chơi xổ số keno trực tuyến

{"appState":{"pageLoadApiCallsStatus":true},"authorState":{"author":{"headers":{"timestamp":"2025-03-18T08:49:17+00:00"},"authorId":9849,"data":{"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" Karen Manthey edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers. Susan Brittain was an assistant editor for Crochet Fantasy magazine.","photo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}}},"authorLoadedStatus":"success"},"listState":{"list":{"count":10,"total":128,"items":[{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-27T14:44:19+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-10-27T20:16:01+00:00","timestamp":"2024-10-27T21:01:15+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"How to Make a Half Double Crochet","strippedTitle":"how to make a half double crochet","slug":"how-to-make-a-half-double-crochet","canonicalUrl":"","搜所网页搜所浏览平台升级网站网站系统seo":{"metaDescription":"These step-by-step instructions show you how to do a half double crochet stitch, which is something between a single and double.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"The half double crochet (abbreviated hdc) is kind of an oddball stitch. It falls in between a <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/crocheting/stitches/how-to-make-a-single-crochet/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">single crochet</a> and a <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/crocheting/projects/doing-a-double-crochet/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">double crochet </a>in height, but instead of working off two loops at a time, you draw the yarn through three loops on the hook. It produces a fairly tight fabric similar to one made with a single crochet stitch:","description":"The half double crochet (abbreviated hdc) is kind of an oddball stitch. It falls in between a <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/crocheting/stitches/how-to-make-a-single-crochet/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">single crochet</a> and a <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/crocheting/projects/doing-a-double-crochet/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">double crochet </a>in height, but instead of working off two loops at a time, you draw the yarn through three loops on the hook. It produces a fairly tight fabric similar to one made with a single crochet stitch:","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":295667,"title":"Crochet Patterns For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"crochet-patterns-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/295667"}},{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-653c251ba21a1\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-653c251ba280e\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Step by Step","articleList":null,"content":[{"title":"Do 15 chain stitches.","thumb":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"content":"<p>This step creates the foundation chain.</p>\n"},{"title":"Chain two more stitches.","thumb":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"content":"<p>These stitches create the turning chain.</p>\n"},{"title":"Yarn over the hook (yo) and insert your hook in the third chain from the hook.","thumb":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/108381.image1.jpg","width":1,"height":1},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/108380.image0.jpg","width":0,"height":0},"content":"<p>See the illustration.</p>\n"},{"title":"Yarn over the hook and gently pull the wrapped hook through the center of the chain stitch, carrying the wrapped yarn through the stitch.","thumb":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/108383.image3.jpg","width":1,"height":1},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/108382.image2.jpg","width":0,"height":0},"content":"<p>You should have three loops on your hook.</p>\n"},{"title":"Yarn over the hook and draw your yarn through all three loops on your hook.","thumb":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/108385.image5.jpg","width":1,"height":1},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/108384.image4.jpg","width":0,"height":0},"content":"<p>See the illustration.</p>\n"},{"title":"Begin in the next chain of the foundation chain.","thumb":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/108387.image7.jpg","width":1,"height":1},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/108386.image6.jpg","width":0,"height":0},"content":"<p>This step completes a full row of hdc stitches.</p>\n"},{"title":"Work one hdc stitch in each successive chain across the foundation chain.","thumb":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"content":"<p>You have 16 hdc stitches at the end of Row 1 (counting the turning chain as one hdc stitch).</p>\n"},{"title":"Turn your work.","thumb":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"content":"<p>You need to turn your work to start Row 2.</p>\n"},{"title":"Chain two and yarn over the hook (yo).","thumb":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"content":"<p>The two stitches are for the turning chain.</p>\n"},{"title":"Skipping the first stitch of the row directly below the turning chain, insert your hook in the next stitch.","thumb":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/108389.image9.jpg","width":1,"height":1},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/108388.image8.jpg","width":0,"height":0},"content":"<p>Skipping the first stitch maintains a consistent number of stitches per row.</p>\n"},{"title":"Repeat the preceding steps in each of the next 14 hdc stitches.","thumb":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"content":"<p>Follow the steps from pulling the wrapped hook through the center of the chain stitch to drawing yarn through all three loops.</p>\n"},{"title":"Work one hdc in the top chain of the previous row’s turning chain.","thumb":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"image":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"content":"<p>You should have 16 hdc stitches in Row 2 (counting the turning chain as one hdc).</p>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2022-09-17T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":206602},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2021-03-16T15:11:31+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-10-20T20:39:22+00:00","timestamp":"2024-10-20T21:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","strippedTitle":"how to knit basic beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","canonicalUrl":"","搜所网页搜所浏览平台升级网站网站系统seo":{"metaDescription":"Follow the pattern to knit a basic beanie, sized for babies through adults. Make it plain or cabled, add stripes, and other options.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"A good hat is a must-have in your <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">knitting</a> repertoire, and this basic beanie, sized for babies through adults, fits the bill. Make it plain or cabled. Add in stripes or a color pattern. After your beanie is knit, top it with a pompom or tassel. The variations are endless.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269279\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269279\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-beanies.jpg\" alt=\"crocheting beanies\" width=\"556\" height=\"371\" /> ©Ivanikova Tatyana/Shutterstock.com[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Materials and vital statistics</h2>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Yarn:</strong> Berrocco Smart Mohair (41 percent mohair, 54 percent acrylic, 5 percent polyester); 108 yards (100 meters) per 50 grams; 1 (1, 1, 2, 2) balls; color: Pink</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Needles:</strong> US 10 (6 mm) circular needle, 16-inch length, or the size needed to match gauge; US 8 (5 mm) circular needle, 16-inch length; US 10 (6 mm) double-pointed needles</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Other materials:</strong> Eight stitch markers; yarn needle to weave in ends</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Size:</strong> Baby (toddler, child, small adult, large adult); circumference: 14 (16, 18, 20, 22) inches, unstretched</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Gauge:</strong> 16 stitches and 20 rows per 4 inches in stockinette stitch on larger needles</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThis beanie is worked in the round, starting on circular needles and switching to double-pointed needles when you shape the crown of the hat. If you want to include any color patterning, add it to the body of the hat between the ribbing and the decreases. If you’d like to knit cables on your hat, see the variation at the end of the pattern.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Directions</h2>\r\nCast on 56 (64, 72, 80, 88) sts with the smaller circular needles. Place marker and join in the round, being careful not to twist.\r\n\r\n<strong>Round 1:</strong> *K2, p2, repeat from * to end of round.\r\n\r\nRepeat this round for 3⁄4 (1, 1, 1-1⁄2, 2) inches.\r\n\r\nSwitch to larger circular needles and begin knitting in stockinette stitch (knit all rounds).\r\n\r\nWhen your hat measures 4-1⁄2 (5, 5-1⁄2, 6-1⁄2, 7) inches, begin the crown shaping as follows:\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K7 (8, 9, 10, 11), place marker, repeat from * to end.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round (Decrease Round):</strong> *K2tog, knit to marker, slip marker, repeat from * to end. 8 sts have been decreased.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\nRepeat these 2 rounds until 8 sts remain, switching to double-pointed needles when you have too few sts to fit comfortably on your circular needle.\r\n\r\nCut yarn, leaving a 12-inch tail.\r\n\r\n<strong>Finishing:</strong> Thread the tail of the yarn onto the yarn needle. Slip the stitches from the knitting needle to the yarn needle, making sure that you go through each stitch. Pull the yarn firmly to tighten the top of the hat, and then run the yarn through the stitches again before weaving in the yarn end on the inside to secure. Weave in any remaining ends.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you want, you can top your beanie with a pompom, knitted flower, or other adornment for extra flair.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Variation: Creating a cabled beanie</h2>\r\nThis cabled hat features straightforward six-stitch cables. It is made with the same yarn and needles as the basic beanie, fits a toddler (child, small adult, large adult), and measures 16 (17-1⁄2, 19, 22) inches around. You need six stitch markers to help keep your decreases lined up.\r\n\r\nUsing the smaller circular needles, cast on 66 (72, 78, 90) sts. Place a marker and join in the round, being careful not to twist.\r\n\r\n<strong>Ribbing round:</strong> *K1, p1, repeat from * to end.\r\n\r\nRepeat this round for 1 (1, 2, 2) inches.\r\n\r\nSwitch to the larger circular needles and begin the six-stitch right cable pattern as follows, placing markers on the first round as indicated:\r\n\r\n<strong>Rounds 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5:</strong> *K6, p5 (6, 7, 9), place marker, repeat from * to end of round.\r\n\r\n<strong>Round 6:</strong> *Slip 3 sts to the cable needle and hold to back, k3, k3 from cable needle, p5 (6, 7, 9), repeat from * to end of round.\r\n\r\nRepeat these 6 rounds until the hat measures 5-1⁄2 (6, 6-1⁄2, 7) inches, and then begin decreasing as follows:\r\n\r\nContinue the cable pattern as set on the columns of 6 knit sts. In other words, you should cable every 6th round (even though the decreasing is occurring too).\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K6, p2tog, purl to marker, repeat from * to end of round.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you’re unfamiliar with purling 2 stitches together (p2tog), here’s how to do it: Insert the right needle into the next 2 stitches purlwise, wrap the yarn around the right-hand needle, and then purl them to decrease 1 stitch.</p>\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Work even, knitting and purling the sts as they appear.\r\n\r\nRepeat the previous 2 rounds 3 (4, 5, 7) more times. There are 42 sts on the needles.\r\n\r\nStop the cable pattern and finish the hat in stockinette stitch (knit all rounds).\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K5, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 36 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K4, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 30 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K3, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 24 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K2, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 18 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K1, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 12 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 6 sts remain.\r\n\r\nCut the yarn leaving a 12-inch tail.\r\n\r\n<strong>Finishing:</strong> Use the same technique described in the basic pattern to finish your cabled beanie.","description":"A good hat is a must-have in your <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">knitting</a> repertoire, and this basic beanie, sized for babies through adults, fits the bill. Make it plain or cabled. Add in stripes or a color pattern. After your beanie is knit, top it with a pompom or tassel. The variations are endless.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269279\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269279\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-beanies.jpg\" alt=\"crocheting beanies\" width=\"556\" height=\"371\" /> ©Ivanikova Tatyana/Shutterstock.com[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Materials and vital statistics</h2>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Yarn:</strong> Berrocco Smart Mohair (41 percent mohair, 54 percent acrylic, 5 percent polyester); 108 yards (100 meters) per 50 grams; 1 (1, 1, 2, 2) balls; color: Pink</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Needles:</strong> US 10 (6 mm) circular needle, 16-inch length, or the size needed to match gauge; US 8 (5 mm) circular needle, 16-inch length; US 10 (6 mm) double-pointed needles</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Other materials:</strong> Eight stitch markers; yarn needle to weave in ends</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Size:</strong> Baby (toddler, child, small adult, large adult); circumference: 14 (16, 18, 20, 22) inches, unstretched</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Gauge:</strong> 16 stitches and 20 rows per 4 inches in stockinette stitch on larger needles</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThis beanie is worked in the round, starting on circular needles and switching to double-pointed needles when you shape the crown of the hat. If you want to include any color patterning, add it to the body of the hat between the ribbing and the decreases. If you’d like to knit cables on your hat, see the variation at the end of the pattern.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Directions</h2>\r\nCast on 56 (64, 72, 80, 88) sts with the smaller circular needles. Place marker and join in the round, being careful not to twist.\r\n\r\n<strong>Round 1:</strong> *K2, p2, repeat from * to end of round.\r\n\r\nRepeat this round for 3⁄4 (1, 1, 1-1⁄2, 2) inches.\r\n\r\nSwitch to larger circular needles and begin knitting in stockinette stitch (knit all rounds).\r\n\r\nWhen your hat measures 4-1⁄2 (5, 5-1⁄2, 6-1⁄2, 7) inches, begin the crown shaping as follows:\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K7 (8, 9, 10, 11), place marker, repeat from * to end.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round (Decrease Round):</strong> *K2tog, knit to marker, slip marker, repeat from * to end. 8 sts have been decreased.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\nRepeat these 2 rounds until 8 sts remain, switching to double-pointed needles when you have too few sts to fit comfortably on your circular needle.\r\n\r\nCut yarn, leaving a 12-inch tail.\r\n\r\n<strong>Finishing:</strong> Thread the tail of the yarn onto the yarn needle. Slip the stitches from the knitting needle to the yarn needle, making sure that you go through each stitch. Pull the yarn firmly to tighten the top of the hat, and then run the yarn through the stitches again before weaving in the yarn end on the inside to secure. Weave in any remaining ends.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you want, you can top your beanie with a pompom, knitted flower, or other adornment for extra flair.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Variation: Creating a cabled beanie</h2>\r\nThis cabled hat features straightforward six-stitch cables. It is made with the same yarn and needles as the basic beanie, fits a toddler (child, small adult, large adult), and measures 16 (17-1⁄2, 19, 22) inches around. You need six stitch markers to help keep your decreases lined up.\r\n\r\nUsing the smaller circular needles, cast on 66 (72, 78, 90) sts. Place a marker and join in the round, being careful not to twist.\r\n\r\n<strong>Ribbing round:</strong> *K1, p1, repeat from * to end.\r\n\r\nRepeat this round for 1 (1, 2, 2) inches.\r\n\r\nSwitch to the larger circular needles and begin the six-stitch right cable pattern as follows, placing markers on the first round as indicated:\r\n\r\n<strong>Rounds 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5:</strong> *K6, p5 (6, 7, 9), place marker, repeat from * to end of round.\r\n\r\n<strong>Round 6:</strong> *Slip 3 sts to the cable needle and hold to back, k3, k3 from cable needle, p5 (6, 7, 9), repeat from * to end of round.\r\n\r\nRepeat these 6 rounds until the hat measures 5-1⁄2 (6, 6-1⁄2, 7) inches, and then begin decreasing as follows:\r\n\r\nContinue the cable pattern as set on the columns of 6 knit sts. In other words, you should cable every 6th round (even though the decreasing is occurring too).\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K6, p2tog, purl to marker, repeat from * to end of round.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you’re unfamiliar with purling 2 stitches together (p2tog), here’s how to do it: Insert the right needle into the next 2 stitches purlwise, wrap the yarn around the right-hand needle, and then purl them to decrease 1 stitch.</p>\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Work even, knitting and purling the sts as they appear.\r\n\r\nRepeat the previous 2 rounds 3 (4, 5, 7) more times. There are 42 sts on the needles.\r\n\r\nStop the cable pattern and finish the hat in stockinette stitch (knit all rounds).\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K5, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 36 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K4, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 30 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K3, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 24 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K2, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 18 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K1, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 12 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 6 sts remain.\r\n\r\nCut the yarn leaving a 12-inch tail.\r\n\r\n<strong>Finishing:</strong> Use the same technique described in the basic pattern to finish your cabled beanie.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Materials and vital statistics","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Directions","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Variation: Creating a cabled beanie","target":"#tab3"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269273,"title":"Crochet Pattern for a Multicolored Scarf","slug":"crochet-pattern-for-a-multicolored-scarf","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269273"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":295667,"title":"Crochet Patterns For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"crochet-patterns-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/295667"}},{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge 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& Crocheting All-in-One For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"9540\">Pam Allen</b></b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9541\">Shannon Okey</b></b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9849\">Susan Brittain</b></b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"10487\">Karen Manthey</b></b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6532ea8f46084\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6532ea8f4658c\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-10-20T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":269278},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2021-03-16T15:35:23+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-08-08T18:24:47+00:00","timestamp":"2024-08-08T21:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","strippedTitle":"go-to stitches: garter, stockinette, and seed stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","canonicalUrl":"","搜所网页搜所浏览平台升级网站网站系统seo":{"metaDescription":"Beginning knitters explore the basics of the garter stitch and stockinette stitch patterns and add the seed stitch to their repertoire.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Knitting and purling open the door to all sorts of patterns that involve alternating between knit and purl stitches. But as a <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">beginning knitter</a>, you really only need to know two patterns: garter stitch, which you create by knitting (or purling) every row, and stockinette stitch, which you create by alternating a knit row with a purl row.\r\n\r\nAnother stitch all knitters should have in their repertoire is seed stitch. Although a little more complicated than garter and stockinette stitches, seed stitches create an interesting texture and appear in many patterns.\r\n\r\nKnits and purls have a quirky but predictable relationship to each other. When lined up horizontally, the purled rows stand out from the knitted rows. Arranged in vertical patterns, like ribbing, the purl stitches recede and the knit stitches come forward, creating an elastic fabric.\r\n\r\nWhen worked in a balanced manner (meaning the same number of knits and purls appear on each side of the fabric), as in seed stitch and its variations, the fabric is stable — it lies flat and doesn’t have the tendency to roll in on the edges. These qualities make seed and moss stitches, as well as garter stitches, good choices for borders that need to lie flat and not pull in as ribbed borders do.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Garter stitch</h2>\r\nGarter stitch is the most basic of all knitted fabrics. It’s made by knitting every row. (You can create garter stitch by purling every row, too. Neat, huh?) You can recognize garter stitch by the horizontal ridges formed by the tops of the knitted loops on every other row.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269292\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269292\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-garter-stitch.jpg\" alt=\"Garter stitch.\" width=\"556\" height=\"405\" /> Garter stitch[/caption]\r\n\r\nGarter stitch has a lot going for it in addition to being easy to create. It’s reversible, lies flat, and has a pleasant rustic look. Unlike most knitted fabrics, garter stitch has a square gauge, meaning that there are usually twice as many rows as stitches in 1 inch. To count rows in garter stitch, count the ridges and multiply by two, or count the ridges by twos.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Garter stitch has a hanging gauge that stretches more vertically. Therefore, gravity and the weight of the garter stitch piece pulls on the fabric and actually makes it longer. This is important to keep in mind when you’re making a garment that you want to fit properly and not grow two times larger after an hour of wearing it.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Stockinette stitch</h2>\r\nWhen you alternate a knit row with a purl row (knit the first row, purl the second, knit the third, purl the fourth, and so on), you create stockinette stitch. You see stockinette stitch everywhere: in scarves, socks, sweaters, blankets, hats — you name it. In fact, most beginning and intermediate designs incorporate stockinette stitch.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269291\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269291\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-stockinette-knit.jpg\" alt=\"knit side of stockinette\" width=\"556\" height=\"361\" /> Stockinette stitch showing the knit side[/caption]\r\n\r\nIn written knitting instructions, stockinette stitch (abbreviated <em>St st</em>) appears like this:\r\n<blockquote><strong>Row 1 (RS):</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 2 (WS):</strong> Purl.\r\n\r\nRep Rows 1 and 2 for desired length.</blockquote>\r\nStockinette fabric looks and behaves in a particular way. To successfully incorporate this stitch into your knitting repertoire, pay attention to the following:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Stockinette stitch has a right side and a wrong side (though, of course, either side may be the “right” side, depending on the intended design). The right side is typically the smooth side, called stockinette or On this side, the stitches look like small <em>V</em>s. The bumpy side of stockinette stitch fabric is called reverse stockinette or purl.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"\"article-tips\">If you’re working in stockinette stitch and you lose track of whether you knit the last row or purled it, not to worry. You can tell what to do next by looking at your knitting. Hold your needles in the ready-to-knit position (with the LH needle holding the stitches to be worked) and look at what’s facing you. If you’re looking at the knit (smooth) side, you knit. If you’re looking at the purl (bumpy) side, you purl. A good mantra to say to yourself is knit the knits and purl the purls.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Stockinette fabric curls on the edges. The top and bottom (horizontal) edges curl toward the front or smooth side. The side (vertical) edges roll toward the bumpy side. Sweater designers frequently use this rolling feature deliberately to create rolled hems or cuffs, and you can create easy cords or straps simply by knitting a very narrow band in stockinette stitch (say, four or six stitches across).</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">But when you want the piece to lie flat, you need to counteract this tendency by working the three or four stitches on the edge in some stitch that lies flat (like garter stitch, discussed in the preceding section, or seed stitch, discussed in the next section).</p>\r\nTo figure out the gauge of a swatch knitted in stockinette stitch, count the <em>V</em>s on the smooth side or right side. They’re easier to see and distinguish than the bumps on the wrong side. Of course, if you find the bumps easier to count, it’s okay to do so.\r\n\r\nThe names garter stitch and stockinette stitch date from the 1500s, when hand-knit stockings were a major industry in England. Garter stitch was used at the top of the stocking, where it needed to expand for the thigh, and stockinette (or stocking stitch) was used for the fitted leg portion.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Seed stitch</h2>\r\nSeed stitch, shown in the figure below (and demonstrated in the video below), consists of single knits and purls alternating horizontally and vertically. Its name refers to the way the knitted fabric looks: The little purl bumps look like scattered seeds. Like garter stitch, seed stitch lies flat, making it a good edging for a sweater border and cuffs. It also looks the same from both sides, making it a nice choice for scarves and other pieces of which both sides are visible.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269290\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269290\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-seed-stitch.jpg\" alt=\"Seed stitch.\" width=\"556\" height=\"432\" /> Seed stitch[/caption]\r\n\r\nSeed stitch stitch gauge tends to be wider than a stockinette stitch stitch gauge. This is important to note if you plan to mix stitch patterns but want to maintain the same measurements in both patterns.\r\n<div class=\"x2 x2-top\">\r\n\r\n<div class=\"video-player-organism\"></div>\r\n\r\n</div>\r\nWhen knitting a stitch, the loose tail of yarn is in back of your work. When purling a stitch, the yarn is in front of your work. As you switch back and forth within a row, as in seed stitch, you need to move your yarn to the front or to the back as appropriate between the needles. If you forget to do so, you create an unintentional yarn over, resulting in an extra stitch on the next row and a hole in the work.\r\n\r\nUnfortunately for novice knitters, who often forget to move the yarn accordingly, instructions don’t explicitly tell you to bring your yarn to the front or back of your work. They assume that you know where the yarn should be when you’re about to knit or purl a stitch. As you practice the patterns that combine both knit and purl stitches, make sure your yarn is in the proper position for each stitch before you start it.\r\n\r\nTo create seed stitch:\r\n<blockquote>Cast on an even number of sts.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 1:</strong> * K1, p1; rep from * to end of row.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 2:</strong> * P1, k1; rep from * to end of row.\r\n\r\nRep Rows 1 and 2 for pattern.</blockquote>\r\nWhen working seed stitch, you alternate between knit and purl stitches in each row. The trick to creating the little “seeds” is to knit in the purl stitches of the previous row and purl in the knit stitches of the previous row.\r\n\r\nIf you’re working in seed stitch and you lose track of whether you knit the last stitch or purled it, don’t worry. You can tell what to do next by looking at your knitting. Hold your needles in the ready-to-knit position (with the LH needle holding the stitches to be worked or the ones you’re working on) and look at what’s facing you.\r\n\r\nOn the LH needle, if you’re looking at a knit stitch, you purl. If you’re looking at a purl (bumpy) stitch, you knit. A good mantra to say to yourself is knit the purls and purl the knits.","description":"Knitting and purling open the door to all sorts of patterns that involve alternating between knit and purl stitches. But as a <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">beginning knitter</a>, you really only need to know two patterns: garter stitch, which you create by knitting (or purling) every row, and stockinette stitch, which you create by alternating a knit row with a purl row.\r\n\r\nAnother stitch all knitters should have in their repertoire is seed stitch. Although a little more complicated than garter and stockinette stitches, seed stitches create an interesting texture and appear in many patterns.\r\n\r\nKnits and purls have a quirky but predictable relationship to each other. When lined up horizontally, the purled rows stand out from the knitted rows. Arranged in vertical patterns, like ribbing, the purl stitches recede and the knit stitches come forward, creating an elastic fabric.\r\n\r\nWhen worked in a balanced manner (meaning the same number of knits and purls appear on each side of the fabric), as in seed stitch and its variations, the fabric is stable — it lies flat and doesn’t have the tendency to roll in on the edges. These qualities make seed and moss stitches, as well as garter stitches, good choices for borders that need to lie flat and not pull in as ribbed borders do.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Garter stitch</h2>\r\nGarter stitch is the most basic of all knitted fabrics. It’s made by knitting every row. (You can create garter stitch by purling every row, too. Neat, huh?) You can recognize garter stitch by the horizontal ridges formed by the tops of the knitted loops on every other row.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269292\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269292\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-garter-stitch.jpg\" alt=\"Garter stitch.\" width=\"556\" height=\"405\" /> Garter stitch[/caption]\r\n\r\nGarter stitch has a lot going for it in addition to being easy to create. It’s reversible, lies flat, and has a pleasant rustic look. Unlike most knitted fabrics, garter stitch has a square gauge, meaning that there are usually twice as many rows as stitches in 1 inch. To count rows in garter stitch, count the ridges and multiply by two, or count the ridges by twos.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Garter stitch has a hanging gauge that stretches more vertically. Therefore, gravity and the weight of the garter stitch piece pulls on the fabric and actually makes it longer. This is important to keep in mind when you’re making a garment that you want to fit properly and not grow two times larger after an hour of wearing it.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Stockinette stitch</h2>\r\nWhen you alternate a knit row with a purl row (knit the first row, purl the second, knit the third, purl the fourth, and so on), you create stockinette stitch. You see stockinette stitch everywhere: in scarves, socks, sweaters, blankets, hats — you name it. In fact, most beginning and intermediate designs incorporate stockinette stitch.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269291\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269291\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-stockinette-knit.jpg\" alt=\"knit side of stockinette\" width=\"556\" height=\"361\" /> Stockinette stitch showing the knit side[/caption]\r\n\r\nIn written knitting instructions, stockinette stitch (abbreviated <em>St st</em>) appears like this:\r\n<blockquote><strong>Row 1 (RS):</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 2 (WS):</strong> Purl.\r\n\r\nRep Rows 1 and 2 for desired length.</blockquote>\r\nStockinette fabric looks and behaves in a particular way. To successfully incorporate this stitch into your knitting repertoire, pay attention to the following:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Stockinette stitch has a right side and a wrong side (though, of course, either side may be the “right” side, depending on the intended design). The right side is typically the smooth side, called stockinette or On this side, the stitches look like small <em>V</em>s. The bumpy side of stockinette stitch fabric is called reverse stockinette or purl.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"\"article-tips\">If you’re working in stockinette stitch and you lose track of whether you knit the last row or purled it, not to worry. You can tell what to do next by looking at your knitting. Hold your needles in the ready-to-knit position (with the LH needle holding the stitches to be worked) and look at what’s facing you. If you’re looking at the knit (smooth) side, you knit. If you’re looking at the purl (bumpy) side, you purl. A good mantra to say to yourself is knit the knits and purl the purls.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Stockinette fabric curls on the edges. The top and bottom (horizontal) edges curl toward the front or smooth side. The side (vertical) edges roll toward the bumpy side. Sweater designers frequently use this rolling feature deliberately to create rolled hems or cuffs, and you can create easy cords or straps simply by knitting a very narrow band in stockinette stitch (say, four or six stitches across).</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">But when you want the piece to lie flat, you need to counteract this tendency by working the three or four stitches on the edge in some stitch that lies flat (like garter stitch, discussed in the preceding section, or seed stitch, discussed in the next section).</p>\r\nTo figure out the gauge of a swatch knitted in stockinette stitch, count the <em>V</em>s on the smooth side or right side. They’re easier to see and distinguish than the bumps on the wrong side. Of course, if you find the bumps easier to count, it’s okay to do so.\r\n\r\nThe names garter stitch and stockinette stitch date from the 1500s, when hand-knit stockings were a major industry in England. Garter stitch was used at the top of the stocking, where it needed to expand for the thigh, and stockinette (or stocking stitch) was used for the fitted leg portion.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Seed stitch</h2>\r\nSeed stitch, shown in the figure below (and demonstrated in the video below), consists of single knits and purls alternating horizontally and vertically. Its name refers to the way the knitted fabric looks: The little purl bumps look like scattered seeds. Like garter stitch, seed stitch lies flat, making it a good edging for a sweater border and cuffs. It also looks the same from both sides, making it a nice choice for scarves and other pieces of which both sides are visible.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269290\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269290\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-seed-stitch.jpg\" alt=\"Seed stitch.\" width=\"556\" height=\"432\" /> Seed stitch[/caption]\r\n\r\nSeed stitch stitch gauge tends to be wider than a stockinette stitch stitch gauge. This is important to note if you plan to mix stitch patterns but want to maintain the same measurements in both patterns.\r\n<div class=\"x2 x2-top\">\r\n\r\n<div class=\"video-player-organism\"></div>\r\n\r\n</div>\r\nWhen knitting a stitch, the loose tail of yarn is in back of your work. When purling a stitch, the yarn is in front of your work. As you switch back and forth within a row, as in seed stitch, you need to move your yarn to the front or to the back as appropriate between the needles. If you forget to do so, you create an unintentional yarn over, resulting in an extra stitch on the next row and a hole in the work.\r\n\r\nUnfortunately for novice knitters, who often forget to move the yarn accordingly, instructions don’t explicitly tell you to bring your yarn to the front or back of your work. They assume that you know where the yarn should be when you’re about to knit or purl a stitch. As you practice the patterns that combine both knit and purl stitches, make sure your yarn is in the proper position for each stitch before you start it.\r\n\r\nTo create seed stitch:\r\n<blockquote>Cast on an even number of sts.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 1:</strong> * K1, p1; rep from * to end of row.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 2:</strong> * P1, k1; rep from * to end of row.\r\n\r\nRep Rows 1 and 2 for pattern.</blockquote>\r\nWhen working seed stitch, you alternate between knit and purl stitches in each row. The trick to creating the little “seeds” is to knit in the purl stitches of the previous row and purl in the knit stitches of the previous row.\r\n\r\nIf you’re working in seed stitch and you lose track of whether you knit the last stitch or purled it, don’t worry. You can tell what to do next by looking at your knitting. Hold your needles in the ready-to-knit position (with the LH needle holding the stitches to be worked or the ones you’re working on) and look at what’s facing you.\r\n\r\nOn the LH needle, if you’re looking at a knit stitch, you purl. If you’re looking at a purl (bumpy) stitch, you knit. A good mantra to say to yourself is knit the purls and purl the knits.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Garter stitch","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Stockinette stitch","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Seed stitch","target":"#tab3"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted 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& Crocheting All-in-One For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"9540\">Pam Allen</b></b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9541\">Shannon Okey</b></b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9849\">Susan Brittain</b></b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"10487\">Karen Manthey</b></b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. 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Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64d2ad0ec8674\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64d2ad0ec8f99\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Videos","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":"1648423511001","name":"How to Make the Seed Stitch When Knitting","accountId":"622696558001","playerId":"default","thumbnailUrl":"//cf-images.us-east-1.prod.boltdns.net/v1/static/622696558001/0e09a436-8e0e-4f41-8a53-10244c2228d0/da9a8a20-88bc-4df4-b9f8-066a3de0e311/120x67/match/image.jpg","description":"A seed stitch creates a flat, reversible piece of knitting that doesn't curl. The seed stitch is good for knitted edgings, like cuffs and borders, and for scarves.","uploadDate":"2023-06-30T17:08:57.784Z"}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-08-08T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":269289},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T22:52:40+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-07-21T14:32:28+00:00","timestamp":"2024-07-21T15:01:25+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"Preparing to Crochet","strippedTitle":"preparing to crochet","slug":"preparing-to-crochet","canonicalUrl":"","搜所网页搜所浏览平台升级网站网站系统seo":{"metaDescription":"Before you even attempt your first stitch, you need to master some basic skills. First, you need to know how to hold the hook and yarn, and second, you need to ","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Before you even attempt your first stitch, you need to master some basic skills. First, you need to know how to hold the hook and yarn, and second, you need to know how to get the yarn on the hook.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Are you a lefty or a righty?</h2>\r\nYour dominant hand — the one that you write with, eat with, and do just about everything else with — is the hand that you should hold your hook in. This is the hand that does most of the action, while the other hand guides the yarn and holds the work that's already been completed. Although most crochet patterns are written for right-handed people, those of you that are lefties shouldn't be discouraged. Your motions are exactly the same. You just do it with your left hand instead of your right.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Getting a grip</h2>\r\nEven though you crochet with only one hook, both hands are kept busy. Your dominant hand holds the hook, and your other hand holds the yarn.\r\n\r\nHolding your crochet hook is pretty simple. You just need to get a nice hold on your hook. If your hand isn't comfortable, it can cramp up, and your stitches won't go with the flow. Crocheting should be relaxing, not a continuous fight with the hook and yarn. Experiment with each of the following positions to see which one feels the most comfortable for you.\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><b>Over-the-hook position: </b>Position your hand over the hook with the handle resting against your palm and your thumb and middle finger grasping the thumb rest.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><b>Under-the-hook position:</b> Hold the hook as you would a pencil with the thumb rest between your forefinger and thumb.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nBoth are common ways of holding the crochet hook — for lefties and righties. Both work just fine.\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">When you first start working with yarn, it's best to use a light to medium, solid color worsted-weight yarn. You'll be able to see the stitches more clearly and manipulate the yarn easier, thus eliminating any potential problems that may occur if you used a textured or variegated yarn.</p>\r\nAfter you know what to do with the hook, you need to grab hold of the yarn. Like holding the hook, holding the yarn properly may seem simple. It may also seem like your fingers have to be contortionists to achieve the proper position, but don't worry, they can do it. Your yarn hand — the hand not holding your hook — has an important job. Not only does it feed the yarn to your crochet hook, but it also controls the tension of the yarn. Remember that right-handed crocheters wrap the yarn over their left hand, and left-handed people wrap the yarn over their right hand. The following steps offer one common method for wrapping the yarn around your hand.\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li>Starting from underneath your hand, bring the yarn up between your little finger and ring finger.</li>\r\n \t<li>Wrap the yarn around your little finger to form a loop.</li>\r\n \t<li>Draw the yarn under your ring finger and middle finger.</li>\r\n \t<li>Bring the yarn up to the top of your hand between your middle finger and forefinger.</li>\r\n \t<li>Finally, lay the yarn over your forefinger.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n\r\nTo keep the yarn in place, grasp the end of the yarn between your middle finger and thumb. By raising or lowering your forefinger, you can control the yarn tension.\r\n\r\nPractice wrapping and rewrapping the yarn around your yarn hand. Whenever you feel that your working yarn is too loose or too tight, stop and rewrap to get the proper tension. This motion will soon become an ingrained habit.","description":"Before you even attempt your first stitch, you need to master some basic skills. First, you need to know how to hold the hook and yarn, and second, you need to know how to get the yarn on the hook.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Are you a lefty or a righty?</h2>\r\nYour dominant hand — the one that you write with, eat with, and do just about everything else with — is the hand that you should hold your hook in. This is the hand that does most of the action, while the other hand guides the yarn and holds the work that's already been completed. Although most crochet patterns are written for right-handed people, those of you that are lefties shouldn't be discouraged. Your motions are exactly the same. You just do it with your left hand instead of your right.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Getting a grip</h2>\r\nEven though you crochet with only one hook, both hands are kept busy. Your dominant hand holds the hook, and your other hand holds the yarn.\r\n\r\nHolding your crochet hook is pretty simple. You just need to get a nice hold on your hook. If your hand isn't comfortable, it can cramp up, and your stitches won't go with the flow. Crocheting should be relaxing, not a continuous fight with the hook and yarn. Experiment with each of the following positions to see which one feels the most comfortable for you.\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><b>Over-the-hook position: </b>Position your hand over the hook with the handle resting against your palm and your thumb and middle finger grasping the thumb rest.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><b>Under-the-hook position:</b> Hold the hook as you would a pencil with the thumb rest between your forefinger and thumb.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nBoth are common ways of holding the crochet hook — for lefties and righties. Both work just fine.\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">When you first start working with yarn, it's best to use a light to medium, solid color worsted-weight yarn. You'll be able to see the stitches more clearly and manipulate the yarn easier, thus eliminating any potential problems that may occur if you used a textured or variegated yarn.</p>\r\nAfter you know what to do with the hook, you need to grab hold of the yarn. Like holding the hook, holding the yarn properly may seem simple. It may also seem like your fingers have to be contortionists to achieve the proper position, but don't worry, they can do it. Your yarn hand — the hand not holding your hook — has an important job. Not only does it feed the yarn to your crochet hook, but it also controls the tension of the yarn. Remember that right-handed crocheters wrap the yarn over their left hand, and left-handed people wrap the yarn over their right hand. The following steps offer one common method for wrapping the yarn around your hand.\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li>Starting from underneath your hand, bring the yarn up between your little finger and ring finger.</li>\r\n \t<li>Wrap the yarn around your little finger to form a loop.</li>\r\n \t<li>Draw the yarn under your ring finger and middle finger.</li>\r\n \t<li>Bring the yarn up to the top of your hand between your middle finger and forefinger.</li>\r\n \t<li>Finally, lay the yarn over your forefinger.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n\r\nTo keep the yarn in place, grasp the end of the yarn between your middle finger and thumb. By raising or lowering your forefinger, you can control the yarn tension.\r\n\r\nPractice wrapping and rewrapping the yarn around your yarn hand. Whenever you feel that your working yarn is too loose or too tight, stop and rewrap to get the proper tension. This motion will soon become an ingrained habit.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Are you a lefty or a righty?","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Getting a grip","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":295667,"title":"Crochet Patterns For Dummies Cheat 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Patterns For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9849\">Susan Brittain</b></b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = 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weights","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Standardized yarn weights are wonderful because one weight (or size) yarn can be called by several different names. This chart outlines the guidelines as set by the yarn industry.</p>\n<div class=\"figure-container\"><figure id=\"attachment_295669\" aria-labelledby=\"figcaption_attachment_295669\" class=\"wp-caption alignnone\" style=\"width: 640px\"><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"size-full wp-image-295669\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/yarn-weights.jpg\" alt=\"A table showing standardized yard weights\" width=\"630\" height=\"429\" /><figcaption id=\"figcaption_attachment_295669\" class=\"wp-caption-text\">Standardized yarn weights</figcaption></figure></div><div class=\"clearfix\"></div>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n"},{"title":"International crochet symbols","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Check out the following reference guide to the international crochet symbols and the abbreviations (in parentheses) for common crochet stitches. Note: The info in brackets describes the version of the stitch that the symbol represents.</p>\n<div class=\"figure-container\"><figure id=\"attachment_295668\" aria-labelledby=\"figcaption_attachment_295668\" class=\"wp-caption alignnone\" style=\"width: 640px\"><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"size-full wp-image-295668\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/crochet-symbols.jpg\" alt=\"A chart showing the international crochet symbols\" width=\"630\" height=\"655\" /><figcaption id=\"figcaption_attachment_295668\" class=\"wp-caption-text\">International crochet symbols</figcaption></figure></div><div class=\"clearfix\"></div>\n"},{"title":"Converting to and from metrics","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Here are a few quick conversions that you may need from time to time. These are approximations, but they’re much easier to do in your head and close enough for your crocheting needs!</p>\n<h3>Yards and meters</h3>\n<ul>\n<li>A yard is 36 inches</li>\n<li>A meter is 39 inches</li>\n<li>Multiply yards by 90 percent (0.9) to get meters (100 yds = 90 m)</li>\n<li>Multiply meters by 110 percent (1.1) to get yards (100 m = 110 yds)</li>\n</ul>\n<h3>Inches and centimeters</h3>\n<ul>\n<li>2.5 is the magic number here</li>\n<li>Multiply inches by 2.5 to get centimeters: 4 in. x 2.5 = 10 cm</li>\n<li>Divide centimeters by 2.5 to get inches: 10 cm ÷ 2.5 = 4 in.</li>\n</ul>\n<h3>Ounces and grams</h3>\n<p>50 g = 1.75 oz.; 100 g = 3.5 oz</p>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-01-11T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":295667},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T22:50:00+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-07-28T14:19:59+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:19:49+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"Doing a Double Crochet","strippedTitle":"doing a double crochet","slug":"doing-a-double-crochet","canonicalUrl":"","搜所网页搜所浏览平台升级网站网站系统seo":{"metaDescription":"This article provides step-by-step instructions for the double crochet stitch, which is about twice as tall as a single crochet stitch.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"The <em>double crochet </em>(abbreviated <em>dc</em>) is one of the most common crochet stitches and is about twice as tall as a single crochet. (You can read about single crochet in <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/how-to/content/how-to-make-a-single-crochet.html?cid=embedlink\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How to Make a Single Crochet</a>.) A fabric made of all double crochet stitches is fairly solid but not stiff and is great for sweaters, shawls, Afghans, placemats, or any number of other home decor items. You can also combine the double crochet stitch with other stitches to produce many interesting patterns and textures.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >First things first: Row 1</h2>\r\nThe following steps set you up to work your first double crochet stitch:\r\n<p class=\"number\">1. Make a foundation chain by doing 15 chain stitches (ch 15). (Check out <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/how-to/content/how-to-crochet-the-chain-stitch.html?cid=embedlink\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How to Crochet the Chain Stitch</a> if you need to.)</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">2. Chain 3 more stitches for the turning chain. (Get the scoop in <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/how-to/content/how-to-crochet-a-turning-chain.html?cid=embedlink\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How to Crochet a Turning Chain</a>.)</p>\r\nNow for your first double crochet stitch:\r\n<p class=\"number\">1. Yarn over the hook (yo), which you can read about in <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/how-to/content/how-to-yarn-over-in-crochet.html?cid=embedlink\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How to Yarn Over in Crochet</a>.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-list\">Remember to yarn over from back to front.</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">2. Insert your hook between the 2 front loops and under the back bump loop of the fourth chain from the hook (see Figure 1a).</p>\r\n\r\n<div class=\"figure\"><img class=\"alignnone\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/0-07645-4151-X_0601.jpg\" alt=\"Beginning a double crochet stitch.\" width=\"327\" height=\"89\" border=\"0\" /></div>\r\n<span class=\"caption\"><b>Figure 1:</b> Beginning a double crochet stitch.</span>\r\n<p class=\"number\">3. Yarn over the hook.</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">4. Gently pull the wrapped hook through the center of the chain stitch, carrying the wrapped yarn through the stitch.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-list\">Now, you should have 3 loops on your hook (refer to Figure 1b).</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">5. Yarn over the hook.</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">6. Draw your yarn through the first 2 loops on your hook (see Figure 2a).</p>\r\n\r\n<div class=\"figure\"><img class=\"alignnone\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/0-07645-4151-X_0602.jpg\" alt=\"Drawing your yarn through the loops.\" width=\"327\" height=\"86\" border=\"0\" /></div>\r\n<span class=\"caption\"><b>Figure 2:</b> Drawing your yarn through the loops.</span>\r\n<p class=\"number\">7. Yarn over the hook.</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">8. Draw your yarn through the last 2 loops on the hook (refer to Figure 2b).</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-list\">One double crochet (dc) stitch is complete. You should have one loop remaining on your hook.</p>\r\nTo finish your first row of double crochet, work 1 double crochet stitch in each successive chain stitch across the foundation chain, beginning in the next chain of the foundation chain as Figure 3a shows. You should have 16 double crochet stitches in Row 1 (counting the turning chain as the first double crochet).\r\n<div class=\"figure\"><img class=\"alignnone\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/0-07645-4151-X_0603.jpg\" alt=\"Finishing the first row of double crochet\" width=\"306\" height=\"108\" border=\"0\" /></div>\r\n<span class=\"caption\"><b>Figure 3:</b> Finishing the first row of double crochet.</span>\r\n\r\nTake a look at Figure 3b to see what the end of the first row of double crochet looks like.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Turn around and begin again: Row 2</h2>\r\nTo work the second row of double crochet, follow these steps:\r\n<p class=\"number\">1. Turn your work so that the back side is facing you.</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">2. Chain 3 (ch 3; for the turning chain).</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">3. Yarn over the hook (yo).</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">4. Skipping the first stitch of the row directly below the turning chain, insert your hook in the next stitch (see Figure 4a).</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-list\">Figure 4b shows you the wrong place to insert your hook.</p>\r\n\r\n<div class=\"figure\"><img class=\"alignnone\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/0-07645-4151-X_0604.jpg\" alt=\"Inserting hook for the first stitch of second row.\" width=\"302\" height=\"121\" border=\"0\" /></div>\r\n<span class=\"caption\"><b>Figure 4:</b> Inserting hook for the first stitch of second row.</span>\r\n<p class=\"number\">5. Repeat Steps 3 through 8 from the previous section in each of the next 14 double crochet (dc) stitches. Be sure to yarn over before inserting your hook in each stitch.</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">6. Work 1 double crochet in the top chain of the previous row's turning chain (see Figure 5).</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-list\">You should have 16 double crochet stitches in Row 2 (counting the turning chain as 1 double crochet).</p>\r\n\r\n<div class=\"figure\"><img class=\"alignnone\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/0-07645-4151-X_0605.jpg\" alt=\"Insert the hook in the top chain of the turning chain.\" width=\"120\" height=\"100\" border=\"0\" /></div>\r\n<span class=\"caption\"><b>Figure 5:</b> Insert the hook in the top chain of the turning chain.</span>\r\n\r\nRepeat these steps for each additional row of double crochet. Continue until you feel comfortable working this stitch. Figure 6 shows you how rows of double crochet look as a fabric.\r\n<div class=\"figure\"><img class=\"alignnone\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/0-07645-4151-X_0606.jpg\" alt=\"Several rows of double crochet.\" width=\"525\" height=\"541\" border=\"0\" /></div>\r\n<span class=\"caption\"><b>Figure 6:</b> Several rows of double crochet.</span>\r\n<p class=\"Warning\">Don't work a stitch into the first stitch of the row after the turning chain. Doing so produces an extra stitch, and if you continue to add a stitch in each row, your design gets wider and wider as it gets longer and longer. Be sure to count your stitches frequently to make sure that you haven't inadvertently gained (or lost) any stitches along the way.</p>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">Sometimes, especially when you're working with bulky yarn or a larger than usual hook, the turning chain on a double crochet row leaves a gap at the beginning of the row. To get a neater edge, try chaining 2 instead of 3 stitches for the turning chain.</p>\r\n<strong>See also:</strong>\r\n\r\n<a class=\"embedlink\" href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/home-auto-hobbies/crafts/knitting-crocheting/how-to-decrease-double-crochet-197663/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How to Decrease Double Crochet</a>\r\n\r\n<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/home-auto-hobbies/crafts/knitting-crocheting/how-to-increase-double-crochet-at-the-beginning-of-a-row-197614/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How to Increase Double Crochet at the Beginning of a Row</a>\r\n\r\n<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/how-to/content/how-to-make-a-double-triple-crochet.html?cid=embedlink\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How to Make a Double Triple Crochet</a>\r\n\r\n<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/how-to/content/how-to-make-a-half-double-crochet.html?cid=embedlink\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How to Make a Half Double Crochet</a>","description":"The <em>double crochet </em>(abbreviated <em>dc</em>) is one of the most common crochet stitches and is about twice as tall as a single crochet. (You can read about single crochet in <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/how-to/content/how-to-make-a-single-crochet.html?cid=embedlink\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How to Make a Single Crochet</a>.) A fabric made of all double crochet stitches is fairly solid but not stiff and is great for sweaters, shawls, Afghans, placemats, or any number of other home decor items. You can also combine the double crochet stitch with other stitches to produce many interesting patterns and textures.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >First things first: Row 1</h2>\r\nThe following steps set you up to work your first double crochet stitch:\r\n<p class=\"number\">1. Make a foundation chain by doing 15 chain stitches (ch 15). (Check out <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/how-to/content/how-to-crochet-the-chain-stitch.html?cid=embedlink\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How to Crochet the Chain Stitch</a> if you need to.)</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">2. Chain 3 more stitches for the turning chain. (Get the scoop in <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/how-to/content/how-to-crochet-a-turning-chain.html?cid=embedlink\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How to Crochet a Turning Chain</a>.)</p>\r\nNow for your first double crochet stitch:\r\n<p class=\"number\">1. Yarn over the hook (yo), which you can read about in <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/how-to/content/how-to-yarn-over-in-crochet.html?cid=embedlink\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How to Yarn Over in Crochet</a>.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-list\">Remember to yarn over from back to front.</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">2. Insert your hook between the 2 front loops and under the back bump loop of the fourth chain from the hook (see Figure 1a).</p>\r\n\r\n<div class=\"figure\"><img class=\"alignnone\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/0-07645-4151-X_0601.jpg\" alt=\"Beginning a double crochet stitch.\" width=\"327\" height=\"89\" border=\"0\" /></div>\r\n<span class=\"caption\"><b>Figure 1:</b> Beginning a double crochet stitch.</span>\r\n<p class=\"number\">3. Yarn over the hook.</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">4. Gently pull the wrapped hook through the center of the chain stitch, carrying the wrapped yarn through the stitch.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-list\">Now, you should have 3 loops on your hook (refer to Figure 1b).</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">5. Yarn over the hook.</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">6. Draw your yarn through the first 2 loops on your hook (see Figure 2a).</p>\r\n\r\n<div class=\"figure\"><img class=\"alignnone\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/0-07645-4151-X_0602.jpg\" alt=\"Drawing your yarn through the loops.\" width=\"327\" height=\"86\" border=\"0\" /></div>\r\n<span class=\"caption\"><b>Figure 2:</b> Drawing your yarn through the loops.</span>\r\n<p class=\"number\">7. Yarn over the hook.</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">8. Draw your yarn through the last 2 loops on the hook (refer to Figure 2b).</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-list\">One double crochet (dc) stitch is complete. You should have one loop remaining on your hook.</p>\r\nTo finish your first row of double crochet, work 1 double crochet stitch in each successive chain stitch across the foundation chain, beginning in the next chain of the foundation chain as Figure 3a shows. You should have 16 double crochet stitches in Row 1 (counting the turning chain as the first double crochet).\r\n<div class=\"figure\"><img class=\"alignnone\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/0-07645-4151-X_0603.jpg\" alt=\"Finishing the first row of double crochet\" width=\"306\" height=\"108\" border=\"0\" /></div>\r\n<span class=\"caption\"><b>Figure 3:</b> Finishing the first row of double crochet.</span>\r\n\r\nTake a look at Figure 3b to see what the end of the first row of double crochet looks like.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Turn around and begin again: Row 2</h2>\r\nTo work the second row of double crochet, follow these steps:\r\n<p class=\"number\">1. Turn your work so that the back side is facing you.</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">2. Chain 3 (ch 3; for the turning chain).</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">3. Yarn over the hook (yo).</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">4. Skipping the first stitch of the row directly below the turning chain, insert your hook in the next stitch (see Figure 4a).</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-list\">Figure 4b shows you the wrong place to insert your hook.</p>\r\n\r\n<div class=\"figure\"><img class=\"alignnone\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/0-07645-4151-X_0604.jpg\" alt=\"Inserting hook for the first stitch of second row.\" width=\"302\" height=\"121\" border=\"0\" /></div>\r\n<span class=\"caption\"><b>Figure 4:</b> Inserting hook for the first stitch of second row.</span>\r\n<p class=\"number\">5. Repeat Steps 3 through 8 from the previous section in each of the next 14 double crochet (dc) stitches. Be sure to yarn over before inserting your hook in each stitch.</p>\r\n<p class=\"number\">6. Work 1 double crochet in the top chain of the previous row's turning chain (see Figure 5).</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-list\">You should have 16 double crochet stitches in Row 2 (counting the turning chain as 1 double crochet).</p>\r\n\r\n<div class=\"figure\"><img class=\"alignnone\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/0-07645-4151-X_0605.jpg\" alt=\"Insert the hook in the top chain of the turning chain.\" width=\"120\" height=\"100\" border=\"0\" /></div>\r\n<span class=\"caption\"><b>Figure 5:</b> Insert the hook in the top chain of the turning chain.</span>\r\n\r\nRepeat these steps for each additional row of double crochet. Continue until you feel comfortable working this stitch. Figure 6 shows you how rows of double crochet look as a fabric.\r\n<div class=\"figure\"><img class=\"alignnone\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/0-07645-4151-X_0606.jpg\" alt=\"Several rows of double crochet.\" width=\"525\" height=\"541\" border=\"0\" /></div>\r\n<span class=\"caption\"><b>Figure 6:</b> Several rows of double crochet.</span>\r\n<p class=\"Warning\">Don't work a stitch into the first stitch of the row after the turning chain. Doing so produces an extra stitch, and if you continue to add a stitch in each row, your design gets wider and wider as it gets longer and longer. Be sure to count your stitches frequently to make sure that you haven't inadvertently gained (or lost) any stitches along the way.</p>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">Sometimes, especially when you're working with bulky yarn or a larger than usual hook, the turning chain on a double crochet row leaves a gap at the beginning of the row. To get a neater edge, try chaining 2 instead of 3 stitches for the turning chain.</p>\r\n<strong>See also:</strong>\r\n\r\n<a class=\"embedlink\" href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/home-auto-hobbies/crafts/knitting-crocheting/how-to-decrease-double-crochet-197663/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How to Decrease Double Crochet</a>\r\n\r\n<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/article/home-auto-hobbies/crafts/knitting-crocheting/how-to-increase-double-crochet-at-the-beginning-of-a-row-197614/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How to Increase Double Crochet at the Beginning of a Row</a>\r\n\r\n<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/how-to/content/how-to-make-a-double-triple-crochet.html?cid=embedlink\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How to Make a Double Triple Crochet</a>\r\n\r\n<a href=\"//coursofppt.com/how-to/content/how-to-make-a-half-double-crochet.html?cid=embedlink\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\">How to Make a Half Double Crochet</a>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"First things first: Row 1","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Turn around and begin again: Row 2","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":0,"slug":null,"isbn":null,"categoryList":null,"amazon":null,"image":null,"title":null,"testBankPinActivationLink":null,"bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":null,"authors":null,"_links":null},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b45391c8\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b4539c9f\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-07-28T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":200452},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-27T16:57:16+00:00","modifiedTime":"2023-03-25T17:59:16+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:19:30+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"Crocheting For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"crocheting for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"crocheting-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","搜所网页搜所浏览平台升级网站网站系统seo":{"metaDescription":"Introduction to the art of crocheting, including common symbols and abbreviations, as well as a quick guide to measuring a gauge swatch.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"You're never too old or too young to discover crochet. The skills you master, the benefits you receive, and the beautiful heirlooms you create can last a lifetime and be passed on to future generations. To get started with crocheting, you need to decode crochet symbols and abbreviations so you can follow patterns with ease, and you need to find out what gauge is (and why it's so important).","description":"You're never too old or too young to discover crochet. The skills you master, the benefits you receive, and the beautiful heirlooms you create can last a lifetime and be passed on to future generations. To get started with crocheting, you need to decode crochet symbols and abbreviations so you can follow patterns with ease, and you need to find out what gauge is (and why it's so important).","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":10488,"name":"Julie Holetz","slug":"julie-holetz","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10488"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":234163,"title":"How to Include Ties and Drawstrings in Your Crocheted Items","slug":"include-ties-drawstrings-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/234163"}},{"articleId":234160,"title":"Outline Your Crocheted Designs with Edging","slug":"outline-crocheted-designs-edging","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/234160"}},{"articleId":234157,"title":"Granny Square Cuff Crochet Project","slug":"granny-square-cuff-crochet-project","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/234157"}},{"articleId":234154,"title":"Joining Crochet Pieces on the Last Row or Round","slug":"joining-crochet-pieces-last-row-round","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/234154"}},{"articleId":234151,"title":"Join Crochet Pieces with a Row of Stitches","slug":"join-crochet-pieces-row-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/234151"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282125,"slug":"crocheting-for-dummies-with-online-videos-3rd-edition","isbn":"9781119287117","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119287111/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119287111/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119287111-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119287111/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119287111/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/Crocheting-For-Dummies-3rd-Edition-Cover-9781119287117.jpg","width":200,"height":251},"title":"Crocheting For Dummies with Online Videos","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":false,"authorsInfo":"<p><b data-author-id=\"10487\">Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b data-author-id=\"9849\">Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119287117&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b32f36e4\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119287117&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b32f3f4d\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":193945,"title":"Common International Crochet Symbols and Crochet Stitch Abbreviations","slug":"common-international-crochet-symbols-and-crochet-stitch-abbreviations","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193945"}},{"articleId":193938,"title":"Abbreviations for Common Crochet Terms","slug":"abbreviations-for-common-crochet-terms","categoryList":["business-careers-money","business","marketing"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193938"}},{"articleId":193941,"title":"Making and Measuring a Gauge Swatch before You Crochet","slug":"making-and-measuring-a-gauge-swatch-before-you-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193941"}}],"content":[{"title":"Common International Crochet Symbols and Crochet Stitch Abbreviations","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Check out the following quick reference guide to the International Crochet Symbols and the abbreviations (in parentheses) for common crochet stitches. <b><i>Note:</i></b> The info in brackets describes the version of the crochet stitch that the symbol represents.</p>\n<p><a href=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/crocheting-international-sy.jpg\"><img loading=\"lazy\" class=\"aligncenter wp-image-228633 size-large\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/crocheting-international-sy-535x586.jpg\" alt=\"crocheting-international-symbols\" width=\"535\" height=\"586\" /></a></p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n"},{"title":"Abbreviations for common crochet terms","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>So they stay free of clutter, crochet patterns feature a lot of abbreviations for common crochet terms. Here’s a sampling of typical crochet abbreviations you might find on a pattern:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">approximately <b>(approx)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">begin(ning) <b>(beg)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">between <b>(bet)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">contrast color <b>(CC)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">centimeter(s) <b>(cm)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">decrease(s)(d)(ing) <b>(dec)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">follow or following <b>(foll)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">gram or grams <b>(g)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">inch or inches <b>(in.)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">increase(s)(d)(ing) <b>(inc)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">meter(s) <b>(m)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">main color <b>(MC)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">ounce(s) <b>(oz.)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">pattern <b>(patt)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">remaining <b>(rem)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">repeat <b>(rep)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">ribbing <b>(rib)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">right side <b>(RS)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">round(s) <b>(rnd or rnds)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">stitch(es) <b>(st or sts)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">turning ch <b>(tch)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">together <b>(tog)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">wrong side <b>(WS)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">yard <b>(yd)</b></p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">yarn over (the) hook <b>(yo)</b></p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Making and measuring a gauge swatch before you crochet","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Making sure your stitches are consistently the right size is very important when crocheting. To get the shape and size you want, you must check the gauge provided in your crochet pattern; <i>gauge</i> is the ratio of a given number of stitches or rows to inches (or some other unit of measurement), such as seven stitches per inch or four rows per inch. You use this ratio to keep your stitches consistent and the size of your design on track.</p>\n<p>Follow these steps to make and measure a gauge swatch before you crochet:</p>\n<ol class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b></b>Make a swatch of the stitch pattern using the materials and hook size called for in the pattern.</p>\n<p class=\"child-para\">Your gauge swatch should be 1 to 2 inches larger than the measurement given in the Gauge section of the pattern. For example, if the gauge given is 4 inches, you should make your swatch 6 inches so you can get an accurate 4-inch measurement across the center of the swatch.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Block the swatch by lightly spraying it with water and then smoothing it out flat on a towel.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">Measure the stitches and rows across the center of the swatch and then compare your measurements to those listed in the Gauge section of the pattern.</p>\n<p class=\"child-para\">Usually gauge is measured across the center 4 inches. Using a ruler, count the number of stitches and rows across the center 4 inches of your swatch. That number is the gauge.</p>\n</li>\n</ol>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-03-25T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":209230},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2021-03-16T16:49:48+00:00","modifiedTime":"2021-03-16T16:49:48+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:36+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","strippedTitle":"how to clean knitted and crocheted items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","canonicalUrl":"","搜所网页搜所浏览平台升级网站网站系统seo":{"metaDescription":"Learn how to safely clean your knitted and crocheted items. Dry clean if the yarn label says so; otherwise, you can handwash or possibly machine wash.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Hand washing your <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">handknitted and crocheted</a> items is the safest bet, but you can try washing and drying some items, too. The following sections give you tips for each method.\r\n\r\nIf the yarn label says “Dry clean only,” then by all means, take the item to the cleaners. A word of advice, though: Bring the label (or a copy of the label) to the cleaners with you. That way they’ll know what material they’re working with and can use the appropriate chemicals.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269305\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269305\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-cleaning.jpg\" alt=\"cleaning knitted items\" width=\"556\" height=\"368\" /> ©Dmitriev Mikhail/Shutterstock.com[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Handwashing</h2>\r\nUnless the yarn specifically states “dry clean only,” handwashing is your best option. Here’s how:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong>Grab a bottle of mild detergent and make sure your sink or bathtub is clean.\r\n</strong>The best soap to use is a mild laundry detergent formulated for delicate items or baby clothes, such as Woolite or Ivory Soap. For small items, the kitchen sink is the perfect size. For larger items such as afghans, the bathtub or washtub works better.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Fill the sink or tub with enough cool to warm water so the item can be submerged.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Swish the item around gently.\r\n</strong>By keeping the agitation to a minimum, you preserve the integrity of the stitches.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>After washing, rinse thoroughly and squeeze out excess moisture.\r\n</strong>Rinse the item under cool water until it runs clear.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Never wring a knitted or crocheted item because the twisting motion can stretch the stitches and ultimately ruin the item’s shape.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Wrap the item in towels to absorb the extra moisture and lay flat to dry, blocking as necessary.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Never hang a crocheted piece to dry (it will stretch out of shape beyond recognition), and please, keep items out of the sun, which can cause fading.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Machine washing and drying</h2>\r\nIn some cases, it’s perfectly fine to throw your masterpieces in the washing machine. This holds true for items made from synthetic yarns, such as acrylic, which won’t sustain so much damage from the washing machine. Use the delicate cycle and, if size permits, throw the item into a mesh laundry bag. Be sure to check the yarn label for the correct water temperature settings.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">It’s always a safe bet to wash these items alone the first time around, just to make sure the colors won’t bleed into the rest of your laundry. If you’re not sure what the correct water temperature should be, opt for the safe route and use the cool water setting.</p>\r\nSometimes tossing your afghan, scarf, or other piece of handiwork in the dryer is just fine. Again, check the yarn label to make sure it’s okay. Most synthetic yarns will take a low heat setting unless it’s got some stuff attached like sequins or mirrors. Add some smooth-textured items like pillowcases to the dryer to help absorb moisture.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Don’t machine dry wool — it will shrink! Find a spot large enough to accommodate the piece and lay it out flat, shape it if necessary, and allow to dry, preferably in a place that is out of direct sunlight and won’t be disturbed by playful pets.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Iron only if you must</h2>\r\nIf you feel that you need to add some heat to an item to get all the wrinkles out, set the iron on the lowest heat setting suggested for the yarn. Place a slightly damp cloth, such as a clean cotton dish towel, on top of your piece before ironing.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Never allow the iron to come into direct contact with the yarn. Excessive heat can ruin the integrity of the yarn fibers, and even cotton thread can flatten out too much and ruin the original look of the design.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Remove those pesky pills</h2>\r\nIt’s inevitable — where there’s yarn there’s pills, those unsightly little balls that pop up on fabric after laundering or from normal wear and tear. Removing the pills can revitalize your pieces and make them look like new again.\r\n\r\nYou can get rid of pills two ways:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>By using a sweater stone:</strong> This is the recommended preference because it is gentler on the fabric and you have more control over it.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>By using a sweater shaver:</strong> These devices are typically battery operated or electric, and if you don’t use them properly, you can put holes in your item.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nTo use a sweater stone properly:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong>Lay the item on a flat surface.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Hold the stone in the palm of your hand and gently brush the fabric in smooth short strokes.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\nThe stone will crumble a bit, but don’t worry, this is normal and won’t damage your piece. Gently shake the item or use a lint roller to remove these tiny pieces.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Never, ever try to remove pilling with scissors! Remember that knits and crochet are a series of interlocking loops; if you inadvertently cut even one of the strands of yarn, your whole piece can unravel.</p>","description":"Hand washing your <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">handknitted and crocheted</a> items is the safest bet, but you can try washing and drying some items, too. The following sections give you tips for each method.\r\n\r\nIf the yarn label says “Dry clean only,” then by all means, take the item to the cleaners. A word of advice, though: Bring the label (or a copy of the label) to the cleaners with you. That way they’ll know what material they’re working with and can use the appropriate chemicals.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269305\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269305\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-cleaning.jpg\" alt=\"cleaning knitted items\" width=\"556\" height=\"368\" /> ©Dmitriev Mikhail/Shutterstock.com[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Handwashing</h2>\r\nUnless the yarn specifically states “dry clean only,” handwashing is your best option. Here’s how:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong>Grab a bottle of mild detergent and make sure your sink or bathtub is clean.\r\n</strong>The best soap to use is a mild laundry detergent formulated for delicate items or baby clothes, such as Woolite or Ivory Soap. For small items, the kitchen sink is the perfect size. For larger items such as afghans, the bathtub or washtub works better.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Fill the sink or tub with enough cool to warm water so the item can be submerged.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Swish the item around gently.\r\n</strong>By keeping the agitation to a minimum, you preserve the integrity of the stitches.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>After washing, rinse thoroughly and squeeze out excess moisture.\r\n</strong>Rinse the item under cool water until it runs clear.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Never wring a knitted or crocheted item because the twisting motion can stretch the stitches and ultimately ruin the item’s shape.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Wrap the item in towels to absorb the extra moisture and lay flat to dry, blocking as necessary.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Never hang a crocheted piece to dry (it will stretch out of shape beyond recognition), and please, keep items out of the sun, which can cause fading.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Machine washing and drying</h2>\r\nIn some cases, it’s perfectly fine to throw your masterpieces in the washing machine. This holds true for items made from synthetic yarns, such as acrylic, which won’t sustain so much damage from the washing machine. Use the delicate cycle and, if size permits, throw the item into a mesh laundry bag. Be sure to check the yarn label for the correct water temperature settings.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">It’s always a safe bet to wash these items alone the first time around, just to make sure the colors won’t bleed into the rest of your laundry. If you’re not sure what the correct water temperature should be, opt for the safe route and use the cool water setting.</p>\r\nSometimes tossing your afghan, scarf, or other piece of handiwork in the dryer is just fine. Again, check the yarn label to make sure it’s okay. Most synthetic yarns will take a low heat setting unless it’s got some stuff attached like sequins or mirrors. Add some smooth-textured items like pillowcases to the dryer to help absorb moisture.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Don’t machine dry wool — it will shrink! Find a spot large enough to accommodate the piece and lay it out flat, shape it if necessary, and allow to dry, preferably in a place that is out of direct sunlight and won’t be disturbed by playful pets.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Iron only if you must</h2>\r\nIf you feel that you need to add some heat to an item to get all the wrinkles out, set the iron on the lowest heat setting suggested for the yarn. Place a slightly damp cloth, such as a clean cotton dish towel, on top of your piece before ironing.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Never allow the iron to come into direct contact with the yarn. Excessive heat can ruin the integrity of the yarn fibers, and even cotton thread can flatten out too much and ruin the original look of the design.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Remove those pesky pills</h2>\r\nIt’s inevitable — where there’s yarn there’s pills, those unsightly little balls that pop up on fabric after laundering or from normal wear and tear. Removing the pills can revitalize your pieces and make them look like new again.\r\n\r\nYou can get rid of pills two ways:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>By using a sweater stone:</strong> This is the recommended preference because it is gentler on the fabric and you have more control over it.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>By using a sweater shaver:</strong> These devices are typically battery operated or electric, and if you don’t use them properly, you can put holes in your item.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nTo use a sweater stone properly:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong>Lay the item on a flat surface.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Hold the stone in the palm of your hand and gently brush the fabric in smooth short strokes.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\nThe stone will crumble a bit, but don’t worry, this is normal and won’t damage your piece. Gently shake the item or use a lint roller to remove these tiny pieces.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Never, ever try to remove pilling with scissors! Remember that knits and crochet are a series of interlocking loops; if you inadvertently cut even one of the strands of yarn, your whole piece can unravel.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Handwashing","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Machine washing and drying","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Iron only if you must","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Remove those pesky pills","target":"#tab4"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}},{"articleId":269273,"title":"Crochet Pattern for a Multicolored Scarf","slug":"crochet-pattern-for-a-multicolored-scarf","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269273"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}},{"articleId":269273,"title":"Crochet Pattern for a Multicolored Scarf","slug":"crochet-pattern-for-a-multicolored-scarf","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269273"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282338,"slug":"knitting-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119652939","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119652936-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cover-9781119652939-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Knitting & Crocheting All-in-One For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"9540\">Pam Allen</b></b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9541\">Shannon Okey</b></b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9849\">Susan Brittain</b></b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"10487\">Karen Manthey</b></b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ac05d78f\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ac05e095\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":null,"lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":269304},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2021-03-16T16:12:22+00:00","modifiedTime":"2021-03-16T16:12:22+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:36+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","strippedTitle":"how to execute the extended double crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","canonicalUrl":"","搜所网页搜所浏览平台升级网站网站系统seo":{"metaDescription":"Learn how to adapt the standard double crochet stitch into the extended double crochet and how to adapt any stitch into an extended stitch.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"The <em>extended double crochet</em> (abbreviated <em>Edc</em>) is a variation on the standard <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/crocheting/projects/doing-a-double-crochet/\">double crochet stitch</a> (abbreviated <em>dc</em>). Occasionally a pattern may direct you to make <em>extended crochet stitches,</em> which are a little taller than the regular version of the same stitch. They also provide variation in texture with a slightly improved drape, meaning a fabric made of extended stitches is softer and less dense than one made with standard stitches.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">You can adapt any stitch into an extended stitch. How? Instead of adding a yarn over to the beginning of the stitch, extended stitches include a chain stitch in the middle of the stitch to give a little extra lift.</p>\r\nTo get started:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Make a foundation chain by working 15 chain stitches (ch 15).</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Chain 3 more stitches for the turning chain.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\nTo create your first extended double crochet stitch, follow these steps:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook (yo).</strong>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Always yarn over from back to front.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Insert your hook into the fourth chain (ch) from the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Gently pull the wrapped hook through the center of the chain stitch, carrying the wrapped yarn through the stitch.\r\n</strong>You should now have 3 loops on your hook.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong><strong> Work a chain stitch by drawing the yarn through the first loop on the hook, as in the following figure.\r\n</strong></strong>\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269300\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269300\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-extended-double-crochet.jpg\" alt=\"extended double crochet\" width=\"556\" height=\"256\" /> Making a chain stitch for your extended double crochet.[/caption]</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Yarn over the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Draw the yarn through the first 2 loops on your hook, like in (a) in the following figure.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Draw the yarn through the last 2 loops on the hook, as shown in (b) in the following figure.\r\n</strong>One extended double crochet stitch (Edc) is now complete, and you should have 1 loop remaining on your hook. When a stitch diagram indicates an extended double crochet stitch, you see the symbol shown in (c).</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269299\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269299\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-extended-finish.jpg\" alt=\"Finishing an extended double crochet stitch.\" width=\"556\" height=\"255\" /> Finishing an extended double crochet stitch.[/caption]\r\n\r\nTo work your next extended double crochet and continue the row, perform these steps:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook (yo) and insert your hook into the next chain stitch (ch).</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over and pull the yarn through the chain stitch.\r\n</strong>You should have 3 loops on the hook.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Repeat Steps 5 through 10 from the preceding instructions to complete the second extended double crochet stitch (Edc).</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Work 1 extended double crochet stitch in each chain stitch across the foundation chain by repeating Steps 1 through 3.\r\n</strong>When you count the turning chain as the first extended double crochet, you should have 16 extended double crochet stitches in Row 1. This figure shows the end of the first extended double crochet row.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269298\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269298\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-extended-first-row.jpg\" alt=\" first row of extended double crochet\" width=\"556\" height=\"358\" /> Finishing the first row of extended double crochet.[/caption]\r\n\r\nTo begin the next row of extended double crochet, turn your piece and make three chains for the turning chain. Skipping the first stitch, work your first extended double crochet stitch into the next stitch on the previous row and follow Steps 1 through 3 of the preceding instructions. Take a look at this figure to see what rows of extended double crochet look like as a fabric.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269297\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269297\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-extended-rows.jpg\" alt=\" rows of extended double crochet\" width=\"556\" height=\"502\" /> Several rows of extended double crochet.[/caption]","description":"The <em>extended double crochet</em> (abbreviated <em>Edc</em>) is a variation on the standard <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/crocheting/projects/doing-a-double-crochet/\">double crochet stitch</a> (abbreviated <em>dc</em>). Occasionally a pattern may direct you to make <em>extended crochet stitches,</em> which are a little taller than the regular version of the same stitch. They also provide variation in texture with a slightly improved drape, meaning a fabric made of extended stitches is softer and less dense than one made with standard stitches.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">You can adapt any stitch into an extended stitch. How? Instead of adding a yarn over to the beginning of the stitch, extended stitches include a chain stitch in the middle of the stitch to give a little extra lift.</p>\r\nTo get started:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Make a foundation chain by working 15 chain stitches (ch 15).</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Chain 3 more stitches for the turning chain.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\nTo create your first extended double crochet stitch, follow these steps:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook (yo).</strong>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Always yarn over from back to front.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Insert your hook into the fourth chain (ch) from the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Gently pull the wrapped hook through the center of the chain stitch, carrying the wrapped yarn through the stitch.\r\n</strong>You should now have 3 loops on your hook.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong><strong> Work a chain stitch by drawing the yarn through the first loop on the hook, as in the following figure.\r\n</strong></strong>\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269300\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269300\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-extended-double-crochet.jpg\" alt=\"extended double crochet\" width=\"556\" height=\"256\" /> Making a chain stitch for your extended double crochet.[/caption]</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Yarn over the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Draw the yarn through the first 2 loops on your hook, like in (a) in the following figure.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Draw the yarn through the last 2 loops on the hook, as shown in (b) in the following figure.\r\n</strong>One extended double crochet stitch (Edc) is now complete, and you should have 1 loop remaining on your hook. When a stitch diagram indicates an extended double crochet stitch, you see the symbol shown in (c).</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269299\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269299\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-extended-finish.jpg\" alt=\"Finishing an extended double crochet stitch.\" width=\"556\" height=\"255\" /> Finishing an extended double crochet stitch.[/caption]\r\n\r\nTo work your next extended double crochet and continue the row, perform these steps:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook (yo) and insert your hook into the next chain stitch (ch).</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over and pull the yarn through the chain stitch.\r\n</strong>You should have 3 loops on the hook.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Repeat Steps 5 through 10 from the preceding instructions to complete the second extended double crochet stitch (Edc).</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Work 1 extended double crochet stitch in each chain stitch across the foundation chain by repeating Steps 1 through 3.\r\n</strong>When you count the turning chain as the first extended double crochet, you should have 16 extended double crochet stitches in Row 1. This figure shows the end of the first extended double crochet row.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269298\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269298\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-extended-first-row.jpg\" alt=\" first row of extended double crochet\" width=\"556\" height=\"358\" /> Finishing the first row of extended double crochet.[/caption]\r\n\r\nTo begin the next row of extended double crochet, turn your piece and make three chains for the turning chain. Skipping the first stitch, work your first extended double crochet stitch into the next stitch on the previous row and follow Steps 1 through 3 of the preceding instructions. Take a look at this figure to see what rows of extended double crochet look like as a fabric.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269297\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269297\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-extended-rows.jpg\" alt=\" rows of extended double crochet\" width=\"556\" height=\"502\" /> Several rows of extended double crochet.[/caption]","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}},{"articleId":269273,"title":"Crochet Pattern for a Multicolored Scarf","slug":"crochet-pattern-for-a-multicolored-scarf","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269273"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}},{"articleId":269273,"title":"Crochet Pattern for a Multicolored Scarf","slug":"crochet-pattern-for-a-multicolored-scarf","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269273"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282338,"slug":"knitting-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119652939","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119652936-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cover-9781119652939-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Knitting & Crocheting All-in-One For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"9540\">Pam Allen</b></b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9541\">Shannon Okey</b></b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9849\">Susan Brittain</b></b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"10487\">Karen Manthey</b></b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ac055a64\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ac056337\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":null,"lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":269296},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2021-03-16T15:21:41+00:00","modifiedTime":"2021-03-16T15:21:41+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:36+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","strippedTitle":"why (and when) yarn gauge matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","canonicalUrl":"","搜所网页搜所浏览平台升级网站网站系统seo":{"metaDescription":"Learn how to measure and work with gauge so that you can go from a knitted or crocheted swatch to a finished project with the correct measurements.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Understanding how to measure and work with gauge is what allows you to go from a knitted or crocheted swatch to a finished project that has the correct measurements.\r\n\r\nIf you’ve spent some time around <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">knitters or crocheters</a>, you may already know that mention of the word gauge often elicits a groan. Gauge has a bad reputation for three reasons. First, it represents an unpleasant “should.” Second, it’s a tedious task that has to be accomplished before the fun part of the project can begin. Finally, it involves math. However, getting comfortable with gauge gives you a leg up in knitting and crocheting. Without knowing your gauge, you couldn’t do the following:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Work away, comfortable in the knowledge that after you work the thousands of stitches required to complete your project, it will fit.</li>\r\n \t<li>Ensure your final project is neat and attractive.</li>\r\n \t<li>Substitute another yarn for the one given in the pattern.</li>\r\n \t<li>Use the needle or hook size that makes the best fabric for your chosen yarn, even if it means you don’t match the pattern’s gauge.</li>\r\n \t<li>Ensure that the amount of yarn the pattern specifies is sufficient to complete the project.</li>\r\n \t<li>Design your own projects and sweaters.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Determine the gauge</h2>\r\nThe first step in any project is to determine the gauge of the fabric you’re making. Gauge (sometimes called <em>tension</em>) is listed at the beginning of a pattern before the instructions begin. It’s given as a number of stitches and rows over 4 inches or 10 centimeters, and it tells you which needle or hook size and which stitch pattern were used to determine the gauge. Check your pattern to see how many stitches and rows should make up 4 inches of knitted fabric. You need to measure <em>your</em> gauge against that given in the directions.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">The yarn manufacturer may also recommend a particular gauge on the yarn label. This gauge may be quite different from the one in your pattern, but that’s okay. Sometimes, the pattern designer wants to create a looser or tighter stitch pattern than the standard that the yarn manufacturer set. Follow the pattern gauge to get the same results as the pictured project.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Gauge isn’t always important, such as when you’re making a scarf, an afghan, a bag, or anything else for which a precise size isn’t essential. But when size does matter, the right or wrong gauge can make or break the finished piece.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >What affects gauge</h2>\r\nGauge varies depending on the yarn, the needle or hook size, and the stitch pattern you use:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Yarn:</strong> Yarns of different weights produce different gauges. A bulkier yarn produces a larger stitch, and a finer yarn produces a smaller stitch.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Needle or hook size:</strong> The same yarn knitted on different-sized needles or crocheted on a different size hook will have different gauges. Because you make a stitch by wrapping yarn around a needle or hook, the size (circumference) of the needle or hook determines the size of the stitch.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">This figure shows how needle size can affect the way the finished fabric looks. The smaller the needle is, the tighter the stitches and the denser the knitted fabric. The larger the needle is, the looser the stitches and the drapier (and stretchier) the fabric.</p>\r\n\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269285\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269285\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-needle-size.jpg\" alt=\"stitches from different needle sizes\" width=\"556\" height=\"363\" /> Smaller needles result in tighter stitches; bigger needles, in looser stitches.[/caption]\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Stitch patterns and stitch size:</strong> The same yarn knitted on the same needles or crocheted on the same hook but in different stitch patterns will have different gauges. For example, some stitches pull in, requiring more stitches to make a square inch. Other stitches spread the fabric out, so they require fewer stitches to make an inch. The following figure compares the gauges of two different stitch patterns that use the same number of stitches.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269284\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269284\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-stitch-patterns.jpg\" alt=\"stitch patterns\" width=\"556\" height=\"374\" /> Gauge on different stitch patterns.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Gauge also can vary with the time of day you’re working, how long you’ve been working, and what you’re thinking about. The tension you put on the yarn traveling around the needle or hook contributes to stitch size, so being tired or tense can affect the flow of your yarn and stitch size.</p>","description":"Understanding how to measure and work with gauge is what allows you to go from a knitted or crocheted swatch to a finished project that has the correct measurements.\r\n\r\nIf you’ve spent some time around <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">knitters or crocheters</a>, you may already know that mention of the word gauge often elicits a groan. Gauge has a bad reputation for three reasons. First, it represents an unpleasant “should.” Second, it’s a tedious task that has to be accomplished before the fun part of the project can begin. Finally, it involves math. However, getting comfortable with gauge gives you a leg up in knitting and crocheting. Without knowing your gauge, you couldn’t do the following:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Work away, comfortable in the knowledge that after you work the thousands of stitches required to complete your project, it will fit.</li>\r\n \t<li>Ensure your final project is neat and attractive.</li>\r\n \t<li>Substitute another yarn for the one given in the pattern.</li>\r\n \t<li>Use the needle or hook size that makes the best fabric for your chosen yarn, even if it means you don’t match the pattern’s gauge.</li>\r\n \t<li>Ensure that the amount of yarn the pattern specifies is sufficient to complete the project.</li>\r\n \t<li>Design your own projects and sweaters.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Determine the gauge</h2>\r\nThe first step in any project is to determine the gauge of the fabric you’re making. Gauge (sometimes called <em>tension</em>) is listed at the beginning of a pattern before the instructions begin. It’s given as a number of stitches and rows over 4 inches or 10 centimeters, and it tells you which needle or hook size and which stitch pattern were used to determine the gauge. Check your pattern to see how many stitches and rows should make up 4 inches of knitted fabric. You need to measure <em>your</em> gauge against that given in the directions.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">The yarn manufacturer may also recommend a particular gauge on the yarn label. This gauge may be quite different from the one in your pattern, but that’s okay. Sometimes, the pattern designer wants to create a looser or tighter stitch pattern than the standard that the yarn manufacturer set. Follow the pattern gauge to get the same results as the pictured project.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Gauge isn’t always important, such as when you’re making a scarf, an afghan, a bag, or anything else for which a precise size isn’t essential. But when size does matter, the right or wrong gauge can make or break the finished piece.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >What affects gauge</h2>\r\nGauge varies depending on the yarn, the needle or hook size, and the stitch pattern you use:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Yarn:</strong> Yarns of different weights produce different gauges. A bulkier yarn produces a larger stitch, and a finer yarn produces a smaller stitch.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Needle or hook size:</strong> The same yarn knitted on different-sized needles or crocheted on a different size hook will have different gauges. Because you make a stitch by wrapping yarn around a needle or hook, the size (circumference) of the needle or hook determines the size of the stitch.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">This figure shows how needle size can affect the way the finished fabric looks. The smaller the needle is, the tighter the stitches and the denser the knitted fabric. The larger the needle is, the looser the stitches and the drapier (and stretchier) the fabric.</p>\r\n\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269285\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269285\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-needle-size.jpg\" alt=\"stitches from different needle sizes\" width=\"556\" height=\"363\" /> Smaller needles result in tighter stitches; bigger needles, in looser stitches.[/caption]\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Stitch patterns and stitch size:</strong> The same yarn knitted on the same needles or crocheted on the same hook but in different stitch patterns will have different gauges. For example, some stitches pull in, requiring more stitches to make a square inch. Other stitches spread the fabric out, so they require fewer stitches to make an inch. The following figure compares the gauges of two different stitch patterns that use the same number of stitches.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269284\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269284\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-stitch-patterns.jpg\" alt=\"stitch patterns\" width=\"556\" height=\"374\" /> Gauge on different stitch patterns.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Gauge also can vary with the time of day you’re working, how long you’ve been working, and what you’re thinking about. The tension you put on the yarn traveling around the needle or hook contributes to stitch size, so being tired or tense can affect the flow of your yarn and stitch size.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Determine the gauge","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"What affects gauge","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}},{"articleId":269273,"title":"Crochet Pattern for a Multicolored Scarf","slug":"crochet-pattern-for-a-multicolored-scarf","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269273"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}},{"articleId":269273,"title":"Crochet Pattern for a Multicolored Scarf","slug":"crochet-pattern-for-a-multicolored-scarf","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269273"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282338,"slug":"knitting-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119652939","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119652936-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cover-9781119652939-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Knitting & Crocheting All-in-One For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"9540\">Pam Allen</b></b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9541\">Shannon Okey</b></b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9849\">Susan Brittain</b></b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"10487\">Karen Manthey</b></b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. 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Susan Brittain

Karen Manthey edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers. Susan Brittain was an assistant editor for Crochet Fantasy magazine.

Articles From Susan Brittain

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128 results
How to Make a Half Double Crochet Step by Step / Updated 10-27-2023 The half double crochet (abbreviated hdc) is kind of an oddball stitch. It falls in between a single crochet and a double crochet in height, but instead of working off two loops at a time, you draw the yarn through three loops on the hook. It produces a fairly tight fabric similar to one made with a single crochet stitch: View Step by Step
How to Knit Basic Beanies Article / Updated 10-20-2023 A good hat is a must-have in your knitting repertoire, and this basic beanie, sized for babies through adults, fits the bill. Make it plain or cabled. Add in stripes or a color pattern. After your beanie is knit, top it with a pompom or tassel. The variations are endless. Materials and vital statistics Yarn: Berrocco Smart Mohair (41 percent mohair, 54 percent acrylic, 5 percent polyester); 108 yards (100 meters) per 50 grams; 1 (1, 1, 2, 2) balls; color: Pink Needles: US 10 (6 mm) circular needle, 16-inch length, or the size needed to match gauge; US 8 (5 mm) circular needle, 16-inch length; US 10 (6 mm) double-pointed needles Other materials: Eight stitch markers; yarn needle to weave in ends Size: Baby (toddler, child, small adult, large adult); circumference: 14 (16, 18, 20, 22) inches, unstretched Gauge: 16 stitches and 20 rows per 4 inches in stockinette stitch on larger needles This beanie is worked in the round, starting on circular needles and switching to double-pointed needles when you shape the crown of the hat. If you want to include any color patterning, add it to the body of the hat between the ribbing and the decreases. If you’d like to knit cables on your hat, see the variation at the end of the pattern. Directions Cast on 56 (64, 72, 80, 88) sts with the smaller circular needles. Place marker and join in the round, being careful not to twist. Round 1: *K2, p2, repeat from * to end of round. Repeat this round for 3⁄4 (1, 1, 1-1⁄2, 2) inches. Switch to larger circular needles and begin knitting in stockinette stitch (knit all rounds). When your hat measures 4-1⁄2 (5, 5-1⁄2, 6-1⁄2, 7) inches, begin the crown shaping as follows: Next round: *K7 (8, 9, 10, 11), place marker, repeat from * to end. Next round (Decrease Round): *K2tog, knit to marker, slip marker, repeat from * to end. 8 sts have been decreased. Next round: Knit. Repeat these 2 rounds until 8 sts remain, switching to double-pointed needles when you have too few sts to fit comfortably on your circular needle. Cut yarn, leaving a 12-inch tail. Finishing: Thread the tail of the yarn onto the yarn needle. Slip the stitches from the knitting needle to the yarn needle, making sure that you go through each stitch. Pull the yarn firmly to tighten the top of the hat, and then run the yarn through the stitches again before weaving in the yarn end on the inside to secure. Weave in any remaining ends. If you want, you can top your beanie with a pompom, knitted flower, or other adornment for extra flair. Variation: Creating a cabled beanie This cabled hat features straightforward six-stitch cables. It is made with the same yarn and needles as the basic beanie, fits a toddler (child, small adult, large adult), and measures 16 (17-1⁄2, 19, 22) inches around. You need six stitch markers to help keep your decreases lined up. Using the smaller circular needles, cast on 66 (72, 78, 90) sts. Place a marker and join in the round, being careful not to twist. Ribbing round: *K1, p1, repeat from * to end. Repeat this round for 1 (1, 2, 2) inches. Switch to the larger circular needles and begin the six-stitch right cable pattern as follows, placing markers on the first round as indicated: Rounds 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5: *K6, p5 (6, 7, 9), place marker, repeat from * to end of round. Round 6: *Slip 3 sts to the cable needle and hold to back, k3, k3 from cable needle, p5 (6, 7, 9), repeat from * to end of round. Repeat these 6 rounds until the hat measures 5-1⁄2 (6, 6-1⁄2, 7) inches, and then begin decreasing as follows: Continue the cable pattern as set on the columns of 6 knit sts. In other words, you should cable every 6th round (even though the decreasing is occurring too). Next round: *K6, p2tog, purl to marker, repeat from * to end of round. If you’re unfamiliar with purling 2 stitches together (p2tog), here’s how to do it: Insert the right needle into the next 2 stitches purlwise, wrap the yarn around the right-hand needle, and then purl them to decrease 1 stitch. Next round: Work even, knitting and purling the sts as they appear. Repeat the previous 2 rounds 3 (4, 5, 7) more times. There are 42 sts on the needles. Stop the cable pattern and finish the hat in stockinette stitch (knit all rounds). Next round: *K5, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 36 sts remain. Next round: Knit. Next round: *K4, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 30 sts remain. Next round: Knit. Next round: *K3, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 24 sts remain. Next round: Knit. Next round: *K2, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 18 sts remain. Next round: *K1, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 12 sts remain. Next round: *K2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 6 sts remain. Cut the yarn leaving a 12-inch tail. Finishing: Use the same technique described in the basic pattern to finish your cabled beanie. View Article
Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches Video / Updated 08-08-2023 Knitting and purling open the door to all sorts of patterns that involve alternating between knit and purl stitches. But as a beginning knitter, you really only need to know two patterns: garter stitch, which you create by knitting (or purling) every row, and stockinette stitch, which you create by alternating a knit row with a purl row. Another stitch all knitters should have in their repertoire is seed stitch. Although a little more complicated than garter and stockinette stitches, seed stitches create an interesting texture and appear in many patterns. Knits and purls have a quirky but predictable relationship to each other. When lined up horizontally, the purled rows stand out from the knitted rows. Arranged in vertical patterns, like ribbing, the purl stitches recede and the knit stitches come forward, creating an elastic fabric. When worked in a balanced manner (meaning the same number of knits and purls appear on each side of the fabric), as in seed stitch and its variations, the fabric is stable — it lies flat and doesn’t have the tendency to roll in on the edges. These qualities make seed and moss stitches, as well as garter stitches, good choices for borders that need to lie flat and not pull in as ribbed borders do. Garter stitch Garter stitch is the most basic of all knitted fabrics. It’s made by knitting every row. (You can create garter stitch by purling every row, too. Neat, huh?) You can recognize garter stitch by the horizontal ridges formed by the tops of the knitted loops on every other row. Garter stitch has a lot going for it in addition to being easy to create. It’s reversible, lies flat, and has a pleasant rustic look. Unlike most knitted fabrics, garter stitch has a square gauge, meaning that there are usually twice as many rows as stitches in 1 inch. To count rows in garter stitch, count the ridges and multiply by two, or count the ridges by twos. Garter stitch has a hanging gauge that stretches more vertically. Therefore, gravity and the weight of the garter stitch piece pulls on the fabric and actually makes it longer. This is important to keep in mind when you’re making a garment that you want to fit properly and not grow two times larger after an hour of wearing it. Stockinette stitch When you alternate a knit row with a purl row (knit the first row, purl the second, knit the third, purl the fourth, and so on), you create stockinette stitch. You see stockinette stitch everywhere: in scarves, socks, sweaters, blankets, hats — you name it. In fact, most beginning and intermediate designs incorporate stockinette stitch. In written knitting instructions, stockinette stitch (abbreviated St st) appears like this: Row 1 (RS): Knit. Row 2 (WS): Purl. Rep Rows 1 and 2 for desired length. Stockinette fabric looks and behaves in a particular way. To successfully incorporate this stitch into your knitting repertoire, pay attention to the following: Stockinette stitch has a right side and a wrong side (though, of course, either side may be the “right” side, depending on the intended design). The right side is typically the smooth side, called stockinette or On this side, the stitches look like small Vs. The bumpy side of stockinette stitch fabric is called reverse stockinette or purl. If you’re working in stockinette stitch and you lose track of whether you knit the last row or purled it, not to worry. You can tell what to do next by looking at your knitting. Hold your needles in the ready-to-knit position (with the LH needle holding the stitches to be worked) and look at what’s facing you. If you’re looking at the knit (smooth) side, you knit. If you’re looking at the purl (bumpy) side, you purl. A good mantra to say to yourself is knit the knits and purl the purls. Stockinette fabric curls on the edges. The top and bottom (horizontal) edges curl toward the front or smooth side. The side (vertical) edges roll toward the bumpy side. Sweater designers frequently use this rolling feature deliberately to create rolled hems or cuffs, and you can create easy cords or straps simply by knitting a very narrow band in stockinette stitch (say, four or six stitches across). But when you want the piece to lie flat, you need to counteract this tendency by working the three or four stitches on the edge in some stitch that lies flat (like garter stitch, discussed in the preceding section, or seed stitch, discussed in the next section). To figure out the gauge of a swatch knitted in stockinette stitch, count the Vs on the smooth side or right side. They’re easier to see and distinguish than the bumps on the wrong side. Of course, if you find the bumps easier to count, it’s okay to do so. The names garter stitch and stockinette stitch date from the 1500s, when hand-knit stockings were a major industry in England. Garter stitch was used at the top of the stocking, where it needed to expand for the thigh, and stockinette (or stocking stitch) was used for the fitted leg portion. Seed stitch Seed stitch, shown in the figure below (and demonstrated in the video below), consists of single knits and purls alternating horizontally and vertically. Its name refers to the way the knitted fabric looks: The little purl bumps look like scattered seeds. Like garter stitch, seed stitch lies flat, making it a good edging for a sweater border and cuffs. It also looks the same from both sides, making it a nice choice for scarves and other pieces of which both sides are visible. Seed stitch stitch gauge tends to be wider than a stockinette stitch stitch gauge. This is important to note if you plan to mix stitch patterns but want to maintain the same measurements in both patterns. When knitting a stitch, the loose tail of yarn is in back of your work. When purling a stitch, the yarn is in front of your work. As you switch back and forth within a row, as in seed stitch, you need to move your yarn to the front or to the back as appropriate between the needles. If you forget to do so, you create an unintentional yarn over, resulting in an extra stitch on the next row and a hole in the work. Unfortunately for novice knitters, who often forget to move the yarn accordingly, instructions don’t explicitly tell you to bring your yarn to the front or back of your work. They assume that you know where the yarn should be when you’re about to knit or purl a stitch. As you practice the patterns that combine both knit and purl stitches, make sure your yarn is in the proper position for each stitch before you start it. To create seed stitch: Cast on an even number of sts. Row 1: * K1, p1; rep from * to end of row. Row 2: * P1, k1; rep from * to end of row. Rep Rows 1 and 2 for pattern. When working seed stitch, you alternate between knit and purl stitches in each row. The trick to creating the little “seeds” is to knit in the purl stitches of the previous row and purl in the knit stitches of the previous row. If you’re working in seed stitch and you lose track of whether you knit the last stitch or purled it, don’t worry. You can tell what to do next by looking at your knitting. Hold your needles in the ready-to-knit position (with the LH needle holding the stitches to be worked or the ones you’re working on) and look at what’s facing you. On the LH needle, if you’re looking at a knit stitch, you purl. If you’re looking at a purl (bumpy) stitch, you knit. A good mantra to say to yourself is knit the purls and purl the knits. Watch Video
Preparing to Crochet Article / Updated 07-21-2023 Before you even attempt your first stitch, you need to master some basic skills. First, you need to know how to hold the hook and yarn, and second, you need to know how to get the yarn on the hook. Are you a lefty or a righty? Your dominant hand — the one that you write with, eat with, and do just about everything else with — is the hand that you should hold your hook in. This is the hand that does most of the action, while the other hand guides the yarn and holds the work that's already been completed. Although most crochet patterns are written for right-handed people, those of you that are lefties shouldn't be discouraged. Your motions are exactly the same. You just do it with your left hand instead of your right. Getting a grip Even though you crochet with only one hook, both hands are kept busy. Your dominant hand holds the hook, and your other hand holds the yarn. Holding your crochet hook is pretty simple. You just need to get a nice hold on your hook. If your hand isn't comfortable, it can cramp up, and your stitches won't go with the flow. Crocheting should be relaxing, not a continuous fight with the hook and yarn. Experiment with each of the following positions to see which one feels the most comfortable for you. Over-the-hook position: Position your hand over the hook with the handle resting against your palm and your thumb and middle finger grasping the thumb rest. Under-the-hook position: Hold the hook as you would a pencil with the thumb rest between your forefinger and thumb. Both are common ways of holding the crochet hook — for lefties and righties. Both work just fine. When you first start working with yarn, it's best to use a light to medium, solid color worsted-weight yarn. You'll be able to see the stitches more clearly and manipulate the yarn easier, thus eliminating any potential problems that may occur if you used a textured or variegated yarn. After you know what to do with the hook, you need to grab hold of the yarn. Like holding the hook, holding the yarn properly may seem simple. It may also seem like your fingers have to be contortionists to achieve the proper position, but don't worry, they can do it. Your yarn hand — the hand not holding your hook — has an important job. Not only does it feed the yarn to your crochet hook, but it also controls the tension of the yarn. Remember that right-handed crocheters wrap the yarn over their left hand, and left-handed people wrap the yarn over their right hand. The following steps offer one common method for wrapping the yarn around your hand. Starting from underneath your hand, bring the yarn up between your little finger and ring finger. Wrap the yarn around your little finger to form a loop. Draw the yarn under your ring finger and middle finger. Bring the yarn up to the top of your hand between your middle finger and forefinger. Finally, lay the yarn over your forefinger. To keep the yarn in place, grasp the end of the yarn between your middle finger and thumb. By raising or lowering your forefinger, you can control the yarn tension. Practice wrapping and rewrapping the yarn around your yarn hand. Whenever you feel that your working yarn is too loose or too tight, stop and rewrap to get the proper tension. This motion will soon become an ingrained habit. View Article
Crochet Patterns For Dummies Cheat Sheet Cheat Sheet / Updated 01-11-2023 If you love to crochet, this Cheat Sheet is a handy reference to keep nearby. It includes standardized yarn weights, international crochet symbols, and a metrics conversion table. View Cheat Sheet
Doing a Double Crochet Article / Updated 07-28-2022 The double crochet (abbreviated dc) is one of the most common crochet stitches and is about twice as tall as a single crochet. (You can read about single crochet in How to Make a Single Crochet.) A fabric made of all double crochet stitches is fairly solid but not stiff and is great for sweaters, shawls, Afghans, placemats, or any number of other home decor items. You can also combine the double crochet stitch with other stitches to produce many interesting patterns and textures. First things first: Row 1 The following steps set you up to work your first double crochet stitch: 1. Make a foundation chain by doing 15 chain stitches (ch 15). (Check out How to Crochet the Chain Stitch if you need to.) 2. Chain 3 more stitches for the turning chain. (Get the scoop in How to Crochet a Turning Chain.) Now for your first double crochet stitch: 1. Yarn over the hook (yo), which you can read about in How to Yarn Over in Crochet. Remember to yarn over from back to front. 2. Insert your hook between the 2 front loops and under the back bump loop of the fourth chain from the hook (see Figure 1a). Figure 1: Beginning a double crochet stitch. 3. Yarn over the hook. 4. Gently pull the wrapped hook through the center of the chain stitch, carrying the wrapped yarn through the stitch. Now, you should have 3 loops on your hook (refer to Figure 1b). 5. Yarn over the hook. 6. Draw your yarn through the first 2 loops on your hook (see Figure 2a). Figure 2: Drawing your yarn through the loops. 7. Yarn over the hook. 8. Draw your yarn through the last 2 loops on the hook (refer to Figure 2b). One double crochet (dc) stitch is complete. You should have one loop remaining on your hook. To finish your first row of double crochet, work 1 double crochet stitch in each successive chain stitch across the foundation chain, beginning in the next chain of the foundation chain as Figure 3a shows. You should have 16 double crochet stitches in Row 1 (counting the turning chain as the first double crochet). Figure 3: Finishing the first row of double crochet. Take a look at Figure 3b to see what the end of the first row of double crochet looks like. Turn around and begin again: Row 2 To work the second row of double crochet, follow these steps: 1. Turn your work so that the back side is facing you. 2. Chain 3 (ch 3; for the turning chain). 3. Yarn over the hook (yo). 4. Skipping the first stitch of the row directly below the turning chain, insert your hook in the next stitch (see Figure 4a). Figure 4b shows you the wrong place to insert your hook. Figure 4: Inserting hook for the first stitch of second row. 5. Repeat Steps 3 through 8 from the previous section in each of the next 14 double crochet (dc) stitches. Be sure to yarn over before inserting your hook in each stitch. 6. Work 1 double crochet in the top chain of the previous row's turning chain (see Figure 5). You should have 16 double crochet stitches in Row 2 (counting the turning chain as 1 double crochet). Figure 5: Insert the hook in the top chain of the turning chain. Repeat these steps for each additional row of double crochet. Continue until you feel comfortable working this stitch. Figure 6 shows you how rows of double crochet look as a fabric. Figure 6: Several rows of double crochet. Don't work a stitch into the first stitch of the row after the turning chain. Doing so produces an extra stitch, and if you continue to add a stitch in each row, your design gets wider and wider as it gets longer and longer. Be sure to count your stitches frequently to make sure that you haven't inadvertently gained (or lost) any stitches along the way. Sometimes, especially when you're working with bulky yarn or a larger than usual hook, the turning chain on a double crochet row leaves a gap at the beginning of the row. To get a neater edge, try chaining 2 instead of 3 stitches for the turning chain. See also: How to Decrease Double Crochet How to Increase Double Crochet at the Beginning of a Row How to Make a Double Triple Crochet How to Make a Half Double Crochet View Article
Crocheting For Dummies Cheat Sheet Cheat Sheet / Updated 03-25-2022 You're never too old or too young to discover crochet. The skills you master, the benefits you receive, and the beautiful heirlooms you create can last a lifetime and be passed on to future generations. To get started with crocheting, you need to decode crochet symbols and abbreviations so you can follow patterns with ease, and you need to find out what gauge is (and why it's so important). View Cheat Sheet
How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items Article / Updated 03-16-2020 Hand washing your handknitted and crocheted items is the safest bet, but you can try washing and drying some items, too. The following sections give you tips for each method. If the yarn label says “Dry clean only,” then by all means, take the item to the cleaners. A word of advice, though: Bring the label (or a copy of the label) to the cleaners with you. That way they’ll know what material they’re working with and can use the appropriate chemicals. Handwashing Unless the yarn specifically states “dry clean only,” handwashing is your best option. Here’s how: Grab a bottle of mild detergent and make sure your sink or bathtub is clean. The best soap to use is a mild laundry detergent formulated for delicate items or baby clothes, such as Woolite or Ivory Soap. For small items, the kitchen sink is the perfect size. For larger items such as afghans, the bathtub or washtub works better. Fill the sink or tub with enough cool to warm water so the item can be submerged. Swish the item around gently. By keeping the agitation to a minimum, you preserve the integrity of the stitches. After washing, rinse thoroughly and squeeze out excess moisture. Rinse the item under cool water until it runs clear. Never wring a knitted or crocheted item because the twisting motion can stretch the stitches and ultimately ruin the item’s shape. Wrap the item in towels to absorb the extra moisture and lay flat to dry, blocking as necessary. Never hang a crocheted piece to dry (it will stretch out of shape beyond recognition), and please, keep items out of the sun, which can cause fading. Machine washing and drying In some cases, it’s perfectly fine to throw your masterpieces in the washing machine. This holds true for items made from synthetic yarns, such as acrylic, which won’t sustain so much damage from the washing machine. Use the delicate cycle and, if size permits, throw the item into a mesh laundry bag. Be sure to check the yarn label for the correct water temperature settings. It’s always a safe bet to wash these items alone the first time around, just to make sure the colors won’t bleed into the rest of your laundry. If you’re not sure what the correct water temperature should be, opt for the safe route and use the cool water setting. Sometimes tossing your afghan, scarf, or other piece of handiwork in the dryer is just fine. Again, check the yarn label to make sure it’s okay. Most synthetic yarns will take a low heat setting unless it’s got some stuff attached like sequins or mirrors. Add some smooth-textured items like pillowcases to the dryer to help absorb moisture. Don’t machine dry wool — it will shrink! Find a spot large enough to accommodate the piece and lay it out flat, shape it if necessary, and allow to dry, preferably in a place that is out of direct sunlight and won’t be disturbed by playful pets. Iron only if you must If you feel that you need to add some heat to an item to get all the wrinkles out, set the iron on the lowest heat setting suggested for the yarn. Place a slightly damp cloth, such as a clean cotton dish towel, on top of your piece before ironing. Never allow the iron to come into direct contact with the yarn. Excessive heat can ruin the integrity of the yarn fibers, and even cotton thread can flatten out too much and ruin the original look of the design. Remove those pesky pills It’s inevitable — where there’s yarn there’s pills, those unsightly little balls that pop up on fabric after laundering or from normal wear and tear. Removing the pills can revitalize your pieces and make them look like new again. You can get rid of pills two ways: By using a sweater stone: This is the recommended preference because it is gentler on the fabric and you have more control over it. By using a sweater shaver: These devices are typically battery operated or electric, and if you don’t use them properly, you can put holes in your item. To use a sweater stone properly: Lay the item on a flat surface. Hold the stone in the palm of your hand and gently brush the fabric in smooth short strokes. The stone will crumble a bit, but don’t worry, this is normal and won’t damage your piece. Gently shake the item or use a lint roller to remove these tiny pieces. Never, ever try to remove pilling with scissors! Remember that knits and crochet are a series of interlocking loops; if you inadvertently cut even one of the strands of yarn, your whole piece can unravel. View Article
How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet Article / Updated 03-16-2020 The extended double crochet (abbreviated Edc) is a variation on the standard double crochet stitch (abbreviated dc). Occasionally a pattern may direct you to make extended crochet stitches, which are a little taller than the regular version of the same stitch. They also provide variation in texture with a slightly improved drape, meaning a fabric made of extended stitches is softer and less dense than one made with standard stitches. You can adapt any stitch into an extended stitch. How? Instead of adding a yarn over to the beginning of the stitch, extended stitches include a chain stitch in the middle of the stitch to give a little extra lift. To get started: Make a foundation chain by working 15 chain stitches (ch 15). Chain 3 more stitches for the turning chain. To create your first extended double crochet stitch, follow these steps: Yarn over the hook (yo). Always yarn over from back to front. Insert your hook into the fourth chain (ch) from the hook. Yarn over the hook. Gently pull the wrapped hook through the center of the chain stitch, carrying the wrapped yarn through the stitch. You should now have 3 loops on your hook. Yarn over the hook. Work a chain stitch by drawing the yarn through the first loop on the hook, as in the following figure. Yarn over the hook. Draw the yarn through the first 2 loops on your hook, like in (a) in the following figure. Yarn over the hook. Draw the yarn through the last 2 loops on the hook, as shown in (b) in the following figure. One extended double crochet stitch (Edc) is now complete, and you should have 1 loop remaining on your hook. When a stitch diagram indicates an extended double crochet stitch, you see the symbol shown in (c). To work your next extended double crochet and continue the row, perform these steps: Yarn over the hook (yo) and insert your hook into the next chain stitch (ch). Yarn over and pull the yarn through the chain stitch. You should have 3 loops on the hook. Repeat Steps 5 through 10 from the preceding instructions to complete the second extended double crochet stitch (Edc). Work 1 extended double crochet stitch in each chain stitch across the foundation chain by repeating Steps 1 through 3. When you count the turning chain as the first extended double crochet, you should have 16 extended double crochet stitches in Row 1. This figure shows the end of the first extended double crochet row. To begin the next row of extended double crochet, turn your piece and make three chains for the turning chain. Skipping the first stitch, work your first extended double crochet stitch into the next stitch on the previous row and follow Steps 1 through 3 of the preceding instructions. Take a look at this figure to see what rows of extended double crochet look like as a fabric. View Article
Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters Article / Updated 03-16-2020 Understanding how to measure and work with gauge is what allows you to go from a knitted or crocheted swatch to a finished project that has the correct measurements. If you’ve spent some time around knitters or crocheters, you may already know that mention of the word gauge often elicits a groan. Gauge has a bad reputation for three reasons. First, it represents an unpleasant “should.” Second, it’s a tedious task that has to be accomplished before the fun part of the project can begin. Finally, it involves math. However, getting comfortable with gauge gives you a leg up in knitting and crocheting. Without knowing your gauge, you couldn’t do the following: Work away, comfortable in the knowledge that after you work the thousands of stitches required to complete your project, it will fit. Ensure your final project is neat and attractive. Substitute another yarn for the one given in the pattern. Use the needle or hook size that makes the best fabric for your chosen yarn, even if it means you don’t match the pattern’s gauge. Ensure that the amount of yarn the pattern specifies is sufficient to complete the project. Design your own projects and sweaters. Determine the gauge The first step in any project is to determine the gauge of the fabric you’re making. Gauge (sometimes called tension) is listed at the beginning of a pattern before the instructions begin. It’s given as a number of stitches and rows over 4 inches or 10 centimeters, and it tells you which needle or hook size and which stitch pattern were used to determine the gauge. Check your pattern to see how many stitches and rows should make up 4 inches of knitted fabric. You need to measure your gauge against that given in the directions. The yarn manufacturer may also recommend a particular gauge on the yarn label. This gauge may be quite different from the one in your pattern, but that’s okay. Sometimes, the pattern designer wants to create a looser or tighter stitch pattern than the standard that the yarn manufacturer set. Follow the pattern gauge to get the same results as the pictured project. Gauge isn’t always important, such as when you’re making a scarf, an afghan, a bag, or anything else for which a precise size isn’t essential. But when size does matter, the right or wrong gauge can make or break the finished piece. What affects gauge Gauge varies depending on the yarn, the needle or hook size, and the stitch pattern you use: Yarn: Yarns of different weights produce different gauges. A bulkier yarn produces a larger stitch, and a finer yarn produces a smaller stitch. Needle or hook size: The same yarn knitted on different-sized needles or crocheted on a different size hook will have different gauges. Because you make a stitch by wrapping yarn around a needle or hook, the size (circumference) of the needle or hook determines the size of the stitch. This figure shows how needle size can affect the way the finished fabric looks. The smaller the needle is, the tighter the stitches and the denser the knitted fabric. The larger the needle is, the looser the stitches and the drapier (and stretchier) the fabric. Stitch patterns and stitch size: The same yarn knitted on the same needles or crocheted on the same hook but in different stitch patterns will have different gauges. For example, some stitches pull in, requiring more stitches to make a square inch. Other stitches spread the fabric out, so they require fewer stitches to make an inch. The following figure compares the gauges of two different stitch patterns that use the same number of stitches. Gauge also can vary with the time of day you’re working, how long you’ve been working, and what you’re thinking about. The tension you put on the yarn traveling around the needle or hook contributes to stitch size, so being tired or tense can affect the flow of your yarn and stitch size. View Article
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