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{"appState":{"pageLoadApiCallsStatus":true},"authorState":{"author":{"headers":{"timestamp":"2025-03-18T08:49:15+00:00"},"authorId":9663,"data":{"name":"Teresa L. Picarazzi","slug":"teresa-l-picarazzi","description":" Teresa Picarazzi, PhD, has taught Italian language, literature, and cinema for more than 30 years. She now teaches Italian at The Hopkins School in New Haven. She has lived, studied, and worked in Florence, Siena, Urbino, Cortona, and Ravenna, Italy. She has written books and several articles on Italian politics and culture. 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Visit http//:garden.org.</p> <p><b>Charlie Nardozzi</b> is a nationally recognized garden writer, radio and TV show host, consultant, and speaker. Charlie delights in making gardening information simple, easy, fun, and accessible to everyone.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/34784"}},{"authorId":9663,"name":"Teresa L. Picarazzi","slug":"teresa-l-picarazzi","description":" <p><b>Teresa Picarazzi, PhD,</b> has taught Italian language, literature, and cinema for more than 30 years. She now teaches Italian at The Hopkins School in New Haven. She has lived, studied, and worked in Florence, Siena, Urbino, Cortona, and Ravenna, Italy. She has written books and several articles on Italian politics and culture. 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They’re the best predictor of a noun’s gender. The following table outlines the two types of articles and the partitive, and their variations.</p>\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"143\"><strong>Gender/Number</strong></td>\n<td width=\"127\"><strong>Definite (the)</strong></td>\n<td width=\"135\"><strong>Indefinite (a, an)</strong></td>\n<td width=\"219\"><strong>Partitive (a little, some, any; [preposition di + definite article])</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"143\">m sing.</td>\n<td width=\"127\"><strong>il</strong>/<strong>lo</strong>/<strong>l’</strong></td>\n<td width=\"135\"><strong>uno</strong>/<strong>un</strong></td>\n<td width=\"219\"><strong>del</strong>/<strong>dello</strong>/<strong>dell’</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"143\">f sing.</td>\n<td width=\"127\"><strong>la</strong>/<strong>l’</strong></td>\n<td width=\"135\"><strong>una/un’</strong></td>\n<td width=\"219\"><strong>della</strong>/<strong>dell’</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"143\">m pl.</td>\n<td width=\"127\"><strong>i</strong>/<strong>gli</strong></td>\n<td width=\"135\"><strong>—</strong></td>\n<td width=\"219\"><strong>dei</strong>/<strong>degli</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"143\">f pl.</td>\n<td width=\"127\"><strong>le</strong></td>\n<td width=\"135\"><strong>—</strong></td>\n<td width=\"219\"><strong>delle</strong></td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n"},{"title":"Personal pronouns","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Personal pronouns in Italian serve the same purpose as in English. Italian has some pronouns that English doesn’t have, though: stressed and reflexive pronouns.</p>\n<table width=\"678\">\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"120\"><strong>Person</strong></td>\n<td width=\"108\"><strong>Subject</strong></td>\n<td width=\"102\"><strong>Direct Object</strong></td>\n<td width=\"114\"><strong>Indirect Object</strong></td>\n<td width=\"114\"><strong>Stressed</strong></td>\n<td width=\"120\"><strong>Reflexive</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"120\">1st sing.</td>\n<td width=\"108\"><strong>io</strong></td>\n<td width=\"102\"><strong>mi</strong></td>\n<td width=\"114\"><strong>mi</strong></td>\n<td width=\"114\"><strong>Me</strong></td>\n<td width=\"120\"><strong>mi</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"120\">2nd sing.</td>\n<td width=\"108\"><strong>tu</strong></td>\n<td width=\"102\"><strong>ti</strong></td>\n<td width=\"114\"><strong>ti</strong></td>\n<td width=\"114\"><strong>Te</strong></td>\n<td width=\"120\"><strong>ti</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"120\">3rd sing.</td>\n<td width=\"108\"><strong>lui</strong>/<strong>lei</strong>/<strong>Lei</strong></td>\n<td width=\"102\"><strong>lo</strong>/<strong>la</strong>/<strong>la</strong></td>\n<td width=\"114\"><strong>gli</strong>/<strong>le</strong>/<strong>Le</strong></td>\n<td width=\"114\"><strong>lui</strong>/<strong>lei</strong>/<strong>Lei</strong></td>\n<td width=\"120\"><strong>si</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"120\">1st pl.</td>\n<td width=\"108\"><strong>noi</strong></td>\n<td width=\"102\"><strong>ci</strong></td>\n<td width=\"114\"><strong>ci</strong></td>\n<td width=\"114\"><strong>Noi</strong></td>\n<td width=\"120\"><strong>ci</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"120\">2nd pl.</td>\n<td width=\"108\"><strong>voi</strong></td>\n<td width=\"102\"><strong>vi</strong></td>\n<td width=\"114\"><strong>vi</strong></td>\n<td width=\"114\"><strong>Voi</strong></td>\n<td width=\"120\"><strong>vi</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"120\">3rd pl.</td>\n<td width=\"108\"><strong>loro</strong></td>\n<td width=\"102\"><strong>le</strong>/<strong>li</strong></td>\n<td width=\"114\"><strong>gli</strong></td>\n<td width=\"114\"><strong>loro</strong></td>\n<td width=\"120\"><strong>si</strong></td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n"},{"title":"Simple prepositions","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Italian has eight basic prepositions (amongst many), which correspond to the basic prepositions used in English. Remember, though, that although the translations shown here reflect the meanings in each language, the usage sometimes differs between the two languages, depending on context.</p>\n<p>The basic prepositions are as follows; I’ve put a star by the ones that are typically — but not always! — contracted with a definite article:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>di</strong>* (<em>of</em>, <em>about</em>, <em>some</em>, possession)</li>\n<li><strong>a</strong>* (<em>at</em>, <em>to</em>)</li>\n<li><strong>da</strong>* (<em>from</em>, <em>by</em>, <em>at</em>)</li>\n<li><strong>in</strong>* (<em>in</em>, <em>into</em>, <em>to</em>)</li>\n<li><strong>con</strong> (<em>with</em>)</li>\n<li><strong>su</strong>* (<em>on</em>, <em>onto</em>)</li>\n<li><strong>per</strong> (<em>for</em>, <em>through</em>)</li>\n<li><strong>fra</strong>/<strong>tra</strong> (<em>between</em>, <em>among</em>)</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Tenses in Italian","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>This section provides you with samples of the tenses included in the book.</p>\n<p><strong>Modo indicativo (indicative mood)</strong></p>\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"> <strong>Modo Indicativo (Indicative Mood) Tenses</strong></td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Example Using guardare (to look/to watch)</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>presente</strong> (<em>simple present</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Io guardo.</strong> (<em>I look/I’m looking/I’m watching/I do watch.</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>presente progressivo</strong> (<em>present progressive</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Io sto guardando.</strong> (I<em>‘m looking./</em>I’m watching</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>imperfetto</strong> (<em>imperfect</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Io guardavo.</strong> (<em>I looked/I was watching.</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>imperfetto progressivo </strong>(<em>past</em>/<em>imperfect progressive</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Io stavo guardando. </strong>(<em>I was looking.</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>passato prossimo</strong> (<em>present perfect</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Io ho guardato.</strong> (<em>I have looked/I did look.</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>trapassato prossimo</strong> (<em>past perfect</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Io avevo guardato</strong> (<em>I had looked.</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>futuro</strong> (<em>future</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Io guarderò.</strong> (<em>I will look.</em>); infinitive stem</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Future anteriore</strong> (<em>future perfect</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>avrò</strong><strong> guardato</strong> (<em>I will have looked/watched.</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p><strong>Modo condizionale (conditional mood): Infinitive Stem + –ei, –esti, –ebbe, –emmo, –este, –ebbero</strong></p>\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Tense</strong></td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Example Using guardare (to look/watch)</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>presente</strong> (<em>present</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Io guarderei. </strong>(<em>I would look/watch.</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>passato</strong> (<em>past</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Io avrei guardato.</strong> (<em>I would have looked.</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p><strong>Modo imperativo (imperative mood)</strong></p>\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Subject Pronouns</strong></td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Example Using guardare (to look/to watch)</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Tu</strong></td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Guarda! </strong>(<em>[You] look!</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Lei</strong> (<em>you</em>, formal)</td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Guardi! </strong>(<em>[You] look!</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Noi</strong></td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Guardiamo! </strong>(<em>[We] Let’s look!</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Voi</strong></td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Guardate!</strong> (<em>[You all] look!</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Loro</strong> (plural; <em>you</em>, formal)</td>\n<td width=\"312\"><strong>Guardino! </strong><em>[You] look!</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p><strong>Modo participio (participle)</strong></p>\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>Infinitive Ending</strong></td>\n<td width=\"160\"><strong>Participle Ending</strong></td>\n<td width=\"140\"><strong>Example Infinitive</strong></td>\n<td width=\"168\"><strong>Example Participle</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>­–are</strong></td>\n<td width=\"160\"><strong>–ato</strong></td>\n<td width=\"140\"><strong>guardare</strong> (<em>to watch</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"168\"><strong>guardato</strong> (<em>watched</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>–ere</strong></td>\n<td width=\"160\"><strong>–uto</strong></td>\n<td width=\"140\"><strong>ripetere</strong> (<em>to repeat</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"168\"><strong>ripetuto</strong> (<em>repeated</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>–ire</strong></td>\n<td width=\"160\"><strong>–ito</strong></td>\n<td width=\"140\"><strong>finire</strong> (<em>to finish</em>/<em>to end</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"168\"><strong>finito</strong> (<em>finished</em>/<em>ended</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"156\">Irregular</td>\n<td width=\"160\">Irregular</td>\n<td width=\"140\"><strong>dire</strong> (<em>to say</em>/<em>to tell</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"168\"><strong>detto</strong> (<em>said</em>/<em>told</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p><strong>Modo gerundio (gerund)</strong></p>\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>Infinitive Ending</strong></td>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>Gerund Ending</strong></td>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>Example Infinitive</strong></td>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>Example Gerund</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>–are</strong></td>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>–ando</strong></td>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>guardare</strong> (<em>to look</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>guardando</strong> (<em>looking</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>–ere</strong></td>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>–endo</strong></td>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>ripetere</strong> (<em>to repeat</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>ripetendo</strong> (<em>repeating</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>–ire</strong></td>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>–endo</strong></td>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>dormire</strong> (<em>to sleep</em>)</td>\n<td width=\"156\"><strong>dormendo</strong> (<em>sleeping</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-12-08T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":296223},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T22:01:46+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-05-18T17:24:32+00:00","timestamp":"2024-05-18T18:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Learning Languages","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33689"},"slug":"learning-languages","categoryId":33689},{"name":"Italian","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33698"},"slug":"italian","categoryId":33698}],"title":"How to Count in Italian","strippedTitle":"how to count in italian","slug":"how-to-count-in-italian","canonicalUrl":"","关注引挚SEO调优方案网络":{"metaDescription":"Learning numbers and counting in Italian isn't complicated. In fact, the Italians follow many of the same patterns that we do in English. There are a few differ","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"<p>Learning numbers and counting in Italian isn't complicated. In fact, the Italians follow many of the same patterns that we do in English. There are a few differences, but it's when it comes to numbers and counting in Italian, it's really just a question of memorizing.</p>\r\n<p>In Italian, as in English, there is a unique number from 0 – 16. After that they add the next number to the tens, making one word. So, 17, is the word for 10 followed by the word for 7 and so on.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Numbers 1 to 19 in Italian</h2>\r\n<table>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>uno</td>\r\n<td>1</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>due</td>\r\n<td>2</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>tre</td>\r\n<td>3</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>quattro</td>\r\n<td>4</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>cinque</td>\r\n<td>5</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>sei</td>\r\n<td>6</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>sette</td>\r\n<td>7</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>otto</td>\r\n<td>8</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>nove</td>\r\n<td>9</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>dieci</td>\r\n<td>10</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>undici</td>\r\n<td>11</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>dodici</td>\r\n<td>12</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>tredici</td>\r\n<td>13</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>quattordici</td>\r\n<td>14</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>quindici</td>\r\n<td>15</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>sedici</td>\r\n<td>16</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>diciassette</td>\r\n<td>17</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>diciotto</td>\r\n<td>18</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>diciannove</td>\r\n<td>19</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n</table>\r\n<p>For the numbers in the twenties, thirties, forties, and so on, just add the number to the tens, with the exception of when you add a 1 or an 8. For these two numbers, drop the final \"–i.\" For example, <b>venti</b> (20), <b>ventuno</b> (21), <b>ventidue</b> (22), <b>venticinque</b> (25), <b>ventotto</b> (28<i>).</i><i> </i>See? It's not <i>ventiuno</i> or <i>ventiotto</i>.</p>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Numbers 20 to 99 in Italian</h2>\r\n<table>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>venti</td>\r\n<td>20</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>ventuno</td>\r\n<td>21</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>ventidue</td>\r\n<td>22</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>trenta</td>\r\n<td>30</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>trentuno</td>\r\n<td>31</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>quaranta</td>\r\n<td>40</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>quarantuno</td>\r\n<td>41</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>cinquanta</td>\r\n<td>50</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>sessanta</td>\r\n<td>60</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>settanta</td>\r\n<td>70</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>ottanta</td>\r\n<td>80</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>novanta</td>\r\n<td>90</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n</table>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">When you add the <b><i>tre</i></b><i>,</i> the <b><i>-e</i></b> takes an accent: <b>ventitr</b><b><i>è</i></b><i>.</i></p>\r\n<p>Larger numbers in Italian follow the same formula.</p>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Numbers 100 and higher in Italian</h2>\r\n<table>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>100</td>\r\n<td><i>cento</i></td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>101</td>\r\n<td><i>centuno</i></td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>102</td>\r\n<td><i>centodue</i></td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>150</td>\r\n<td><i>centocinquanta</i></td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>1,000</td>\r\n<td><i>mille</i></td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>2,000</td>\r\n<td><i>duemila</i></td>\r\n</tr>\r\n</table>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">In Italian, large numbers are said in the same order that we use for English. For example, 1916 would be 1916 (<b>millenovecentosedici</b>) (<i>literally</i>: one thousand, nine hundred, and sixteen).</p>\r\n<p>The following phrases can help you when talking about numbers.</p>\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n <li><p class=\"first-para\"><b>Quanti anni hai?</b> (How old are you?)</p>\r\n </li>\r\n <li><p class=\"first-para\"><b>Ho ventitrè anni.</b> (I'm 23 years old.)</p>\r\n </li>\r\n <li><p class=\"first-para\"><b>Quanto viene?</b> (How much does it come to?)</p>\r\n </li>\r\n <li><p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sei euro sessanta.</b> (6 euros and 60 cents.)</p>\r\n </li>\r\n <li><p class=\"first-para\"><b>Quanto è per una camerasingola?</b> (How much is it for a single room?)</p>\r\n </li>\r\n <li><p class=\"first-para\"><b>Centoventi euro.</b> (120 Euros)</p>\r\n </li>\r\n</ul>","description":"<p>Learning numbers and counting in Italian isn't complicated. In fact, the Italians follow many of the same patterns that we do in English. There are a few differences, but it's when it comes to numbers and counting in Italian, it's really just a question of memorizing.</p>\r\n<p>In Italian, as in English, there is a unique number from 0 – 16. After that they add the next number to the tens, making one word. So, 17, is the word for 10 followed by the word for 7 and so on.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Numbers 1 to 19 in Italian</h2>\r\n<table>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>uno</td>\r\n<td>1</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>due</td>\r\n<td>2</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>tre</td>\r\n<td>3</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>quattro</td>\r\n<td>4</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>cinque</td>\r\n<td>5</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>sei</td>\r\n<td>6</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>sette</td>\r\n<td>7</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>otto</td>\r\n<td>8</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>nove</td>\r\n<td>9</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>dieci</td>\r\n<td>10</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>undici</td>\r\n<td>11</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>dodici</td>\r\n<td>12</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>tredici</td>\r\n<td>13</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>quattordici</td>\r\n<td>14</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>quindici</td>\r\n<td>15</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>sedici</td>\r\n<td>16</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>diciassette</td>\r\n<td>17</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>diciotto</td>\r\n<td>18</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>diciannove</td>\r\n<td>19</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n</table>\r\n<p>For the numbers in the twenties, thirties, forties, and so on, just add the number to the tens, with the exception of when you add a 1 or an 8. For these two numbers, drop the final \"–i.\" For example, <b>venti</b> (20), <b>ventuno</b> (21), <b>ventidue</b> (22), <b>venticinque</b> (25), <b>ventotto</b> (28<i>).</i><i> </i>See? It's not <i>ventiuno</i> or <i>ventiotto</i>.</p>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Numbers 20 to 99 in Italian</h2>\r\n<table>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>venti</td>\r\n<td>20</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>ventuno</td>\r\n<td>21</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>ventidue</td>\r\n<td>22</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>trenta</td>\r\n<td>30</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>trentuno</td>\r\n<td>31</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>quaranta</td>\r\n<td>40</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>quarantuno</td>\r\n<td>41</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>cinquanta</td>\r\n<td>50</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>sessanta</td>\r\n<td>60</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>settanta</td>\r\n<td>70</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>ottanta</td>\r\n<td>80</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>novanta</td>\r\n<td>90</td>\r\n</tr>\r\n</table>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">When you add the <b><i>tre</i></b><i>,</i> the <b><i>-e</i></b> takes an accent: <b>ventitr</b><b><i>è</i></b><i>.</i></p>\r\n<p>Larger numbers in Italian follow the same formula.</p>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Numbers 100 and higher in Italian</h2>\r\n<table>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>100</td>\r\n<td><i>cento</i></td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>101</td>\r\n<td><i>centuno</i></td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>102</td>\r\n<td><i>centodue</i></td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>150</td>\r\n<td><i>centocinquanta</i></td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>1,000</td>\r\n<td><i>mille</i></td>\r\n</tr>\r\n<tr>\r\n<td>2,000</td>\r\n<td><i>duemila</i></td>\r\n</tr>\r\n</table>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">In Italian, large numbers are said in the same order that we use for English. For example, 1916 would be 1916 (<b>millenovecentosedici</b>) (<i>literally</i>: one thousand, nine hundred, and sixteen).</p>\r\n<p>The following phrases can help you when talking about numbers.</p>\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n <li><p class=\"first-para\"><b>Quanti anni hai?</b> (How old are you?)</p>\r\n </li>\r\n <li><p class=\"first-para\"><b>Ho ventitrè anni.</b> (I'm 23 years old.)</p>\r\n </li>\r\n <li><p class=\"first-para\"><b>Quanto viene?</b> (How much does it come to?)</p>\r\n </li>\r\n <li><p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sei euro sessanta.</b> (6 euros and 60 cents.)</p>\r\n </li>\r\n <li><p class=\"first-para\"><b>Quanto è per una camerasingola?</b> (How much is it for a single room?)</p>\r\n </li>\r\n <li><p class=\"first-para\"><b>Centoventi euro.</b> (120 Euros)</p>\r\n </li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9663,"name":"Teresa L. Picarazzi","slug":"teresa-l-picarazzi","description":" <p><b>Teresa Picarazzi, PhD,</b> has taught Italian language, literature, and cinema for more than 30 years. She now teaches Italian at The Hopkins School in New Haven. She has lived, studied, and worked in Florence, Siena, Urbino, Cortona, and Ravenna, Italy. She has written books and several articles on Italian politics and culture. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9663"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33698,"title":"Italian","slug":"italian","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33698"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Numbers 1 to 19 in Italian","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Numbers 20 to 99 in Italian","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Numbers 100 and higher in Italian","target":"#tab3"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":296223,"title":"Italian Workbook For Dummies Cheat","slug":"italian-workbook-for-dummies-cheat","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296223"}},{"articleId":208553,"title":"Italian For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/208553"}},{"articleId":207900,"title":"Italian Grammar For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-grammar-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207900"}},{"articleId":207893,"title":"Italian All-in-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207893"}},{"articleId":200932,"title":"Picking Up Italian Quickly","slug":"picking-up-italian-quickly","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/200932"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;learning-languages&quot;,&quot;italian&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-646667df29e89\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;learning-languages&quot;,&quot;italian&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-646667df2a73d\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-05-18T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":195677},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T22:01:28+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-03-15T20:03:44+00:00","timestamp":"2024-03-15T21:01:04+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Learning Languages","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33689"},"slug":"learning-languages","categoryId":33689},{"name":"Italian","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33698"},"slug":"italian","categoryId":33698}],"title":"Common Conversational Words and Phrases in Italian","strippedTitle":"common conversational words and phrases in italian","slug":"common-conversational-words-and-phrases-in-italian","canonicalUrl":"","关注引挚SEO调优方案网络":{"metaDescription":"By mastering the basics of conversation in Italian, you put yourself and the person you're talking to at ease. Everyone should learn essential Italian conversat","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"By mastering the basics of conversation in Italian, you put yourself and the person you're talking to at ease. Everyone should <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/academics-the-arts/language-language-arts/learning-languages/italian/italian-for-dummies-cheat-sheet-208553/\">learn essential Italian</a> conversational words and phrases before traveling to Italy. These words and expressions are sure to come up in most everyday conversations.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Courteous phrases</h2>\r\nBeing polite is just as important in Italy as anywhere else in this world. The following words and phrases cover most of the pleasantries required for polite conversation. After all, learning to say the expressions of common courtesy in Italian before traveling is just good manners.\r\n<blockquote><b>sì</b> (yes)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>no</b> (no)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>per favore; per piacere; per cortesia</b> (please)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>G</b><b>razie</b> (Thank you)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>M</b><b>olte grazie</b> (Thank you very much.)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>Prego!</b> (You're welcome!)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>S</b><b>i figuri!</b> (It's nothing.)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>Mi scusi.</b> (Excuse me.)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>prego</b> (by all means)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>Può ripetere, per cortesia?</b> (Can you please repeat.)</blockquote>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Personal pronouns</h2>\r\nOnce you've mastered the common pleasantries, the next important thing to learn is how to refer to people. The most common way is by using personal pronouns. In Italian, the pronouns (you and they) are complicated by gender and formality. You'll use slightly different variations of these words depending to whom you are referring and how well you know them.\r\n<blockquote><b>Io</b> (I)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>lui</b> (he)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>lei</b> (she)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>noi</b> (we)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>t</b><b>u</b> (you [singular])</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>l</b><b>ei</b> (you [singular/formal])</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>voi</b> (you (plural/informal])</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>loro</b> (you (plural/formal])</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>loro</b> (they)</blockquote>\r\nUse the informal <b>tu</b> (singular you) and <b>voi</b> (plural you) for friends, relatives, younger people, and people you know well. Use the formal <b>l</b><b>ei</b> (singular you) when speaking to people you don't know well; in situations such as in stores, restaurants, hotels, or pharmacies); and with professors, older people, and your friends' parents.\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">The formal <b>l</b><b>oro</b> (plural you) is rarely used and is gradually being replaced by the informal <b>voi</b><i> </i>when addressing a group of people.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >References to people</h2>\r\nWhen meeting people in Italy, be sure to use the appropriate formal title. Italians tend to use titles whenever possible. Use the <b>Lei</b> form when using any of the following titles. A man would be called <b>Signore</b>, which is the same as Mr. or Sir. An older or married woman is called <b>Signora</b> and a young lady is called <b>Signorina</b>.\r\n\r\nIt is also helpful to know the correct vocabulary term for referring to people based on their age, gender, or relationship to you.\r\n<blockquote><b>uomo</b> (a man)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>donna</b> (a woman)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>ragazzo</b> (a boy)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>ragazza</b> (a girl)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>bambino</b> [M]; <b>bambina</b> [F] (a child)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>padre</b> (a father)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>madre</b> (a mother)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>figlio</b> [M]; <b>figlia</b> [F] (child)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>fratello</b> (a brother)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>sorella</b> (a sister)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>marito</b> (a husband)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>moglie</b> (a wife)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>amico</b> [M]; <b>amica</b> [F] (a friend)</blockquote>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">In Italian, there are four words to cover the English indefinite articles <i>a</i> and <i>an</i>. For masculine words, you would use <b>uno</b> if the word begins with a z or an s and a consonant and you would use <b>un</b> for the rest. For feminine words, you should use <b>'un</b> for words beginning with a vowel and <b>una</b> for words beginning with a consonant.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Phrases for travelers</h2>\r\nThere are some Italian phrases that are particularly helpful to international travelers. Below are several phrases may come in handy during your stay in Italy.\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mi scusi.</b> (Excuse me. [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non parlo bene l'italiano.</b> (I don't speak Italian well.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Parla inglese?</b> (Do you speak English? [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Parlo inglese.</b> (I speak English.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mi sono perso.</b> [M]; <b>Mi sono persa.</b> [F] (I'm lost.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sto cercando il mio albergo.</b> (I'm looking for my hotel.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sì, lo so.</b> (Yes, I know.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non lo so.</b> (I don't know.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non so dove sia.</b> (I don't know where it is.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non capisco.</b> (I don't understand.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Capisco, grazie.</b> (I understand, thanks.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Può ripetere, per cortesia?</b> (Can you repeat, please? [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>È bello.</b> (It's beautiful.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>È bellissimo.</b> (It's very beautiful.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Vado a casa.</b> (I'm going home.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Domani visitiamo Venezia.</b> (We'll visit Venice tomorrow.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Due cappuccini, per favore.</b> (Two cappuccinos, please.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non lo so.</b> (I don't know.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non posso.</b> (I can't.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non potevo.</b> (I couldn't.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non lo faccio.</b> (I won't do it.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non dimenticare!</b> (Don't forget!)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Lei non mangia la carne.</b> (She doesn't eat meat.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non siamo americani.</b> (We aren't American.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Il caffè non è buono.</b> (The coffee isn't good.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non è caro!</b> (It's not expensive!)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">It's possible to use more than one negative in a sentence. For example, you may say <b>Non capisce niente</b> (He/she doesn't understand anything). Generally, you may just put <b>non</b> in front of your verb to negate your sentence, such as <b>m</b><b>'</b><b>ama non m</b><b>'</b><b>ama</b> (he/she loves me, he/she loves me not).</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >Common places and locations</h2>\r\nIt is also helpful to know the correct vocabulary for some of the common places or locations that you might need or want while traveling in Italy.\r\n<blockquote><b>banca</b> (bank)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>città</b> (city)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>il consolato Americano</b> (American consulate)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>il ristorante</b> (restaurant)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>in campagna</b> (in the country)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>in città</b> (in the city)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>in montagna</b> (in the mountains)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>l</b><b>'</b><b>albergo</b> (hotel)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>l</b><b>'</b><b>ospedale</b> (hospital)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>la casa</b> (house)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>la polizia</b> (police)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>la stazione dei treni</b> (train station)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>metropolitana</b> (subway)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>mu关注引挚SEO调优方案网络</b> (museum)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>negozio</b> (store)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>paese</b> (country)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>spiaggia</b> (beach)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>stato</b> (state)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>ufficio</b> (office)</blockquote>","description":"By mastering the basics of conversation in Italian, you put yourself and the person you're talking to at ease. Everyone should <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/academics-the-arts/language-language-arts/learning-languages/italian/italian-for-dummies-cheat-sheet-208553/\">learn essential Italian</a> conversational words and phrases before traveling to Italy. These words and expressions are sure to come up in most everyday conversations.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Courteous phrases</h2>\r\nBeing polite is just as important in Italy as anywhere else in this world. The following words and phrases cover most of the pleasantries required for polite conversation. After all, learning to say the expressions of common courtesy in Italian before traveling is just good manners.\r\n<blockquote><b>sì</b> (yes)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>no</b> (no)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>per favore; per piacere; per cortesia</b> (please)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>G</b><b>razie</b> (Thank you)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>M</b><b>olte grazie</b> (Thank you very much.)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>Prego!</b> (You're welcome!)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>S</b><b>i figuri!</b> (It's nothing.)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>Mi scusi.</b> (Excuse me.)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>prego</b> (by all means)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>Può ripetere, per cortesia?</b> (Can you please repeat.)</blockquote>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Personal pronouns</h2>\r\nOnce you've mastered the common pleasantries, the next important thing to learn is how to refer to people. The most common way is by using personal pronouns. In Italian, the pronouns (you and they) are complicated by gender and formality. You'll use slightly different variations of these words depending to whom you are referring and how well you know them.\r\n<blockquote><b>Io</b> (I)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>lui</b> (he)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>lei</b> (she)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>noi</b> (we)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>t</b><b>u</b> (you [singular])</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>l</b><b>ei</b> (you [singular/formal])</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>voi</b> (you (plural/informal])</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>loro</b> (you (plural/formal])</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>loro</b> (they)</blockquote>\r\nUse the informal <b>tu</b> (singular you) and <b>voi</b> (plural you) for friends, relatives, younger people, and people you know well. Use the formal <b>l</b><b>ei</b> (singular you) when speaking to people you don't know well; in situations such as in stores, restaurants, hotels, or pharmacies); and with professors, older people, and your friends' parents.\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">The formal <b>l</b><b>oro</b> (plural you) is rarely used and is gradually being replaced by the informal <b>voi</b><i> </i>when addressing a group of people.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >References to people</h2>\r\nWhen meeting people in Italy, be sure to use the appropriate formal title. Italians tend to use titles whenever possible. Use the <b>Lei</b> form when using any of the following titles. A man would be called <b>Signore</b>, which is the same as Mr. or Sir. An older or married woman is called <b>Signora</b> and a young lady is called <b>Signorina</b>.\r\n\r\nIt is also helpful to know the correct vocabulary term for referring to people based on their age, gender, or relationship to you.\r\n<blockquote><b>uomo</b> (a man)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>donna</b> (a woman)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>ragazzo</b> (a boy)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>ragazza</b> (a girl)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>bambino</b> [M]; <b>bambina</b> [F] (a child)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>padre</b> (a father)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>madre</b> (a mother)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>figlio</b> [M]; <b>figlia</b> [F] (child)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>fratello</b> (a brother)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>sorella</b> (a sister)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>marito</b> (a husband)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>moglie</b> (a wife)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>amico</b> [M]; <b>amica</b> [F] (a friend)</blockquote>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">In Italian, there are four words to cover the English indefinite articles <i>a</i> and <i>an</i>. For masculine words, you would use <b>uno</b> if the word begins with a z or an s and a consonant and you would use <b>un</b> for the rest. For feminine words, you should use <b>'un</b> for words beginning with a vowel and <b>una</b> for words beginning with a consonant.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Phrases for travelers</h2>\r\nThere are some Italian phrases that are particularly helpful to international travelers. Below are several phrases may come in handy during your stay in Italy.\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mi scusi.</b> (Excuse me. [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non parlo bene l'italiano.</b> (I don't speak Italian well.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Parla inglese?</b> (Do you speak English? [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Parlo inglese.</b> (I speak English.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mi sono perso.</b> [M]; <b>Mi sono persa.</b> [F] (I'm lost.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sto cercando il mio albergo.</b> (I'm looking for my hotel.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sì, lo so.</b> (Yes, I know.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non lo so.</b> (I don't know.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non so dove sia.</b> (I don't know where it is.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non capisco.</b> (I don't understand.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Capisco, grazie.</b> (I understand, thanks.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Può ripetere, per cortesia?</b> (Can you repeat, please? [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>È bello.</b> (It's beautiful.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>È bellissimo.</b> (It's very beautiful.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Vado a casa.</b> (I'm going home.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Domani visitiamo Venezia.</b> (We'll visit Venice tomorrow.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Due cappuccini, per favore.</b> (Two cappuccinos, please.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non lo so.</b> (I don't know.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non posso.</b> (I can't.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non potevo.</b> (I couldn't.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non lo faccio.</b> (I won't do it.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non dimenticare!</b> (Don't forget!)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Lei non mangia la carne.</b> (She doesn't eat meat.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non siamo americani.</b> (We aren't American.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Il caffè non è buono.</b> (The coffee isn't good.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non è caro!</b> (It's not expensive!)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">It's possible to use more than one negative in a sentence. For example, you may say <b>Non capisce niente</b> (He/she doesn't understand anything). Generally, you may just put <b>non</b> in front of your verb to negate your sentence, such as <b>m</b><b>'</b><b>ama non m</b><b>'</b><b>ama</b> (he/she loves me, he/she loves me not).</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >Common places and locations</h2>\r\nIt is also helpful to know the correct vocabulary for some of the common places or locations that you might need or want while traveling in Italy.\r\n<blockquote><b>banca</b> (bank)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>città</b> (city)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>il consolato Americano</b> (American consulate)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>il ristorante</b> (restaurant)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>in campagna</b> (in the country)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>in città</b> (in the city)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>in montagna</b> (in the mountains)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>l</b><b>'</b><b>albergo</b> (hotel)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>l</b><b>'</b><b>ospedale</b> (hospital)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>la casa</b> (house)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>la polizia</b> (police)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>la stazione dei treni</b> (train station)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>metropolitana</b> (subway)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>mu关注引挚SEO调优方案网络</b> (museum)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>negozio</b> (store)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>paese</b> (country)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>spiaggia</b> (beach)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>stato</b> (state)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>ufficio</b> (office)</blockquote>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9663,"name":"Teresa L. Picarazzi","slug":"teresa-l-picarazzi","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9663"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33698,"title":"Italian","slug":"italian","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33698"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Courteous phrases","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Personal pronouns","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"References to people","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Phrases for travelers","target":"#tab4"},{"label":"Common places and locations","target":"#tab5"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":296223,"title":"Italian Workbook For Dummies Cheat","slug":"italian-workbook-for-dummies-cheat","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296223"}},{"articleId":208553,"title":"Italian For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/208553"}},{"articleId":207900,"title":"Italian Grammar For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-grammar-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207900"}},{"articleId":207893,"title":"Italian All-in-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207893"}},{"articleId":200932,"title":"Picking Up Italian Quickly","slug":"picking-up-italian-quickly","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/200932"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;learning-languages&quot;,&quot;italian&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-641232108ef2c\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;learning-languages&quot;,&quot;italian&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-641232108f6a8\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-03-14T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":195630},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T20:59:38+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-02-09T20:41:51+00:00","timestamp":"2024-02-09T21:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Learning Languages","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33689"},"slug":"learning-languages","categoryId":33689},{"name":"Italian","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33698"},"slug":"italian","categoryId":33698}],"title":"How to Order Food in Italian","strippedTitle":"how to order food in italian","slug":"how-to-order-food-in-italian","canonicalUrl":"","关注引挚SEO调优方案网络":{"metaDescription":"Whether you're on a short visit to an Italian-speaking country or you're planning to take up residence in Italy itself, knowing how to order food in Italian is ","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Whether you're on a short visit to an Italian-speaking country or you're planning to take up residence in Italy itself, knowing how to order food in Italian is essential. Eating out can be a lot of fun, especially if you know some basic vocabulary.\r\n<p class=\"Remember\">The Italian <strong>bar</strong> is really what Americans would call a café. There you can get breakfast (coffee and a pastry), snacks, sandwiches, and salty snacks to accompany your before-dinner drink.</p>\r\n\r\n<blockquote><strong>assegno</strong> (<em>ahs-seh-</em>nyoh) [m] (check)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>pagare</strong> (pah<em>-gah-</em>reh) (to pay)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>soldi</strong> (<em>sohl-</em>dee) [m/pl] (money)</blockquote>\r\nIn Italian-speaking countries, as in most of the rest of the world, there are three meals a day: <strong>colazione </strong>(koh-lah-tsee<em>-oh-</em>neh) [f] (breakfast), <strong>pranzo</strong> (<em>prahn-</em>tsoh) [m] (lunch), and <strong>cena</strong> (<em>cheh</em>-nah) [f] (dinner).\r\n\r\nThe following phrases might help you when you're eating at a restaurant.\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Vorrei prenotare.</strong> (I’d like to make a reservation.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Per che ora?</strong> (For what time?)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Per quante persone?</strong> (For how many people?)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>No, non abbiamo prenotato.</strong> (No, we don’t have a reservation.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Ci porti il conto, per favore.</strong> [Formal] (Bring us the check, please.)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nHere are some food items you can order:\r\n<blockquote><strong>antipasti</strong> (<em>ahn-tee-pahs-tee</em>) [m] (appetizers)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>carne </strong>(<em>kahr</em>-neh) [f] (meat)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>cioccolata</strong> (choh-koh<em>-lah-</em>tah) [f] (chocolate)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>formaggio</strong> (<em>fohr-mahj-joh</em>) [m] (cheese)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>fragola</strong> (<em>frah</em><em>-</em>goh-lah) [f] (strawberry)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>frutta</strong> (<em>froot</em><em>-</em>tah) [f] (fruit)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>gelato</strong> (jeh<em>-</em><em>lah</em><em>-</em>toh) [m] (ice cream)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>insalata</strong> (een-sah<em>-</em><em>lah</em><em>-</em>tah) [f] (salad)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>pane</strong> (<em>pah-</em>neh) [m] (bread)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>pesce</strong> (<em>peh</em><em>-</em>cheh) [m] (fish)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>riso</strong> (<em>ree-</em>zoh) [m] (rice)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>sale</strong> (<em>sah</em><em>-</em>leh) [m] (salt)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>verdur</strong><strong>a</strong> (vehr-<em>doo</em>-reh) [f] (vegetables)</blockquote>\r\nThe following phrases can help you place your drink order.\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Un caffè, per favore.</strong> (A coffee, please.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Un bicchiere di latte caldo</strong> (A glass of warm milk)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Una cioccolata calda</strong> (A hot chocolate)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Tre birre</strong> (Three beers)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Un bicchiere di acqua minerale</strong> (A glass of mineral water)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Liscia o gassata?</strong> (Flat or carbonated?)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Un panino, per favore.</strong> (I’ll have a sandwich, please.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Lo scontrino, per favore.</strong> (Receipt, please.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Due cappuccini, per favore.</strong> (Two cappuccinos, please.)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nHere are some drink items you can order\r\n<blockquote><strong>acqua</strong> (<em>ahk-</em>koo-ah) [f] (water)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>vino</strong> (<em>vee-</em>noh) [m] (wine)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>bere</strong> (<em>beh-</em>reh) (to drink)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>birra</strong> (<em>beer-</em>rah) [f] (beer)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>caffè</strong> (kahf<em>-feh</em>) [m] (coffee)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>latte</strong> (<em>laht</em><em>-</em>teh) [m] (milk)</blockquote>\r\nYou might want to use the following adjectives to when giving your <strong>cameriere/cameriera</strong> (waiter/waitress) your food or drink order:\r\n<blockquote><strong>calda/o</strong> (<em>kahl-</em>dah/doh) [f/m] (warm; hot)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>fredda/o</strong> (<em>frehd</em><em>-</em>dah/doh) [f] (cold)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>dolce</strong> (<em>dohl-</em>cheh) [m/f] (sweet)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>grande</strong> (<em>grahn-</em>deh) [m/f] (big; tall; large)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>piccola/o</strong> (<em>peek-</em>koh-lah/loh) [f/m] (small; short)</blockquote>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">Italians don’t drink cappuccino after breakfast time.</p>","description":"Whether you're on a short visit to an Italian-speaking country or you're planning to take up residence in Italy itself, knowing how to order food in Italian is essential. Eating out can be a lot of fun, especially if you know some basic vocabulary.\r\n<p class=\"Remember\">The Italian <strong>bar</strong> is really what Americans would call a café. There you can get breakfast (coffee and a pastry), snacks, sandwiches, and salty snacks to accompany your before-dinner drink.</p>\r\n\r\n<blockquote><strong>assegno</strong> (<em>ahs-seh-</em>nyoh) [m] (check)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>pagare</strong> (pah<em>-gah-</em>reh) (to pay)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>soldi</strong> (<em>sohl-</em>dee) [m/pl] (money)</blockquote>\r\nIn Italian-speaking countries, as in most of the rest of the world, there are three meals a day: <strong>colazione </strong>(koh-lah-tsee<em>-oh-</em>neh) [f] (breakfast), <strong>pranzo</strong> (<em>prahn-</em>tsoh) [m] (lunch), and <strong>cena</strong> (<em>cheh</em>-nah) [f] (dinner).\r\n\r\nThe following phrases might help you when you're eating at a restaurant.\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Vorrei prenotare.</strong> (I’d like to make a reservation.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Per che ora?</strong> (For what time?)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Per quante persone?</strong> (For how many people?)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>No, non abbiamo prenotato.</strong> (No, we don’t have a reservation.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Ci porti il conto, per favore.</strong> [Formal] (Bring us the check, please.)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nHere are some food items you can order:\r\n<blockquote><strong>antipasti</strong> (<em>ahn-tee-pahs-tee</em>) [m] (appetizers)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>carne </strong>(<em>kahr</em>-neh) [f] (meat)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>cioccolata</strong> (choh-koh<em>-lah-</em>tah) [f] (chocolate)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>formaggio</strong> (<em>fohr-mahj-joh</em>) [m] (cheese)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>fragola</strong> (<em>frah</em><em>-</em>goh-lah) [f] (strawberry)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>frutta</strong> (<em>froot</em><em>-</em>tah) [f] (fruit)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>gelato</strong> (jeh<em>-</em><em>lah</em><em>-</em>toh) [m] (ice cream)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>insalata</strong> (een-sah<em>-</em><em>lah</em><em>-</em>tah) [f] (salad)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>pane</strong> (<em>pah-</em>neh) [m] (bread)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>pesce</strong> (<em>peh</em><em>-</em>cheh) [m] (fish)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>riso</strong> (<em>ree-</em>zoh) [m] (rice)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>sale</strong> (<em>sah</em><em>-</em>leh) [m] (salt)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>verdur</strong><strong>a</strong> (vehr-<em>doo</em>-reh) [f] (vegetables)</blockquote>\r\nThe following phrases can help you place your drink order.\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Un caffè, per favore.</strong> (A coffee, please.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Un bicchiere di latte caldo</strong> (A glass of warm milk)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Una cioccolata calda</strong> (A hot chocolate)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Tre birre</strong> (Three beers)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Un bicchiere di acqua minerale</strong> (A glass of mineral water)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Liscia o gassata?</strong> (Flat or carbonated?)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Un panino, per favore.</strong> (I’ll have a sandwich, please.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Lo scontrino, per favore.</strong> (Receipt, please.)</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Due cappuccini, per favore.</strong> (Two cappuccinos, please.)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nHere are some drink items you can order\r\n<blockquote><strong>acqua</strong> (<em>ahk-</em>koo-ah) [f] (water)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>vino</strong> (<em>vee-</em>noh) [m] (wine)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>bere</strong> (<em>beh-</em>reh) (to drink)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>birra</strong> (<em>beer-</em>rah) [f] (beer)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>caffè</strong> (kahf<em>-feh</em>) [m] (coffee)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>latte</strong> (<em>laht</em><em>-</em>teh) [m] (milk)</blockquote>\r\nYou might want to use the following adjectives to when giving your <strong>cameriere/cameriera</strong> (waiter/waitress) your food or drink order:\r\n<blockquote><strong>calda/o</strong> (<em>kahl-</em>dah/doh) [f/m] (warm; hot)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>fredda/o</strong> (<em>frehd</em><em>-</em>dah/doh) [f] (cold)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>dolce</strong> (<em>dohl-</em>cheh) [m/f] (sweet)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>grande</strong> (<em>grahn-</em>deh) [m/f] (big; tall; large)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><strong>piccola/o</strong> (<em>peek-</em>koh-lah/loh) [f/m] (small; short)</blockquote>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">Italians don’t drink cappuccino after breakfast time.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9663,"name":"Teresa L. Picarazzi","slug":"teresa-l-picarazzi","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9663"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33698,"title":"Italian","slug":"italian","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33698"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":296223,"title":"Italian Workbook For Dummies Cheat","slug":"italian-workbook-for-dummies-cheat","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/296223"}},{"articleId":208553,"title":"Italian For Dummies Cheat 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of simpler, more concise sentences and paragraphs. The basic rules of the Italian language, however, stay the same. Despite the ongoing transformation of the language, these rules remain the foundation that stabilizes it. Here are a few Italian fundamentals that you don't want to miss if you want to communicate in Italian.","description":"The Italian language is adapting to the rhythms of modern life with the introduction of new idioms and the construction of simpler, more concise sentences and paragraphs. The basic rules of the Italian language, however, stay the same. Despite the ongoing transformation of the language, these rules remain the foundation that stabilizes it. Here are a few Italian fundamentals that you don't want to miss if you want to communicate in Italian.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9661,"name":"Antonietta Di Pietro","slug":"antonietta-di-pietro","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9661"}},{"authorId":9662,"name":"Francesca Romana Onofri","slug":"francesca-romana-onofri","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9662"}},{"authorId":9663,"name":"Teresa L. Picarazzi","slug":"teresa-l-picarazzi","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9663"}},{"authorId":9664,"name":"Karen Antje Mller","slug":"karen-antje-moller","description":"Karen Antje Möller is a veteran language teacher and author. She has worked with Berlitz Publishing on German-Italian projects and Italian exercise books.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9664"}},{"authorId":9665,"name":"Daniela Gobetti","slug":"daniela-gobetti","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9665"}},{"authorId":9666,"name":"Beth Bartolini-Salimbeni","slug":"beth-bartolini-salimbeni","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9666"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33698,"title":"Italian","slug":"italian","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33698"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":164240,"title":"Colors as Italian Adjectives and Idioms","slug":"colors-as-italian-adjectives-and-idioms","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/164240"}},{"articleId":164237,"title":"Italian Verbs: Present Perfect Indicative of Essere Sincero and Mentire","slug":"italian-verbs-present-perfect-indicative-of-essere-sincero-and-mentire","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/164237"}},{"articleId":164233,"title":"Figure Out the Future Tense in Italian","slug":"figure-out-the-future-tense-in-italian","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/164233"}},{"articleId":164236,"title":"Texting and Chatting in Italian","slug":"texting-and-chatting-in-italian","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/164236"}},{"articleId":164152,"title":"Summing Up Italian Articles, Nouns, and Adjectives","slug":"summing-up-italian-articles-nouns-and-adjectives","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/164152"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":208553,"title":"Italian For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/208553"}},{"articleId":207900,"title":"Italian Grammar For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-grammar-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207900"}},{"articleId":200932,"title":"Picking Up Italian Quickly","slug":"picking-up-italian-quickly","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/200932"}},{"articleId":200457,"title":"Discussing Your Job in Italian","slug":"discussing-your-job-in-italian","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/200457"}},{"articleId":199655,"title":"Asking Simple Questions in Italian","slug":"asking-simple-questions-in-italian","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/199655"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282317,"slug":"italian-all-in-one-for-dummies","isbn":"9781118510605","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1118510607/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1118510607/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1118510607-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1118510607/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1118510607/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/italian-all-in-one-for-dummies-cover-9781118510605-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Italian All-in-One For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":"","authors":[{"authorId":9661,"name":"Antonietta Di Pietro","slug":"antonietta-di-pietro","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9661"}},{"authorId":9663,"name":"Teresa L. Picarazzi","slug":"teresa-l-picarazzi","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9663"}},{"authorId":34864,"name":"Karen Antje Möller","slug":"karen-antje-m&ouml;ller","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/34864"}},{"authorId":9665,"name":"Daniela Gobetti","slug":"daniela-gobetti","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9665"}},{"authorId":9666,"name":"Beth Bartolini-Salimbeni","slug":"beth-bartolini-salimbeni","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9666"}},{"authorId":9662,"name":"Francesca Romana Onofri","slug":"francesca-romana-onofri","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9662"}},{"authorId":34784,"name":"","slug":"","description":" <p><b> Joseph A. Allen, PhD</b> is a professor of industrial and organizational (I/O) psychology at the University of Utah. His articles have appeared in <i>Human Relations, Journal of Business Psychology</i>, and more.</p> <p><b>Karin M. Reed</b> is CEO of Speaker Dynamics, a corporate communications training firm. She is an Emmy award-winning broadcast journalist. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/34784"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;learning-languages&quot;,&quot;italian&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781118510605&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b213b781\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;learning-languages&quot;,&quot;italian&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781118510605&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b213c224\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":164152,"title":"Summing Up Italian Articles, Nouns, and Adjectives","slug":"summing-up-italian-articles-nouns-and-adjectives","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/164152"}},{"articleId":164151,"title":"How to Conjugate Italian Verbs in the Present Indicative Tense","slug":"how-to-conjugate-italian-verbs-in-the-present-indicative-tense","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/164151"}},{"articleId":164150,"title":"Crafting Common Idiomatic Expressions in Italian","slug":"crafting-common-idiomatic-expressions-in-italian","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/164150"}},{"articleId":164149,"title":"Learning Italian: When to Capitalize Formal Titles before Names","slug":"learning-italian-when-to-capitalize-formal-titles-before-names","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/164149"}}],"content":[{"title":"Summing up Italian articles, nouns, and adjectives ","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>In Italian, nouns have gender and number — masculine or feminine, and singular or plural. Articles (a, an, the, and so on), which are associated with nouns, are also masculine, feminine, singular, or plural according to the noun they refer to. So the English definite article <em>the</em> is either masculine singular, masculine plural, feminine singular, or feminine plural in Italian.</p>\n<p class=\"Remember\">The following table shows how you can combine nouns and articles. Pay attention to the beginning letter of masculine nouns because the article changes according to this letter; this is why you see four versions of masculine nouns in the table.</p>\n<p>Italian articles take the gender and number of the nouns they refer to, so the first thing you have to do is determine the gender and number of the noun you&#8217;re working with. You&#8217;ll find some examples in the first column. The second column helps you focus on the beginning letters of nouns, which is essential to find the correct definite and indefinite articles, shown in the third and fourth columns, respectively.</p>\n<table border=\"0\">\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<th>Gender and Number of Nouns</th>\n<th>Nouns Beginning with &#8230;</th>\n<th>Definite Articles</th>\n<th>Indefinite Articles</th>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Masculine singular 1.</td>\n<td>Nouns beginning with a consonant (such as <strong>libro, tavolo,</strong> and <strong>sogno</strong>)</td>\n<td><strong>il (il libro, il tavolo, il sogno)</strong></td>\n<td><strong>un (un libro, un tavolo, un sogno)</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Masculine plural 1.</td>\n<td>Nouns beginning with a consonant (such as <strong>libri, tavoli,</strong> and <strong>sogni</strong>)</td>\n<td><strong>i (i libri, i tavoli, i sogni)</strong></td>\n<td><strong>dei (dei libri, dei tavoli, dei sogni)</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Masculine singular 2.</td>\n<td>Nouns beginning with <strong>s</strong> + a consonant, <strong>z, ps, pn, gn,</strong> or <strong>y</strong> (as in <strong>specchio, stivale, scienziato, zaino, psicologo, pneumatico, gnomo,</strong> and <strong>yogurt</strong>)</td>\n<td><strong>lo (lo specchio, lo stivale, lo scienziato, lo zaino, lo psicologo, lo pneumatico</strong> [but also <strong>il pneumatico</strong>], <strong>lo gnomo, lo yogurt)</strong></td>\n<td><strong>uno (uno specchio, uno stivale, uno scienziato, uno zaino, uno psicologo, uno pneumatico, uno gnomo, uno yogurt)</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td></td>\n<td>Nouns beginning with a vowel (<strong>a, e, i,</strong> <strong>o,</strong> or <strong>u</strong>) as in <strong>aereo, amico, orso,</strong> and <strong>invito</strong></td>\n<td><strong>l</strong><strong>&#8216;</strong> <strong>(l</strong><strong>&#8216;</strong><strong>aereo, l</strong><strong>&#8216;</strong><strong>amico, l</strong><strong>&#8216;</strong><strong>orso, l</strong><strong>&#8216;</strong><strong>invito)</strong></td>\n<td><strong>un (un aereo, un amico, un orso, un invito)</strong><strong><br />\n</strong><strong><em>Note:</em></strong> Make sure you don&#8217;t use an apostrophe with the masculine <strong>un.</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Masculine plural 2.</td>\n<td>Nouns beginning with <strong>s</strong> + a consonant, <strong>z, ps, pn, gn,</strong> or <strong>y</strong> (as in <strong>specchi, stivali, scienziati, zaini, psicologi, pneumatici, gnomi,</strong> and <strong>yogurt</strong>)</td>\n<td><strong>gli (gli specchi, gli stivali, gli scienziati, gli zaini, gli psicologi, gli</strong> <strong>pneumatici</strong> [but also <strong>i pneumatici</strong>], <strong>gli gnomi, gli yogurt)</strong></td>\n<td><strong>degli (degli specchi, degli stivali, degli scienziati, degli zaini, degli psicologi, degli pneumatici</strong> [but also <strong>dei pneumatici</strong>], <strong>degli gnomi, degli yogurt</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td></td>\n<td>Nouns beginning with a vowel (<strong>a, e, i,</strong> <strong>o,</strong> or <strong>u</strong>)</td>\n<td><strong>gli (gli aerei, gli amici, gli orsi, gli inviti)</strong></td>\n<td><strong>degli (degli aerei, degli amici, degli orsi, degli</strong> <strong>inviti)</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Feminine singular</td>\n<td>Nouns beginning with a consonant (such as <strong>banca, casa,</strong> and <strong>stazione</strong>)</td>\n<td><strong>la (la banca, la casa, la stazione)</strong></td>\n<td><strong>una (una banca, una casa, una stazione)</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td></td>\n<td>Nouns beginning with a vowel (<strong>a, e, i,</strong> <strong>o,</strong> or <strong>u</strong>) as in <strong>arte</strong> and <strong>eredità</strong></td>\n<td><strong>l</strong><strong>&#8216;</strong> <strong>(l</strong><strong>&#8216;</strong><strong>arte, l</strong><strong>&#8216;</strong><strong>eredità)</strong></td>\n<td><strong>un</strong><strong>&#8216;</strong> <strong>(un</strong><strong>&#8216;</strong><strong>arte, un</strong><strong>&#8216;</strong><strong>eredità)</strong></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>Feminine plural</td>\n<td>All nouns (such as <strong>banche, case, stazioni, arti,</strong> and <strong>eredità</strong>)</td>\n<td><strong>le (le banche, le case, le stazioni, le arti, le eredità)</strong></td>\n<td><strong>delle (delle banche, delle case, delle stazioni, delle arti, delle eredità)</strong></td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n<p>Also note that although definite articles are omitted in English, they&#8217;re not omitted in Italian. For example, <strong>La gente dice . . . </strong>(<em>People say . . .</em>).</p>\n<p>Adjectives provide details about the noun(s) they refer to. They take the noun&#8217;s gender and number. Most masculine nouns end in <strong>-o</strong> (singular) or <strong>-i</strong> (plural), while most feminine nouns end in <strong>-a</strong> (singular) or <strong>-e</strong> (plural). Some nouns end in <strong>-e</strong> in their singular form and in <strong>-i</strong> in the plural, both for feminine and masculine forms.</p>\n<p>Check the following table to see how adjectives and nouns agree in gender and number:</p>\n<table border=\"0\">\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td><strong>bianco</strong></td>\n<td><strong>un foglio bianco</strong> (<em>a white sheet of paper</em>)</td>\n<td><strong>fogli bianchi</strong> (<em>white sheets of paper</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><strong>bianca</strong></td>\n<td><strong>una pagina bianca</strong> (<em>a white page</em>)</td>\n<td><strong>pagine bianche</strong> (<em>white pages</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><strong>verde</strong></td>\n<td><strong>un banco verde</strong> (<em>a green desk</em>); <strong>una penna verde</strong> (<em>a green pen</em>)</td>\n<td><strong>banchi verdi</strong> (<em>green desks</em>); <strong>penne verdi</strong> (<em>green pens</em>)</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n<p>Qualifying adjectives usually follow the noun; however, all other modifiers — demonstrative, interrogative, possessive, and indefinite pronouns, as well as number — come before the noun:</p>\n<blockquote><p><strong>Abbiamo letto un libro</strong> <strong>interessante</strong><strong>.</strong> (<em>We read an interesting book.</em>)</p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><strong>Vorrei comprare </strong><strong>questo</strong><strong> libro.</strong> (<em>I would like to buy this book.</em>)</p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><strong>I </strong><strong>tuoi</strong> <strong>libri sono nello zaino nero.</strong> (<em>Your books are in the black book pack.</em>)</p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><strong>Perché hai ordinato</strong> <strong>pochi</strong><strong> </strong><strong>libri?</strong> (<em>Why did you order so few books?</em>)</p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><strong>Quali</strong> <strong>libri hai preso in prestito?</strong> (<em>Which books did you borrow?</em>)</p></blockquote>\n<blockquote><p><strong>È il</strong> <strong>terzo</strong> <strong>libro che leggo su questo argomento.</strong> (<em>This is the third book that I have read on this subject</em><em>.</em>)</p></blockquote>\n"},{"title":"How to conjugate Italian verbs in the present indicative tense ","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>In Italian, the present indicative tense works much like the present tense in English. To conjugate Italian verbs in the present indicative tense, you first need to understand that Italian infinitives (the &#8220;to&#8221; form, as in<i> to </i><i>die</i><i>, to </i><i>sleep</i><i>, to </i><i>dream</i>) end in one of three ways — and that you conjugate the verb based on that ending:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Verbs that end in <b>-are</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Verbs that end in <b>-ere</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Verbs that end in <b>-ire</b></p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p>The endings of <i>regular</i> verbs don&#8217;t change. Master the endings for each mode and tense, and you&#8217;re good to go! Keep in mind that verbs agree with subjects and subject pronouns (<b>io, tu,</b> <b>lui/lei/Lei, noi, voi, loro/Loro</b>):</p>\n<table>\n<caption>Common Regular Italian Verbs in the Present Indicative Tense</caption>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<th>Subject Pronoun</th>\n<th>Lavorare (<i>to work</i>)</th>\n<th>Prendere (<i>to take; to order</i>)</th>\n<th>Partire (<i>to leave</i>)</th>\n<th>Capire (<i>to understand</i>)</th>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>io</b></td>\n<td><b>lavoro</b></td>\n<td><b>prendo</b></td>\n<td><b>parto</b></td>\n<td><b>capisco</b></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>tu</b></td>\n<td><b>lavori</b></td>\n<td><b>prendi</b></td>\n<td><b>parti</b></td>\n<td><b>capisci</b></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>lui/lei/Lei</b></td>\n<td><b>lavora</b></td>\n<td><b>prende</b></td>\n<td><b>parte</b></td>\n<td><b>capisce</b></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>noi</b></td>\n<td><b>lavoriamo</b></td>\n<td><b>prendiamo</b></td>\n<td><b>partiamo</b></td>\n<td><b>capiamo</b></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>voi</b></td>\n<td><b>lavorate</b></td>\n<td><b>prendete</b></td>\n<td><b>partite</b></td>\n<td><b>capite</b></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>loro/Loro</b></td>\n<td><b>lavorano</b></td>\n<td><b>prendono</b></td>\n<td><b>partono</b></td>\n<td><b>capiscono</b></td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n<p class=\"Remember\">Unfortunately, there are also <i>irregular</i> verbs, which you have to memorize. You&#8217;ll find that the more you practice them, the easier it is to use them in conversation:</p>\n<table>\n<caption>Common Irregular Italian Verbs in the Present Indicative Tense</caption>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<th>Subject Pronoun</th>\n<th>Andare (<i>to go</i>)</th>\n<th>Bere (<i>to drink</i>)</th>\n<th>Dare (<i>to give</i>)</th>\n<th>Fare (<i>to do</i>)</th>\n<th>Stare (<i>to stay</i>)</th>\n<th>Venire (<i>to come</i>)</th>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>io</b></td>\n<td><b>vado</b></td>\n<td><b>bevo</b></td>\n<td><b>do</b></td>\n<td><b>faccio</b></td>\n<td><b>sto</b></td>\n<td><b>vengo</b></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>tu</b></td>\n<td><b>vai</b></td>\n<td><b>bevi</b></td>\n<td><b>dai</b></td>\n<td><b>fai</b></td>\n<td><b>stai</b></td>\n<td><b>vieni</b></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>lui/lei/Lei</b></td>\n<td><b>va</b></td>\n<td><b>beve</b></td>\n<td><b>dà</b></td>\n<td><b>fa</b></td>\n<td><b>sta</b></td>\n<td><b>viene</b></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>noi</b></td>\n<td><b>andiamo</b></td>\n<td><b>beviamo</b></td>\n<td><b>diamo</b></td>\n<td><b>facciamo</b></td>\n<td><b>stiamo</b></td>\n<td><b>veniamo</b></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>voi</b></td>\n<td><b>andate</b></td>\n<td><b>bevete</b></td>\n<td><b>date</b></td>\n<td><b>fate</b></td>\n<td><b>state</b></td>\n<td><b>venite</b></td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>loro/Loro</b></td>\n<td><b>vanno</b></td>\n<td><b>bevono</b></td>\n<td><b>danno</b></td>\n<td><b>fanno</b></td>\n<td><b>stanno</b></td>\n<td><b>vengono</b></td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n"},{"title":"Crafting common idiomatic expressions in Italian ","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Whether you&#8217;re learning Mandarin, Farsi, German, or Italian, idioms enrich communication — but can&#8217;t be translated literally. In Italian, the most common idioms use the following verbs: <b>fare</b> (<i>to do</i>), <b>avere</b> (<i>to have</i>), <b>essere</b> (<i>to be</i>), and <b>andare</b> (<i>to go</i>).</p>\n<h2 id=\"tab1\">Idioms using fare (to do)</h2>\n<p>Here&#8217;s a list of the most common idiomatic expressions with <b>fare</b> (<i>to do</i>):</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare gli auguri</b> (<i>to give one</i><i>&#8216;</i><i>s wishes</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare il bagno/la doccia</b> (<i>to take a bath/shower</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare bello/brutto/caldo/freddo/fresco</b> (<i>to have good/bad/warm/cold/cool weather</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare il biglietto</b> (<i>to get a ticket</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare buon viaggio</b> (<i>to have a good trip</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare colazione</b> (<i>to have breakfast/lunch</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare i compiti</b> (<i>to do homework</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare una conferenza</b> (<i>to give a lecture</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare la conoscenza di</b> (<i>to meet</i><i>; to</i><i> make the acquaintance of</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare il conto</b> (<i>to add up the total)</i></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare due, tre, . . . chilometri</b> (<i>to cover 2, 3, . . . kilometers</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare un favore</b> (<i>to do a favor</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare un giro</b> (<i>to take a tour</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare male</b> (<i>to hurt; to ache</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare una partita di calcio</b> (<i>to play soccer</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare una passeggiata</b> (<i>to take a walk</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare la pasta</b> (<i>to cook pasta</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fai pure!</b> (<i>go ahead!</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare un regalo</b> (<i>give a present</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare una sorpresa</b> (<i>to surprise</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare la spesa</b> (<i>to go grocery shopping</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare le spese</b> (<i>to go shopping</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare lo spiritoso</b> (<i>to joke; to clown</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare tardi</b> (<i>to be late</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare una telefonata</b> (<i>to make a call</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare le valige</b> (<i>to pack</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare vedere</b> (<i>to show</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare un viaggio</b> (<i>to take a trip</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>fare una visita</b> (<i>to pay a visit</i>)</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<h2 id=\"tab2\">Idioms using avere (to have)</h2>\n<p>Notice that most of the idiomatic expressions with <b>avere</b> are translated with the verb <i>to be</i> in English.</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>aver caldo</b> (<i>to be warm</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>avere . . . anni</b> (<i>to be . . . years old</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>avere la corda al collo</b> (<i>to have no way out</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>aver fame</b> (<i>to be hungry</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>avere fegato</b> (<i>to be brave</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>aver freddo</b> (<i>to </i><i>be cold</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>aver fretta</b> (<i>to be in a hurry</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>avere grilli per la testa</b> (<i>to have fancy and unrealistic ambitions</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>avere la luna storta</b> (<i>to be in a bad mood</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>avere una memoria di ferro</b> (<i>to have a good memory</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>avere molto caldo</b> (<i>to be hot</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>aver paura</b> (<i>to be afraid of</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>aver ragione</b> (<i>to be right</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>aver sete</b> (<i>to be thirsty</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>aver sonno</b> (<i>to be sleepy</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>aver torto</b> (<i>to be wrong</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>aver vergogna</b> (<i>to be ashamed of</i>)</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<h2 id=\"tab3\">Idioms using essere (to be) and andare (to go)</h2>\n<p>Here&#8217;s a list of the most common idiomatic expressions with <b>essere</b> (<i>to be</i>) and <b>andare</b> (<i>to go</i>).</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>essere a cavallo</b> (<i>to find a good solution to an issue</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>essere al settimo cielo</b> (<i>to be very happy</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>essere come il diavolo e l&#8217;acqua santa</b> (<i>to be extremely different</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>essere nelle canne</b> (<i>to be broke</i><i>; </i><i>to be in difficulty</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>essere un carciofo</b> (<i>to be credulous/awkward</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>andare all&#8217;aria</b> (<i>to disrupt the plans; to be unsuccessful</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>andare liscio</b> (<i>to go smoothly</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>andare via</b> (<i>to leave</i><i>; </i><i>to go away</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>andare a trovare</b> (<i>to pay a visit </i><i>to </i><i>someone</i>)</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"When to capitalize formal titles before names ","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Fine-tune your command of the Italian language by knowing when to capitalize a person&#8217;s title. If you have to write a formal letter or e-mail to VIPs, such as the principal of your child&#8217;s school, show that you&#8217;re familiar with the rules of Italian &#8220;bureaucratic&#8221; etiquette.</p>\n<p>Names that represent a particular title — by birth, merit, or qualification — should be capitalized. You write:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>il Presidente</b> (<i>President</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>l&#8217;Onorevole</b> (<i>Honorable</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>il Rettore</b> (<i>Dean</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>il Preside</b> (<i>Principal</i>)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>il Professore</b> (<i>Professor</i>)</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p>However, when these titles are accompanied by a proper name, using lowercase is preferable:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>il presidente Rossi</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>l&#8217;onorevole Verdi</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>il rettore Bianchi</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>il conte Cavour</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>il re Vittorio Emanuele II</b></p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p>In the plural, these titles aren&#8217;t capitalized (such as ministers or senators). For example, <b>i</b><b> </b><b>senatori hanno approvato una nuova legge sul lavoro</b> (<i>The senators</i><i> have approved a new labor law</i>).</p>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Two years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-02-24T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":207893},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-27T16:53:31+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-01-19T17:02:37+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:19:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Learning Languages","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33689"},"slug":"learning-languages","categoryId":33689},{"name":"Italian","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33698"},"slug":"italian","categoryId":33698}],"title":"Italian For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"italian for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"italian-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","关注引挚SEO调优方案网络":{"metaDescription":"Planning a trip to Italy? Learn some basic Italian to make it more fulfilling. Get to know Italian greetings, question words, numbers, and the days of the week.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Planning a trip to Italy? Learn some basic Italian to make it more fulfilling. Get to know Italian greetings, question words, numbers, and the days of the week. Also, be sure to know how to ask for help in Italian so you're prepared for emergencies. And something very important: how to order food and drink!","description":"Planning a trip to Italy? Learn some basic Italian to make it more fulfilling. Get to know Italian greetings, question words, numbers, and the days of the week. Also, be sure to know how to ask for help in Italian so you're prepared for emergencies. And something very important: how to order food and drink!","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9662,"name":"Francesca Romana Onofri","slug":"francesca-romana-onofri","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9662"}},{"authorId":9664,"name":"Karen Antje Mller","slug":"karen-antje-moller","description":"Karen Antje Möller is a veteran language teacher and author. She has worked with Berlitz Publishing on German-Italian projects and Italian exercise books.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9664"}},{"authorId":9663,"name":"Teresa L. Picarazzi","slug":"teresa-l-picarazzi","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9663"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33698,"title":"Italian","slug":"italian","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33698"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":187221,"title":"Ordering Food and Drink in Italian","slug":"ordering-food-and-drink-in-italian","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/187221"}},{"articleId":187222,"title":"Italian Greetings","slug":"italian-greetings","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/187222"}},{"articleId":187215,"title":"Getting Started with Italian Numbers","slug":"getting-started-with-italian-numbers","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/187215"}},{"articleId":187203,"title":"Days of the Week in Italian","slug":"days-of-the-week-in-italian","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/187203"}},{"articleId":187184,"title":"Italian Courtesy Phrases","slug":"italian-courtesy-phrases","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/187184"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":207900,"title":"Italian Grammar For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-grammar-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207900"}},{"articleId":207893,"title":"Italian All-in-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207893"}},{"articleId":200932,"title":"Picking Up Italian Quickly","slug":"picking-up-italian-quickly","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/200932"}},{"articleId":200457,"title":"Discussing Your Job in Italian","slug":"discussing-your-job-in-italian","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/200457"}},{"articleId":199655,"title":"Asking Simple Questions in Italian","slug":"asking-simple-questions-in-italian","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/199655"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282318,"slug":"italian-for-dummies-2nd-edition","isbn":"9781118004654","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1118004655/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1118004655/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1118004655-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1118004655/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1118004655/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/italian-for-dummies-2nd-edition-cover-9781118004654-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Italian For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":"<p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9662,"name":"Francesca Romana Onofri","slug":"francesca-romana-onofri","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9662"}},{"authorId":34864,"name":"Karen Antje Möller","slug":"karen-antje-m&ouml;ller","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/34864"}},{"authorId":9663,"name":"Teresa L. Picarazzi","slug":"teresa-l-picarazzi","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9663"}},{"authorId":34784,"name":"","slug":"","description":" <p><b> Joseph A. Allen, PhD</b> is a professor of industrial and organizational (I/O) psychology at the University of Utah. His articles have appeared in <i>Human Relations, Journal of Business Psychology</i>, and more.</p> <p><b>Karin M. Reed</b> is CEO of Speaker Dynamics, a corporate communications training firm. She is an Emmy award-winning broadcast journalist. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/34784"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;learning-languages&quot;,&quot;italian&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781118004654&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b164b96f\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;learning-languages&quot;,&quot;italian&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781118004654&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b164c41c\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":187222,"title":"Italian Greetings","slug":"italian-greetings","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/187222"}},{"articleId":187184,"title":"Italian Courtesy Phrases","slug":"italian-courtesy-phrases","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/187184"}},{"articleId":187179,"title":"Basic Question Words in Italian","slug":"basic-question-words-in-italian","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/187179"}},{"articleId":187203,"title":"Days of the Week in Italian","slug":"days-of-the-week-in-italian","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/187203"}},{"articleId":187177,"title":"Getting Help for Emergencies in Italian","slug":"getting-help-for-emergencies-in-italian","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/187177"}},{"articleId":187221,"title":"Ordering Food and Drink in Italian","slug":"ordering-food-and-drink-in-italian","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/187221"}}],"content":[{"title":"Italian greetings","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Knowing Italian greetings can make a good impression, whether you&#8217;re speaking Italian for business or while traveling. The Italian culture places importance on introductions and salutations as it is often considered a foundational way of showing respect.</p>\n<p>There are different expressions you can use depending whether the situation is formal (business meeting) or informal (meeting someone at a restaurant). Offer polite greetings to friends and associates or as a way to break the ice when meeting new people.</p>\n<p>Practice using these common Italian greetings:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buongiorno!</b> (bwohn-<i>johr</i>-noh) (Hello! and Good morning!)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Arrivederci!</b> (<i>ahr-</i>ree-veh-<i>dehr-</i>chee) (Goodbye!) (Formal)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Ciao!</b><i> </i>(chou) (Hello! and Good-bye!) (Informal)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Salve!</b><i> </i>(<i>sahl</i>-veh) (Hello! and Good-bye!) (Neutral)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buonasera!</b><i> </i>(<i>bwoh</i>-nah-<i>seh</i>-rah) (Good afternoon! Good evening!) (Formal)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buonanotte!</b><i> </i>(<i>bwoh</i>-nah-<i>noht</i>-teh) (Good night!) (Informal)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come si chiama?</b> (<i>koh</i>-meh see <i>kyah</i>-mah) (What is your name?) (Formal)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come ti chiami?</b> (<i>koh</i>-meh tee <i>kyah</i>-mee) (What is your name?) (Informal)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mi chiamo</b>…(mee <i>kyah</i>-moh) (My name is. . .)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come sta?</b> (<i>koh</i>-meh stah) (How are you?) (Formal)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come stai?</b> (<i>koh</i>-meh stahy) (How are you?) (Informal)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Bene, grazie.</b> (<i>beh</i>-neh <i>grah</i>-tsee-eh) (Fine, thank you.)</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Italian courtesy phrases","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Courtesy is important no matter what country you&#8217;re in. Use these courtesy phrases when speaking in Italian so you can be considerate and polite; they&#8217;ll also help you communicate easily:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Per favore</b> (pehr fah-<i>voh</i>-reh) (Please.)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Per piacere </b>(pehr pyah-<i>cheh</i>-reh) (Please.)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Grazie</b> (<i>grah</i>-tsee-eh) (Thank you.)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Prego!</b> (<i>preh</i>-goh) (You&#8217;re welcome!; By all means, after you.)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non c&#8217;è di che.</b> (nohn cheh dee keh) (You&#8217;re welcome.)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mi dispiace<i>.</i></b> (mee dees-<i>pyah</i>-cheh) (I&#8217;m sorry.)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mi scusi.</b> (mee <i>skooh</i>-zee) (Excuse me, formal.)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Scusi, un informazione, per favore.</b> (<i>skooh</i>-zee oohn-<i>een</i>-fohr-mats-<i>yoh</i>-neh pehr fah-<i>voh</i>-reh) (Excuse me, I need some information, please.)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Scusa.</b> (<i>skooh</i>-zah) (Excuse me, I&#8217;m sorry, informal)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Permesso?</b> (pehr-<i>mehs</i>-soh) (Excuse me — when walking through a crowded train compartment; also, &#8220;May I come in?&#8221; when crossing the threshold of someone&#8217;s house.)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sì.</b> (see) (Yes.)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>No.</b> (noh) (No.)</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Basic question words in Italian","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>To communicate in Italian and to travel with ease, there are practical questions in Italian (or any language for that matter) that you&#8217;ll use daily and have to know:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Parla inglese?</b> (<i>pahr</i>-lah een-<i>gleh-</i>zeh) (Do you speak English?)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Chi?</b> (kee) (Who?)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Cosa?</b> (<i>koh</i>-sah) (What?)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Quando?</b> (<i>kwahn</i>-doh) (When?)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Dove?</b> (<i>doh</i>-veh) (Where?)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Perché?</b> (pehr-<i>keh</i>) (Why?)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come?</b> (<i>koh</i>-meh) (How?)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Quanto?</b> (<i>kwanh</i>-toh) (How much?)</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p>Try these helpful phrases:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Dov&#8217;è la stazione?</b> (doh-<i>veh</i> lah stah-<i>tsyoh</i>-neh) (Where is the station?)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Scusi, dov&#8217;è il bagno?</b> (<i>skooh</i>-zee doh-<i>veh</i> eel <i>bahn</i>-yoh) (Where is the bathroom?)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Quanto dista il Colos关注引挚SEO调优方案网络?</b> (<i>kwahn</i>-toh <i>dees</i>-tah eel koh-lohs-<i>seh</i>-oh) (How far is the Coloseum?)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Dove si mangia il miglior gelato?</b> (<i>doh</i>-veh see <i>mahn</i>-jah eel meel-<i>yohr</i> geh-<i>lah</i>-toh) (Where can you get the best ice cream?)</p>\n<p class=\"child-para\"><b>Come si arriva in Piazza della Repubblica?</b> (<i>koh</i>-meh see ahr-<i>ree</i>-vah een <i>pyahts</i>-sah <i>dehl</i>-lah reh-<i>pooh</i>-blee-kah) (How do you get to Piazza della Repubblica?)</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Days of the week in Italian","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>In Italian, the days of the week aren&#8217;t capitalized. Eyeball this table of the days of the week in Italian (along with pronunciations and abbreviations) to ensure you get your days straight while in Italy.</p>\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<th>Italian/Abbreviation</th>\n<th>Pronunciation</th>\n<th>Translation</th>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>domenica/do.</td>\n<td>doh-<i>meh-</i>nee-kah</td>\n<td>Sunday</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>lunedì/lun.</td>\n<td>looh-neh-<i>dee</i></td>\n<td>Monday</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>martedì/mar.</td>\n<td>mahr-teh-<i>dee</i></td>\n<td>Tuesday</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>mercoledì/mer.</td>\n<td>mehr-koh-leh-<i>dee</i></td>\n<td>Wednesday</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>giovedì/gio.</td>\n<td>joh-veh-<i>dee</i></td>\n<td>Thursday</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>venerdì/ven.</td>\n<td>veh-nehr-<i>dee</i></td>\n<td>Friday</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td>sabato/sab.</td>\n<td><i>sah</i>-bah-toh</td>\n<td>Saturday</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n<p>You might also need to know how to say the following:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Oggi </b>(<i>ohj</i>-jee)<b> </b>(today)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Domani </b>(doh-<i>mah</i>-nee)<b> </b>(tomorrow)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Dopodomani </b>(<i>doh</i>-poh-doh-<i>mah</i>-nee) (day after tomorrow)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Ieri </b>(<i>yeh</i>-ree) (yesterday)</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Getting help for emergencies in Italian","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>If you have an emergency while traveling in Italy, you&#8217;ll be glad to know these basic Italian phrases. Be prepared for emergencies by committing these Italian phrases to memory:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Aiuto!</b> (ah-<i>yooh</i>-toh) (Help!)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Emergenza!</b> (eh-mehr-<i>jehn-</i>tsah) (Emergency!)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Chiamate la polizia!</b> (chee-ah-<i>mah</i>-teh lah poh-lee-<i>tsee</i>-ah) (Call the police!)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Chiamate un&#8217;ambulanza!</b> (kee-ah-<i>mah</i>-teh ooh-nahm-booh-<i>lahn-</i>tsah) (Call an ambulance!)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Ho bisogno di un medico.</b> (oh bee-<i>zoh-</i>nyoh dee oohn <i>meh-</i>dee-koh) (I need a doctor.)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Dov&#8217;è l&#8217;ospedale?</b> (doh-<i>veh</i><u> </u>lohs-peh-<i>dah</i>-leh) (Where is the hospital?)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mi sento molto male.</b> (mee <i>sehn</i>-toh <i>mohl</i>-toh <i>mah</i>-leh) (I feel very sick.)</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Ordering food and drink in Italian","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>If you visit Italy without trying some of the food, you haven&#8217;t really visited Italy. (You&#8217;re also probably rather hungry.) The following phrases can come in handy whether you need a bottle of water or you&#8217;re ordering a lavish Italian dinner:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Un cappucccino, per favore.</b> (oohn kahp-pooh-<i>chee</i>-noh pehr fah-<i>voh</i>-reh) (A cappuccino, please.)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Un bicchiere di acqua minerale per favore.</b> (oohn bee-<i>kyeh</i>-reh dee <i>ahk</i>-wah meen-eh-<i>rah</i>-leh perh fah-<i>voh</i>-reh). (A glass of mineral water, please.)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mezzo litro d&#8217;acqua</b>. (<i>me</i><i>h</i><i>dz</i>-zoh <i>lee</i>-troh <i>dahk</i>-wah) (Half a liter of water.) (Generally, you would take this to go, not standing at the bar)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mezzo chilo di pesche, per piacere.</b> (<i>mehdz</i>-zoh <i>kee</i>-loh dee <i>pehs</i>-keh perh pyah-<i>cheh</i>-reh) (Half a kilo of peaches, please.)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Quanto viene?</b> (<i>kwahn</i>-toh <i>vyeh</i>-neh) (How much does it come to?)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Un gelato di 2 euro, per favore.</b> (oohn geh-<i>lah</i>-toh dee <i>dooh</i>-eh <i>eh</i>-ooh-roh pehr fah-<i>voh</i>-reh) (A 2-Euro size ice cream, please.)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Quali gusti?</b> (<i>kwah</i>-lee <i>goohs</i>-tee) (What flavors?)</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Ci fa il conto, per favore?</b>/<b>Ci porta il conto?</b> (chee fah eel <i>kohn</i>-toh pehr fah-<i>voh</i>-reh/chee <i>pohr</i>-tah eel <i>kohn</i>-toh) (Will you bring us the bill please?)</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p class=\"Tip\"><b>A Tip about</b> <b>Tipping</b><b>:</b> You generally do not tip in an Italian restaurant: Italians and Europeans don&#8217;t. This is nothing to feel guilty about because waiters are well paid and don&#8217;t rely on or expect tips to round out their salaries as they do in some other countries.</p>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-01-19T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":208553},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T22:01:26+00:00","modifiedTime":"2022-10-01T22:14:02+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:18:40+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Learning Languages","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33689"},"slug":"learning-languages","categoryId":33689},{"name":"Italian","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33698"},"slug":"italian","categoryId":33698}],"title":"Italian Greetings and Goodbyes","strippedTitle":"italian greetings and goodbyes","slug":"italian-greetings-and-good-byes","canonicalUrl":"","关注引挚SEO调优方案网络":{"metaDescription":"One of the best things to learn first before traveling to Italy is how to greet people and say goodbye. Here are the many ways to do it.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"When traveling in Italy, you'll find that the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/languages/italian/italian-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Italian words and phrases</a> you use most frequently will be the common greetings. The words and phrases will quickly become second nature as you <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/languages/italian/picking-up-italian-quickly/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">use them day in and day out</a> with everyone you come across.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Saying hello and goodbye</h2>\r\nAs you'd expect, you should use a polite greeting when you run into someone you know or want to know. But it's important to use the correct greeting depending on who the person is. So, you would use a different word for greeting your friend than you would for greeting your boss or teacher.\r\n\r\nThe most common ways to greet someone in Italian are:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Ciao</b> (hello; hi [Informal])</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips Warning\"><b>Ciao!</b> is the most common way of saying hello and goodbye informally. You should never use it with someone like a boss or a teacher or anyone else with whom you're using <b>Lei</b> (the formal version of you)<i>.</i></p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Salve!</b> (Hi; Bye [Formal/Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Che piacere vederti!</b> (How nice it is to see you! [Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buongiorno!</b> (Hello; Good morning; Goodbye [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buona sera!</b> (Hello; Good evening; Goodbye [Formal])</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">Use the longer <b>Buon giorno</b> and <b>Buona sera</b> in more formal situations, like when you enter a store.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThere are also many ways to say goodbye:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Ciao!</b> (Hi; Bye [Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Salve!</b> (Hi; Bye [Formal/Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Ciao! Ciao!</b> (Bye-bye!)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buon giorno!</b> (Hello; Good morning; Goodbye [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buona sera!</b> (Hello; Good evening; Goodbye [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buona notte!</b> (Good night! [Formal/Informal])</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para Remember\">Use <b>Buona notte!</b> only when its bedtime and when you're taking leave of people at night and you think that everyone is going to bed.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Arrivederci!</b> (Goodbye! [Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Arrivederla!</b> (Goodbye! [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>A dopo!</b> (See you later! [Formal/Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>A presto!</b> (See you soon! [Formal/Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>A domani!</b> (See you tomorrow! [Formal/Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>A fra poco.</b> (See you in a bit.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nCheek kissing is another common type of greeting in Italy, as it is in most European countries. However, in Italy, cheek kissing is reserved for greeting people you know well and is less common among men.\r\n\r\nTo avoid bumping noses, the rule is to kiss left cheek first and then the right. When you meet someone for the first time, handshakes are much more common. As you get to know the other person, you move more into cheek-kissing territory.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Asking and replying to \"How are you?\"</h2>\r\nHow are you? How's it going? How many times a day do we hear or say these brief greetings at the beginning of our <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/languages/italian/common-conversational-words-and-phrases-in-italian/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">conversations</a>? So many times, in fact, that half the time, we don't even pay attention. These pleasantries are common in Italy as well. The most common ways to ask how someone is doing are:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come stai?</b> (How are you? [Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come sta?</b> (How are you? [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nAs you'd expect, when someone asks you how you're doing, there are many responses.\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sto bene!</b> (I'm well!)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Molto bene, grazie.</b> (Very well, thanks.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Abbastanza bene, grazie.</b> (Pretty well, thanks.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non c'è male.</b> (Pretty well, thanks.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sto bene grazie, e tu?</b> (I'm well, thanks, and you? [Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sto bene, grazie, e Lei?</b> (I'm well, thanks, and you? [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non sto bene.; Sto male.</b> (I'm not well.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Malissimo!</b> (Not well at all!)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Va bene.</b> (Things are going well.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Va tutto bene.</b> (Everything's going well.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Va benissimo!</b> (Things are going great!)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Va male.</b> (Things aren't going well.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Così così.</b> (So so.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non mi posso lamentare.</b> (I can't complain.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Benissimo!</b> (Great!)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >How to address people</h2>\r\nItalians like titles and tend to use them whenever possible. When addressing someone without using his or her last name, use the entire title as it's listed here. But when you add the person's last name to the title, you drop the final -e in the title. Use the <b>Lei</b> form when using any of the following titles:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Miss</b> (Signorina)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mrs.; Madam</b> (Signora)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mister; Sir</b> (Signore)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>professore</b> [M]; <b>professoressa</b> [F] (professor)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>ingegnere</b> (engineer)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>dottore</b> [M]; <b>dottoressa</b> [F] (doctor)</p>\r\nIn Italian, <b>dottore</b> is used if the person has a university degree even though it's not a medical degree.</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"When traveling in Italy, you'll find that the <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/languages/italian/italian-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">Italian words and phrases</a> you use most frequently will be the common greetings. The words and phrases will quickly become second nature as you <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/languages/italian/picking-up-italian-quickly/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">use them day in and day out</a> with everyone you come across.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Saying hello and goodbye</h2>\r\nAs you'd expect, you should use a polite greeting when you run into someone you know or want to know. But it's important to use the correct greeting depending on who the person is. So, you would use a different word for greeting your friend than you would for greeting your boss or teacher.\r\n\r\nThe most common ways to greet someone in Italian are:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Ciao</b> (hello; hi [Informal])</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips Warning\"><b>Ciao!</b> is the most common way of saying hello and goodbye informally. You should never use it with someone like a boss or a teacher or anyone else with whom you're using <b>Lei</b> (the formal version of you)<i>.</i></p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Salve!</b> (Hi; Bye [Formal/Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Che piacere vederti!</b> (How nice it is to see you! [Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buongiorno!</b> (Hello; Good morning; Goodbye [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buona sera!</b> (Hello; Good evening; Goodbye [Formal])</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">Use the longer <b>Buon giorno</b> and <b>Buona sera</b> in more formal situations, like when you enter a store.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThere are also many ways to say goodbye:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Ciao!</b> (Hi; Bye [Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Salve!</b> (Hi; Bye [Formal/Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Ciao! Ciao!</b> (Bye-bye!)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buon giorno!</b> (Hello; Good morning; Goodbye [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buona sera!</b> (Hello; Good evening; Goodbye [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buona notte!</b> (Good night! [Formal/Informal])</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para Remember\">Use <b>Buona notte!</b> only when its bedtime and when you're taking leave of people at night and you think that everyone is going to bed.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Arrivederci!</b> (Goodbye! [Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Arrivederla!</b> (Goodbye! [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>A dopo!</b> (See you later! [Formal/Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>A presto!</b> (See you soon! [Formal/Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>A domani!</b> (See you tomorrow! [Formal/Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>A fra poco.</b> (See you in a bit.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nCheek kissing is another common type of greeting in Italy, as it is in most European countries. However, in Italy, cheek kissing is reserved for greeting people you know well and is less common among men.\r\n\r\nTo avoid bumping noses, the rule is to kiss left cheek first and then the right. When you meet someone for the first time, handshakes are much more common. As you get to know the other person, you move more into cheek-kissing territory.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Asking and replying to \"How are you?\"</h2>\r\nHow are you? How's it going? How many times a day do we hear or say these brief greetings at the beginning of our <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/languages/italian/common-conversational-words-and-phrases-in-italian/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">conversations</a>? So many times, in fact, that half the time, we don't even pay attention. These pleasantries are common in Italy as well. The most common ways to ask how someone is doing are:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come stai?</b> (How are you? [Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come sta?</b> (How are you? [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nAs you'd expect, when someone asks you how you're doing, there are many responses.\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sto bene!</b> (I'm well!)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Molto bene, grazie.</b> (Very well, thanks.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Abbastanza bene, grazie.</b> (Pretty well, thanks.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non c'è male.</b> (Pretty well, thanks.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sto bene grazie, e tu?</b> (I'm well, thanks, and you? [Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sto bene, grazie, e Lei?</b> (I'm well, thanks, and you? [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non sto bene.; Sto male.</b> (I'm not well.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Malissimo!</b> (Not well at all!)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Va bene.</b> (Things are going well.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Va tutto bene.</b> (Everything's going well.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Va benissimo!</b> (Things are going great!)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Va male.</b> (Things aren't going well.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Così così.</b> (So so.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Non mi posso lamentare.</b> (I can't complain.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Benissimo!</b> (Great!)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >How to address people</h2>\r\nItalians like titles and tend to use them whenever possible. When addressing someone without using his or her last name, use the entire title as it's listed here. But when you add the person's last name to the title, you drop the final -e in the title. Use the <b>Lei</b> form when using any of the following titles:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Miss</b> (Signorina)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mrs.; Madam</b> (Signora)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mister; Sir</b> (Signore)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>professore</b> [M]; <b>professoressa</b> [F] (professor)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>ingegnere</b> (engineer)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>dottore</b> [M]; <b>dottoressa</b> [F] (doctor)</p>\r\nIn Italian, <b>dottore</b> is used if the person has a university degree even though it's not a medical degree.</li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9663,"name":"Teresa L. Picarazzi","slug":"teresa-l-picarazzi","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9663"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33698,"title":"Italian","slug":"italian","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33698"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Saying hello and goodbye","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Asking and replying to \"How are you?\"","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"How to address people","target":"#tab3"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":208553,"title":"Italian For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/208553"}},{"articleId":207900,"title":"Italian Grammar For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-grammar-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207900"}},{"articleId":207893,"title":"Italian All-in-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207893"}},{"articleId":200932,"title":"Picking Up Italian Quickly","slug":"picking-up-italian-quickly","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/200932"}},{"articleId":200457,"title":"Discussing Your Job in Italian","slug":"discussing-your-job-in-italian","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/200457"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;learning-languages&quot;,&quot;italian&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b0014184\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;learning-languages&quot;,&quot;italian&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b0014b34\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2022-10-01T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":195625},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T22:01:26+00:00","modifiedTime":"2021-01-13T17:41:17+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:28+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Learning Languages","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33689"},"slug":"learning-languages","categoryId":33689},{"name":"Italian","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33698"},"slug":"italian","categoryId":33698}],"title":"How to Make Introductions in Italian","strippedTitle":"how to make introductions in italian","slug":"how-to-make-introductions-in-italian","canonicalUrl":"","关注引挚SEO调优方案网络":{"metaDescription":"Learning the proper way to make introductions in Italian can help you get off to the right start. The Italian language tends to be a bit more formal than Americ","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Learning the proper way to make introductions in Italian can help you get off to the right start. The <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/languages/italian/italian-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">Italian language</a> tends to be a bit more formal than American English. Consequently, introductions in Italian follow more of a pattern than they sometimes do in the United States. Don't worry, it’s not complicated — just good manners.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Introducing yourself</h2>\r\nFirst impressions are important — they can start a friendship or set the tone for your interaction with someone.\r\n<ol class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Start with a greeting.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">The simplest greeting is <b>Ciao</b> or <b>Buon giorno</b>, which means Hello or Good Day.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Introduce yourself.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">The two most common ways to introduce are to say <b>Mi chiamo <i>Name</i></b> (My name is <i>Name</i>) or <b>Sono</b> <b><i>Name</i></b> (I'm Name).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Since you are meeting the person for the first time, you should use the more formal form of you.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">Use the formal <b>Lei</b> (singular you) when speaking to people you don't know well; in situations such as in stores, restaurants, hotels, or pharmacies); and with professors, older people, and your friends' parents. Save the informal <b>tu</b> (singular you) and <b>voi</b> (plural you) for friends, relatives, younger people, and people you know well.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">The formal <b>Loro</b> (plural you) is rarely used and is gradually being replaced by the informal <b>voi</b><i> </i>when addressing a group of people:</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\"><b>Come ti/si chiami?</b> (What's your name? [Informal])</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\"><b>Lei come si chiama?</b> (What's your name? [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">After they tell you their name you should express pleasure. For example.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\"><b>Piacere!</b> (Nice to meet you!)</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\"><b>Piacere di conoscerla </b>(Pleased to meet you.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Asking \"Where are you from?\"</h2>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">You don't need to stop at introductions; you could also take this opportunity to talk about where each of you is from. To tell them where you're from, say <b>Sono degli Stati Uniti.</b><b> </b>(I'm from the United States.) To ask where the person is from, you can say:</p>\r\n\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Di dove sei?</b> (Where are you from? [Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Di dov'è Lei?</b> (Where are you from? [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nIf you want to talk about where you live on the other hand, you can use the verbs <b>abita</b> or <b>vivere</b><b> </b>— both of which mean to live:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>In quale città abita?</b> (What city do you live in?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><a href=\"//italian.about.com/library/media/audio/survival003i.wav\"><b>Lei abita qui?</b></a> (Do you live here?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Dove vive?</b> (Where do you live?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Vivo a Los Angeles.</b> (I live in Los Angeles.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Introducing other people</h2>\r\nThe second most common type of introduction is to introduce someone else, such as your spouse, child, or friend. The following phrases are typical of introducing someone else.\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Permette che mi presenti mia moglie?</b> (May I introduce my wife?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Permette che mi presenti mio fidanzato, Antonio?</b> (May I introduce my fiancé, Antonio?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Le/ti presento un amico mi, James.</b> (This is my friend, James. [F/M])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nPut the steps together and see how it comes together in a conversation.\r\n<blockquote>Larry:<b> </b><b>Buongiorno</b><b>. </b><b>Mi chiamo</b><b> Larry.</b><b> Lei come si chiama?</b><b> </b>(Hello. My name is Larry. What's your name?)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote>Maria: <b>Sono Maria.</b><b> (</b>I'm Maria.)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote>Larry: <b>Piacere di conoscerla</b><b>.</b><b> (</b>It's a pleasure to meet you.)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote>Maria: <b>E l</b><b>ei.</b><b> </b>(And you.)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote>Larry: <b>Lei abitaqui?</b><b> </b>(Do you live here?)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote>Maria: <b>Sì. </b><b>Di dov</b><b>'</b><b>è Lei?</b><b> </b>(Yes. Where are you from?)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote>Larry: <b>Sono degli Stati Unit.</b><b> Vivo a Los Angeles.</b><b> </b>(I'm from the United States. I live in Los Angeles.)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote>Maria: <b>Permette che mi presenti mio fidanzato, Antonio?</b><b> </b>(May I introduce my fiancé, Antonio?)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote>Larry: <b>Piacere!</b><b> </b>(Nice to meet you!)</blockquote>","description":"Learning the proper way to make introductions in Italian can help you get off to the right start. The <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/languages/italian/italian-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">Italian language</a> tends to be a bit more formal than American English. Consequently, introductions in Italian follow more of a pattern than they sometimes do in the United States. Don't worry, it’s not complicated — just good manners.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Introducing yourself</h2>\r\nFirst impressions are important — they can start a friendship or set the tone for your interaction with someone.\r\n<ol class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Start with a greeting.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">The simplest greeting is <b>Ciao</b> or <b>Buon giorno</b>, which means Hello or Good Day.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Introduce yourself.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">The two most common ways to introduce are to say <b>Mi chiamo <i>Name</i></b> (My name is <i>Name</i>) or <b>Sono</b> <b><i>Name</i></b> (I'm Name).</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">Since you are meeting the person for the first time, you should use the more formal form of you.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">Use the formal <b>Lei</b> (singular you) when speaking to people you don't know well; in situations such as in stores, restaurants, hotels, or pharmacies); and with professors, older people, and your friends' parents. Save the informal <b>tu</b> (singular you) and <b>voi</b> (plural you) for friends, relatives, younger people, and people you know well.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">The formal <b>Loro</b> (plural you) is rarely used and is gradually being replaced by the informal <b>voi</b><i> </i>when addressing a group of people:</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\"><b>Come ti/si chiami?</b> (What's your name? [Informal])</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\"><b>Lei come si chiama?</b> (What's your name? [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\">After they tell you their name you should express pleasure. For example.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\"><b>Piacere!</b> (Nice to meet you!)</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\"><b>Piacere di conoscerla </b>(Pleased to meet you.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Asking \"Where are you from?\"</h2>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">You don't need to stop at introductions; you could also take this opportunity to talk about where each of you is from. To tell them where you're from, say <b>Sono degli Stati Uniti.</b><b> </b>(I'm from the United States.) To ask where the person is from, you can say:</p>\r\n\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Di dove sei?</b> (Where are you from? [Informal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Di dov'è Lei?</b> (Where are you from? [Formal])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nIf you want to talk about where you live on the other hand, you can use the verbs <b>abita</b> or <b>vivere</b><b> </b>— both of which mean to live:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>In quale città abita?</b> (What city do you live in?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><a href=\"//italian.about.com/library/media/audio/survival003i.wav\"><b>Lei abita qui?</b></a> (Do you live here?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Dove vive?</b> (Where do you live?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Vivo a Los Angeles.</b> (I live in Los Angeles.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Introducing other people</h2>\r\nThe second most common type of introduction is to introduce someone else, such as your spouse, child, or friend. The following phrases are typical of introducing someone else.\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Permette che mi presenti mia moglie?</b> (May I introduce my wife?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Permette che mi presenti mio fidanzato, Antonio?</b> (May I introduce my fiancé, Antonio?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Le/ti presento un amico mi, James.</b> (This is my friend, James. [F/M])</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nPut the steps together and see how it comes together in a conversation.\r\n<blockquote>Larry:<b> </b><b>Buongiorno</b><b>. </b><b>Mi chiamo</b><b> Larry.</b><b> Lei come si chiama?</b><b> </b>(Hello. My name is Larry. What's your name?)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote>Maria: <b>Sono Maria.</b><b> (</b>I'm Maria.)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote>Larry: <b>Piacere di conoscerla</b><b>.</b><b> (</b>It's a pleasure to meet you.)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote>Maria: <b>E l</b><b>ei.</b><b> </b>(And you.)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote>Larry: <b>Lei abitaqui?</b><b> </b>(Do you live here?)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote>Maria: <b>Sì. </b><b>Di dov</b><b>'</b><b>è Lei?</b><b> </b>(Yes. Where are you from?)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote>Larry: <b>Sono degli Stati Unit.</b><b> Vivo a Los Angeles.</b><b> </b>(I'm from the United States. I live in Los Angeles.)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote>Maria: <b>Permette che mi presenti mio fidanzato, Antonio?</b><b> </b>(May I introduce my fiancé, Antonio?)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote>Larry: <b>Piacere!</b><b> </b>(Nice to meet you!)</blockquote>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9663,"name":"Teresa L. Picarazzi","slug":"teresa-l-picarazzi","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9663"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33698,"title":"Italian","slug":"italian","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33698"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Introducing yourself","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Asking \"Where are you from?\"","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Introducing other people","target":"#tab3"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":208553,"title":"Italian For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/208553"}},{"articleId":207900,"title":"Italian Grammar For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-grammar-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207900"}},{"articleId":207893,"title":"Italian All-in-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207893"}},{"articleId":200932,"title":"Picking Up Italian Quickly","slug":"picking-up-italian-quickly","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/200932"}},{"articleId":200457,"title":"Discussing Your Job in Italian","slug":"discussing-your-job-in-italian","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/200457"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;learning-languages&quot;,&quot;italian&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ab8d69c4\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;academics-the-arts&quot;,&quot;language-language-arts&quot;,&quot;learning-languages&quot;,&quot;italian&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ab8d725d\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":null,"lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":195626},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T22:01:59+00:00","modifiedTime":"2021-01-13T17:40:05+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:28+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Academics & The Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Learning Languages","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33689"},"slug":"learning-languages","categoryId":33689},{"name":"Italian","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33698"},"slug":"italian","categoryId":33698}],"title":"How to Say Dates and Times in Italian","strippedTitle":"how to say dates and times in italian","slug":"how-to-say-dates-and-times-in-italian","canonicalUrl":"","关注引挚SEO调优方案网络":{"metaDescription":"When making plans, appointments, and travel arrangements in Italian-speaking countries, you need to be able to state dates and other calendar terms in Italian. ","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"When making plans, appointments, and travel arrangements in <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/languages/italian/italian-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">Italian-speaking</a> countries, you need to be able to state dates and other calendar terms in Italian. Understanding the days of the week, the months of the year, and how to tell time in Italian can help you to avoid confusion.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Calendar terms</h2>\r\nThe days of the week (<b>I giorni </b><b>della settimana</b>)<b> </b>aren't capitalized in Italian.\r\n<blockquote><b>lunedì</b> <i>(</i><i>loo-neh-</i><i>dee</i><i>)</i> (Monday)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>martedì</b> <i>(</i><i>mahr-teh-</i><i>dee</i><i>)</i> (Tuesday)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>mercoledì</b> <i>(</i><i>mehr-koh-leh-</i><i>dee</i><i>)</i> (Wednesday)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>giovedì</b> <i>(</i><i>zhoh-veh-</i><i>dee</i><i>)</i> (Thursday)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>venerdì</b> <i>(</i><i>veh-nehr-</i><i>dee</i><i>)</i> (Friday)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>sabato</b> <i>(</i><i>sah</i><i>-bah-toh</i><i>)</i> (Saturday)O</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>domenica</b> <i>(</i><i>doh-</i><i>meh</i><i>-nee-kah</i><i>)</i> (Sunday)</blockquote>\r\nLike the days of the week, the months of the year (<b>I mesi della </b><b>anno</b>) aren't capitalized in Italian.)\r\n<blockquote><b>gennaio</b> (<i>jehn-nah-yoh</i>) (January)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>febbraio</b> (<i>fehb-brah-yoh</i>) (February)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>marzo</b> (<i>mahr-tsoh</i>) (March)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>aprile</b> (<i>ah-pree-leh</i>) (April)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>maggio</b> (<i>mahj-joh</i>) (May)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>giugno</b> (<i>joo-nyoh</i>) (June)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>luglio</b> (<i>loo-lyoh</i>) (July)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>agosto</b> (<i>ah-gohs-toh</i>) (August)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>settembre</b> (<i>seht-tehm-breh</i>) (September)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>ottobre</b> (<i>oht-toh-breh</i>) (October)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>novembre</b> (<i>noh-vehm-breh</i>) (November)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>dicembre</b> (<i>dee-chehm-breh</i>) (December)</blockquote>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">Italians write dates in a different order than we do. Start with the day, then the month, and then the year. For example, to express January 08, 2009, you would write 8/1/09 instead of 1/8/09. If you write it 1/8/09, it would be assumed you were talking about August.</p>\r\nYou can use the following phrases when discussing dates in Italian.\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Che giorno è oggi?</b> (What day is today?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Oggi è venerdì.</b> (Today is Friday.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Che giorno parti?</b> [Informal]; <b>Che giorno parte?</b> [Formal] (What day are you leaving?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Parto lunedì.</b> (I'm leaving on Monday.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>In che mese vai in Italia?</b> [Informal] (What month are you going to Italy?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Ad agosto.</b> (In August.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Quando è il tuo compleanno?</b> [Informal] (When's your birthday?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Il sette novembre.</b> (November 7.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Che giorno è oggi?</b> (What's the date?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>É il cinque settembre.</b> (It's September 5.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Telling time</h2>\r\nThe time of day can be described in general terms or specific times. You can use the follow words to describe time in a general sense.\r\n<blockquote><b>di mattina</b> (in the morning)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>del pomeriggio</b> (in the afternoon)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>di sera</b> (in the evening)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>di notte</b> (in the middle of the night [until about5 a.m. or so])</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>giorno</b> (johr-noh) [m] (day)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>ieri</b> (ee-eh-ree) (yesterday)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>domani</b> (doh-mah-nee) (tomorrow)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>mezzogiorno </b>(noon)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>mezzanotte </b>(midnight)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>oggi</b> (today)</blockquote>\r\nTelling time in Italian is really just a question of counting.<b> </b>Italy commonly uses a 24-hour clock. When using a 24-hour clock, just add 12 to every hour after noon, for example 6 p.m. becomes 18.\r\n\r\nWhen you want to know a specific time of day, you can ask <b>Che ore sono? </b>(What time is it?). When expressing time between the hours, say the hour + minute, for example, <b>e un quarto</b> (and a quarter), <b>e ventitrè</b> (and 23), <b>e mezzo</b> (thirty). When you get past the half hour, start going the other say the number of minutes until the next hour, for example, say <b>meno un quarto</b> (a quarter to) and <b>meno dieci</b> (ten minutes to).\r\n\r\nYou can use the following phrases as a guide when talking about time in Italian.\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>É l'una.</b> (It's 1 a.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>É l'una e dieci.</b> (It's 1:10 a.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>É mezzogiorno.</b> (It's noon.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>É mezzogiorno e mezzo.</b> (It's 12:30 p.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>É mezzanotte.</b> (It's midnight.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sono le due.</b> (It's 2 a.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sono le due e un quarto.</b> (It's 2:15 a.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sono le quindici.</b> (It's 3 p.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sono le ventidue meno dieci.</b> (It's 9:50 p.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">In Italian, 9:50 p.m. is spoken as <b>ventidue meno dieci.</b> (9:50 p.m.) However, informally, it is usually written as 9,50. Notice that the colon has been replaced with a comma.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>A che ora parte il treno?</b> (At what time does the train leave?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Parte all'una.</b> (It leaves at 1.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>A che ora inizia l'opera?</b> (At what time does the opera begin?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Inizia alle venti.</b> (It begins at 8 p.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>A che ora chiude l'ostello?</b> (At what time does the hostel close?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Chiude a mezzanotte e mezzo.</b> (It closes at 12:30 a.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"When making plans, appointments, and travel arrangements in <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/languages/italian/italian-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">Italian-speaking</a> countries, you need to be able to state dates and other calendar terms in Italian. Understanding the days of the week, the months of the year, and how to tell time in Italian can help you to avoid confusion.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Calendar terms</h2>\r\nThe days of the week (<b>I giorni </b><b>della settimana</b>)<b> </b>aren't capitalized in Italian.\r\n<blockquote><b>lunedì</b> <i>(</i><i>loo-neh-</i><i>dee</i><i>)</i> (Monday)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>martedì</b> <i>(</i><i>mahr-teh-</i><i>dee</i><i>)</i> (Tuesday)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>mercoledì</b> <i>(</i><i>mehr-koh-leh-</i><i>dee</i><i>)</i> (Wednesday)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>giovedì</b> <i>(</i><i>zhoh-veh-</i><i>dee</i><i>)</i> (Thursday)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>venerdì</b> <i>(</i><i>veh-nehr-</i><i>dee</i><i>)</i> (Friday)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>sabato</b> <i>(</i><i>sah</i><i>-bah-toh</i><i>)</i> (Saturday)O</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>domenica</b> <i>(</i><i>doh-</i><i>meh</i><i>-nee-kah</i><i>)</i> (Sunday)</blockquote>\r\nLike the days of the week, the months of the year (<b>I mesi della </b><b>anno</b>) aren't capitalized in Italian.)\r\n<blockquote><b>gennaio</b> (<i>jehn-nah-yoh</i>) (January)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>febbraio</b> (<i>fehb-brah-yoh</i>) (February)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>marzo</b> (<i>mahr-tsoh</i>) (March)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>aprile</b> (<i>ah-pree-leh</i>) (April)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>maggio</b> (<i>mahj-joh</i>) (May)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>giugno</b> (<i>joo-nyoh</i>) (June)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>luglio</b> (<i>loo-lyoh</i>) (July)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>agosto</b> (<i>ah-gohs-toh</i>) (August)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>settembre</b> (<i>seht-tehm-breh</i>) (September)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>ottobre</b> (<i>oht-toh-breh</i>) (October)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>novembre</b> (<i>noh-vehm-breh</i>) (November)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>dicembre</b> (<i>dee-chehm-breh</i>) (December)</blockquote>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">Italians write dates in a different order than we do. Start with the day, then the month, and then the year. For example, to express January 08, 2009, you would write 8/1/09 instead of 1/8/09. If you write it 1/8/09, it would be assumed you were talking about August.</p>\r\nYou can use the following phrases when discussing dates in Italian.\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Che giorno è oggi?</b> (What day is today?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Oggi è venerdì.</b> (Today is Friday.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Che giorno parti?</b> [Informal]; <b>Che giorno parte?</b> [Formal] (What day are you leaving?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Parto lunedì.</b> (I'm leaving on Monday.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>In che mese vai in Italia?</b> [Informal] (What month are you going to Italy?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Ad agosto.</b> (In August.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Quando è il tuo compleanno?</b> [Informal] (When's your birthday?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Il sette novembre.</b> (November 7.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Che giorno è oggi?</b> (What's the date?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>É il cinque settembre.</b> (It's September 5.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Telling time</h2>\r\nThe time of day can be described in general terms or specific times. You can use the follow words to describe time in a general sense.\r\n<blockquote><b>di mattina</b> (in the morning)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>del pomeriggio</b> (in the afternoon)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>di sera</b> (in the evening)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>di notte</b> (in the middle of the night [until about5 a.m. or so])</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>giorno</b> (johr-noh) [m] (day)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>ieri</b> (ee-eh-ree) (yesterday)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>domani</b> (doh-mah-nee) (tomorrow)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>mezzogiorno </b>(noon)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>mezzanotte </b>(midnight)</blockquote>\r\n<blockquote><b>oggi</b> (today)</blockquote>\r\nTelling time in Italian is really just a question of counting.<b> </b>Italy commonly uses a 24-hour clock. When using a 24-hour clock, just add 12 to every hour after noon, for example 6 p.m. becomes 18.\r\n\r\nWhen you want to know a specific time of day, you can ask <b>Che ore sono? </b>(What time is it?). When expressing time between the hours, say the hour + minute, for example, <b>e un quarto</b> (and a quarter), <b>e ventitrè</b> (and 23), <b>e mezzo</b> (thirty). When you get past the half hour, start going the other say the number of minutes until the next hour, for example, say <b>meno un quarto</b> (a quarter to) and <b>meno dieci</b> (ten minutes to).\r\n\r\nYou can use the following phrases as a guide when talking about time in Italian.\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>É l'una.</b> (It's 1 a.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>É l'una e dieci.</b> (It's 1:10 a.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>É mezzogiorno.</b> (It's noon.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>É mezzogiorno e mezzo.</b> (It's 12:30 p.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>É mezzanotte.</b> (It's midnight.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sono le due.</b> (It's 2 a.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sono le due e un quarto.</b> (It's 2:15 a.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sono le quindici.</b> (It's 3 p.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Sono le ventidue meno dieci.</b> (It's 9:50 p.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">In Italian, 9:50 p.m. is spoken as <b>ventidue meno dieci.</b> (9:50 p.m.) However, informally, it is usually written as 9,50. Notice that the colon has been replaced with a comma.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>A che ora parte il treno?</b> (At what time does the train leave?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Parte all'una.</b> (It leaves at 1.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>A che ora inizia l'opera?</b> (At what time does the opera begin?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Inizia alle venti.</b> (It begins at 8 p.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>A che ora chiude l'ostello?</b> (At what time does the hostel close?)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Chiude a mezzanotte e mezzo.</b> (It closes at 12:30 a.m.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9663,"name":"Teresa L. Picarazzi","slug":"teresa-l-picarazzi","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9663"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33698,"title":"Italian","slug":"italian","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33698"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Calendar terms","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Telling time","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":208553,"title":"Italian For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/208553"}},{"articleId":207900,"title":"Italian Grammar For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-grammar-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207900"}},{"articleId":207893,"title":"Italian All-in-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"italian-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/207893"}},{"articleId":200932,"title":"Picking Up Italian Quickly","slug":"picking-up-italian-quickly","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/200932"}},{"articleId":200457,"title":"Discussing Your Job in Italian","slug":"discussing-your-job-in-italian","categoryList":["academics-the-arts","language-language-arts","learning-languages","italian"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/200457"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = 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Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33662"},"slug":"academics-the-arts","categoryId":33662},{"name":"Language & Language Arts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33687"},"slug":"language-language-arts","categoryId":33687},{"name":"Learning Languages","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33689"},"slug":"learning-languages","categoryId":33689},{"name":"Italian","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33698"},"slug":"italian","categoryId":33698}],"title":"Italian Greetings","strippedTitle":"italian greetings","slug":"italian-greetings","canonicalUrl":"","关注引挚SEO调优方案网络":{"metaDescription":"Knowing Italian greetings can make a good impression, whether you’re speaking Italian for business or while traveling - discover common salutations!","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Knowing Italian greetings can make a good impression, whether you're speaking Italian for business or while traveling. The Italian culture places importance on introductions and salutations as it is often considered a foundational way of showing respect. There are different expressions you can use depending on if the situation is formal (business meeting) or informal (meeting someone at a restaurant). Offer polite greetings to friends and associates or as a way to break the ice when meeting new people.\r\n\r\nPractice using these common Italian greetings:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buongiorno!</b> (bwohn-<i>johr</i>-noh) (Hello! and Good morning!)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Arrivederci!</b> (<i>ahr-</i>ree-veh-<i>dehr-</i>chee) (Goodbye!) (Formal)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Ciao!</b><i> </i>(chou) (Hello! and Good-bye!) (Informal)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Salve!</b><i> </i>(<i>sahl</i>-veh) (Hello! and Good-bye!) (Neutral)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buonasera!</b><i> </i>(<i>bwoh</i>-nah-<i>seh</i>-rah) (Good afternoon! Good evening!) (Formal)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buonanotte!</b><i> </i>(<i>bwoh</i>-nah-<i>noht</i>-teh) (Good night!) (Informal)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come si chiama?</b> (<i>koh</i>-meh see <i>kyah</i>-mah) (What is your name?) (Formal)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come ti chiami?</b> (<i>koh</i>-meh tee <i>kyah</i>-mee) (What is your name?) (Informal)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mi chiamo</b>…(mee <i>kyah</i>-moh) (My name is. . .)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come sta?</b> (<i>koh</i>-meh stah) (How are you?) (Formal)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come stai?</b> (<i>koh</i>-meh stahy) (How are you?) (Informal)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Bene, grazie.</b> (<i>beh</i>-neh <i>grah</i>-tsee-eh) (Fine, thank you.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","description":"Knowing Italian greetings can make a good impression, whether you're speaking Italian for business or while traveling. The Italian culture places importance on introductions and salutations as it is often considered a foundational way of showing respect. There are different expressions you can use depending on if the situation is formal (business meeting) or informal (meeting someone at a restaurant). Offer polite greetings to friends and associates or as a way to break the ice when meeting new people.\r\n\r\nPractice using these common Italian greetings:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buongiorno!</b> (bwohn-<i>johr</i>-noh) (Hello! and Good morning!)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Arrivederci!</b> (<i>ahr-</i>ree-veh-<i>dehr-</i>chee) (Goodbye!) (Formal)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Ciao!</b><i> </i>(chou) (Hello! and Good-bye!) (Informal)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Salve!</b><i> </i>(<i>sahl</i>-veh) (Hello! and Good-bye!) (Neutral)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buonasera!</b><i> </i>(<i>bwoh</i>-nah-<i>seh</i>-rah) (Good afternoon! Good evening!) (Formal)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Buonanotte!</b><i> </i>(<i>bwoh</i>-nah-<i>noht</i>-teh) (Good night!) (Informal)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come si chiama?</b> (<i>koh</i>-meh see <i>kyah</i>-mah) (What is your name?) (Formal)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come ti chiami?</b> (<i>koh</i>-meh tee <i>kyah</i>-mee) (What is your name?) (Informal)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Mi chiamo</b>…(mee <i>kyah</i>-moh) (My name is. . .)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come sta?</b> (<i>koh</i>-meh stah) (How are you?) (Formal)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Come stai?</b> (<i>koh</i>-meh stahy) (How are you?) (Informal)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>Bene, grazie.</b> (<i>beh</i>-neh <i>grah</i>-tsee-eh) (Fine, thank you.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9662,"name":"Francesca Romana Onofri","slug":"francesca-romana-onofri","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. Picarazzi, PhD, teaches Italian at The Hopkins School and has lived and worked in Cortona, Florence, Ravenna, Siena, and Urbino.</p> ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9662"}},{"authorId":9664,"name":"Karen Antje Mller","slug":"karen-antje-moller","description":"Karen Antje Möller is a veteran language teacher and author. She has worked with Berlitz Publishing on German-Italian projects and Italian exercise books.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9664"}},{"authorId":9663,"name":"Teresa L. Picarazzi","slug":"teresa-l-picarazzi","description":" <p>Berlitz has taught languages to millions of people for more than 130 years. Francesca Romana Onofri and Karen Antje Moller are veteran language teachers. Teresa L. 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Teresa L. Picarazzi

Teresa Picarazzi, PhD, has taught Italian language, literature, and cinema for more than 30 years. She now teaches Italian at The Hopkins School in New Haven. She has lived, studied, and worked in Florence, Siena, Urbino, Cortona, and Ravenna, Italy. She has written books and several articles on Italian politics and culture.

Articles From Teresa L. Picarazzi

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Italian Workbook For Dummies Cheat Sheet Cheat Sheet / Updated 11-02-2023 As you're studying Italian, either on your own or in a course, keep this Cheat Sheet handy for a quick reference on articles, personal pronouns, tenses, and more. View Cheat Sheet
How to Count in Italian Article / Updated 05-18-2023 Learning numbers and counting in Italian isn't complicated. In fact, the Italians follow many of the same patterns that we do in English. There are a few differences, but it's when it comes to numbers and counting in Italian, it's really just a question of memorizing. In Italian, as in English, there is a unique number from 0 – 16. After that they add the next number to the tens, making one word. So, 17, is the word for 10 followed by the word for 7 and so on. Numbers 1 to 19 in Italian uno 1 due 2 tre 3 quattro 4 cinque 5 sei 6 sette 7 otto 8 nove 9 dieci 10 undici 11 dodici 12 tredici 13 quattordici 14 quindici 15 sedici 16 diciassette 17 diciotto 18 diciannove 19 For the numbers in the twenties, thirties, forties, and so on, just add the number to the tens, with the exception of when you add a 1 or an 8. For these two numbers, drop the final "–i." For example, venti (20), ventuno (21), ventidue (22), venticinque (25), ventotto (28). See? It's not ventiuno or ventiotto. Numbers 20 to 99 in Italian venti 20 ventuno 21 ventidue 22 trenta 30 trentuno 31 quaranta 40 quarantuno 41 cinquanta 50 sessanta 60 settanta 70 ottanta 80 novanta 90 When you add the tre, the -e takes an accent: ventitrè. Larger numbers in Italian follow the same formula. Numbers 100 and higher in Italian 100 cento 101 centuno 102 centodue 150 centocinquanta 1,000 mille 2,000 duemila In Italian, large numbers are said in the same order that we use for English. For example, 1916 would be 1916 (millenovecentosedici) (literally: one thousand, nine hundred, and sixteen). The following phrases can help you when talking about numbers. Quanti anni hai? (How old are you?) Ho ventitrè anni. (I'm 23 years old.) Quanto viene? (How much does it come to?) Sei euro sessanta. (6 euros and 60 cents.) Quanto è per una camerasingola? (How much is it for a single room?) Centoventi euro. (120 Euros) View Article
Common Conversational Words and Phrases in Italian Article / Updated 03-15-2023 By mastering the basics of conversation in Italian, you put yourself and the person you're talking to at ease. Everyone should learn essential Italian conversational words and phrases before traveling to Italy. These words and expressions are sure to come up in most everyday conversations. Courteous phrases Being polite is just as important in Italy as anywhere else in this world. The following words and phrases cover most of the pleasantries required for polite conversation. After all, learning to say the expressions of common courtesy in Italian before traveling is just good manners. sì (yes) no (no) per favore; per piacere; per cortesia (please) Grazie (Thank you) Molte grazie (Thank you very much.) Prego! (You're welcome!) Si figuri! (It's nothing.) Mi scusi. (Excuse me.) prego (by all means) Può ripetere, per cortesia? (Can you please repeat.) Personal pronouns Once you've mastered the common pleasantries, the next important thing to learn is how to refer to people. The most common way is by using personal pronouns. In Italian, the pronouns (you and they) are complicated by gender and formality. You'll use slightly different variations of these words depending to whom you are referring and how well you know them. Io (I) lui (he) lei (she) noi (we) tu (you [singular]) lei (you [singular/formal]) voi (you (plural/informal]) loro (you (plural/formal]) loro (they) Use the informal tu (singular you) and voi (plural you) for friends, relatives, younger people, and people you know well. Use the formal lei (singular you) when speaking to people you don't know well; in situations such as in stores, restaurants, hotels, or pharmacies); and with professors, older people, and your friends' parents. The formal loro (plural you) is rarely used and is gradually being replaced by the informal voi when addressing a group of people. References to people When meeting people in Italy, be sure to use the appropriate formal title. Italians tend to use titles whenever possible. Use the Lei form when using any of the following titles. A man would be called Signore, which is the same as Mr. or Sir. An older or married woman is called Signora and a young lady is called Signorina. It is also helpful to know the correct vocabulary term for referring to people based on their age, gender, or relationship to you. uomo (a man) donna (a woman) ragazzo (a boy) ragazza (a girl) bambino [M]; bambina [F] (a child) padre (a father) madre (a mother) figlio [M]; figlia [F] (child) fratello (a brother) sorella (a sister) marito (a husband) moglie (a wife) amico [M]; amica [F] (a friend) In Italian, there are four words to cover the English indefinite articles a and an. For masculine words, you would use uno if the word begins with a z or an s and a consonant and you would use un for the rest. For feminine words, you should use 'un for words beginning with a vowel and una for words beginning with a consonant. Phrases for travelers There are some Italian phrases that are particularly helpful to international travelers. Below are several phrases may come in handy during your stay in Italy. Mi scusi. (Excuse me. [Formal]) Non parlo bene l'italiano. (I don't speak Italian well.) Parla inglese? (Do you speak English? [Formal]) Parlo inglese. (I speak English.) Mi sono perso. [M]; Mi sono persa. [F] (I'm lost.) Sto cercando il mio albergo. (I'm looking for my hotel.) Sì, lo so. (Yes, I know.) Non lo so. (I don't know.) Non so dove sia. (I don't know where it is.) Non capisco. (I don't understand.) Capisco, grazie. (I understand, thanks.) Può ripetere, per cortesia? (Can you repeat, please? [Formal]) È bello. (It's beautiful.) È bellissimo. (It's very beautiful.) Vado a casa. (I'm going home.) Domani visitiamo Venezia. (We'll visit Venice tomorrow.) Due cappuccini, per favore. (Two cappuccinos, please.) Non lo so. (I don't know.) Non posso. (I can't.) Non potevo. (I couldn't.) Non lo faccio. (I won't do it.) Non dimenticare! (Don't forget!) Lei non mangia la carne. (She doesn't eat meat.) Non siamo americani. (We aren't American.) Il caffè non è buono. (The coffee isn't good.) Non è caro! (It's not expensive!) It's possible to use more than one negative in a sentence. For example, you may say Non capisce niente (He/she doesn't understand anything). Generally, you may just put non in front of your verb to negate your sentence, such as m'ama non m'ama (he/she loves me, he/she loves me not). Common places and locations It is also helpful to know the correct vocabulary for some of the common places or locations that you might need or want while traveling in Italy. banca (bank) città (city) il consolato Americano (American consulate) il ristorante (restaurant) in campagna (in the country) in città (in the city) in montagna (in the mountains) l'albergo (hotel) l'ospedale (hospital) la casa (house) la polizia (police) la stazione dei treni (train station) metropolitana (subway) mu搜到传奇引擎优化系统 (museum) negozio (store) paese (country) spiaggia (beach) stato (state) ufficio (office) View Article
How to Order Food in Italian Article / Updated 02-09-2023 Whether you're on a short visit to an Italian-speaking country or you're planning to take up residence in Italy itself, knowing how to order food in Italian is essential. Eating out can be a lot of fun, especially if you know some basic vocabulary. The Italian bar is really what Americans would call a café. There you can get breakfast (coffee and a pastry), snacks, sandwiches, and salty snacks to accompany your before-dinner drink. assegno (ahs-seh-nyoh) [m] (check) pagare (pah-gah-reh) (to pay) soldi (sohl-dee) [m/pl] (money) In Italian-speaking countries, as in most of the rest of the world, there are three meals a day: colazione (koh-lah-tsee-oh-neh) [f] (breakfast), pranzo (prahn-tsoh) [m] (lunch), and cena (cheh-nah) [f] (dinner). The following phrases might help you when you're eating at a restaurant. Vorrei prenotare. (I’d like to make a reservation.) Per che ora? (For what time?) Per quante persone? (For how many people?) No, non abbiamo prenotato. (No, we don’t have a reservation.) Ci porti il conto, per favore. [Formal] (Bring us the check, please.) Here are some food items you can order: antipasti (ahn-tee-pahs-tee) [m] (appetizers) carne (kahr-neh) [f] (meat) cioccolata (choh-koh-lah-tah) [f] (chocolate) formaggio (fohr-mahj-joh) [m] (cheese) fragola (frah-goh-lah) [f] (strawberry) frutta (froot-tah) [f] (fruit) gelato (jeh-lah-toh) [m] (ice cream) insalata (een-sah-lah-tah) [f] (salad) pane (pah-neh) [m] (bread) pesce (peh-cheh) [m] (fish) riso (ree-zoh) [m] (rice) sale (sah-leh) [m] (salt) verdura (vehr-doo-reh) [f] (vegetables) The following phrases can help you place your drink order. Un caffè, per favore. (A coffee, please.) Un bicchiere di latte caldo (A glass of warm milk) Una cioccolata calda (A hot chocolate) Tre birre (Three beers) Un bicchiere di acqua minerale (A glass of mineral water) Liscia o gassata? (Flat or carbonated?) Un panino, per favore. (I’ll have a sandwich, please.) Lo scontrino, per favore. (Receipt, please.) Due cappuccini, per favore. (Two cappuccinos, please.) Here are some drink items you can order acqua (ahk-koo-ah) [f] (water) vino (vee-noh) [m] (wine) bere (beh-reh) (to drink) birra (beer-rah) [f] (beer) caffè (kahf-feh) [m] (coffee) latte (laht-teh) [m] (milk) You might want to use the following adjectives to when giving your cameriere/cameriera (waiter/waitress) your food or drink order: calda/o (kahl-dah/doh) [f/m] (warm; hot) fredda/o (frehd-dah/doh) [f] (cold) dolce (dohl-cheh) [m/f] (sweet) grande (grahn-deh) [m/f] (big; tall; large) piccola/o (peek-koh-lah/loh) [f/m] (small; short) Italians don’t drink cappuccino after breakfast time. View Article
Italian All-in-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet Cheat Sheet / Updated 02-24-2022 The Italian language is adapting to the rhythms of modern life with the introduction of new idioms and the construction of simpler, more concise sentences and paragraphs. The basic rules of the Italian language, however, stay the same. Despite the ongoing transformation of the language, these rules remain the foundation that stabilizes it. Here are a few Italian fundamentals that you don't want to miss if you want to communicate in Italian. View Cheat Sheet
Italian For Dummies Cheat Sheet Cheat Sheet / Updated 01-19-2022 Planning a trip to Italy? Learn some basic Italian to make it more fulfilling. Get to know Italian greetings, question words, numbers, and the days of the week. Also, be sure to know how to ask for help in Italian so you're prepared for emergencies. And something very important: how to order food and drink! View Cheat Sheet
Italian Greetings and Goodbyes Article / Updated 10-01-2021 When traveling in Italy, you'll find that the Italian words and phrases you use most frequently will be the common greetings. The words and phrases will quickly become second nature as you use them day in and day out with everyone you come across. Saying hello and goodbye As you'd expect, you should use a polite greeting when you run into someone you know or want to know. But it's important to use the correct greeting depending on who the person is. So, you would use a different word for greeting your friend than you would for greeting your boss or teacher. The most common ways to greet someone in Italian are: Ciao (hello; hi [Informal]) Ciao! is the most common way of saying hello and goodbye informally. You should never use it with someone like a boss or a teacher or anyone else with whom you're using Lei (the formal version of you). Salve! (Hi; Bye [Formal/Informal]) Che piacere vederti! (How nice it is to see you! [Informal]) Buongiorno! (Hello; Good morning; Goodbye [Formal]) Buona sera! (Hello; Good evening; Goodbye [Formal]) Use the longer Buon giorno and Buona sera in more formal situations, like when you enter a store. There are also many ways to say goodbye: Ciao! (Hi; Bye [Informal]) Salve! (Hi; Bye [Formal/Informal]) Ciao! Ciao! (Bye-bye!) Buon giorno! (Hello; Good morning; Goodbye [Formal]) Buona sera! (Hello; Good evening; Goodbye [Formal]) Buona notte! (Good night! [Formal/Informal]) Use Buona notte! only when its bedtime and when you're taking leave of people at night and you think that everyone is going to bed. Arrivederci! (Goodbye! [Informal]) Arrivederla! (Goodbye! [Formal]) A dopo! (See you later! [Formal/Informal]) A presto! (See you soon! [Formal/Informal]) A domani! (See you tomorrow! [Formal/Informal]) A fra poco. (See you in a bit.) Cheek kissing is another common type of greeting in Italy, as it is in most European countries. However, in Italy, cheek kissing is reserved for greeting people you know well and is less common among men. To avoid bumping noses, the rule is to kiss left cheek first and then the right. When you meet someone for the first time, handshakes are much more common. As you get to know the other person, you move more into cheek-kissing territory. Asking and replying to "How are you?" How are you? How's it going? How many times a day do we hear or say these brief greetings at the beginning of our conversations? So many times, in fact, that half the time, we don't even pay attention. These pleasantries are common in Italy as well. The most common ways to ask how someone is doing are: Come stai? (How are you? [Informal]) Come sta? (How are you? [Formal]) As you'd expect, when someone asks you how you're doing, there are many responses. Sto bene! (I'm well!) Molto bene, grazie. (Very well, thanks.) Abbastanza bene, grazie. (Pretty well, thanks.) Non c'è male. (Pretty well, thanks.) Sto bene grazie, e tu? (I'm well, thanks, and you? [Informal]) Sto bene, grazie, e Lei? (I'm well, thanks, and you? [Formal]) Non sto bene.; Sto male. (I'm not well.) Malissimo! (Not well at all!) Va bene. (Things are going well.) Va tutto bene. (Everything's going well.) Va benissimo! (Things are going great!) Va male. (Things aren't going well.) Così così. (So so.) Non mi posso lamentare. (I can't complain.) Benissimo! (Great!) How to address people Italians like titles and tend to use them whenever possible. When addressing someone without using his or her last name, use the entire title as it's listed here. But when you add the person's last name to the title, you drop the final -e in the title. Use the Lei form when using any of the following titles: Miss (Signorina) Mrs.; Madam (Signora) Mister; Sir (Signore) professore [M]; professoressa [F] (professor) ingegnere (engineer) dottore [M]; dottoressa [F] (doctor) In Italian, dottore is used if the person has a university degree even though it's not a medical degree. View Article
How to Make Introductions in Italian Article / Updated 01-13-2020 Learning the proper way to make introductions in Italian can help you get off to the right start. The Italian language tends to be a bit more formal than American English. Consequently, introductions in Italian follow more of a pattern than they sometimes do in the United States. Don't worry, it’s not complicated — just good manners. Introducing yourself First impressions are important — they can start a friendship or set the tone for your interaction with someone. Start with a greeting. The simplest greeting is Ciao or Buon giorno, which means Hello or Good Day. Introduce yourself. The two most common ways to introduce are to say Mi chiamo Name (My name is Name) or Sono Name (I'm Name). Since you are meeting the person for the first time, you should use the more formal form of you. Use the formal Lei (singular you) when speaking to people you don't know well; in situations such as in stores, restaurants, hotels, or pharmacies); and with professors, older people, and your friends' parents. Save the informal tu (singular you) and voi (plural you) for friends, relatives, younger people, and people you know well. The formal Loro (plural you) is rarely used and is gradually being replaced by the informal voi when addressing a group of people: Come ti/si chiami? (What's your name? [Informal]) Lei come si chiama? (What's your name? [Formal]) After they tell you their name you should express pleasure. For example. Piacere! (Nice to meet you!) Piacere di conoscerla (Pleased to meet you.) Asking "Where are you from?" You don't need to stop at introductions; you could also take this opportunity to talk about where each of you is from. To tell them where you're from, say Sono degli Stati Uniti. (I'm from the United States.) To ask where the person is from, you can say: Di dove sei? (Where are you from? [Informal]) Di dov'è Lei? (Where are you from? [Formal]) If you want to talk about where you live on the other hand, you can use the verbs abita or vivere — both of which mean to live: In quale città abita? (What city do you live in?) Lei abita qui? (Do you live here?) Dove vive? (Where do you live?) Vivo a Los Angeles. (I live in Los Angeles.) Introducing other people The second most common type of introduction is to introduce someone else, such as your spouse, child, or friend. The following phrases are typical of introducing someone else. Permette che mi presenti mia moglie? (May I introduce my wife?) Permette che mi presenti mio fidanzato, Antonio? (May I introduce my fiancé, Antonio?) Le/ti presento un amico mi, James. (This is my friend, James. [F/M]) Put the steps together and see how it comes together in a conversation. Larry: Buongiorno. Mi chiamo Larry. Lei come si chiama? (Hello. My name is Larry. What's your name?) Maria: Sono Maria. (I'm Maria.) Larry: Piacere di conoscerla. (It's a pleasure to meet you.) Maria: E lei. (And you.) Larry: Lei abitaqui? (Do you live here?) Maria: Sì. Di dov'è Lei? (Yes. Where are you from?) Larry: Sono degli Stati Unit. Vivo a Los Angeles. (I'm from the United States. I live in Los Angeles.) Maria: Permette che mi presenti mio fidanzato, Antonio? (May I introduce my fiancé, Antonio?) Larry: Piacere! (Nice to meet you!) View Article
How to Say Dates and Times in Italian Article / Updated 01-13-2020 When making plans, appointments, and travel arrangements in Italian-speaking countries, you need to be able to state dates and other calendar terms in Italian. Understanding the days of the week, the months of the year, and how to tell time in Italian can help you to avoid confusion. Calendar terms The days of the week (I giorni della settimana) aren't capitalized in Italian. lunedì (loo-neh-dee) (Monday) martedì (mahr-teh-dee) (Tuesday) mercoledì (mehr-koh-leh-dee) (Wednesday) giovedì (zhoh-veh-dee) (Thursday) venerdì (veh-nehr-dee) (Friday) sabato (sah-bah-toh) (Saturday)O domenica (doh-meh-nee-kah) (Sunday) Like the days of the week, the months of the year (I mesi della anno) aren't capitalized in Italian.) gennaio (jehn-nah-yoh) (January) febbraio (fehb-brah-yoh) (February) marzo (mahr-tsoh) (March) aprile (ah-pree-leh) (April) maggio (mahj-joh) (May) giugno (joo-nyoh) (June) luglio (loo-lyoh) (July) agosto (ah-gohs-toh) (August) settembre (seht-tehm-breh) (September) ottobre (oht-toh-breh) (October) novembre (noh-vehm-breh) (November) dicembre (dee-chehm-breh) (December) Italians write dates in a different order than we do. Start with the day, then the month, and then the year. For example, to express January 08, 2009, you would write 8/1/09 instead of 1/8/09. If you write it 1/8/09, it would be assumed you were talking about August. You can use the following phrases when discussing dates in Italian. Che giorno è oggi? (What day is today?) Oggi è venerdì. (Today is Friday.) Che giorno parti? [Informal]; Che giorno parte? [Formal] (What day are you leaving?) Parto lunedì. (I'm leaving on Monday.) In che mese vai in Italia? [Informal] (What month are you going to Italy?) Ad agosto. (In August.) Quando è il tuo compleanno? [Informal] (When's your birthday?) Il sette novembre. (November 7.) Che giorno è oggi? (What's the date?) É il cinque settembre. (It's September 5.) Telling time The time of day can be described in general terms or specific times. You can use the follow words to describe time in a general sense. di mattina (in the morning) del pomeriggio (in the afternoon) di sera (in the evening) di notte (in the middle of the night [until about5 a.m. or so]) giorno (johr-noh) [m] (day) ieri (ee-eh-ree) (yesterday) domani (doh-mah-nee) (tomorrow) mezzogiorno (noon) mezzanotte (midnight) oggi (today) Telling time in Italian is really just a question of counting. Italy commonly uses a 24-hour clock. When using a 24-hour clock, just add 12 to every hour after noon, for example 6 p.m. becomes 18. When you want to know a specific time of day, you can ask Che ore sono? (What time is it?). When expressing time between the hours, say the hour + minute, for example, e un quarto (and a quarter), e ventitrè (and 23), e mezzo (thirty). When you get past the half hour, start going the other say the number of minutes until the next hour, for example, say meno un quarto (a quarter to) and meno dieci (ten minutes to). You can use the following phrases as a guide when talking about time in Italian. É l'una. (It's 1 a.m.) É l'una e dieci. (It's 1:10 a.m.) É mezzogiorno. (It's noon.) É mezzogiorno e mezzo. (It's 12:30 p.m.) É mezzanotte. (It's midnight.) Sono le due. (It's 2 a.m.) Sono le due e un quarto. (It's 2:15 a.m.) Sono le quindici. (It's 3 p.m.) Sono le ventidue meno dieci. (It's 9:50 p.m.) In Italian, 9:50 p.m. is spoken as ventidue meno dieci. (9:50 p.m.) However, informally, it is usually written as 9,50. Notice that the colon has been replaced with a comma. A che ora parte il treno? (At what time does the train leave?) Parte all'una. (It leaves at 1.) A che ora inizia l'opera? (At what time does the opera begin?) Inizia alle venti. (It begins at 8 p.m.) A che ora chiude l'ostello? (At what time does the hostel close?) Chiude a mezzanotte e mezzo. (It closes at 12:30 a.m.) View Article
Italian Greetings Article / Updated 05-01-2017 Knowing Italian greetings can make a good impression, whether you're speaking Italian for business or while traveling. The Italian culture places importance on introductions and salutations as it is often considered a foundational way of showing respect. There are different expressions you can use depending on if the situation is formal (business meeting) or informal (meeting someone at a restaurant). Offer polite greetings to friends and associates or as a way to break the ice when meeting new people. Practice using these common Italian greetings: Buongiorno! (bwohn-johr-noh) (Hello! and Good morning!) Arrivederci! (ahr-ree-veh-dehr-chee) (Goodbye!) (Formal) Ciao! (chou) (Hello! and Good-bye!) (Informal) Salve! (sahl-veh) (Hello! and Good-bye!) (Neutral) Buonasera! (bwoh-nah-seh-rah) (Good afternoon! Good evening!) (Formal) Buonanotte! (bwoh-nah-noht-teh) (Good night!) (Informal) Come si chiama? (koh-meh see kyah-mah) (What is your name?) (Formal) Come ti chiami? (koh-meh tee kyah-mee) (What is your name?) (Informal) Mi chiamo…(mee kyah-moh) (My name is. . .) Come sta? (koh-meh stah) (How are you?) (Formal) Come stai? (koh-meh stahy) (How are you?) (Informal) Bene, grazie. (beh-neh grah-tsee-eh) (Fine, thank you.) View Article
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