are all available as smartphone apps as well. Chess Base is an amazing, simple-to-use, state-of-the-art resource available from both the Android Play Store and Apple App Store that can give you the frequency and winning percentages of any opening line of play. It also gives you access to millions of master games. It provides an available online computer to analyze in any of these modes.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10138,"name":"James Eade","slug":"james-eade","description":" <p><b>James Eade</b> is a United States Chess Federation &#40;USCF&#41; chess master as well as a chess writer, tournament organizer, and teacher. He is the author of <i>Chess For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10138"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33889,"title":"Chess","slug":"chess","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33889"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":230276,"title":"10 (or So) Cool Facts about Kids and Chess","slug":"10-cool-facts-kids-chess","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230276"}},{"articleId":230271,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Garry Kasparov (1963–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-garry-kasparov-1963-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230271"}},{"articleId":230265,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Anatoly Karpov (1951–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-anatoly-karpov-1951-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230265"}},{"articleId":230260,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: José Raúl Capablanca (1888–1942), Cuba","slug":"top-10-chess-players-jose-raul-capablanca-1888-1942-cuba","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230260"}},{"articleId":230256,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Robert James Fischer (1943–2008), United States","slug":"top-10-chess-players-robert-james-fischer-1943-2008-united-states","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230256"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":275142,"title":"How the Queen’s Gambit Is Played as a Chess Opening","slug":"how-the-queens-gambit-is-played-as-a-chess-opening","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275142"}},{"articleId":230276,"title":"10 (or So) Cool Facts about Kids and Chess","slug":"10-cool-facts-kids-chess","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230276"}},{"articleId":230271,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Garry Kasparov (1963–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-garry-kasparov-1963-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230271"}},{"articleId":230265,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Anatoly Karpov (1951–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-anatoly-karpov-1951-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230265"}},{"articleId":230260,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: José Raúl Capablanca (1888–1942), Cuba","slug":"top-10-chess-players-jose-raul-capablanca-1888-1942-cuba","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230260"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282072,"slug":"chess-for-dummies-4th-edition","isbn":"9781119280019","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/111928001X-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-for-dummies-4th-edition-cover-9781119280019-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Chess For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":"<p><b data-author-id=\"10138\">James Eade</b> became a US Chess Federation Chess Master in 1981. International organizations awarded him the master title in 1990 (for correspondence) and in 1993 (for regular tournament play). Today, he writes about and teaches chess. </p>","authors":[{"authorId":10138,"name":"James Eade","slug":"james-eade","description":" <p><b>James Eade</b> is a United States Chess Federation &#40;USCF&#41; chess master as well as a chess writer, tournament organizer, and teacher. He is the author of <i>Chess For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10138"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;games&quot;,&quot;board-games&quot;,&quot;chess&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119280019&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-647f746080b7b\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;games&quot;,&quot;board-games&quot;,&quot;chess&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119280019&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-647f746081430\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"One year","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2022-07-28T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":230203},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-12-12T23:08:16+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-05-03T20:43:53+00:00","timestamp":"2024-05-03T21:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33884"},"slug":"games","categoryId":33884},{"name":"Board Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33886"},"slug":"board-games","categoryId":33886},{"name":"Chess","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33889"},"slug":"chess","categoryId":33889}],"title":"Russia's Mikhail Botvinnik Was World Chess Champ","strippedTitle":"russia's mikhail botvinnik was world chess champ","slug":"top-10-chess-players-mikhail-botvinnik-1911-1995-russia","canonicalUrl":"","搜寻归类游戏游戏刹车系统SEO":{"metaDescription":"Learn about chess champion Mikhail Botvinnik, who won seven consecutive major tournaments from 1941 to 1948.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Mikhail Botvinnik won seven consecutive major tournaments from 1941 to 1948, including the tournament held to determine the champion upon Alexander Alekhine's death. There's little doubt that he would have defeated Alekhine, and it seems certain that he was the best player of the 1940s.\r\n\r\nRemarkably, Botvinnik was an engineer by profession and didn't dedicate himself to chess the way most of the champions did. He lost his title to Vasily Smyslov in 1957 but won it back in the return match the next year. He then lost to Mikhail Tal in 1960 but again recaptured the title in the return match. The <em>return match clause,</em> stating that the champion has a right to a rematch if defeated, was stricken in 1963 when he lost to Tigran Petrosian, and no one will ever know whether he would have managed to score the hat trick.\r\n\r\nDespite a fairly tarnished record in championship match play, Botvinnik was clearly the best player in the world for many years. None of his challengers could make that claim.\r\n\r\nIn 1945 a famous radio match took place between the United States and the former Soviet Union. Botvinnik, as black, was paired on the top board against Arnold Denker. The position shown here is reached after white's 22nd move. (Check out <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/games/chess/understanding-chess-notation/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Understanding Chess Notation</a> if you need help with reading the moves.)\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_230234\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"535\"]<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Botvinnik-shatters.jpg\"><img class=\"wp-image-230234 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Botvinnik-shatters.jpg\" alt=\"chess-Botvinnik-shatters\" width=\"535\" height=\"276\" /></a> Botvinnik shatters white's king protection with a temporary rook sacrifice.[/caption]\r\n\r\nWhite is hoping to exchange queens and steer the game into an endgame, but Botvinnik has other plans. He plays 22… Rxh2+. (See part b.)\r\n\r\nThe game concludes with these moves:\r\n\r\n23. <strong>Kxh2 Rh8+</strong>\r\n\r\n24. <strong>Qh4</strong>\r\n\r\nThe alternatives were also grim. 24. Bh6 would have lost the queen to 24… Qxf4. Notice that the bishop would have been pinned and unable to capture black's queen. Also, the attempted move 24. Nh5 would have failed to 24… . Rxh5+ 25. Kg3 Rxg5+, when it would have been the white queen's turn to be pinned.\r\n\r\n24. <strong>… Rxh4+</strong>\r\n\r\n25. <strong>Bxh4 Qf4 0-1</strong>\r\n\r\nThe queen is now attacking both of white's bishops. Because white can only save one of them, Denker resigns.","description":"Mikhail Botvinnik won seven consecutive major tournaments from 1941 to 1948, including the tournament held to determine the champion upon Alexander Alekhine's death. There's little doubt that he would have defeated Alekhine, and it seems certain that he was the best player of the 1940s.\r\n\r\nRemarkably, Botvinnik was an engineer by profession and didn't dedicate himself to chess the way most of the champions did. He lost his title to Vasily Smyslov in 1957 but won it back in the return match the next year. He then lost to Mikhail Tal in 1960 but again recaptured the title in the return match. The <em>return match clause,</em> stating that the champion has a right to a rematch if defeated, was stricken in 1963 when he lost to Tigran Petrosian, and no one will ever know whether he would have managed to score the hat trick.\r\n\r\nDespite a fairly tarnished record in championship match play, Botvinnik was clearly the best player in the world for many years. None of his challengers could make that claim.\r\n\r\nIn 1945 a famous radio match took place between the United States and the former Soviet Union. Botvinnik, as black, was paired on the top board against Arnold Denker. The position shown here is reached after white's 22nd move. (Check out <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/games/chess/understanding-chess-notation/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Understanding Chess Notation</a> if you need help with reading the moves.)\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_230234\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"535\"]<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Botvinnik-shatters.jpg\"><img class=\"wp-image-230234 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Botvinnik-shatters.jpg\" alt=\"chess-Botvinnik-shatters\" width=\"535\" height=\"276\" /></a> Botvinnik shatters white's king protection with a temporary rook sacrifice.[/caption]\r\n\r\nWhite is hoping to exchange queens and steer the game into an endgame, but Botvinnik has other plans. He plays 22… Rxh2+. (See part b.)\r\n\r\nThe game concludes with these moves:\r\n\r\n23. <strong>Kxh2 Rh8+</strong>\r\n\r\n24. <strong>Qh4</strong>\r\n\r\nThe alternatives were also grim. 24. Bh6 would have lost the queen to 24… Qxf4. Notice that the bishop would have been pinned and unable to capture black's queen. Also, the attempted move 24. Nh5 would have failed to 24… . Rxh5+ 25. Kg3 Rxg5+, when it would have been the white queen's turn to be pinned.\r\n\r\n24. <strong>… Rxh4+</strong>\r\n\r\n25. <strong>Bxh4 Qf4 0-1</strong>\r\n\r\nThe queen is now attacking both of white's bishops. Because white can only save one of them, Denker resigns.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10138,"name":"James Eade","slug":"james-eade","description":" <p><b>James Eade</b> is a United States Chess Federation &#40;USCF&#41; chess master as well as a chess writer, tournament organizer, and teacher. He is the author of <i>Chess For Dummies.</i> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10138"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33889,"title":"Chess","slug":"chess","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33889"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":230276,"title":"10 (or So) Cool Facts about Kids and Chess","slug":"10-cool-facts-kids-chess","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230276"}},{"articleId":230271,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Garry Kasparov (1963–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-garry-kasparov-1963-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230271"}},{"articleId":230265,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Anatoly Karpov (1951–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-anatoly-karpov-1951-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230265"}},{"articleId":230260,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: José Raúl Capablanca (1888–1942), Cuba","slug":"top-10-chess-players-jose-raul-capablanca-1888-1942-cuba","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230260"}},{"articleId":230256,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Robert James Fischer (1943–2008), United States","slug":"top-10-chess-players-robert-james-fischer-1943-2008-united-states","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230256"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":275142,"title":"How the Queen’s Gambit Is Played as a Chess Opening","slug":"how-the-queens-gambit-is-played-as-a-chess-opening","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/275142"}},{"articleId":230276,"title":"10 (or So) Cool Facts about Kids and Chess","slug":"10-cool-facts-kids-chess","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230276"}},{"articleId":230271,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Garry Kasparov (1963–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-garry-kasparov-1963-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230271"}},{"articleId":230265,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Anatoly Karpov (1951–), Russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-anatoly-karpov-1951-russia","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230265"}},{"articleId":230260,"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: José Raúl Capablanca (1888–1942), Cuba","slug":"top-10-chess-players-jose-raul-capablanca-1888-1942-cuba","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/230260"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282072,"slug":"chess-for-dummies-4th-edition","isbn":"9781119280019","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","chess"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/111928001X-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/111928001X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-for-dummies-4th-edition-cover-9781119280019-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Chess For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":"<p><b data-author-id=\"10138\">James Eade</b> became a US Chess Federation Chess Master in 1981. International organizations awarded him the master title in 1990 (for correspondence) and in 1993 (for regular tournament play). Today, he writes about and teaches chess. </p>","authors":[{"authorId":10138,"name":"James Eade","slug":"james-eade","description":" <p><b>James Eade</b> is a United States Chess Federation &#40;USCF&#41; chess master as well as a chess writer, tournament organizer, and teacher. 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Find out how the Queen's Gambit works, from coursofppt.com.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"<em>The Queen’s Gambit</em> is more than the name of the latest Netflix mega-hit. It’s one of the oldest and best openings in the game of chess and the one Beth, the main character in <em>The Queen's Gambit</em>, uses (spoiler alert!) to defeat Russian grandmaster Vasily Borgov to become the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/games/chess/top-10-chess-players-robert-james-fischer-1943-2008-united-states/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">world’s top chess player</a>.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275144\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"wp-image-275144 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-openings.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"556\" height=\"371\" /> Going for the Queen's Gambit. <br />©Shutterstock/Agustin Bernatene[/caption]\r\n\r\nIn the Queen’s Gambit, whether Black accepts or declines the gambit, White has good chances to secure an advantage in the center.\r\n\r\nThis <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/games/chess/understanding-the-basics-of-chess-openings/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">chess opening</a> appeals to players who like games that require long-term strategic planning. If you enjoy applying subtle pressure until your opponent finally cracks, this opening may be right for you. And as Beth demonstrated, this is one of the best chess openings!\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >A quick look at the Queen’s Gambit</h2>\r\nThe <em>Queen’s Gambit</em> occurs after the moves 1.d4 d5 2.c4 (Check out our article for a <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/games/chess/understanding-chess-notation/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">quick refresher on chess notation</a>). It isn’t entirely correct to characterize White’s second move as a gambit because Black really can’t hang on to the pawn. If Black does capture the pawn on c4, it’s usually with the intention of allowing White to recapture it later.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275143\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"248\"]<img class=\"wp-image-275143 size-medium\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-openings-queens-gambit-248x255.png\" alt=\"Queen's Gambit\" width=\"248\" height=\"255\" /> The Queen’s Gambit begins after the moves 1.d4 d5 2.c4.[/caption]\r\n\r\nWhite tries to gain an advantage in the center by attacking Black’s pawn on d5. If the pawn is removed, the advance e2-e4 is facilitated, giving White a potentially powerful pawn center. Black can decline the gambit in a variety of ways, or simply capture the pawn.\r\n\r\nIf Black captures the pawn, the opening is referred to as the <em>Queen’s Gambit Accepted.</em> If Black doesn’t take the offered pawn and protects the d-pawn with e7-e6, the opening is called the <em>Queen’s Gambit Declined.</em> The Queen’s Gambit Declined can lead to a rich variety of strategically complex variations.\r\n\r\nMany chess openings can be arrived at via different move orders, which is referred to as <em>transposition.</em> The most likely move order for the Queen’s Gambit is 1.d4 d5 2.c4, for example, but 1.c4 d5 2.d4 amounts to the same thing.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >The Queen’s Gambit Accepted</h2>\r\nThe <em>Queen’s Gambit Accepted</em> arises following the moves 1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275146\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"248\"]<img class=\"wp-image-275146 size-medium\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-openings-queens-gambit-accepted-248x255.png\" alt=\"Queen's Gambit Accepted\" width=\"248\" height=\"255\" /> The Queen’s Gambit Accepted begins after the moves 1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4.[/caption]\r\n\r\nIt isn’t normally recommended for Black to try to hold on to this pawn. The basic idea is to develop rapidly and try to saddle White with an isolated d-pawn by playing …c5 and …cxd4. The isolated d-pawn is an intriguing structure in chess. If it can be <em>blockaded</em> (prevented from advancing), it may turn into a weakness and have to be defended by pieces. Pieces don’t like performing guard duty for pawns!\r\n\r\nHowever, if it can advance, it can often break down Black’s defenses and pave the way for a winning attack. Grandmaster games over the years have featured many a delicate dance with an isolated d-pawn.\r\n<h3>When things go White’s way in the Queen's Gambit</h3>\r\nWhite can advance the d-pawn from d4 to d5 and disrupt the coordination of Black’s pieces. It’s surprising to see how rapidly Black’s position can crumble.\r\n\r\nIn a 1995 game in Sweden between Ulf Andersson (as White) and Anatoly Karpov, Black gave White an isolated d-pawn and then tried to prevent its advance. It must’ve been a shock to Karpov when Andersson advanced the pawn anyway.\r\n\r\n<strong>1.Nf3 d5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>2.d4 Nf6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>3.c4 dxc4</strong>\r\n\r\nReaching the Queen’s Gambit Accepted through a transposition of moves. The same position occurs more often by the move order 1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.Nf3 Nf6.\r\n\r\n<strong>4.e3 e6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>5.Bxc4 c5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>6.0–0 a6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>7.Qe2 cxd4 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>8.exd4</strong>\r\n\r\nNow, White has an isolated d-pawn.\r\n\r\n<strong>8.…Be7 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>9.Nc3 b5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>10.Bb3 0–0 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>11.Bg5 Bb7</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>12.Rad1 Nc6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>13.Rfe1 Nb4?</strong>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Black’s move is a serious mistake. Obviously, Black figured he was preventing White from playing 14.d5.</p>\r\n<strong>14.d5!</strong>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">This is the thematic break in isolated d-pawn type of formations. When it can be safely played, things usually go White’s way.</p>\r\n\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275147\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"248\"]<img class=\"wp-image-275147 size-medium\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-openings-pawn-advance-248x255.png\" alt=\"Queen's Gambit thematic Pawn advance\" width=\"248\" height=\"255\" /> The thematic Pawn advance from d4 to d5.[/caption]\r\n\r\n<strong>14....Nfxd5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>15.Nxd5 Bxg5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>16.Nxb4 Qe7 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>17.Nd5 Bxd5</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>18.Bxd5 1–0</strong>\r\n\r\nWhite wins a piece, and Black has no compensation for it. It’s amazing that a player of Karpov’s status can lose so quickly.\r\n<h3>When things go Black’s way in the Queen's Gambit</h3>\r\nBlack can saddle White with an isolated d-pawn and prevent it from advancing from d4 to d5. The pawn becomes weak and gets in the way of White’s pieces. As the endgame approaches, the d-pawn’s weakness grows more and more pronounced.\r\n\r\nIn a game from 1997 played in San Francisco between Guillermo Rey (White) and Alexander Baburin, Black was able to isolate White’s d-pawn and prevent it from advancing. Baburin then attacked it repeatedly, causing White’s pieces to become passive in defense. Eventually, White couldn’t meet Black’s threats, and the d-pawn fell.\r\n\r\n<strong>1.d4 d5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>2.c4 dxc4 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>3.Qa4+ Nc6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>4.Nf3 Bg4</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>5.Nc3 Bxf3 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>6.exf3 e6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>7.Be3 Nf6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>8.Bxc4 a6</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>9.Qd1 Nb4 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>10.0–0 Be7 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>11.Rc1 0–0 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>12.Qe2 c6</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>13.Rfd1 Nbd5</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack occupies the d5 square with his knight, and White has no way to dislodge it. If White captures on d5, it’s important for Black to recapture with a piece rather than a pawn to maintain the blockade.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275148\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"248\"]<img class=\"wp-image-275148 size-medium\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-openings-isolated-pawn-248x255.png\" alt=\"isolated d-pwn Queen's Gambit\" width=\"248\" height=\"255\" /> Black successfully blockades the isolated d-pawn.[/caption]\r\n\r\n<strong>14.a3 Nxc3 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>15.Rxc3 Nd5</strong>\r\n\r\nThe Black knight takes up the blockade by moving in front of the isolated pawn.\r\n\r\n<strong>16.Rcd3 Bf6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>17.g3 Qd7 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>18.Ba2 Rad8 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>19.Qc2 Qc7</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>20.Kg2 Rd7</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack intends to eventually move the rook on f8 to d8. When two rooks are placed on the same file, it’s called <em>doubling</em> them.\r\n\r\n<strong>21.h4 h5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>22.Bb1</strong>\r\n\r\nWhen the bishop is placed behind the queen along a diagonal like White did in the preceding move, the two pieces are referred to as a <em>battery</em><em>.</em>\r\n\r\n<strong>22.…g6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>23.Qd2 Rfd8</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack doubles his rooks on the d-file.\r\n\r\n<strong>24.Bg5 Bxg5</strong>\r\n\r\nAlthough the exchange of bishops leaves Black with some dark-square weaknesses around his king, White has no way to exploit them.\r\n\r\n<strong>25.Qxg5 Ne7 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>26.R3d2 Rd5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>27.Qe3 Nf5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>28.Bxf5 Rxf5</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack captures with the rook to preserve his pawn structure. The rook will head back to the d-file soon enough.\r\n\r\n<strong>29.b4 Rfd5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>30.Qc3 R8d6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>31.f4 a5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>32.Rb1 Qb6</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>33.Rbd1 axb4</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack is creating a second weakness in White’s position (the pawn on b4), which he will then attack. White won’t be able to guard both weak pawns.\r\n\r\n<strong>34.axb4 Rd8 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>35.Qa3 Rb5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>36.Rb1 Rxd4</strong>\r\n\r\nFinally, the d-pawn falls, and it’s a simple win — at least for a grandmaster!\r\n\r\n<strong>37.Qa8+ Kg7 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>38.Rbd1 Rbxb4 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>39.Qb8 c5</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>40.Rxd4 Rxd4 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>41.Ra1 Rd8 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>42.Qe5+ Kg8</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>43.Qf6 c4 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>44.f5 Qd4 0–1</strong>\r\n\r\nWant to learn more? Check out our <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/games/chess/chess-openings-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">Chess Openings Cheat Sheet</a>.","description":"<em>The Queen’s Gambit</em> is more than the name of the latest Netflix mega-hit. It’s one of the oldest and best openings in the game of chess and the one Beth, the main character in <em>The Queen's Gambit</em>, uses (spoiler alert!) to defeat Russian grandmaster Vasily Borgov to become the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/games/chess/top-10-chess-players-robert-james-fischer-1943-2008-united-states/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">world’s top chess player</a>.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275144\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"wp-image-275144 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-openings.png\" alt=\"\" width=\"556\" height=\"371\" /> Going for the Queen's Gambit. <br />©Shutterstock/Agustin Bernatene[/caption]\r\n\r\nIn the Queen’s Gambit, whether Black accepts or declines the gambit, White has good chances to secure an advantage in the center.\r\n\r\nThis <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/games/chess/understanding-the-basics-of-chess-openings/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">chess opening</a> appeals to players who like games that require long-term strategic planning. If you enjoy applying subtle pressure until your opponent finally cracks, this opening may be right for you. And as Beth demonstrated, this is one of the best chess openings!\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >A quick look at the Queen’s Gambit</h2>\r\nThe <em>Queen’s Gambit</em> occurs after the moves 1.d4 d5 2.c4 (Check out our article for a <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/games/chess/understanding-chess-notation/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">quick refresher on chess notation</a>). It isn’t entirely correct to characterize White’s second move as a gambit because Black really can’t hang on to the pawn. If Black does capture the pawn on c4, it’s usually with the intention of allowing White to recapture it later.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275143\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"248\"]<img class=\"wp-image-275143 size-medium\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-openings-queens-gambit-248x255.png\" alt=\"Queen's Gambit\" width=\"248\" height=\"255\" /> The Queen’s Gambit begins after the moves 1.d4 d5 2.c4.[/caption]\r\n\r\nWhite tries to gain an advantage in the center by attacking Black’s pawn on d5. If the pawn is removed, the advance e2-e4 is facilitated, giving White a potentially powerful pawn center. Black can decline the gambit in a variety of ways, or simply capture the pawn.\r\n\r\nIf Black captures the pawn, the opening is referred to as the <em>Queen’s Gambit Accepted.</em> If Black doesn’t take the offered pawn and protects the d-pawn with e7-e6, the opening is called the <em>Queen’s Gambit Declined.</em> The Queen’s Gambit Declined can lead to a rich variety of strategically complex variations.\r\n\r\nMany chess openings can be arrived at via different move orders, which is referred to as <em>transposition.</em> The most likely move order for the Queen’s Gambit is 1.d4 d5 2.c4, for example, but 1.c4 d5 2.d4 amounts to the same thing.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >The Queen’s Gambit Accepted</h2>\r\nThe <em>Queen’s Gambit Accepted</em> arises following the moves 1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275146\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"248\"]<img class=\"wp-image-275146 size-medium\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-openings-queens-gambit-accepted-248x255.png\" alt=\"Queen's Gambit Accepted\" width=\"248\" height=\"255\" /> The Queen’s Gambit Accepted begins after the moves 1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4.[/caption]\r\n\r\nIt isn’t normally recommended for Black to try to hold on to this pawn. The basic idea is to develop rapidly and try to saddle White with an isolated d-pawn by playing …c5 and …cxd4. The isolated d-pawn is an intriguing structure in chess. If it can be <em>blockaded</em> (prevented from advancing), it may turn into a weakness and have to be defended by pieces. Pieces don’t like performing guard duty for pawns!\r\n\r\nHowever, if it can advance, it can often break down Black’s defenses and pave the way for a winning attack. Grandmaster games over the years have featured many a delicate dance with an isolated d-pawn.\r\n<h3>When things go White’s way in the Queen's Gambit</h3>\r\nWhite can advance the d-pawn from d4 to d5 and disrupt the coordination of Black’s pieces. It’s surprising to see how rapidly Black’s position can crumble.\r\n\r\nIn a 1995 game in Sweden between Ulf Andersson (as White) and Anatoly Karpov, Black gave White an isolated d-pawn and then tried to prevent its advance. It must’ve been a shock to Karpov when Andersson advanced the pawn anyway.\r\n\r\n<strong>1.Nf3 d5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>2.d4 Nf6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>3.c4 dxc4</strong>\r\n\r\nReaching the Queen’s Gambit Accepted through a transposition of moves. The same position occurs more often by the move order 1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.Nf3 Nf6.\r\n\r\n<strong>4.e3 e6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>5.Bxc4 c5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>6.0–0 a6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>7.Qe2 cxd4 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>8.exd4</strong>\r\n\r\nNow, White has an isolated d-pawn.\r\n\r\n<strong>8.…Be7 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>9.Nc3 b5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>10.Bb3 0–0 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>11.Bg5 Bb7</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>12.Rad1 Nc6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>13.Rfe1 Nb4?</strong>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Black’s move is a serious mistake. Obviously, Black figured he was preventing White from playing 14.d5.</p>\r\n<strong>14.d5!</strong>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">This is the thematic break in isolated d-pawn type of formations. When it can be safely played, things usually go White’s way.</p>\r\n\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275147\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"248\"]<img class=\"wp-image-275147 size-medium\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-openings-pawn-advance-248x255.png\" alt=\"Queen's Gambit thematic Pawn advance\" width=\"248\" height=\"255\" /> The thematic Pawn advance from d4 to d5.[/caption]\r\n\r\n<strong>14....Nfxd5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>15.Nxd5 Bxg5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>16.Nxb4 Qe7 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>17.Nd5 Bxd5</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>18.Bxd5 1–0</strong>\r\n\r\nWhite wins a piece, and Black has no compensation for it. It’s amazing that a player of Karpov’s status can lose so quickly.\r\n<h3>When things go Black’s way in the Queen's Gambit</h3>\r\nBlack can saddle White with an isolated d-pawn and prevent it from advancing from d4 to d5. The pawn becomes weak and gets in the way of White’s pieces. As the endgame approaches, the d-pawn’s weakness grows more and more pronounced.\r\n\r\nIn a game from 1997 played in San Francisco between Guillermo Rey (White) and Alexander Baburin, Black was able to isolate White’s d-pawn and prevent it from advancing. Baburin then attacked it repeatedly, causing White’s pieces to become passive in defense. Eventually, White couldn’t meet Black’s threats, and the d-pawn fell.\r\n\r\n<strong>1.d4 d5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>2.c4 dxc4 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>3.Qa4+ Nc6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>4.Nf3 Bg4</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>5.Nc3 Bxf3 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>6.exf3 e6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>7.Be3 Nf6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>8.Bxc4 a6</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>9.Qd1 Nb4 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>10.0–0 Be7 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>11.Rc1 0–0 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>12.Qe2 c6</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>13.Rfd1 Nbd5</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack occupies the d5 square with his knight, and White has no way to dislodge it. If White captures on d5, it’s important for Black to recapture with a piece rather than a pawn to maintain the blockade.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_275148\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"248\"]<img class=\"wp-image-275148 size-medium\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-openings-isolated-pawn-248x255.png\" alt=\"isolated d-pwn Queen's Gambit\" width=\"248\" height=\"255\" /> Black successfully blockades the isolated d-pawn.[/caption]\r\n\r\n<strong>14.a3 Nxc3 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>15.Rxc3 Nd5</strong>\r\n\r\nThe Black knight takes up the blockade by moving in front of the isolated pawn.\r\n\r\n<strong>16.Rcd3 Bf6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>17.g3 Qd7 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>18.Ba2 Rad8 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>19.Qc2 Qc7</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>20.Kg2 Rd7</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack intends to eventually move the rook on f8 to d8. When two rooks are placed on the same file, it’s called <em>doubling</em> them.\r\n\r\n<strong>21.h4 h5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>22.Bb1</strong>\r\n\r\nWhen the bishop is placed behind the queen along a diagonal like White did in the preceding move, the two pieces are referred to as a <em>battery</em><em>.</em>\r\n\r\n<strong>22.…g6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>23.Qd2 Rfd8</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack doubles his rooks on the d-file.\r\n\r\n<strong>24.Bg5 Bxg5</strong>\r\n\r\nAlthough the exchange of bishops leaves Black with some dark-square weaknesses around his king, White has no way to exploit them.\r\n\r\n<strong>25.Qxg5 Ne7 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>26.R3d2 Rd5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>27.Qe3 Nf5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>28.Bxf5 Rxf5</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack captures with the rook to preserve his pawn structure. The rook will head back to the d-file soon enough.\r\n\r\n<strong>29.b4 Rfd5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>30.Qc3 R8d6 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>31.f4 a5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>32.Rb1 Qb6</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>33.Rbd1 axb4</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack is creating a second weakness in White’s position (the pawn on b4), which he will then attack. White won’t be able to guard both weak pawns.\r\n\r\n<strong>34.axb4 Rd8 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>35.Qa3 Rb5 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>36.Rb1 Rxd4</strong>\r\n\r\nFinally, the d-pawn falls, and it’s a simple win — at least for a grandmaster!\r\n\r\n<strong>37.Qa8+ Kg7 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>38.Rbd1 Rbxb4 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>39.Qb8 c5</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>40.Rxd4 Rxd4 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>41.Ra1 Rd8 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>42.Qe5+ Kg8</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>43.Qf6 c4 </strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>44.f5 Qd4 0–1</strong>\r\n\r\nWant to learn more? Check out our <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/games/chess/chess-openings-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">Chess Openings Cheat Sheet</a>.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10138,"name":"James Eade","slug":"james-eade","description":" <p><b>James Eade</b> is a United States Chess Federation &#40;USCF&#41; chess master as well as a chess writer, tournament organizer, and teacher. 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Learn all about chess boards, pieces, and the moves you can make.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Unless you have amazing powers of visualization (à la Beth Harmon from The Queen's Gambit), chess requires a chess set and a board for you to play on. The chessboard is divided up into sections called ranks and files, and the set is composed of different chessmen with different movements and powers. After you understand all of these topics, you can start playing the great game of chess, with checkmate as your goal.","description":"Unless you have amazing powers of visualization (à la Beth Harmon from The Queen's Gambit), chess requires a chess set and a board for you to play on. The chessboard is divided up into sections called ranks and files, and the set is composed of different chessmen with different movements and powers. After you understand all of these topics, you can start playing the great game of chess, with checkmate as your goal.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10138,"name":"James Eade","slug":"james-eade","description":" <p><b>James Eade</b> is a United States Chess Federation &#40;USCF&#41; chess master as well as a chess writer, tournament organizer, and teacher. 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International organizations awarded him the master title in 1990 (for correspondence) and in 1993 (for regular tournament play). Today, he writes about and teaches chess. </p>","authors":[{"authorId":10138,"name":"James Eade","slug":"james-eade","description":" <p><b>James Eade</b> is a United States Chess Federation &#40;USCF&#41; chess master as well as a chess writer, tournament organizer, and teacher. 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Take your time setting up the board until you’re confident that you know where everything goes:</p>\n<ol class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Set the rooks (the pieces that typically look like tiny castle towers) on the corner squares.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Place the knights (typically horse-like pieces) next to the rooks.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Put the bishops (pieces that are typically topped with a teardrop shape) on the board next to the knights.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">After the bishops come the queens, usually recognizable by a small crown near the top of the piece. The queens always start on the square of the same shade — the white queen starts on a light square, and the black queen starts on a dark square.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Place the kings next to the queens, which is only fitting. These pieces typically have a tiny cross at their top.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Add the pawns (the smallest and shortest pieces) straight across the rank in front of the other pieces.</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/281898.image0.jpg\" alt=\"image0.jpg\" width=\"400\" height=\"400\" /></li>\n</ol>\n"},{"title":"Naming ranks and files in chess","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>The chessboard is divided into ranks (numbers) and files (letters). This is used as an identifier for when the players move their chess pieces. There are eight of each, and each is comprised of eight squares of equal size:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Ranks</i> are rows that go from side to side across the chessboard and are referred to by numbers. Each chessboard has eight ranks, which are numbered from the <i>bottom</i> of the board (where the white pieces start) on up.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><i>Files</i> are columns that go up and down the chessboard, and, since boards are square, each board also has eight of them. Because numbers indicate ranks, letters indicate files, which are labeled from left to right.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">The naming conventions for ranks and files allows you to give an identifier to every square by using what chess people call the <i>file-first method.</i> For example, the lower right-hand square is called h1. This name is shorthand for h-file, first rank.</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/281905.image0.jpg\" alt=\"image0.jpg\" width=\"390\" height=\"400\" /></li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Knowing the moves that chess pieces can make","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Before you can play a game of chess, you need to know how to move the pieces (legally). A chess piece’s power is tied to its mobility. The more mobile a piece is, the more powerful it is:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Pawns:</b> Pawns can only move forward. On their first move, they can move one or two squares. Afterwards, they can move only one square at a time. They can capture an enemy piece by moving one square forward diagonally.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Bishops:</b> Bishops can move any number of squares diagonally.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Knights:</b> Knights can move only in an L-shape, one square up and two over, or two squares over and one down, or any such combination of one-two or two-one movements in any direction.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Rooks:</b> Rooks can move any number of squares, up and down and side to side.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Queens:</b> Queens can move any number of squares along ranks, files and diagonals.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Kings:</b> Kings can move one square at a time in any direction.</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/281902.image0.jpg\" alt=\"image0.jpg\" width=\"535\" height=\"386\" /></li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Understanding check, checkmate, and stalemate in chess","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>In chess, <i>c</i><i>heck</i> is an attack on an enemy king; this attack can’t be ignored. If the check can’t be neutralized, it is <i>c</i><i>heckmate</i> and the game is over. <i>Stalemate</i> occurs when one player has no legal moves, but his king isn’t in check. Here are a few additional details on check, checkmate, and stalemate in chess:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Check:</b> An attack on a king by either an opposing piece or an opposing pawn is called <i>check.</i> When in check, a player must do one of the following:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-two\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Move the king so that it’s no longer under attack.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Block the attack by placing a piece between the king and the attacker.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Capture the attacking piece.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Checkmate:</b> When a king is in check and can’t perform any of the preceding moves, it has been <i>checkmated.</i> If your king is checkmated, you lose the game. The term <i>checkmate</i> is commonly shortened to simply <i>mate.</i></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Stalemate:</b> <i>Stalemate</i> is the relatively rare situation when a player whose king isn’t in check has no legal move to make. Stalemate is considered a draw. Neither player wins, but the game is over.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2022-07-27T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":208533},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-27T16:52:44+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-02-01T20:54:29+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:19:04+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33884"},"slug":"games","categoryId":33884},{"name":"Board Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33886"},"slug":"board-games","categoryId":33886},{"name":"Backgammon","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33887"},"slug":"backgammon","categoryId":33887}],"title":"Backgammon For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"backgammon for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"backgammon-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","搜寻归类游戏游戏刹车系统SEO":{"metaDescription":"This backgammon Cheat Sheet includes the board setup, odds for rolling numbers with two dice, and the match equity table.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Backgammon is an exciting, tactical game. This Cheat Sheet gives you some of the essential info you’ll need on your way to becoming a master backgammon player.","description":"Backgammon is an exciting, tactical game. This Cheat Sheet gives you some of the essential info you’ll need on your way to becoming a master backgammon player.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":10067,"name":"Chris Bray","slug":"chris-bray","description":" <b>Chris Bray</b> has been playing backgammon for over 30 years, and started writing a weekly backgammon column for <i>The Independent</i> newspaper in 1994. A regular fixture on the London backgammon scene, he also takes part in tournaments around the world, and regularly gives seminars on backgammon and sports psychology.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10067"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33887,"title":"Backgammon","slug":"backgammon","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33887"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":182419,"title":"Remembering the Dice Number-Rolling Odds in Backgammon","slug":"remembering-the-dice-number-rolling-odds-in-backgammon","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","backgammon"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/182419"}},{"articleId":182381,"title":"Knowing the Outcomes of Rolling Two Dice in Backgammon","slug":"knowing-the-outcomes-of-rolling-two-dice-in-backgammon","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","backgammon"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/182381"}},{"articleId":182372,"title":"Keeping the Backgammon Match Equity Table Handy","slug":"keeping-the-backgammon-match-equity-table-handy","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","backgammon"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/182372"}},{"articleId":182354,"title":"Backgammon Starting Positions","slug":"backgammon-starting-positions","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","backgammon"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/182354"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":182419,"title":"Remembering the Dice Number-Rolling Odds in Backgammon","slug":"remembering-the-dice-number-rolling-odds-in-backgammon","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","backgammon"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/182419"}},{"articleId":182381,"title":"Knowing the Outcomes of Rolling Two Dice in Backgammon","slug":"knowing-the-outcomes-of-rolling-two-dice-in-backgammon","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","backgammon"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/182381"}},{"articleId":182372,"title":"Keeping the Backgammon Match Equity Table Handy","slug":"keeping-the-backgammon-match-equity-table-handy","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","backgammon"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/182372"}},{"articleId":182354,"title":"Backgammon Starting Positions","slug":"backgammon-starting-positions","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","backgammon"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/182354"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":281548,"slug":"backgammon-for-dummies","isbn":"9780470770856","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","backgammon"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/0470770856/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/0470770856/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/0470770856-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0470770856/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/0470770856/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/backgammon-for-dummies-cover-9780470770856-164x255.jpg","width":164,"height":255},"title":"Backgammon For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":"<b data-author-id=\"10067\">Chris Bray</b> has been playing backgammon for over 30 years, and started writing a weekly backgammon column for <i>The Independent</i> newspaper in 1994. A regular fixture on the London backgammon scene, he also takes part in tournaments around the world, and regularly gives seminars on backgammon and sports psychology.","authors":[{"authorId":10067,"name":"Chris Bray","slug":"chris-bray","description":" <b>Chris Bray</b> has been playing backgammon for over 30 years, and started writing a weekly backgammon column for <i>The Independent</i> newspaper in 1994. A regular fixture on the London backgammon scene, he also takes part in tournaments around the world, and regularly gives seminars on backgammon and sports psychology.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10067"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;games&quot;,&quot;board-games&quot;,&quot;backgammon&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9780470770856&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b18bfcc6\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;games&quot;,&quot;board-games&quot;,&quot;backgammon&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9780470770856&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b18c0591\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":182354,"title":"Backgammon Starting Positions","slug":"backgammon-starting-positions","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","backgammon"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/182354"}},{"articleId":182419,"title":"Remembering the Dice Number-Rolling Odds in Backgammon","slug":"remembering-the-dice-number-rolling-odds-in-backgammon","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","backgammon"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/182419"}},{"articleId":182381,"title":"Knowing the Outcomes of Rolling Two Dice in Backgammon","slug":"knowing-the-outcomes-of-rolling-two-dice-in-backgammon","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","backgammon"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/182381"}},{"articleId":182372,"title":"Keeping the Backgammon Match Equity Table Handy","slug":"keeping-the-backgammon-match-equity-table-handy","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","games","board-games","backgammon"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/182372"}}],"content":[{"title":"Backgammon starting positions","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Knowing the starting positions in backgammon is very important. Before you start playing the game in earnest, be sure to lay out your board like this.</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/300087.image0.jpg\" alt=\"image0.jpg\" width=\"410\" height=\"400\" /></p>\n"},{"title":"Dice number-rolling odds in backgammon","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Knowing how many ways you can roll any specific number naturally (the roll contains the desired number) or in combination is very useful in backgammon. The following table shows the chances that a roll contains or combines to the numbers from 1 to 12.</p>\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<th>Number</th>\n<th>Chance of Rolling It</th>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>1</td>\n<td>11</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>2</td>\n<td>12</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>3</td>\n<td>14</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>4</td>\n<td>15</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>5</td>\n<td>15</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>6</td>\n<td>17</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>7</td>\n<td>6</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>8</td>\n<td>6</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>9</td>\n<td>5</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>10</td>\n<td>3</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>11</td>\n<td>2</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>12</td>\n<td>3</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>15</td>\n<td>1</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>16</td>\n<td>1</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>18</td>\n<td>1</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>20</td>\n<td>1</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>24</td>\n<td>1</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n"},{"title":"The outcomes of rolling two dice","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Rolling two dice together can produce a variety of outcomes for you when playing backgammon. The following table shows the odds available when you roll two dice.</p>\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<th>Dice</th>\n<th><i>1</i></th>\n<th><i>2</i></th>\n<th><i>3</i></th>\n<th><i>4</i></th>\n<th><i>5</i></th>\n<th><i>6</i></th>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>1</b></td>\n<td>1<i>1</i></td>\n<td>1<i>2</i></td>\n<td>1<i>3</i></td>\n<td>1<i>4</i></td>\n<td>1<i>5</i></td>\n<td>1<i>6</i></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>2</b></td>\n<td>2<i>1</i></td>\n<td>2<i>2</i></td>\n<td>2<i>3</i></td>\n<td>2<i>4</i></td>\n<td>2<i>5</i></td>\n<td>2<i>6</i></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>3</b></td>\n<td>3<i>1</i></td>\n<td>3<i>2</i></td>\n<td>3<i>3</i></td>\n<td>3<i>4</i></td>\n<td>3<i>5</i></td>\n<td>3<i>6</i></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>4</b></td>\n<td>4<i>1</i></td>\n<td>4<i>2</i></td>\n<td>4<i>3</i></td>\n<td>4<i>4</i></td>\n<td>4<i>5</i></td>\n<td>4<i>6</i></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>5</b></td>\n<td>5<i>1</i></td>\n<td>5<i>2</i></td>\n<td>5<i>3</i></td>\n<td>5<i>4</i></td>\n<td>5<i>5</i></td>\n<td>5<i>6</i></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>6</b></td>\n<td>6<i>1</i></td>\n<td>6<i>2</i></td>\n<td>6<i>3</i></td>\n<td>6<i>4</i></td>\n<td>6<i>5</i></td>\n<td>6<i>6</i></td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n"},{"title":"Keep the backgammon match equity table handy","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>A match equity table gives you the percentage chance of winning a backgammon match at any particular score. Here’s the table so you can have it to hand while you play.</p>\n<p><img loading=\"lazy\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/300085.image0.jpg\" alt=\"A Backgammon match equity table.\" width=\"535\" height=\"270\" /></p>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-02-01T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":208435},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-12-12T23:18:27+00:00","modifiedTime":"2022-12-10T15:18:37+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:18:52+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33884"},"slug":"games","categoryId":33884},{"name":"Board Games","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33886"},"slug":"board-games","categoryId":33886},{"name":"Chess","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33889"},"slug":"chess","categoryId":33889}],"title":"Top 10 Chess Players: Alexander Alekhine (1892–1946), Russia","strippedTitle":"top 10 chess players: alexander alekhine (1892–1946), russia","slug":"top-10-chess-players-alexander-alekhine-1892-1946-russia","canonicalUrl":"","搜寻归类游戏游戏刹车系统SEO":{"metaDescription":"Learn about the interesting chess career of Russian champion Alexander Alehkine, including how he came back after some rough years.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Alexander Alekhine was single-minded in his pursuit of the world championship, and his drive eventually, in 1927, overcame José Raúl Capablanca's skill. Alekhine's results were never as dominating as those of the players higher on this list, but he still managed an impressive run.\r\n\r\nFrom 1921 through 1927, he competed in 15 major tournaments and won eight of them. From 1930 to 1934, he won five strong tournaments but let his weakness for drink get the best of him. He lost the title to Max Euwe in 1935, primarily because of his poor physical condition.\r\n\r\nAlekhine cleaned up his act and won the return match in 1937 to regain the title, which he kept until his death. However, his last years were sad ones. His play was unrecognizable, and his physical condition continued to deteriorate. Nevertheless, Alekhine belongs among the champions by virtue of his many tournament and match victories.\r\n\r\nIn one of the great tournaments of his youth (he wasn't yet 20), in Carlsbad, Germany, in 1911, Alekhine flashed the kind of inspired combinational play with which he would continue to shock and disorient his opponents. After 14 moves against the Polish-American master Oscar Chajes, Alekhine is white in the position shown here. (Check out <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/games/chess/understanding-chess-notation/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Understanding Chess Notation</a> if you need help with reading the moves.)\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_230238\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"392\"]<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Alekhine-attack.jpg\"><img class=\"wp-image-230238 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Alekhine-attack.jpg\" alt=\"chess-Alekhine-attack\" width=\"392\" height=\"400\" /></a> The bishop on c4 is under attack from the black pawn.[/caption]\r\n\r\nAlekhine's white bishop on c4 is under attack by Chajes's black pawn on b5, a position that would cause most players to look for a retreat square. But most players aren't Alekine! He knows that black's uncastled king can be vulnerable, especially because much of his army is undeveloped.\r\n\r\n15. <strong>Bxb5Rxb5</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack must capture, or the game is simply lost. So Chajes grabs the bishop and holds on for the ride.\r\n\r\n17. <strong>Rb1</strong>\r\n\r\nWhite pins black's knight to his queen.\r\n\r\nNow black threatens 18… . Qxf1+!, after which he would come out on top.\r\n\r\n18. <strong>Qd6f6</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack could have tried 18… . Ne7, with the idea of castling to get the king out of the center. But after 19. Rfd1 Nc8 20.Qxb4 Qxb4 21. Rxb4, Alekhine would have been an Exchange up with a remote passed pawn, winning easily. After Chajes's 18… . f6, 19. Qxb4 would not have been a threat because black would simply have played 19… . Qxb4, and after 20. Rxb4 Bxf1, Chajes would have had the better game. That's not what the fierce Alekhine has in mind!\r\n\r\n19. <strong>Rfc1Qd3</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack is trying to trade queens, which would ease his defensive burden, but Alekhine is not about to oblige him (see the following figure).\r\n\r\n20. <strong>Rxb4</strong>\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_230239\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"392\"]<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Alekhine-capture.jpg\"><img class=\"wp-image-230239 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Alekhine-capture.jpg\" alt=\"chess-Alekhine-capture\" width=\"392\" height=\"400\" /></a> Should white capture the queen on d3?[/caption]\r\n\r\nWhite has a better move than capturing black's queen. If white had played 20. Qxd3 and black had responded with … Nxd3, black would have had a tough but defensible game.\r\n\r\n20. <strong>… g5</strong>\r\n\r\n21. <strong>Rd4Qb5</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack's queen is defending the pawn on d7, but Alekhine has something up his sleeve.\r\n\r\n22. <strong>a4!</strong>\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_230240\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"392\"]<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Alekhine-interfere.jpg\"><img class=\"wp-image-230240 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Alekhine-interfere.jpg\" alt=\"chess-Alekhine-interfere\" width=\"392\" height=\"400\" /></a> How can white interfere with black's defense of the pawn on d7?[/caption]\r\n\r\nWatch how Alekhine chases the black queen away from its protection of d7.\r\n\r\n22. <strong>… Qb7</strong>\r\n\r\n23. <strong>Rc7Qb1+</strong>\r\n\r\n24. <strong>Rd1</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack calls it quits. If he had saved his queen, he would have been mated quickly after 25. Qxd7+. 1–0.","description":"Alexander Alekhine was single-minded in his pursuit of the world championship, and his drive eventually, in 1927, overcame José Raúl Capablanca's skill. Alekhine's results were never as dominating as those of the players higher on this list, but he still managed an impressive run.\r\n\r\nFrom 1921 through 1927, he competed in 15 major tournaments and won eight of them. From 1930 to 1934, he won five strong tournaments but let his weakness for drink get the best of him. He lost the title to Max Euwe in 1935, primarily because of his poor physical condition.\r\n\r\nAlekhine cleaned up his act and won the return match in 1937 to regain the title, which he kept until his death. However, his last years were sad ones. His play was unrecognizable, and his physical condition continued to deteriorate. Nevertheless, Alekhine belongs among the champions by virtue of his many tournament and match victories.\r\n\r\nIn one of the great tournaments of his youth (he wasn't yet 20), in Carlsbad, Germany, in 1911, Alekhine flashed the kind of inspired combinational play with which he would continue to shock and disorient his opponents. After 14 moves against the Polish-American master Oscar Chajes, Alekhine is white in the position shown here. (Check out <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/games/chess/understanding-chess-notation/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Understanding Chess Notation</a> if you need help with reading the moves.)\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_230238\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"392\"]<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Alekhine-attack.jpg\"><img class=\"wp-image-230238 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Alekhine-attack.jpg\" alt=\"chess-Alekhine-attack\" width=\"392\" height=\"400\" /></a> The bishop on c4 is under attack from the black pawn.[/caption]\r\n\r\nAlekhine's white bishop on c4 is under attack by Chajes's black pawn on b5, a position that would cause most players to look for a retreat square. But most players aren't Alekine! He knows that black's uncastled king can be vulnerable, especially because much of his army is undeveloped.\r\n\r\n15. <strong>Bxb5Rxb5</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack must capture, or the game is simply lost. So Chajes grabs the bishop and holds on for the ride.\r\n\r\n17. <strong>Rb1</strong>\r\n\r\nWhite pins black's knight to his queen.\r\n\r\nNow black threatens 18… . Qxf1+!, after which he would come out on top.\r\n\r\n18. <strong>Qd6f6</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack could have tried 18… . Ne7, with the idea of castling to get the king out of the center. But after 19. Rfd1 Nc8 20.Qxb4 Qxb4 21. Rxb4, Alekhine would have been an Exchange up with a remote passed pawn, winning easily. After Chajes's 18… . f6, 19. Qxb4 would not have been a threat because black would simply have played 19… . Qxb4, and after 20. Rxb4 Bxf1, Chajes would have had the better game. That's not what the fierce Alekhine has in mind!\r\n\r\n19. <strong>Rfc1Qd3</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack is trying to trade queens, which would ease his defensive burden, but Alekhine is not about to oblige him (see the following figure).\r\n\r\n20. <strong>Rxb4</strong>\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_230239\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"392\"]<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Alekhine-capture.jpg\"><img class=\"wp-image-230239 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Alekhine-capture.jpg\" alt=\"chess-Alekhine-capture\" width=\"392\" height=\"400\" /></a> Should white capture the queen on d3?[/caption]\r\n\r\nWhite has a better move than capturing black's queen. If white had played 20. Qxd3 and black had responded with … Nxd3, black would have had a tough but defensible game.\r\n\r\n20. <strong>… g5</strong>\r\n\r\n21. <strong>Rd4Qb5</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack's queen is defending the pawn on d7, but Alekhine has something up his sleeve.\r\n\r\n22. <strong>a4!</strong>\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_230240\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"392\"]<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Alekhine-interfere.jpg\"><img class=\"wp-image-230240 size-full\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/chess-Alekhine-interfere.jpg\" alt=\"chess-Alekhine-interfere\" width=\"392\" height=\"400\" /></a> How can white interfere with black's defense of the pawn on d7?[/caption]\r\n\r\nWatch how Alekhine chases the black queen away from its protection of d7.\r\n\r\n22. <strong>… Qb7</strong>\r\n\r\n23. <strong>Rc7Qb1+</strong>\r\n\r\n24. <strong>Rd1</strong>\r\n\r\nBlack calls it quits. If he had saved his queen, he would have been mated quickly after 25. 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