chơi xổ số keno trực tuyến

{"appState":{"pageLoadApiCallsStatus":true},"authorState":{"author":{"headers":{"timestamp":"2025-03-04T08:49:16+00:00"},"authorId":9540,"data":{"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" Pam Allen is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co. Shannon Okey is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com. Tracy L. Barr is a professional writer and editor. Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.","photo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}}},"authorLoadedStatus":"success"},"listState":{"list":{"count":10,"total":41,"items":[{"headers":{"creationTime":"2021-03-16T15:11:31+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-10-20T20:39:22+00:00","timestamp":"2024-10-20T21:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","strippedTitle":"how to knit basic beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","canonicalUrl":"","关注发动机调优系统系统调整网络":{"metaDescription":"Follow the pattern to knit a basic beanie, sized for babies through adults. Make it plain or cabled, add stripes, and other options.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"A good hat is a must-have in your <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">knitting</a> repertoire, and this basic beanie, sized for babies through adults, fits the bill. Make it plain or cabled. Add in stripes or a color pattern. After your beanie is knit, top it with a pompom or tassel. The variations are endless.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269279\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269279\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-beanies.jpg\" alt=\"crocheting beanies\" width=\"556\" height=\"371\" /> ©Ivanikova Tatyana/Shutterstock.com[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Materials and vital statistics</h2>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Yarn:</strong> Berrocco Smart Mohair (41 percent mohair, 54 percent acrylic, 5 percent polyester); 108 yards (100 meters) per 50 grams; 1 (1, 1, 2, 2) balls; color: Pink</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Needles:</strong> US 10 (6 mm) circular needle, 16-inch length, or the size needed to match gauge; US 8 (5 mm) circular needle, 16-inch length; US 10 (6 mm) double-pointed needles</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Other materials:</strong> Eight stitch markers; yarn needle to weave in ends</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Size:</strong> Baby (toddler, child, small adult, large adult); circumference: 14 (16, 18, 20, 22) inches, unstretched</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Gauge:</strong> 16 stitches and 20 rows per 4 inches in stockinette stitch on larger needles</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThis beanie is worked in the round, starting on circular needles and switching to double-pointed needles when you shape the crown of the hat. If you want to include any color patterning, add it to the body of the hat between the ribbing and the decreases. If you’d like to knit cables on your hat, see the variation at the end of the pattern.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Directions</h2>\r\nCast on 56 (64, 72, 80, 88) sts with the smaller circular needles. Place marker and join in the round, being careful not to twist.\r\n\r\n<strong>Round 1:</strong> *K2, p2, repeat from * to end of round.\r\n\r\nRepeat this round for 3⁄4 (1, 1, 1-1⁄2, 2) inches.\r\n\r\nSwitch to larger circular needles and begin knitting in stockinette stitch (knit all rounds).\r\n\r\nWhen your hat measures 4-1⁄2 (5, 5-1⁄2, 6-1⁄2, 7) inches, begin the crown shaping as follows:\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K7 (8, 9, 10, 11), place marker, repeat from * to end.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round (Decrease Round):</strong> *K2tog, knit to marker, slip marker, repeat from * to end. 8 sts have been decreased.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\nRepeat these 2 rounds until 8 sts remain, switching to double-pointed needles when you have too few sts to fit comfortably on your circular needle.\r\n\r\nCut yarn, leaving a 12-inch tail.\r\n\r\n<strong>Finishing:</strong> Thread the tail of the yarn onto the yarn needle. Slip the stitches from the knitting needle to the yarn needle, making sure that you go through each stitch. Pull the yarn firmly to tighten the top of the hat, and then run the yarn through the stitches again before weaving in the yarn end on the inside to secure. Weave in any remaining ends.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you want, you can top your beanie with a pompom, knitted flower, or other adornment for extra flair.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Variation: Creating a cabled beanie</h2>\r\nThis cabled hat features straightforward six-stitch cables. It is made with the same yarn and needles as the basic beanie, fits a toddler (child, small adult, large adult), and measures 16 (17-1⁄2, 19, 22) inches around. You need six stitch markers to help keep your decreases lined up.\r\n\r\nUsing the smaller circular needles, cast on 66 (72, 78, 90) sts. Place a marker and join in the round, being careful not to twist.\r\n\r\n<strong>Ribbing round:</strong> *K1, p1, repeat from * to end.\r\n\r\nRepeat this round for 1 (1, 2, 2) inches.\r\n\r\nSwitch to the larger circular needles and begin the six-stitch right cable pattern as follows, placing markers on the first round as indicated:\r\n\r\n<strong>Rounds 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5:</strong> *K6, p5 (6, 7, 9), place marker, repeat from * to end of round.\r\n\r\n<strong>Round 6:</strong> *Slip 3 sts to the cable needle and hold to back, k3, k3 from cable needle, p5 (6, 7, 9), repeat from * to end of round.\r\n\r\nRepeat these 6 rounds until the hat measures 5-1⁄2 (6, 6-1⁄2, 7) inches, and then begin decreasing as follows:\r\n\r\nContinue the cable pattern as set on the columns of 6 knit sts. In other words, you should cable every 6th round (even though the decreasing is occurring too).\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K6, p2tog, purl to marker, repeat from * to end of round.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you’re unfamiliar with purling 2 stitches together (p2tog), here’s how to do it: Insert the right needle into the next 2 stitches purlwise, wrap the yarn around the right-hand needle, and then purl them to decrease 1 stitch.</p>\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Work even, knitting and purling the sts as they appear.\r\n\r\nRepeat the previous 2 rounds 3 (4, 5, 7) more times. There are 42 sts on the needles.\r\n\r\nStop the cable pattern and finish the hat in stockinette stitch (knit all rounds).\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K5, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 36 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K4, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 30 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K3, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 24 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K2, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 18 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K1, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 12 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 6 sts remain.\r\n\r\nCut the yarn leaving a 12-inch tail.\r\n\r\n<strong>Finishing:</strong> Use the same technique described in the basic pattern to finish your cabled beanie.","description":"A good hat is a must-have in your <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">knitting</a> repertoire, and this basic beanie, sized for babies through adults, fits the bill. Make it plain or cabled. Add in stripes or a color pattern. After your beanie is knit, top it with a pompom or tassel. The variations are endless.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269279\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269279\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-beanies.jpg\" alt=\"crocheting beanies\" width=\"556\" height=\"371\" /> ©Ivanikova Tatyana/Shutterstock.com[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Materials and vital statistics</h2>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Yarn:</strong> Berrocco Smart Mohair (41 percent mohair, 54 percent acrylic, 5 percent polyester); 108 yards (100 meters) per 50 grams; 1 (1, 1, 2, 2) balls; color: Pink</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Needles:</strong> US 10 (6 mm) circular needle, 16-inch length, or the size needed to match gauge; US 8 (5 mm) circular needle, 16-inch length; US 10 (6 mm) double-pointed needles</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Other materials:</strong> Eight stitch markers; yarn needle to weave in ends</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Size:</strong> Baby (toddler, child, small adult, large adult); circumference: 14 (16, 18, 20, 22) inches, unstretched</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Gauge:</strong> 16 stitches and 20 rows per 4 inches in stockinette stitch on larger needles</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThis beanie is worked in the round, starting on circular needles and switching to double-pointed needles when you shape the crown of the hat. If you want to include any color patterning, add it to the body of the hat between the ribbing and the decreases. If you’d like to knit cables on your hat, see the variation at the end of the pattern.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Directions</h2>\r\nCast on 56 (64, 72, 80, 88) sts with the smaller circular needles. Place marker and join in the round, being careful not to twist.\r\n\r\n<strong>Round 1:</strong> *K2, p2, repeat from * to end of round.\r\n\r\nRepeat this round for 3⁄4 (1, 1, 1-1⁄2, 2) inches.\r\n\r\nSwitch to larger circular needles and begin knitting in stockinette stitch (knit all rounds).\r\n\r\nWhen your hat measures 4-1⁄2 (5, 5-1⁄2, 6-1⁄2, 7) inches, begin the crown shaping as follows:\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K7 (8, 9, 10, 11), place marker, repeat from * to end.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round (Decrease Round):</strong> *K2tog, knit to marker, slip marker, repeat from * to end. 8 sts have been decreased.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\nRepeat these 2 rounds until 8 sts remain, switching to double-pointed needles when you have too few sts to fit comfortably on your circular needle.\r\n\r\nCut yarn, leaving a 12-inch tail.\r\n\r\n<strong>Finishing:</strong> Thread the tail of the yarn onto the yarn needle. Slip the stitches from the knitting needle to the yarn needle, making sure that you go through each stitch. Pull the yarn firmly to tighten the top of the hat, and then run the yarn through the stitches again before weaving in the yarn end on the inside to secure. Weave in any remaining ends.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you want, you can top your beanie with a pompom, knitted flower, or other adornment for extra flair.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Variation: Creating a cabled beanie</h2>\r\nThis cabled hat features straightforward six-stitch cables. It is made with the same yarn and needles as the basic beanie, fits a toddler (child, small adult, large adult), and measures 16 (17-1⁄2, 19, 22) inches around. You need six stitch markers to help keep your decreases lined up.\r\n\r\nUsing the smaller circular needles, cast on 66 (72, 78, 90) sts. Place a marker and join in the round, being careful not to twist.\r\n\r\n<strong>Ribbing round:</strong> *K1, p1, repeat from * to end.\r\n\r\nRepeat this round for 1 (1, 2, 2) inches.\r\n\r\nSwitch to the larger circular needles and begin the six-stitch right cable pattern as follows, placing markers on the first round as indicated:\r\n\r\n<strong>Rounds 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5:</strong> *K6, p5 (6, 7, 9), place marker, repeat from * to end of round.\r\n\r\n<strong>Round 6:</strong> *Slip 3 sts to the cable needle and hold to back, k3, k3 from cable needle, p5 (6, 7, 9), repeat from * to end of round.\r\n\r\nRepeat these 6 rounds until the hat measures 5-1⁄2 (6, 6-1⁄2, 7) inches, and then begin decreasing as follows:\r\n\r\nContinue the cable pattern as set on the columns of 6 knit sts. In other words, you should cable every 6th round (even though the decreasing is occurring too).\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K6, p2tog, purl to marker, repeat from * to end of round.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you’re unfamiliar with purling 2 stitches together (p2tog), here’s how to do it: Insert the right needle into the next 2 stitches purlwise, wrap the yarn around the right-hand needle, and then purl them to decrease 1 stitch.</p>\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Work even, knitting and purling the sts as they appear.\r\n\r\nRepeat the previous 2 rounds 3 (4, 5, 7) more times. There are 42 sts on the needles.\r\n\r\nStop the cable pattern and finish the hat in stockinette stitch (knit all rounds).\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K5, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 36 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K4, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 30 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K3, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 24 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K2, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 18 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K1, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 12 sts remain.\r\n\r\n<strong>Next round:</strong> *K2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 6 sts remain.\r\n\r\nCut the yarn leaving a 12-inch tail.\r\n\r\n<strong>Finishing:</strong> Use the same technique described in the basic pattern to finish your cabled beanie.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Materials and vital statistics","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Directions","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Variation: Creating a cabled beanie","target":"#tab3"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted 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Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282338,"slug":"knitting-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119652939","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119652936-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cover-9781119652939-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Knitting & Crocheting All-in-One For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"9540\">Pam Allen</b></b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9541\">Shannon Okey</b></b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9849\">Susan Brittain</b></b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"10487\">Karen Manthey</b></b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":"","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6532ea8f46084\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-6532ea8f4658c\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-10-20T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":269278},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2021-03-16T15:35:23+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-08-08T18:24:47+00:00","timestamp":"2024-08-08T21:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","strippedTitle":"go-to stitches: garter, stockinette, and seed stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","canonicalUrl":"","关注发动机调优系统系统调整网络":{"metaDescription":"Beginning knitters explore the basics of the garter stitch and stockinette stitch patterns and add the seed stitch to their repertoire.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Knitting and purling open the door to all sorts of patterns that involve alternating between knit and purl stitches. But as a <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">beginning knitter</a>, you really only need to know two patterns: garter stitch, which you create by knitting (or purling) every row, and stockinette stitch, which you create by alternating a knit row with a purl row.\r\n\r\nAnother stitch all knitters should have in their repertoire is seed stitch. Although a little more complicated than garter and stockinette stitches, seed stitches create an interesting texture and appear in many patterns.\r\n\r\nKnits and purls have a quirky but predictable relationship to each other. When lined up horizontally, the purled rows stand out from the knitted rows. Arranged in vertical patterns, like ribbing, the purl stitches recede and the knit stitches come forward, creating an elastic fabric.\r\n\r\nWhen worked in a balanced manner (meaning the same number of knits and purls appear on each side of the fabric), as in seed stitch and its variations, the fabric is stable — it lies flat and doesn’t have the tendency to roll in on the edges. These qualities make seed and moss stitches, as well as garter stitches, good choices for borders that need to lie flat and not pull in as ribbed borders do.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Garter stitch</h2>\r\nGarter stitch is the most basic of all knitted fabrics. It’s made by knitting every row. (You can create garter stitch by purling every row, too. Neat, huh?) You can recognize garter stitch by the horizontal ridges formed by the tops of the knitted loops on every other row.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269292\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269292\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-garter-stitch.jpg\" alt=\"Garter stitch.\" width=\"556\" height=\"405\" /> Garter stitch[/caption]\r\n\r\nGarter stitch has a lot going for it in addition to being easy to create. It’s reversible, lies flat, and has a pleasant rustic look. Unlike most knitted fabrics, garter stitch has a square gauge, meaning that there are usually twice as many rows as stitches in 1 inch. To count rows in garter stitch, count the ridges and multiply by two, or count the ridges by twos.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Garter stitch has a hanging gauge that stretches more vertically. Therefore, gravity and the weight of the garter stitch piece pulls on the fabric and actually makes it longer. This is important to keep in mind when you’re making a garment that you want to fit properly and not grow two times larger after an hour of wearing it.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Stockinette stitch</h2>\r\nWhen you alternate a knit row with a purl row (knit the first row, purl the second, knit the third, purl the fourth, and so on), you create stockinette stitch. You see stockinette stitch everywhere: in scarves, socks, sweaters, blankets, hats — you name it. In fact, most beginning and intermediate designs incorporate stockinette stitch.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269291\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269291\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-stockinette-knit.jpg\" alt=\"knit side of stockinette\" width=\"556\" height=\"361\" /> Stockinette stitch showing the knit side[/caption]\r\n\r\nIn written knitting instructions, stockinette stitch (abbreviated <em>St st</em>) appears like this:\r\n<blockquote><strong>Row 1 (RS):</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 2 (WS):</strong> Purl.\r\n\r\nRep Rows 1 and 2 for desired length.</blockquote>\r\nStockinette fabric looks and behaves in a particular way. To successfully incorporate this stitch into your knitting repertoire, pay attention to the following:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Stockinette stitch has a right side and a wrong side (though, of course, either side may be the “right” side, depending on the intended design). The right side is typically the smooth side, called stockinette or On this side, the stitches look like small <em>V</em>s. The bumpy side of stockinette stitch fabric is called reverse stockinette or purl.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"\"article-tips\">If you’re working in stockinette stitch and you lose track of whether you knit the last row or purled it, not to worry. You can tell what to do next by looking at your knitting. Hold your needles in the ready-to-knit position (with the LH needle holding the stitches to be worked) and look at what’s facing you. If you’re looking at the knit (smooth) side, you knit. If you’re looking at the purl (bumpy) side, you purl. A good mantra to say to yourself is knit the knits and purl the purls.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Stockinette fabric curls on the edges. The top and bottom (horizontal) edges curl toward the front or smooth side. The side (vertical) edges roll toward the bumpy side. Sweater designers frequently use this rolling feature deliberately to create rolled hems or cuffs, and you can create easy cords or straps simply by knitting a very narrow band in stockinette stitch (say, four or six stitches across).</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">But when you want the piece to lie flat, you need to counteract this tendency by working the three or four stitches on the edge in some stitch that lies flat (like garter stitch, discussed in the preceding section, or seed stitch, discussed in the next section).</p>\r\nTo figure out the gauge of a swatch knitted in stockinette stitch, count the <em>V</em>s on the smooth side or right side. They’re easier to see and distinguish than the bumps on the wrong side. Of course, if you find the bumps easier to count, it’s okay to do so.\r\n\r\nThe names garter stitch and stockinette stitch date from the 1500s, when hand-knit stockings were a major industry in England. Garter stitch was used at the top of the stocking, where it needed to expand for the thigh, and stockinette (or stocking stitch) was used for the fitted leg portion.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Seed stitch</h2>\r\nSeed stitch, shown in the figure below (and demonstrated in the video below), consists of single knits and purls alternating horizontally and vertically. Its name refers to the way the knitted fabric looks: The little purl bumps look like scattered seeds. Like garter stitch, seed stitch lies flat, making it a good edging for a sweater border and cuffs. It also looks the same from both sides, making it a nice choice for scarves and other pieces of which both sides are visible.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269290\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269290\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-seed-stitch.jpg\" alt=\"Seed stitch.\" width=\"556\" height=\"432\" /> Seed stitch[/caption]\r\n\r\nSeed stitch stitch gauge tends to be wider than a stockinette stitch stitch gauge. This is important to note if you plan to mix stitch patterns but want to maintain the same measurements in both patterns.\r\n<div class=\"x2 x2-top\">\r\n\r\n<div class=\"video-player-organism\"></div>\r\n\r\n</div>\r\nWhen knitting a stitch, the loose tail of yarn is in back of your work. When purling a stitch, the yarn is in front of your work. As you switch back and forth within a row, as in seed stitch, you need to move your yarn to the front or to the back as appropriate between the needles. If you forget to do so, you create an unintentional yarn over, resulting in an extra stitch on the next row and a hole in the work.\r\n\r\nUnfortunately for novice knitters, who often forget to move the yarn accordingly, instructions don’t explicitly tell you to bring your yarn to the front or back of your work. They assume that you know where the yarn should be when you’re about to knit or purl a stitch. As you practice the patterns that combine both knit and purl stitches, make sure your yarn is in the proper position for each stitch before you start it.\r\n\r\nTo create seed stitch:\r\n<blockquote>Cast on an even number of sts.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 1:</strong> * K1, p1; rep from * to end of row.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 2:</strong> * P1, k1; rep from * to end of row.\r\n\r\nRep Rows 1 and 2 for pattern.</blockquote>\r\nWhen working seed stitch, you alternate between knit and purl stitches in each row. The trick to creating the little “seeds” is to knit in the purl stitches of the previous row and purl in the knit stitches of the previous row.\r\n\r\nIf you’re working in seed stitch and you lose track of whether you knit the last stitch or purled it, don’t worry. You can tell what to do next by looking at your knitting. Hold your needles in the ready-to-knit position (with the LH needle holding the stitches to be worked or the ones you’re working on) and look at what’s facing you.\r\n\r\nOn the LH needle, if you’re looking at a knit stitch, you purl. If you’re looking at a purl (bumpy) stitch, you knit. A good mantra to say to yourself is knit the purls and purl the knits.","description":"Knitting and purling open the door to all sorts of patterns that involve alternating between knit and purl stitches. But as a <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">beginning knitter</a>, you really only need to know two patterns: garter stitch, which you create by knitting (or purling) every row, and stockinette stitch, which you create by alternating a knit row with a purl row.\r\n\r\nAnother stitch all knitters should have in their repertoire is seed stitch. Although a little more complicated than garter and stockinette stitches, seed stitches create an interesting texture and appear in many patterns.\r\n\r\nKnits and purls have a quirky but predictable relationship to each other. When lined up horizontally, the purled rows stand out from the knitted rows. Arranged in vertical patterns, like ribbing, the purl stitches recede and the knit stitches come forward, creating an elastic fabric.\r\n\r\nWhen worked in a balanced manner (meaning the same number of knits and purls appear on each side of the fabric), as in seed stitch and its variations, the fabric is stable — it lies flat and doesn’t have the tendency to roll in on the edges. These qualities make seed and moss stitches, as well as garter stitches, good choices for borders that need to lie flat and not pull in as ribbed borders do.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Garter stitch</h2>\r\nGarter stitch is the most basic of all knitted fabrics. It’s made by knitting every row. (You can create garter stitch by purling every row, too. Neat, huh?) You can recognize garter stitch by the horizontal ridges formed by the tops of the knitted loops on every other row.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269292\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269292\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-garter-stitch.jpg\" alt=\"Garter stitch.\" width=\"556\" height=\"405\" /> Garter stitch[/caption]\r\n\r\nGarter stitch has a lot going for it in addition to being easy to create. It’s reversible, lies flat, and has a pleasant rustic look. Unlike most knitted fabrics, garter stitch has a square gauge, meaning that there are usually twice as many rows as stitches in 1 inch. To count rows in garter stitch, count the ridges and multiply by two, or count the ridges by twos.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Garter stitch has a hanging gauge that stretches more vertically. Therefore, gravity and the weight of the garter stitch piece pulls on the fabric and actually makes it longer. This is important to keep in mind when you’re making a garment that you want to fit properly and not grow two times larger after an hour of wearing it.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Stockinette stitch</h2>\r\nWhen you alternate a knit row with a purl row (knit the first row, purl the second, knit the third, purl the fourth, and so on), you create stockinette stitch. You see stockinette stitch everywhere: in scarves, socks, sweaters, blankets, hats — you name it. In fact, most beginning and intermediate designs incorporate stockinette stitch.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269291\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269291\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-stockinette-knit.jpg\" alt=\"knit side of stockinette\" width=\"556\" height=\"361\" /> Stockinette stitch showing the knit side[/caption]\r\n\r\nIn written knitting instructions, stockinette stitch (abbreviated <em>St st</em>) appears like this:\r\n<blockquote><strong>Row 1 (RS):</strong> Knit.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 2 (WS):</strong> Purl.\r\n\r\nRep Rows 1 and 2 for desired length.</blockquote>\r\nStockinette fabric looks and behaves in a particular way. To successfully incorporate this stitch into your knitting repertoire, pay attention to the following:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Stockinette stitch has a right side and a wrong side (though, of course, either side may be the “right” side, depending on the intended design). The right side is typically the smooth side, called stockinette or On this side, the stitches look like small <em>V</em>s. The bumpy side of stockinette stitch fabric is called reverse stockinette or purl.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"\"article-tips\">If you’re working in stockinette stitch and you lose track of whether you knit the last row or purled it, not to worry. You can tell what to do next by looking at your knitting. Hold your needles in the ready-to-knit position (with the LH needle holding the stitches to be worked) and look at what’s facing you. If you’re looking at the knit (smooth) side, you knit. If you’re looking at the purl (bumpy) side, you purl. A good mantra to say to yourself is knit the knits and purl the purls.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Stockinette fabric curls on the edges. The top and bottom (horizontal) edges curl toward the front or smooth side. The side (vertical) edges roll toward the bumpy side. Sweater designers frequently use this rolling feature deliberately to create rolled hems or cuffs, and you can create easy cords or straps simply by knitting a very narrow band in stockinette stitch (say, four or six stitches across).</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">But when you want the piece to lie flat, you need to counteract this tendency by working the three or four stitches on the edge in some stitch that lies flat (like garter stitch, discussed in the preceding section, or seed stitch, discussed in the next section).</p>\r\nTo figure out the gauge of a swatch knitted in stockinette stitch, count the <em>V</em>s on the smooth side or right side. They’re easier to see and distinguish than the bumps on the wrong side. Of course, if you find the bumps easier to count, it’s okay to do so.\r\n\r\nThe names garter stitch and stockinette stitch date from the 1500s, when hand-knit stockings were a major industry in England. Garter stitch was used at the top of the stocking, where it needed to expand for the thigh, and stockinette (or stocking stitch) was used for the fitted leg portion.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Seed stitch</h2>\r\nSeed stitch, shown in the figure below (and demonstrated in the video below), consists of single knits and purls alternating horizontally and vertically. Its name refers to the way the knitted fabric looks: The little purl bumps look like scattered seeds. Like garter stitch, seed stitch lies flat, making it a good edging for a sweater border and cuffs. It also looks the same from both sides, making it a nice choice for scarves and other pieces of which both sides are visible.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269290\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269290\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-seed-stitch.jpg\" alt=\"Seed stitch.\" width=\"556\" height=\"432\" /> Seed stitch[/caption]\r\n\r\nSeed stitch stitch gauge tends to be wider than a stockinette stitch stitch gauge. This is important to note if you plan to mix stitch patterns but want to maintain the same measurements in both patterns.\r\n<div class=\"x2 x2-top\">\r\n\r\n<div class=\"video-player-organism\"></div>\r\n\r\n</div>\r\nWhen knitting a stitch, the loose tail of yarn is in back of your work. When purling a stitch, the yarn is in front of your work. As you switch back and forth within a row, as in seed stitch, you need to move your yarn to the front or to the back as appropriate between the needles. If you forget to do so, you create an unintentional yarn over, resulting in an extra stitch on the next row and a hole in the work.\r\n\r\nUnfortunately for novice knitters, who often forget to move the yarn accordingly, instructions don’t explicitly tell you to bring your yarn to the front or back of your work. They assume that you know where the yarn should be when you’re about to knit or purl a stitch. As you practice the patterns that combine both knit and purl stitches, make sure your yarn is in the proper position for each stitch before you start it.\r\n\r\nTo create seed stitch:\r\n<blockquote>Cast on an even number of sts.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 1:</strong> * K1, p1; rep from * to end of row.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 2:</strong> * P1, k1; rep from * to end of row.\r\n\r\nRep Rows 1 and 2 for pattern.</blockquote>\r\nWhen working seed stitch, you alternate between knit and purl stitches in each row. The trick to creating the little “seeds” is to knit in the purl stitches of the previous row and purl in the knit stitches of the previous row.\r\n\r\nIf you’re working in seed stitch and you lose track of whether you knit the last stitch or purled it, don’t worry. You can tell what to do next by looking at your knitting. Hold your needles in the ready-to-knit position (with the LH needle holding the stitches to be worked or the ones you’re working on) and look at what’s facing you.\r\n\r\nOn the LH needle, if you’re looking at a knit stitch, you purl. If you’re looking at a purl (bumpy) stitch, you knit. A good mantra to say to yourself is knit the purls and purl the knits.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. 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Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119643203&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b2126068\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119643203&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221b2126aec\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":193248,"title":"Knitting Abbreviations","slug":"knitting-abbreviations","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193248"}},{"articleId":193240,"title":"Converting Metrics for Knitting","slug":"converting-metrics-for-knitting","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193240"}},{"articleId":193267,"title":"Glossary of Knitting Techniques","slug":"glossary-of-knitting-techniques","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193267"}}],"content":[{"title":"Knitting abbreviations ","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>To knit from patterns, you need to know knitting abbreviations and knitting terms. As you work with knitting patterns, you&#8217;ll get to know the most common abbreviations — for example, RS (right side) and WS (wrong side). Knitting-pattern instructions explain any unusual abbreviations and terms or ones that may vary from pattern to pattern.</p>\n<p>Knitting terms (or phrases) can be confusing until you&#8217;ve had some experience with them. Here are some of the more common knitting phrases that you&#8217;ll come across in patterns. Others exist, but this list should take care of most knitting patterns that you&#8217;ll come across as a beginner.</p>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>as established: </strong>When your instructions set up a series of steps or patterns to work, rather than repeat them row by row, they&#8217;ll tell you to continue working <em>as established</em>. For example, if you&#8217;re knitting a cardigan with the center front band knitted in, the stitches for center front band may be worked in a different pattern from the rest of the sweater body. Once the pattern tells you how many border stitches to work in the border pattern and how many stitches to work in the sweater body pattern, it will tell you to continue to work the patterns in the front piece <em>as established</em>.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul class=\"Tip article-ul-indent\">\n<li><strong>at same time:</strong> As in &#8220;dec 1 st every other row 4 times, <em>at same time</em>, when piece measures same length as back to shoulder, work shoulder shaping as for back.&#8221; This phrase indicates that two things need to happen at the same time. In this example, the neckline shaping (dec 1 st) continues as the shoulder shaping begins. Be on the lookout for this phrase; it&#8217;s easy to get going on one task and forget to pay attention to the other. When you see this phrase, it&#8217;s a really good idea to make yourself a chart of the part of the pattern piece you&#8217;ll be shaping.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>back of your work: </strong>As in &#8220;yarn to the back.&#8221; The back of your work is the side of your work that faces away from you as you hold your needles. Not to be confused with the right and wrong side of your work, which refers to how you will wear the piece.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>bind off from each neck edge:</strong> As in &#8220;bind off from each neck edge 3 sts once, 2 sts twice, etc.&#8221; When you shape the neckline on a pullover, you work both edges of the neckline at the same time, but you shape the right side (as you wear it) on right-side rows and the left side on wrong-side rows. Although this instruction may sound tricky, it&#8217;s quite obvious and simple when you&#8217;re doing it.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>end with a WS row:</strong> When you see this phrase, you&#8217;re to finish the section you&#8217;re working on by working a WS (wrong-side) row last. The next row you work should be a RS (right-side) row.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>front of your work:</strong> As in &#8220;yarn to the front.&#8221; The front of your work is the side of your work that faces you as you hold your needles. It could be the wrong side or the right side.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>inc (or dec) every four (six, eight, or whatever) rows:</strong> Increase or decrease on a (usually) right-side row, and then work three (five, seven, or whatever) rows without shaping. Increase or decrease on the next row. This is how the increases along a sleeve seam are written.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>inc (or dec) every other row:</strong> Increase or decrease on the (usually) right-side row, and then work the following row without increasing or decreasing. Then, on the next (usually) right-side row, work the increase or decrease again.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>pat rep:</strong> Same as &#8220;pattern repeat.&#8221; When instructions tell you to do something with the stitch repeat, they write it this way. Pattern repeat refers to what&#8217;s given between an asterisk and a semicolon (* . . . 😉 in written patterns and between heavy black lines in a chart.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>pick up and knit:</strong> As in &#8220;with rs facing starting at neck edge, pick up and knit 28 sts along right front edge.&#8221; Use a separate strand of yarn to create a row of stitches on a needle by pulling loops through along a knitted edge, usually a cardigan front or a neckline.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul class=\"Remember article-ul-indent\">\n<li><strong>place marker (pm):</strong> As in &#8220;join, place marker, and begin round.&#8221; A <em>marker</em> is a plastic ring or tied loop of yarn that sits between stitches on your needle to indicate the beginning of a round in circular knitting or to mark pattern repeats. You slip the marker from one needle to the other. Sometimes you use row markers, too. But usually your pattern won&#8217;t tell you to — your common sense will.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>preparation row:</strong> Some stitch patterns require a <em>set-up row</em>, which is worked only at the beginning of the pattern and is not part of the repeat.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>reverse shaping:</strong> As in &#8220;work to correspond to front, reversing all shaping.&#8221; When you knit a cardigan, you work two pieces that mirror each other. Most patterns have you work the side that carries the buttons before you work the side that carries the buttonholes. Instead of writing a separate set of instructions for each side, the pattern asks you to work the shaping in the opposite direction on the second piece. This means that you&#8217;ll be working bind-offs and neck shaping on the reverse side of the fabric as well. If you work the shaping on the wrong side in one piece, you&#8217;ll work it on the right side when you reverse the shaping.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul class=\"Tip article-ul-indent\">\n<li><strong>right:</strong> As in &#8220;beginning at right front neck edge.&#8221; Refers to right as opposed to left. When a pattern specifies a right front, it means the front that would be on your right side <em>as you would</em> <em>wear it</em>. When in doubt, hold your knitting up to you (wrong side to your body) to determine whether it&#8217;s the right or left front.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>RS:</strong> As in &#8220;with RS facing, pick up and k . . . sts.&#8221; Refers to the right side as opposed to the wrong side of the fabric. The right side is the side of the piece people will see when you wear it..</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>when armhole measures . . . :</strong> Signals that your instructions are about to tell you to do something other than what you&#8217;ve been doing. Measure the armhole <em>not </em>from the edge of the piece, but from the marker you&#8217;ve put near the middle of the row on which the armhole began.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>work as for . . . :</strong> As in &#8220;work as for back until piece measures 21 1/2&#8243; from beg.&#8221; Work the front piece the same as the back. This phrase saves writing out the same instructions twice.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>work even: </strong>Continue in whatever stitch pattern you&#8217;re using without doing any shaping.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>work to end: </strong>Work in whatever stitch pattern you&#8217;re using to the end of the row.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>working inc sts into pat:</strong> As in &#8220;inc 1 st each side (working inc sts into cable pat) every 4th row.&#8221; You see this phrase when you&#8217;re increasing along a sleeve. Whether your pattern is a rib, cable, lace, or color work, as you add stitches, work your stitch pattern over them. For lace and cables, you have to have a certain number of stitches before you can begin to work them in pattern.</li>\n</ul>\n<ul>\n<li><strong>WS:</strong> As in &#8220;with WS facing.&#8221; The wrong side of the garment piece — the one next to your body.</li>\n</ul>\n<p>You may run into other knitting phrases that aren&#8217;t as clear as they could be, but experience will make you familiar with them. Eventually, you&#8217;ll be surprised at how understandable this language becomes, and you&#8217;ll wonder how it ever seemed confusing.</p>\n<p class=\"Remember\">For the most part, if you read your instructions carefully, work each step between commas or semi-colons as a complete step, look at your work, and think about what you&#8217;re doing, you won&#8217;t have any problems.</p>\n"},{"title":"Converting metrics for knitting ","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>If you&#8217;re a knitter, you know that sometimes you need to convert inches to centimeters or vice versa. Knitting conversions aren&#8217;t hard to do, you just need to brush off your math skills. Here are a couple of tips to help you convert both centimeters and inches:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">To convert centimeters to inches, divide the centimeter figure by 2.5; for example, 10 centimeters divided by 2.5 equals 4 inches.</p>\n</li>\n<li>\n<p class=\"first-para\">To convert inches to centimeters, multiply the inch figure by 2.5; for example, 4 inches times 2.5 equals 10 centimeters.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Glossary of knitting techniques ","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<div id=\"article-content-wrapper\" data-v-89b5964a=\"\" data-v-76ccd6ad=\"\">\n<article class=\"article-content\" data-v-89b5964a=\"\" data-testid=\"articleContent\">Knitting is both simple and complicated at the same time — it&#8217;s all in the technique. Knowing a variety of knitting techniques helps you create professional-looking items. Following is a handy list that explains many common knitting techniques. Practice can make you a master of all of them.</p>\n<table>\n<tbody>\n<tr>\n<td><b>Bind off:</b> Remove stitches from the needle to create a finished edge. Knit 2 stitches, * with tip of LH needle bring the stitch on the right (the first one knit) over the second stitch and off the needle. One stitch bound off. Knit 1 stitch. Rep from * to the end of the row.</td>\n<td><b>Place marker:</b> Place a round marker (a purchased ring or strand of contrast yarn) on your needle to remind you of the beginning of a round, to indicate a pattern repeat, or for some other purpose your pattern tells you.</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>Cast on:</b> Make a foundation row of stitches. Row 1 is worked from these stitches.</td>\n<td><b>Purl into the back of the stitch:</b> Instead of entering the stitch with the RH needle in the usual way to purl, go into the <i>back</i> of the stitch, twisting it.</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>Decrease:</b> Remove stitches using k2tog or ssk or psso.</td>\n<td><b>Purl into the stitch below:</b> Insert the RH needle as if to purl into the stitch directly below the first stitch on the LH needle and purl it (wrap yarn and draw a loop through) as you normally would.</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>Increase:</b> Add stitches to a row, often abbreviated as m1 (make 1).</td>\n<td><b>Purl 2 together:</b> Insert the needle into 2 stitches instead of 1 and purl them together as 1 stitch. It decreases 1 stitch and slants to the right.</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>Knit into the back of the stitch:</b> Instead of entering the stitch with the RH needle in the usual way to knit, go into the <i>back</i> of the stitch, twisting it.</td>\n<td><b>Purlwise:</b> Insert the RH needle into the next stitch as if you&#8217;re going to purl it.</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>Knit into the stitch below:</b> Insert the RH needle as if to knit into the stitch directly below the first stitch on the LH needle and knit it (wrap yarn and draw a loop through) as you normally would.</td>\n<td><b>Slip stitch:</b> With the RH needle, go into the first stitch on the LH needle as if to purl it and transfer it to the RH needle without working it.</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>Knit 2 together:</b> Insert the RH needle through the first 2 stitches and knit them together as 1 stitch. It decreases 1 stitch and slants to the right.</td>\n<td><b>Slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over:</b> Slip 1 stitch, knit the next stitch, and then bring the slipped stitch over the knitted stitch and off the needle. It decreases 1 stitch and slants to the left.</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>Knit 3 together:</b> Insert the RH needle into the first 3 stitches and knit them together as 1 stitch. It decreases 2 stitches and slants to the right.</td>\n<td><b>Slip 1, knit 2 together, pass the slipped stitch over:</b> Slip 1 stitch, knit the next 2 stitches together as 1 stitch, and then bring the slipped stitch over the knitted stitch and off the needle. It decreases 2 stitches and slants to the left.</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>Knitwise:</b> Insert the RH needle into the next stitch as if you&#8217;re going to knit it.</td>\n<td><b>Slip, slip, knit:</b> Slip 2 stitches one at a time as if to knit, and then knit them together as 1 stitch through the back of the loops. It decreases 1 stitch and slants to the left.</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>No stitch:</b> A chart symbol indicating that there&#8217;s no stitch on your needle to match the square in the chart. When you get to a no-stitch square, skip it and work the next stitch as indicated in the next square of the chart.</td>\n<td><b>Work even:</b> Continue in whatever pattern you&#8217;re working without increasing or decreasing.</td>\n</tr>\n<tr>\n<td><b>Pick up and knit (or purl):</b> With a knitting needle and yarn, draw through a series of new loops to work from along the edge of a knitted piece. It&#8217;s usually used for neck and cardigan bands.</td>\n<td><b>Yarn over:</b> Make a new stitch by wrapping the yarn around the RH needle. The way to do this depends on the kind of stitches (knit or purl) on either side of the yarn over.</td>\n</tr>\n</tbody>\n</table>\n</article>\n</div>\n<div class=\"about-article-section\" data-v-2c35db38=\"\" data-v-76ccd6ad=\"\">\n<h2 class=\"h3 section-title\" data-v-2c35db38=\"\" data-testid=\"aboutArticleHead\"></h2>\n</div>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"One year","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2023-02-23T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":209134},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2021-03-16T16:49:48+00:00","modifiedTime":"2021-03-16T16:49:48+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:36+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","strippedTitle":"how to clean knitted and crocheted items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","canonicalUrl":"","关注发动机调优系统系统调整网络":{"metaDescription":"Learn how to safely clean your knitted and crocheted items. Dry clean if the yarn label says so; otherwise, you can handwash or possibly machine wash.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Hand washing your <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">handknitted and crocheted</a> items is the safest bet, but you can try washing and drying some items, too. The following sections give you tips for each method.\r\n\r\nIf the yarn label says “Dry clean only,” then by all means, take the item to the cleaners. A word of advice, though: Bring the label (or a copy of the label) to the cleaners with you. That way they’ll know what material they’re working with and can use the appropriate chemicals.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269305\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269305\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-cleaning.jpg\" alt=\"cleaning knitted items\" width=\"556\" height=\"368\" /> ©Dmitriev Mikhail/Shutterstock.com[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Handwashing</h2>\r\nUnless the yarn specifically states “dry clean only,” handwashing is your best option. Here’s how:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong>Grab a bottle of mild detergent and make sure your sink or bathtub is clean.\r\n</strong>The best soap to use is a mild laundry detergent formulated for delicate items or baby clothes, such as Woolite or Ivory Soap. For small items, the kitchen sink is the perfect size. For larger items such as afghans, the bathtub or washtub works better.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Fill the sink or tub with enough cool to warm water so the item can be submerged.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Swish the item around gently.\r\n</strong>By keeping the agitation to a minimum, you preserve the integrity of the stitches.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>After washing, rinse thoroughly and squeeze out excess moisture.\r\n</strong>Rinse the item under cool water until it runs clear.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Never wring a knitted or crocheted item because the twisting motion can stretch the stitches and ultimately ruin the item’s shape.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Wrap the item in towels to absorb the extra moisture and lay flat to dry, blocking as necessary.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Never hang a crocheted piece to dry (it will stretch out of shape beyond recognition), and please, keep items out of the sun, which can cause fading.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Machine washing and drying</h2>\r\nIn some cases, it’s perfectly fine to throw your masterpieces in the washing machine. This holds true for items made from synthetic yarns, such as acrylic, which won’t sustain so much damage from the washing machine. Use the delicate cycle and, if size permits, throw the item into a mesh laundry bag. Be sure to check the yarn label for the correct water temperature settings.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">It’s always a safe bet to wash these items alone the first time around, just to make sure the colors won’t bleed into the rest of your laundry. If you’re not sure what the correct water temperature should be, opt for the safe route and use the cool water setting.</p>\r\nSometimes tossing your afghan, scarf, or other piece of handiwork in the dryer is just fine. Again, check the yarn label to make sure it’s okay. Most synthetic yarns will take a low heat setting unless it’s got some stuff attached like sequins or mirrors. Add some smooth-textured items like pillowcases to the dryer to help absorb moisture.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Don’t machine dry wool — it will shrink! Find a spot large enough to accommodate the piece and lay it out flat, shape it if necessary, and allow to dry, preferably in a place that is out of direct sunlight and won’t be disturbed by playful pets.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Iron only if you must</h2>\r\nIf you feel that you need to add some heat to an item to get all the wrinkles out, set the iron on the lowest heat setting suggested for the yarn. Place a slightly damp cloth, such as a clean cotton dish towel, on top of your piece before ironing.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Never allow the iron to come into direct contact with the yarn. Excessive heat can ruin the integrity of the yarn fibers, and even cotton thread can flatten out too much and ruin the original look of the design.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Remove those pesky pills</h2>\r\nIt’s inevitable — where there’s yarn there’s pills, those unsightly little balls that pop up on fabric after laundering or from normal wear and tear. Removing the pills can revitalize your pieces and make them look like new again.\r\n\r\nYou can get rid of pills two ways:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>By using a sweater stone:</strong> This is the recommended preference because it is gentler on the fabric and you have more control over it.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>By using a sweater shaver:</strong> These devices are typically battery operated or electric, and if you don’t use them properly, you can put holes in your item.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nTo use a sweater stone properly:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong>Lay the item on a flat surface.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Hold the stone in the palm of your hand and gently brush the fabric in smooth short strokes.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\nThe stone will crumble a bit, but don’t worry, this is normal and won’t damage your piece. Gently shake the item or use a lint roller to remove these tiny pieces.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Never, ever try to remove pilling with scissors! Remember that knits and crochet are a series of interlocking loops; if you inadvertently cut even one of the strands of yarn, your whole piece can unravel.</p>","description":"Hand washing your <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">handknitted and crocheted</a> items is the safest bet, but you can try washing and drying some items, too. The following sections give you tips for each method.\r\n\r\nIf the yarn label says “Dry clean only,” then by all means, take the item to the cleaners. A word of advice, though: Bring the label (or a copy of the label) to the cleaners with you. That way they’ll know what material they’re working with and can use the appropriate chemicals.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269305\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269305\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-cleaning.jpg\" alt=\"cleaning knitted items\" width=\"556\" height=\"368\" /> ©Dmitriev Mikhail/Shutterstock.com[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Handwashing</h2>\r\nUnless the yarn specifically states “dry clean only,” handwashing is your best option. Here’s how:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong>Grab a bottle of mild detergent and make sure your sink or bathtub is clean.\r\n</strong>The best soap to use is a mild laundry detergent formulated for delicate items or baby clothes, such as Woolite or Ivory Soap. For small items, the kitchen sink is the perfect size. For larger items such as afghans, the bathtub or washtub works better.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Fill the sink or tub with enough cool to warm water so the item can be submerged.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Swish the item around gently.\r\n</strong>By keeping the agitation to a minimum, you preserve the integrity of the stitches.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>After washing, rinse thoroughly and squeeze out excess moisture.\r\n</strong>Rinse the item under cool water until it runs clear.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Never wring a knitted or crocheted item because the twisting motion can stretch the stitches and ultimately ruin the item’s shape.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Wrap the item in towels to absorb the extra moisture and lay flat to dry, blocking as necessary.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Never hang a crocheted piece to dry (it will stretch out of shape beyond recognition), and please, keep items out of the sun, which can cause fading.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Machine washing and drying</h2>\r\nIn some cases, it’s perfectly fine to throw your masterpieces in the washing machine. This holds true for items made from synthetic yarns, such as acrylic, which won’t sustain so much damage from the washing machine. Use the delicate cycle and, if size permits, throw the item into a mesh laundry bag. Be sure to check the yarn label for the correct water temperature settings.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">It’s always a safe bet to wash these items alone the first time around, just to make sure the colors won’t bleed into the rest of your laundry. If you’re not sure what the correct water temperature should be, opt for the safe route and use the cool water setting.</p>\r\nSometimes tossing your afghan, scarf, or other piece of handiwork in the dryer is just fine. Again, check the yarn label to make sure it’s okay. Most synthetic yarns will take a low heat setting unless it’s got some stuff attached like sequins or mirrors. Add some smooth-textured items like pillowcases to the dryer to help absorb moisture.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Don’t machine dry wool — it will shrink! Find a spot large enough to accommodate the piece and lay it out flat, shape it if necessary, and allow to dry, preferably in a place that is out of direct sunlight and won’t be disturbed by playful pets.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Iron only if you must</h2>\r\nIf you feel that you need to add some heat to an item to get all the wrinkles out, set the iron on the lowest heat setting suggested for the yarn. Place a slightly damp cloth, such as a clean cotton dish towel, on top of your piece before ironing.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Never allow the iron to come into direct contact with the yarn. Excessive heat can ruin the integrity of the yarn fibers, and even cotton thread can flatten out too much and ruin the original look of the design.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Remove those pesky pills</h2>\r\nIt’s inevitable — where there’s yarn there’s pills, those unsightly little balls that pop up on fabric after laundering or from normal wear and tear. Removing the pills can revitalize your pieces and make them look like new again.\r\n\r\nYou can get rid of pills two ways:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>By using a sweater stone:</strong> This is the recommended preference because it is gentler on the fabric and you have more control over it.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>By using a sweater shaver:</strong> These devices are typically battery operated or electric, and if you don’t use them properly, you can put holes in your item.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nTo use a sweater stone properly:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong>Lay the item on a flat surface.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Hold the stone in the palm of your hand and gently brush the fabric in smooth short strokes.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\nThe stone will crumble a bit, but don’t worry, this is normal and won’t damage your piece. Gently shake the item or use a lint roller to remove these tiny pieces.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips warning\">Never, ever try to remove pilling with scissors! Remember that knits and crochet are a series of interlocking loops; if you inadvertently cut even one of the strands of yarn, your whole piece can unravel.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Handwashing","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Machine washing and drying","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Iron only if you must","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Remove those pesky pills","target":"#tab4"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}},{"articleId":269273,"title":"Crochet Pattern for a Multicolored Scarf","slug":"crochet-pattern-for-a-multicolored-scarf","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269273"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}},{"articleId":269273,"title":"Crochet Pattern for a Multicolored Scarf","slug":"crochet-pattern-for-a-multicolored-scarf","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269273"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282338,"slug":"knitting-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119652939","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119652936-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cover-9781119652939-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Knitting & Crocheting All-in-One For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"9540\">Pam Allen</b></b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9541\">Shannon Okey</b></b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9849\">Susan Brittain</b></b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"10487\">Karen Manthey</b></b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ac05d78f\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ac05e095\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":null,"lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":269304},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2021-03-16T16:12:22+00:00","modifiedTime":"2021-03-16T16:12:22+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:36+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","strippedTitle":"how to execute the extended double crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","canonicalUrl":"","关注发动机调优系统系统调整网络":{"metaDescription":"Learn how to adapt the standard double crochet stitch into the extended double crochet and how to adapt any stitch into an extended stitch.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"The <em>extended double crochet</em> (abbreviated <em>Edc</em>) is a variation on the standard <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/crocheting/projects/doing-a-double-crochet/\">double crochet stitch</a> (abbreviated <em>dc</em>). Occasionally a pattern may direct you to make <em>extended crochet stitches,</em> which are a little taller than the regular version of the same stitch. They also provide variation in texture with a slightly improved drape, meaning a fabric made of extended stitches is softer and less dense than one made with standard stitches.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">You can adapt any stitch into an extended stitch. How? Instead of adding a yarn over to the beginning of the stitch, extended stitches include a chain stitch in the middle of the stitch to give a little extra lift.</p>\r\nTo get started:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Make a foundation chain by working 15 chain stitches (ch 15).</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Chain 3 more stitches for the turning chain.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\nTo create your first extended double crochet stitch, follow these steps:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook (yo).</strong>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Always yarn over from back to front.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Insert your hook into the fourth chain (ch) from the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Gently pull the wrapped hook through the center of the chain stitch, carrying the wrapped yarn through the stitch.\r\n</strong>You should now have 3 loops on your hook.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong><strong> Work a chain stitch by drawing the yarn through the first loop on the hook, as in the following figure.\r\n</strong></strong>\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269300\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269300\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-extended-double-crochet.jpg\" alt=\"extended double crochet\" width=\"556\" height=\"256\" /> Making a chain stitch for your extended double crochet.[/caption]</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Yarn over the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Draw the yarn through the first 2 loops on your hook, like in (a) in the following figure.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Draw the yarn through the last 2 loops on the hook, as shown in (b) in the following figure.\r\n</strong>One extended double crochet stitch (Edc) is now complete, and you should have 1 loop remaining on your hook. When a stitch diagram indicates an extended double crochet stitch, you see the symbol shown in (c).</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269299\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269299\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-extended-finish.jpg\" alt=\"Finishing an extended double crochet stitch.\" width=\"556\" height=\"255\" /> Finishing an extended double crochet stitch.[/caption]\r\n\r\nTo work your next extended double crochet and continue the row, perform these steps:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook (yo) and insert your hook into the next chain stitch (ch).</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over and pull the yarn through the chain stitch.\r\n</strong>You should have 3 loops on the hook.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Repeat Steps 5 through 10 from the preceding instructions to complete the second extended double crochet stitch (Edc).</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Work 1 extended double crochet stitch in each chain stitch across the foundation chain by repeating Steps 1 through 3.\r\n</strong>When you count the turning chain as the first extended double crochet, you should have 16 extended double crochet stitches in Row 1. This figure shows the end of the first extended double crochet row.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269298\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269298\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-extended-first-row.jpg\" alt=\" first row of extended double crochet\" width=\"556\" height=\"358\" /> Finishing the first row of extended double crochet.[/caption]\r\n\r\nTo begin the next row of extended double crochet, turn your piece and make three chains for the turning chain. Skipping the first stitch, work your first extended double crochet stitch into the next stitch on the previous row and follow Steps 1 through 3 of the preceding instructions. Take a look at this figure to see what rows of extended double crochet look like as a fabric.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269297\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269297\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-extended-rows.jpg\" alt=\" rows of extended double crochet\" width=\"556\" height=\"502\" /> Several rows of extended double crochet.[/caption]","description":"The <em>extended double crochet</em> (abbreviated <em>Edc</em>) is a variation on the standard <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/crocheting/projects/doing-a-double-crochet/\">double crochet stitch</a> (abbreviated <em>dc</em>). Occasionally a pattern may direct you to make <em>extended crochet stitches,</em> which are a little taller than the regular version of the same stitch. They also provide variation in texture with a slightly improved drape, meaning a fabric made of extended stitches is softer and less dense than one made with standard stitches.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">You can adapt any stitch into an extended stitch. How? Instead of adding a yarn over to the beginning of the stitch, extended stitches include a chain stitch in the middle of the stitch to give a little extra lift.</p>\r\nTo get started:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Make a foundation chain by working 15 chain stitches (ch 15).</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Chain 3 more stitches for the turning chain.</strong></li>\r\n</ol>\r\nTo create your first extended double crochet stitch, follow these steps:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook (yo).</strong>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Always yarn over from back to front.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Insert your hook into the fourth chain (ch) from the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Gently pull the wrapped hook through the center of the chain stitch, carrying the wrapped yarn through the stitch.\r\n</strong>You should now have 3 loops on your hook.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong><strong> Work a chain stitch by drawing the yarn through the first loop on the hook, as in the following figure.\r\n</strong></strong>\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269300\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269300\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-extended-double-crochet.jpg\" alt=\"extended double crochet\" width=\"556\" height=\"256\" /> Making a chain stitch for your extended double crochet.[/caption]</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Yarn over the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Draw the yarn through the first 2 loops on your hook, like in (a) in the following figure.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook.</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Draw the yarn through the last 2 loops on the hook, as shown in (b) in the following figure.\r\n</strong>One extended double crochet stitch (Edc) is now complete, and you should have 1 loop remaining on your hook. When a stitch diagram indicates an extended double crochet stitch, you see the symbol shown in (c).</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269299\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269299\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-extended-finish.jpg\" alt=\"Finishing an extended double crochet stitch.\" width=\"556\" height=\"255\" /> Finishing an extended double crochet stitch.[/caption]\r\n\r\nTo work your next extended double crochet and continue the row, perform these steps:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over the hook (yo) and insert your hook into the next chain stitch (ch).</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Yarn over and pull the yarn through the chain stitch.\r\n</strong>You should have 3 loops on the hook.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Repeat Steps 5 through 10 from the preceding instructions to complete the second extended double crochet stitch (Edc).</strong></li>\r\n \t<li><strong> Work 1 extended double crochet stitch in each chain stitch across the foundation chain by repeating Steps 1 through 3.\r\n</strong>When you count the turning chain as the first extended double crochet, you should have 16 extended double crochet stitches in Row 1. This figure shows the end of the first extended double crochet row.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269298\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269298\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-extended-first-row.jpg\" alt=\" first row of extended double crochet\" width=\"556\" height=\"358\" /> Finishing the first row of extended double crochet.[/caption]\r\n\r\nTo begin the next row of extended double crochet, turn your piece and make three chains for the turning chain. Skipping the first stitch, work your first extended double crochet stitch into the next stitch on the previous row and follow Steps 1 through 3 of the preceding instructions. Take a look at this figure to see what rows of extended double crochet look like as a fabric.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269297\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269297\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-extended-rows.jpg\" alt=\" rows of extended double crochet\" width=\"556\" height=\"502\" /> Several rows of extended double crochet.[/caption]","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}},{"articleId":269273,"title":"Crochet Pattern for a Multicolored Scarf","slug":"crochet-pattern-for-a-multicolored-scarf","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269273"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}},{"articleId":269273,"title":"Crochet Pattern for a Multicolored Scarf","slug":"crochet-pattern-for-a-multicolored-scarf","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269273"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282338,"slug":"knitting-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119652939","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119652936-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cover-9781119652939-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Knitting & Crocheting All-in-One For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"9540\">Pam Allen</b></b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9541\">Shannon Okey</b></b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9849\">Susan Brittain</b></b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"10487\">Karen Manthey</b></b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ac055a64\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ac056337\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":null,"lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":269296},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2021-03-16T15:21:41+00:00","modifiedTime":"2021-03-16T15:21:41+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:36+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","strippedTitle":"why (and when) yarn gauge matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","canonicalUrl":"","关注发动机调优系统系统调整网络":{"metaDescription":"Learn how to measure and work with gauge so that you can go from a knitted or crocheted swatch to a finished project with the correct measurements.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Understanding how to measure and work with gauge is what allows you to go from a knitted or crocheted swatch to a finished project that has the correct measurements.\r\n\r\nIf you’ve spent some time around <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">knitters or crocheters</a>, you may already know that mention of the word gauge often elicits a groan. Gauge has a bad reputation for three reasons. First, it represents an unpleasant “should.” Second, it’s a tedious task that has to be accomplished before the fun part of the project can begin. Finally, it involves math. However, getting comfortable with gauge gives you a leg up in knitting and crocheting. Without knowing your gauge, you couldn’t do the following:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Work away, comfortable in the knowledge that after you work the thousands of stitches required to complete your project, it will fit.</li>\r\n \t<li>Ensure your final project is neat and attractive.</li>\r\n \t<li>Substitute another yarn for the one given in the pattern.</li>\r\n \t<li>Use the needle or hook size that makes the best fabric for your chosen yarn, even if it means you don’t match the pattern’s gauge.</li>\r\n \t<li>Ensure that the amount of yarn the pattern specifies is sufficient to complete the project.</li>\r\n \t<li>Design your own projects and sweaters.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Determine the gauge</h2>\r\nThe first step in any project is to determine the gauge of the fabric you’re making. Gauge (sometimes called <em>tension</em>) is listed at the beginning of a pattern before the instructions begin. It’s given as a number of stitches and rows over 4 inches or 10 centimeters, and it tells you which needle or hook size and which stitch pattern were used to determine the gauge. Check your pattern to see how many stitches and rows should make up 4 inches of knitted fabric. You need to measure <em>your</em> gauge against that given in the directions.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">The yarn manufacturer may also recommend a particular gauge on the yarn label. This gauge may be quite different from the one in your pattern, but that’s okay. Sometimes, the pattern designer wants to create a looser or tighter stitch pattern than the standard that the yarn manufacturer set. Follow the pattern gauge to get the same results as the pictured project.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Gauge isn’t always important, such as when you’re making a scarf, an afghan, a bag, or anything else for which a precise size isn’t essential. But when size does matter, the right or wrong gauge can make or break the finished piece.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >What affects gauge</h2>\r\nGauge varies depending on the yarn, the needle or hook size, and the stitch pattern you use:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Yarn:</strong> Yarns of different weights produce different gauges. A bulkier yarn produces a larger stitch, and a finer yarn produces a smaller stitch.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Needle or hook size:</strong> The same yarn knitted on different-sized needles or crocheted on a different size hook will have different gauges. Because you make a stitch by wrapping yarn around a needle or hook, the size (circumference) of the needle or hook determines the size of the stitch.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">This figure shows how needle size can affect the way the finished fabric looks. The smaller the needle is, the tighter the stitches and the denser the knitted fabric. The larger the needle is, the looser the stitches and the drapier (and stretchier) the fabric.</p>\r\n\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269285\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269285\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-needle-size.jpg\" alt=\"stitches from different needle sizes\" width=\"556\" height=\"363\" /> Smaller needles result in tighter stitches; bigger needles, in looser stitches.[/caption]\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Stitch patterns and stitch size:</strong> The same yarn knitted on the same needles or crocheted on the same hook but in different stitch patterns will have different gauges. For example, some stitches pull in, requiring more stitches to make a square inch. Other stitches spread the fabric out, so they require fewer stitches to make an inch. The following figure compares the gauges of two different stitch patterns that use the same number of stitches.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269284\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269284\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-stitch-patterns.jpg\" alt=\"stitch patterns\" width=\"556\" height=\"374\" /> Gauge on different stitch patterns.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Gauge also can vary with the time of day you’re working, how long you’ve been working, and what you’re thinking about. The tension you put on the yarn traveling around the needle or hook contributes to stitch size, so being tired or tense can affect the flow of your yarn and stitch size.</p>","description":"Understanding how to measure and work with gauge is what allows you to go from a knitted or crocheted swatch to a finished project that has the correct measurements.\r\n\r\nIf you’ve spent some time around <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/\">knitters or crocheters</a>, you may already know that mention of the word gauge often elicits a groan. Gauge has a bad reputation for three reasons. First, it represents an unpleasant “should.” Second, it’s a tedious task that has to be accomplished before the fun part of the project can begin. Finally, it involves math. However, getting comfortable with gauge gives you a leg up in knitting and crocheting. Without knowing your gauge, you couldn’t do the following:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Work away, comfortable in the knowledge that after you work the thousands of stitches required to complete your project, it will fit.</li>\r\n \t<li>Ensure your final project is neat and attractive.</li>\r\n \t<li>Substitute another yarn for the one given in the pattern.</li>\r\n \t<li>Use the needle or hook size that makes the best fabric for your chosen yarn, even if it means you don’t match the pattern’s gauge.</li>\r\n \t<li>Ensure that the amount of yarn the pattern specifies is sufficient to complete the project.</li>\r\n \t<li>Design your own projects and sweaters.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Determine the gauge</h2>\r\nThe first step in any project is to determine the gauge of the fabric you’re making. Gauge (sometimes called <em>tension</em>) is listed at the beginning of a pattern before the instructions begin. It’s given as a number of stitches and rows over 4 inches or 10 centimeters, and it tells you which needle or hook size and which stitch pattern were used to determine the gauge. Check your pattern to see how many stitches and rows should make up 4 inches of knitted fabric. You need to measure <em>your</em> gauge against that given in the directions.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">The yarn manufacturer may also recommend a particular gauge on the yarn label. This gauge may be quite different from the one in your pattern, but that’s okay. Sometimes, the pattern designer wants to create a looser or tighter stitch pattern than the standard that the yarn manufacturer set. Follow the pattern gauge to get the same results as the pictured project.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Gauge isn’t always important, such as when you’re making a scarf, an afghan, a bag, or anything else for which a precise size isn’t essential. But when size does matter, the right or wrong gauge can make or break the finished piece.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >What affects gauge</h2>\r\nGauge varies depending on the yarn, the needle or hook size, and the stitch pattern you use:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Yarn:</strong> Yarns of different weights produce different gauges. A bulkier yarn produces a larger stitch, and a finer yarn produces a smaller stitch.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Needle or hook size:</strong> The same yarn knitted on different-sized needles or crocheted on a different size hook will have different gauges. Because you make a stitch by wrapping yarn around a needle or hook, the size (circumference) of the needle or hook determines the size of the stitch.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">This figure shows how needle size can affect the way the finished fabric looks. The smaller the needle is, the tighter the stitches and the denser the knitted fabric. The larger the needle is, the looser the stitches and the drapier (and stretchier) the fabric.</p>\r\n\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269285\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269285\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-needle-size.jpg\" alt=\"stitches from different needle sizes\" width=\"556\" height=\"363\" /> Smaller needles result in tighter stitches; bigger needles, in looser stitches.[/caption]\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Stitch patterns and stitch size:</strong> The same yarn knitted on the same needles or crocheted on the same hook but in different stitch patterns will have different gauges. For example, some stitches pull in, requiring more stitches to make a square inch. Other stitches spread the fabric out, so they require fewer stitches to make an inch. The following figure compares the gauges of two different stitch patterns that use the same number of stitches.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269284\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269284\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-stitch-patterns.jpg\" alt=\"stitch patterns\" width=\"556\" height=\"374\" /> Gauge on different stitch patterns.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Gauge also can vary with the time of day you’re working, how long you’ve been working, and what you’re thinking about. The tension you put on the yarn traveling around the needle or hook contributes to stitch size, so being tired or tense can affect the flow of your yarn and stitch size.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Determine the gauge","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"What affects gauge","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}},{"articleId":269273,"title":"Crochet Pattern for a Multicolored Scarf","slug":"crochet-pattern-for-a-multicolored-scarf","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269273"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}},{"articleId":269273,"title":"Crochet Pattern for a Multicolored Scarf","slug":"crochet-pattern-for-a-multicolored-scarf","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269273"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282338,"slug":"knitting-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119652939","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119652936-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cover-9781119652939-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Knitting & Crocheting All-in-One For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"9540\">Pam Allen</b></b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9541\">Shannon Okey</b></b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9849\">Susan Brittain</b></b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"10487\">Karen Manthey</b></b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ac045b9c\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ac046489\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":null,"lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":269283},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2021-03-16T15:02:46+00:00","modifiedTime":"2021-03-16T15:02:46+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:36+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"Crochet Pattern for a Multicolored Scarf","strippedTitle":"crochet pattern for a multicolored scarf","slug":"crochet-pattern-for-a-multicolored-scarf","canonicalUrl":"","关注发动机调优系统系统调整网络":{"metaDescription":"Brighten up your wardrobe by crocheting this multicolored scarf, which you work completely with single crochet stitches and mix and match yarns.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Crocheting this scarf is really fun, and it’ll certainly brighten up your wardrobe. Not only are you changing colors with each row, but textures as well. You work the scarf completely with <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/crocheting/stitches/how-to-crochet-a-reverse-single-crochet-stitch/\">single crochet stitches</a>, but you’d never know to look at it. Sometimes it’s okay to mix and match yarns, and this design is a great example.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269274\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269274\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-multicolored-scarf.jpg\" alt=\"multicolored scarves\" width=\"556\" height=\"371\" /> ©zaranda/Shutterstock.com[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Materials and vital statistics</h2>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Yarn:</strong>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Bernat “Matrix” railroad yarn (62% nylon/38% polyester), Article #166102 (1.75 oz. [50 g], 140 yds [128 m] each ball): 1 ball of #02430 Web Wines (A)</li>\r\n \t<li>Patons “Silverlash” eyelash yarn (98% polyester/2% lurex), Article #244081 (1.75 oz. [50 g], 164 yds [150 m] each skein): 1 skein of #81415 Rose Quartz (B)</li>\r\n \t<li>Patons “Lacette” fine-weight yarn (39% nylon/36% acrylic/25% mohair), Article #243030 (1.75 oz. [50 g], 235 yds [215 m] each skein): 1 skein of #30040 Touch of Black (C)</li>\r\n \t<li>Patons “Silverlash” eyelash yarn (98% polyester/2% lurex), Article #244081 (1.75 oz. [50 g], 164 yds [150 m] each skein): 1 skein of #81405 Maroon Magic (D)</li>\r\n \t<li>Patons “Lacette” fine-weight yarn (39% nylon/36% acrylic/25% mohair), Article #243030 (1.75 oz. [50 g], 235 yds [215 m] each skein): 1 skein of #30008 Cream Caress (E)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">You’ll have enough yarn to make several scarves.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Hook:</strong> Crochet hook size H-8 U.S. or size needed to obtain gauge</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Measurements:</strong> 31⁄4 wide x 45 in. long</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Gauge:</strong> 8 sts = 2 in.; 6 rows = 1 in.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Stitches used:</strong> Chain stitch (ch), slip stitch (sl st), single crochet (sc)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThe beauty of this design reveals itself as you complete each row. You’ll get lots of practice changing yarn colors, and the great thing is the textures will hide any slip-ups if you don’t get it quite right the first time. Because the scarf is worked in single crochet stitches, it’s also a great project to help you get used to working with novelty yarns.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Directions</h2>\r\n<strong>Foundation chain:</strong> With A, ch 201.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 1 (right side):</strong> Sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in each ch across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off A, join B.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 2:</strong> With B, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off B, join C.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 3:</strong> With C, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off C, join B.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 4:</strong> With B, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off B, join A.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 5:</strong> With A, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off A, join D.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 6:</strong> With D, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off D, join E.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 7:</strong> With E, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off E, join D.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 8:</strong> With D, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off D, join A.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 9:</strong> With A, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off A, join C.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 10:</strong> With C, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off C, join A.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 11:</strong> With A, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off A, join D.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 12:</strong> With D, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off D, join E.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 13:</strong> With E, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off E, join D.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 14:</strong> With D, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off D, join A.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 15:</strong> With A, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off A, join B.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 16:</strong> With B, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off B, join C.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 17:</strong> With C, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off C, join B.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 18:</strong> With B, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off B, join A.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 19:</strong> With A, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 20:</strong> Ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc). Fasten off.","description":"Crocheting this scarf is really fun, and it’ll certainly brighten up your wardrobe. Not only are you changing colors with each row, but textures as well. You work the scarf completely with <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/crocheting/stitches/how-to-crochet-a-reverse-single-crochet-stitch/\">single crochet stitches</a>, but you’d never know to look at it. Sometimes it’s okay to mix and match yarns, and this design is a great example.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269274\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269274\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-multicolored-scarf.jpg\" alt=\"multicolored scarves\" width=\"556\" height=\"371\" /> ©zaranda/Shutterstock.com[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Materials and vital statistics</h2>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Yarn:</strong>\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Bernat “Matrix” railroad yarn (62% nylon/38% polyester), Article #166102 (1.75 oz. [50 g], 140 yds [128 m] each ball): 1 ball of #02430 Web Wines (A)</li>\r\n \t<li>Patons “Silverlash” eyelash yarn (98% polyester/2% lurex), Article #244081 (1.75 oz. [50 g], 164 yds [150 m] each skein): 1 skein of #81415 Rose Quartz (B)</li>\r\n \t<li>Patons “Lacette” fine-weight yarn (39% nylon/36% acrylic/25% mohair), Article #243030 (1.75 oz. [50 g], 235 yds [215 m] each skein): 1 skein of #30040 Touch of Black (C)</li>\r\n \t<li>Patons “Silverlash” eyelash yarn (98% polyester/2% lurex), Article #244081 (1.75 oz. [50 g], 164 yds [150 m] each skein): 1 skein of #81405 Maroon Magic (D)</li>\r\n \t<li>Patons “Lacette” fine-weight yarn (39% nylon/36% acrylic/25% mohair), Article #243030 (1.75 oz. [50 g], 235 yds [215 m] each skein): 1 skein of #30008 Cream Caress (E)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">You’ll have enough yarn to make several scarves.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Hook:</strong> Crochet hook size H-8 U.S. or size needed to obtain gauge</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Measurements:</strong> 31⁄4 wide x 45 in. long</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Gauge:</strong> 8 sts = 2 in.; 6 rows = 1 in.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Stitches used:</strong> Chain stitch (ch), slip stitch (sl st), single crochet (sc)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThe beauty of this design reveals itself as you complete each row. You’ll get lots of practice changing yarn colors, and the great thing is the textures will hide any slip-ups if you don’t get it quite right the first time. Because the scarf is worked in single crochet stitches, it’s also a great project to help you get used to working with novelty yarns.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Directions</h2>\r\n<strong>Foundation chain:</strong> With A, ch 201.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 1 (right side):</strong> Sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in each ch across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off A, join B.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 2:</strong> With B, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off B, join C.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 3:</strong> With C, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off C, join B.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 4:</strong> With B, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off B, join A.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 5:</strong> With A, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off A, join D.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 6:</strong> With D, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off D, join E.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 7:</strong> With E, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off E, join D.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 8:</strong> With D, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off D, join A.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 9:</strong> With A, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off A, join C.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 10:</strong> With C, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off C, join A.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 11:</strong> With A, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off A, join D.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 12:</strong> With D, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off D, join E.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 13:</strong> With E, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off E, join D.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 14:</strong> With D, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off D, join A.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 15:</strong> With A, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off A, join B.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 16:</strong> With B, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off B, join C.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 17:</strong> With C, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off C, join B.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 18:</strong> With B, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off B, join A.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 19:</strong> With A, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 20:</strong> Ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc). Fasten off.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Materials and vital statistics","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Directions","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282338,"slug":"knitting-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119652939","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119652936-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cover-9781119652939-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Knitting & Crocheting All-in-One For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"9540\">Pam Allen</b></b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9541\">Shannon Okey</b></b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9849\">Susan Brittain</b></b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"10487\">Karen Manthey</b></b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ac0358e2\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ac0361b0\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":null,"lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":269273},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2021-03-16T14:55:08+00:00","modifiedTime":"2021-03-16T14:55:08+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:36+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"Information Provided by Knitted Sweater Patterns","strippedTitle":"information provided by knitted sweater patterns","slug":"information-provided-by-knitted-sweater-patterns","canonicalUrl":"","关注发动机调优系统系统调整网络":{"metaDescription":"Learn about the kinds of information you find in a typical sweater pattern which provides a lot of information besides piece-by-piece instructions.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Sweater patterns tell you how to knit the individual pieces of a sweater and how to put them together. Whether from a book, magazine, leaflet, or website, sweater patterns are set up in a predictable way. You find information about sizes, materials needed, gauge, and any special pattern <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/designs-patterns/understand-knitting-abbreviations-and-knitting-terms/\">stitches or abbreviations</a> listed before the actual piece-by-piece instructions. This article runs you through the kinds of information you find in a typical sweater pattern.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Picture This: Studying the Garment Photo</h2>\r\nWhen you sit down with a new sweater pattern — or better yet, when you’re choosing one — begin by paying close attention to the picture of the sweater you want to knit. This step may seem obvious, but studying the photograph or drawing and noting the details will clarify parts of the instructions that may otherwise be confusing. Study the picture of your sweater and answer these questions:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Is it a pullover or a cardigan?</li>\r\n \t<li>How is it constructed? Can you tell from the picture whether the sweater is designed with a drop shoulder or a set-in sleeve, two common sleeve styles?</li>\r\n \t<li>Does the shoulder slope, or is it worked straight across? (If you can’t tell from the photo, check the schematic. The shoulder design will be clear in the line drawing that often comes with the instructions.)</li>\r\n \t<li>Is the body of the sweater shaped in any way, or is it a simple rectangle?</li>\r\n \t<li>Is the sweater worked primarily in stockinette stitch? If other pattern stitches are used, can you identify them? Are they knit-and-purl patterns, cables, or something else?</li>\r\n \t<li>Is there a color pattern? If so, is it an allover pattern, or is it placed along the hem or across the yoke?</li>\r\n \t<li>Is there ribbing at the bottom edges, or does the sweater begin some other way?</li>\r\n \t<li>Does it have a round neckline or a V-neck? Is it finished with a ribbed neckband? A collar? A crocheted edge?</li>\r\n \t<li>If the sweater is pictured on a model, how’s the fit? Does the collar lie properly around the neck? Does the sleeve cap pull? If the sweater doesn’t fit the model well, chances are that it won’t look good on you. (Then again, it just might.)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThe point of all these questions? Know thy sweater.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Assess the Pattern at a Glance</h2>\r\nLooking at a picture of the knitted garment can tell you only so much about how the sweater is constructed. For the nitty-gritty details, you need to read the pattern — preferably before you begin.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Knowing as much as you can about your sweater upfront helps you anticipate the steps in the instructions and forestall many a mistake. If you find that something in the instructions is confusing in the first read-through, don’t be alarmed; it may make sense by the time you get to that point in the instructions with needles and yarn in hand.</p>\r\nThe following sections walk you through the various bits of info a typical sweater pattern contains.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">It’s a good idea to photocopy the pattern so you have a working copy that you can highlight, take notes on, or make changes to without messing up the original pattern.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>How hard is “easy”? Level of difficulty</h3>\r\nMany patterns tell you right away the level of difficulty the pattern writer has assigned to it. Here are the categories:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>A <em>beginner </em>sweater uses basic stitches (knits and purls) and involves minimal shaping and simple finishing.</li>\r\n \t<li>An <em>intermediate</em> project uses more-challenging stitch patterns and/or shaping and finishing.</li>\r\n \t<li>An <em>experienced </em>or <em>expert</em> pattern may require all your powers of concentration. It frequently features tricky pattern or color work, and it may involve complicated shaping or construction details. Work on it only when you can give it all your attention.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Having more than one project going at a time is always a good idea. Make one of those projects something portable and rather brainless to give you a feeling of accomplishment and to keep your hands going while you watch TV or wait for a website to load. And have another more challenging project to work on when you have the time and quiet to concentrate on it.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>How big is “big”? Knitted measurements</h3>\r\nMost patterns begin by listing the sizes given in the instructions. Older patterns may list them in numbered chest sizes — for example, 38 (40, 42, 44, 46). Most current patterns give sizes in the designations small (medium, large) or in some combination of the two systems. Be sure you know your measurements before choosing the size to knit!\r\n\r\nThe size section is the first place you see parentheses in a knitting pattern, and it pays to notice where the size you want to make is located in the pattern: before or inside the parentheses. Every time a number or measurement is given in the pattern, the one for your size will be in the same place in relation to the parentheses. For example, if the pattern is written for small, medium, and large sizes — presented “small (medium, large)” — and you’re making a small, the numbers for your size will always be written first outside the parentheses. If you’re making a large, your numbers will always be last in the parentheses.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Before you start knitting, take the time to circle all the instructions in your size throughout the entire pattern (this is when your photocopy comes in handy). If you use a pencil, you can then erase the circles when finished so you can knit the pattern again later in a different size without confusion.</p>\r\nSweater patterns generally tell you what the finished garment should measure when laid out on a flat surface. Sometimes only the chest/bust width is given. Other times, you find measurements for overall length, sleeve length, and/or upper arm circumference. Use this info to help you determine which size to knit.\r\n<h3>Materials</h3>\r\nThe pattern tells you what materials and equipment you need to make your sweater. In the “Materials” section of the pattern, you can find the following:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>The brand and specific name of the yarn used: </strong>It gives the fiber content of the yarn, the weight and often the number of yards per skein, the color number and name of the yarn, and the number of skeins or balls required for the sweater. If the sweater hasn’t been designed for a specific yarn company and isn’t a vehicle for selling a particular brand, the pattern may simply call for yarn in a specific weight — for example, worsted-weight.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>The size and type of needles you need:</strong> Often, needles in two sizes are listed — the smaller for cuffs and bottom borders and the larger for the body of the sweater. If the pattern uses double-pointed needles or a circular needle (say for a neckband or collar), or if the entire sweater is worked in the round, the pattern tells you which size needle(s) to use and in what length.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">Following the particular needles specified, you always see the phrase “or size to obtain gauge.” This phrase often appears in full capitalization or in italics. Why? Because gauge matters.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Any special equipment or gadgets required:</strong> Constructing some sweaters requires special tools — for example, a cable needle, stitch markers, stitch holders, and so on. These tools are listed after the needles.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Buttons or other finishing materials:</strong> If the sweater is a cardigan, the number and size of the buttons called for are listed. If pompoms, embroidery, or other embellishments are in order, the materials needed to make them are listed here.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Check the materials list and make sure that you have what you need when you’re purchasing yarn and needles for a project. You don’t want to find yourself unable to continue working on your project after the stores have closed because you don’t have a particular tool in your supply box.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Gauge</h3>\r\nIn the “Gauge” section of the pattern, you find a formula that reads something like this:\r\n<blockquote>14 sts and 21 rows to 4\" (10 cm) over St st, using larger needles.</blockquote>\r\nThis notation is the gauge formula. It tells you how many stitches and rows are in a 4-inch square of the sweater fabric (in this case, stockinette stitch). If you want to make a sweater that corresponds to the measurements given, you must duplicate this gauge. You can’t underestimate the importance of gauge!\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Gauge isn’t a standard, and you should make a gauge swatch for everything you plan to knit — especially if you want the finished project to fit when you’re done.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Special pattern stitches</h3>\r\nIf your sweater has any special pattern stitches or instructions, they may be listed and explained separately and not given again in the body of the instructions. For example, you may see the following:\r\n<blockquote><strong>Seed Stitch</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 1 (RS):</strong> * K1, p1; rep from * to end of row.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 2:</strong> K the purl sts and p the knit sts.\r\n\r\nRep Row 2 for pattern.</blockquote>\r\nThen, in the instructions proper, when you read “work seed stitch for 8 rows,” come back to this section to find out how to work seed stitch.\r\n\r\nYou also may find that a special abbreviation is explained. For example, you may see the following:\r\n<blockquote><strong>C3R (cross 3 right):</strong> Sl 1 st to cn and hold to back, k2, p1 from cn.</blockquote>\r\nWhen you come across C3R in your instructions, you don’t have to scratch your head and wonder, “What the heck?” You can look in the opening information for an explanation. (And if the instruction used in this example is making you wonder, “What the heck?” refer to the abbreviations in Book 1, Chapter 4.)\r\n<h3>Schematics and charts</h3>\r\nThe <em>schematic</em> is a small outline drawing of each sweater piece in the pattern. The pattern usually includes one schematic showing the body front and back with the neckline sketched in and another schematic of one sleeve. Cardigans usually show a single front, a back, and a sleeve.\r\n\r\nListed along the edges of the drawing are the dimensions of the piece in each size — for example, the width and length of the sweater, the distance from the bottom of the sweater to the armhole, the depth of the armhole, and the depth and width of the neck. This figure shows a schematic for a toggle jacket.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269269\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"275\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269269\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-toggle-jacket.jpg\" alt=\"schematic of shape\" width=\"275\" height=\"600\" /> A sample schematic showing shape and measurements.[/caption]\r\n\r\nSchematics are a big help because they show you the structure of the sweater at a glance: whether the armhole is straight or shaped and whether the sleeve cap is tall and narrow or short and wide. As you become more familiar with the way actual measurements fit you, you’ll be able to tell quickly from the schematic whether you want to knit the pattern as-is or make changes.\r\n\r\nDepending on the design of the sweater and the way the pattern’s written, a sweater pattern may include a chart to show a stitch, cable, or color pattern. Or it may include a chart to show an unusual feature of the garment, such as a shawl collar. This figure shows a chart for a repeating color motif and indicates how you should use it.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269268\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269268\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-color-motif.jpg\" alt=\"chart for a repeating color motif\" width=\"556\" height=\"287\" /> Sample chart for a repeating color motif.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">On right-side rows, work the chart from right to left. On wrong-side rows, work the chart from left to right.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you collect vintage knitting patterns, you’ll seldom see a chart or schematic. Instead, all the moves are painstakingly written out. Some people who learned to knit under the row-by-written-row system regret its demise. Others welcome the picture over the written instructions. The good news is that if you understand better when things are described with words, you can write charts in word form — and vice versa. If you have a pattern with interminable and obscure directions, read them carefully with graph paper and pencil in hand and make yourself a chart to better understand the text.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Knitting instructions</h3>\r\nAfter all the introductory information, the instructions for knitting your sweater begin. In general, most patterns for cardigans and pullovers begin with the back piece. Here the pattern tells you how many stitches to cast on and what to do with them.\r\n\r\nThe instructions are usually sequenced like this:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Instructions for the back</li>\r\n \t<li>Instructions for the front (or fronts if you’re knitting a cardigan); generally, the instructions for the front mirror those of the back until it’s time to shape the front neckline</li>\r\n \t<li>Instructions for the sleeves</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">The instructions describe each step as you work from the bottom border to the shoulder. They tell you what pattern stitches or colors to work, and they tell you how to shape (increase or decrease) your piece. If, for example, your sweater has a set-in sleeve and shaped armhole, the pattern will alert you that it’s time to begin the shaping by interrupting the text with a boldface heading such as “Shape armhole” or “Armhole shaping.”</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Finishing</h3>\r\nThe “Finishing” section of the pattern tells you what to do with your knitted pieces to make them into a complete sweater. It gives any special blocking instructions and tells you the order in which to sew the pieces together. You also find instructions for additional sweater details, such as how to make the neckband, cardigan bands, collar, crochet edge, and so on.","description":"Sweater patterns tell you how to knit the individual pieces of a sweater and how to put them together. Whether from a book, magazine, leaflet, or website, sweater patterns are set up in a predictable way. You find information about sizes, materials needed, gauge, and any special pattern <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/crafts/knitting/designs-patterns/understand-knitting-abbreviations-and-knitting-terms/\">stitches or abbreviations</a> listed before the actual piece-by-piece instructions. This article runs you through the kinds of information you find in a typical sweater pattern.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Picture This: Studying the Garment Photo</h2>\r\nWhen you sit down with a new sweater pattern — or better yet, when you’re choosing one — begin by paying close attention to the picture of the sweater you want to knit. This step may seem obvious, but studying the photograph or drawing and noting the details will clarify parts of the instructions that may otherwise be confusing. Study the picture of your sweater and answer these questions:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Is it a pullover or a cardigan?</li>\r\n \t<li>How is it constructed? Can you tell from the picture whether the sweater is designed with a drop shoulder or a set-in sleeve, two common sleeve styles?</li>\r\n \t<li>Does the shoulder slope, or is it worked straight across? (If you can’t tell from the photo, check the schematic. The shoulder design will be clear in the line drawing that often comes with the instructions.)</li>\r\n \t<li>Is the body of the sweater shaped in any way, or is it a simple rectangle?</li>\r\n \t<li>Is the sweater worked primarily in stockinette stitch? If other pattern stitches are used, can you identify them? Are they knit-and-purl patterns, cables, or something else?</li>\r\n \t<li>Is there a color pattern? If so, is it an allover pattern, or is it placed along the hem or across the yoke?</li>\r\n \t<li>Is there ribbing at the bottom edges, or does the sweater begin some other way?</li>\r\n \t<li>Does it have a round neckline or a V-neck? Is it finished with a ribbed neckband? A collar? A crocheted edge?</li>\r\n \t<li>If the sweater is pictured on a model, how’s the fit? Does the collar lie properly around the neck? Does the sleeve cap pull? If the sweater doesn’t fit the model well, chances are that it won’t look good on you. (Then again, it just might.)</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThe point of all these questions? Know thy sweater.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Assess the Pattern at a Glance</h2>\r\nLooking at a picture of the knitted garment can tell you only so much about how the sweater is constructed. For the nitty-gritty details, you need to read the pattern — preferably before you begin.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Knowing as much as you can about your sweater upfront helps you anticipate the steps in the instructions and forestall many a mistake. If you find that something in the instructions is confusing in the first read-through, don’t be alarmed; it may make sense by the time you get to that point in the instructions with needles and yarn in hand.</p>\r\nThe following sections walk you through the various bits of info a typical sweater pattern contains.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">It’s a good idea to photocopy the pattern so you have a working copy that you can highlight, take notes on, or make changes to without messing up the original pattern.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>How hard is “easy”? Level of difficulty</h3>\r\nMany patterns tell you right away the level of difficulty the pattern writer has assigned to it. Here are the categories:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>A <em>beginner </em>sweater uses basic stitches (knits and purls) and involves minimal shaping and simple finishing.</li>\r\n \t<li>An <em>intermediate</em> project uses more-challenging stitch patterns and/or shaping and finishing.</li>\r\n \t<li>An <em>experienced </em>or <em>expert</em> pattern may require all your powers of concentration. It frequently features tricky pattern or color work, and it may involve complicated shaping or construction details. Work on it only when you can give it all your attention.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Having more than one project going at a time is always a good idea. Make one of those projects something portable and rather brainless to give you a feeling of accomplishment and to keep your hands going while you watch TV or wait for a website to load. And have another more challenging project to work on when you have the time and quiet to concentrate on it.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>How big is “big”? Knitted measurements</h3>\r\nMost patterns begin by listing the sizes given in the instructions. Older patterns may list them in numbered chest sizes — for example, 38 (40, 42, 44, 46). Most current patterns give sizes in the designations small (medium, large) or in some combination of the two systems. Be sure you know your measurements before choosing the size to knit!\r\n\r\nThe size section is the first place you see parentheses in a knitting pattern, and it pays to notice where the size you want to make is located in the pattern: before or inside the parentheses. Every time a number or measurement is given in the pattern, the one for your size will be in the same place in relation to the parentheses. For example, if the pattern is written for small, medium, and large sizes — presented “small (medium, large)” — and you’re making a small, the numbers for your size will always be written first outside the parentheses. If you’re making a large, your numbers will always be last in the parentheses.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Before you start knitting, take the time to circle all the instructions in your size throughout the entire pattern (this is when your photocopy comes in handy). If you use a pencil, you can then erase the circles when finished so you can knit the pattern again later in a different size without confusion.</p>\r\nSweater patterns generally tell you what the finished garment should measure when laid out on a flat surface. Sometimes only the chest/bust width is given. Other times, you find measurements for overall length, sleeve length, and/or upper arm circumference. Use this info to help you determine which size to knit.\r\n<h3>Materials</h3>\r\nThe pattern tells you what materials and equipment you need to make your sweater. In the “Materials” section of the pattern, you can find the following:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>The brand and specific name of the yarn used: </strong>It gives the fiber content of the yarn, the weight and often the number of yards per skein, the color number and name of the yarn, and the number of skeins or balls required for the sweater. If the sweater hasn’t been designed for a specific yarn company and isn’t a vehicle for selling a particular brand, the pattern may simply call for yarn in a specific weight — for example, worsted-weight.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>The size and type of needles you need:</strong> Often, needles in two sizes are listed — the smaller for cuffs and bottom borders and the larger for the body of the sweater. If the pattern uses double-pointed needles or a circular needle (say for a neckband or collar), or if the entire sweater is worked in the round, the pattern tells you which size needle(s) to use and in what length.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p style=\"padding-left: 40px;\">Following the particular needles specified, you always see the phrase “or size to obtain gauge.” This phrase often appears in full capitalization or in italics. Why? Because gauge matters.</p>\r\n\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Any special equipment or gadgets required:</strong> Constructing some sweaters requires special tools — for example, a cable needle, stitch markers, stitch holders, and so on. These tools are listed after the needles.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Buttons or other finishing materials:</strong> If the sweater is a cardigan, the number and size of the buttons called for are listed. If pompoms, embroidery, or other embellishments are in order, the materials needed to make them are listed here.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Check the materials list and make sure that you have what you need when you’re purchasing yarn and needles for a project. You don’t want to find yourself unable to continue working on your project after the stores have closed because you don’t have a particular tool in your supply box.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Gauge</h3>\r\nIn the “Gauge” section of the pattern, you find a formula that reads something like this:\r\n<blockquote>14 sts and 21 rows to 4\" (10 cm) over St st, using larger needles.</blockquote>\r\nThis notation is the gauge formula. It tells you how many stitches and rows are in a 4-inch square of the sweater fabric (in this case, stockinette stitch). If you want to make a sweater that corresponds to the measurements given, you must duplicate this gauge. You can’t underestimate the importance of gauge!\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Gauge isn’t a standard, and you should make a gauge swatch for everything you plan to knit — especially if you want the finished project to fit when you’re done.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Special pattern stitches</h3>\r\nIf your sweater has any special pattern stitches or instructions, they may be listed and explained separately and not given again in the body of the instructions. For example, you may see the following:\r\n<blockquote><strong>Seed Stitch</strong>\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 1 (RS):</strong> * K1, p1; rep from * to end of row.\r\n\r\n<strong>Row 2:</strong> K the purl sts and p the knit sts.\r\n\r\nRep Row 2 for pattern.</blockquote>\r\nThen, in the instructions proper, when you read “work seed stitch for 8 rows,” come back to this section to find out how to work seed stitch.\r\n\r\nYou also may find that a special abbreviation is explained. For example, you may see the following:\r\n<blockquote><strong>C3R (cross 3 right):</strong> Sl 1 st to cn and hold to back, k2, p1 from cn.</blockquote>\r\nWhen you come across C3R in your instructions, you don’t have to scratch your head and wonder, “What the heck?” You can look in the opening information for an explanation. (And if the instruction used in this example is making you wonder, “What the heck?” refer to the abbreviations in Book 1, Chapter 4.)\r\n<h3>Schematics and charts</h3>\r\nThe <em>schematic</em> is a small outline drawing of each sweater piece in the pattern. The pattern usually includes one schematic showing the body front and back with the neckline sketched in and another schematic of one sleeve. Cardigans usually show a single front, a back, and a sleeve.\r\n\r\nListed along the edges of the drawing are the dimensions of the piece in each size — for example, the width and length of the sweater, the distance from the bottom of the sweater to the armhole, the depth of the armhole, and the depth and width of the neck. This figure shows a schematic for a toggle jacket.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269269\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"275\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269269\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-toggle-jacket.jpg\" alt=\"schematic of shape\" width=\"275\" height=\"600\" /> A sample schematic showing shape and measurements.[/caption]\r\n\r\nSchematics are a big help because they show you the structure of the sweater at a glance: whether the armhole is straight or shaped and whether the sleeve cap is tall and narrow or short and wide. As you become more familiar with the way actual measurements fit you, you’ll be able to tell quickly from the schematic whether you want to knit the pattern as-is or make changes.\r\n\r\nDepending on the design of the sweater and the way the pattern’s written, a sweater pattern may include a chart to show a stitch, cable, or color pattern. Or it may include a chart to show an unusual feature of the garment, such as a shawl collar. This figure shows a chart for a repeating color motif and indicates how you should use it.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_269268\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"556\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-269268\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-crochet-color-motif.jpg\" alt=\"chart for a repeating color motif\" width=\"556\" height=\"287\" /> Sample chart for a repeating color motif.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">On right-side rows, work the chart from right to left. On wrong-side rows, work the chart from left to right.</p>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If you collect vintage knitting patterns, you’ll seldom see a chart or schematic. Instead, all the moves are painstakingly written out. Some people who learned to knit under the row-by-written-row system regret its demise. Others welcome the picture over the written instructions. The good news is that if you understand better when things are described with words, you can write charts in word form — and vice versa. If you have a pattern with interminable and obscure directions, read them carefully with graph paper and pencil in hand and make yourself a chart to better understand the text.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Knitting instructions</h3>\r\nAfter all the introductory information, the instructions for knitting your sweater begin. In general, most patterns for cardigans and pullovers begin with the back piece. Here the pattern tells you how many stitches to cast on and what to do with them.\r\n\r\nThe instructions are usually sequenced like this:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Instructions for the back</li>\r\n \t<li>Instructions for the front (or fronts if you’re knitting a cardigan); generally, the instructions for the front mirror those of the back until it’s time to shape the front neckline</li>\r\n \t<li>Instructions for the sleeves</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">The instructions describe each step as you work from the bottom border to the shoulder. They tell you what pattern stitches or colors to work, and they tell you how to shape (increase or decrease) your piece. If, for example, your sweater has a set-in sleeve and shaped armhole, the pattern will alert you that it’s time to begin the shaping by interrupting the text with a boldface heading such as “Shape armhole” or “Armhole shaping.”</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Finishing</h3>\r\nThe “Finishing” section of the pattern tells you what to do with your knitted pieces to make them into a complete sweater. It gives any special blocking instructions and tells you the order in which to sew the pieces together. You also find instructions for additional sweater details, such as how to make the neckband, cardigan bands, collar, crochet edge, and so on.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Picture This: Studying the Garment Photo","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Assess the Pattern at a Glance","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282338,"slug":"knitting-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119652939","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119652936-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119652936/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-and-crocheting-all-in-one-for-dummies-cover-9781119652939-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Knitting & Crocheting All-in-One For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"9540\">Pam Allen</b></b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9541\">Shannon Okey</b></b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9849\">Susan Brittain</b></b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"10487\">Karen Manthey</b></b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}},{"authorId":9849,"name":"Susan Brittain","slug":"susan-brittain","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9849"}},{"authorId":10487,"name":"Karen Manthey","slug":"karen-manthey","description":" <p><b>Karen Manthey</b> edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.</p> <p><b>Susan Brittain</b> was an assistant editor for <i>Crochet Fantasy</i> magazine.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/10487"}},{"authorId":9848,"name":"Kristi Porter","slug":"kristi-porter","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9848"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ac02d39b\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119652939&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ac02dc89\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":null,"lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":269267},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T13:51:50+00:00","modifiedTime":"2018-03-23T14:33:36+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:17:55+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"How to Make a Yarn Over between a Purl and a Knit Stitch","strippedTitle":"how to make a yarn over between a purl and a knit stitch","slug":"how-to-make-a-yarn-over-between-a-purl-and-a-knit-stitch","canonicalUrl":"","关注发动机调优系统系统调整网络":{"metaDescription":"To make a yarn over (abbreviated yo) that follows a purl stitch and precedes a knit stitch (which you’d encounter in a pattern as p1, yo, k1), follow these step","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"<p>To make a yarn over (abbreviated yo) that follows a purl stitch and precedes a knit stitch (which you’d encounter in a pattern as p1, yo, k1), follow these steps:</p>\r\n<ol class=\"level-one\">\r\n <li><p class=\"first-para\">Purl the first stitch and leave the yarn in the front of your work.</p>\r\n </li>\r\n <li><p class=\"first-para\">Knit the next stitch.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">The yarn automatically crosses the RH needle when you knit this next stitch (see the following figure).</p>\r\n<img src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/402762.image0.jpg\" width=\"535\" height=\"306\" alt=\"Knitting a yarn over between a purl and a knit stitch.\"/>\r\n </li>\r\n</ol>","description":"<p>To make a yarn over (abbreviated yo) that follows a purl stitch and precedes a knit stitch (which you’d encounter in a pattern as p1, yo, k1), follow these steps:</p>\r\n<ol class=\"level-one\">\r\n <li><p class=\"first-para\">Purl the first stitch and leave the yarn in the front of your work.</p>\r\n </li>\r\n <li><p class=\"first-para\">Knit the next stitch.</p>\r\n<p class=\"child-para\">The yarn automatically crosses the RH needle when you knit this next stitch (see the following figure).</p>\r\n<img src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/402762.image0.jpg\" width=\"535\" height=\"306\" alt=\"Knitting a yarn over between a purl and a knit stitch.\"/>\r\n </li>\r\n</ol>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":9542,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-barr","description":"Tracy Barr has been an editor, editorial manager, writer, and consultant on several Dummies books.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9542"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":210674,"title":"Knitting For Dummies, 3rd Edition","slug":"knitting-for-dummies-3rd-edition","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/210674"}},{"articleId":209134,"title":"Knitting For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"knitting-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209134"}},{"articleId":193267,"title":"Glossary of Knitting Techniques","slug":"glossary-of-knitting-techniques","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193267"}},{"articleId":193248,"title":"Knitting Abbreviations","slug":"knitting-abbreviations","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193248"}},{"articleId":193240,"title":"Converting Metrics for Knitting","slug":"converting-metrics-for-knitting","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193240"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282339,"slug":"knitting-for-dummies-3rd-edition","isbn":"9781119643203","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119643201/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119643201/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119643201-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119643201/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119643201/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-for-dummies-3rd-edition-cover-9781119643203-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Knitting For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"9540\">Pam Allen</b></b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9541\">Shannon Okey</b></b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119643203&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ad392dff\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119643203&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221ad39334d\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":null,"lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":159836},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2017-03-26T13:52:03+00:00","modifiedTime":"2017-04-25T20:50:59+00:00","timestamp":"2023-09-14T18:14:29+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Crafts","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33825"},"slug":"crafts","categoryId":33825},{"name":"Knitting & Crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"},"slug":"knitting-crocheting","categoryId":33826}],"title":"Selecting Knitting Needles","strippedTitle":"selecting knitting needles","slug":"selecting-knitting-needles","canonicalUrl":"","关注发动机调优系统系统调整网络":{"metaDescription":"Knitting needles come in a stunning assortment of materials and sizes to mesh with your knitting style, the particular project you're working on, your aesthetic","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Knitting needles come in a stunning assortment of materials and sizes to mesh with your knitting style, the particular project you're working on, your aesthetics, and your budget.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Sizing up needles</h2>\r\nA needle’s size is determined by its diameter. The smaller the size, the narrower the needle and the smaller the stitch it makes. The following figure shows needle sizes and their US and metric equivalents.\r\n\r\n<img src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/402737.image0.jpg\" alt=\"image0.jpg\" width=\"400\" height=\"822\" />\r\n\r\nIf you aren’t sure what needle sizes you’ll need in the future, try a<b> </b>circular knitting needle set with interchangeable tips. Even though the needle is designed for circular knitting, you can also use it to knit back and forth. Some sets feature plastic needle tips, some metal. These sets allow you to combine different-sized needle tips with different connector cords to make a very large range of needle sizes on the fly. An interchangeable circular needle is especially handy when you’re unsure which needle size to use for a given yarn. If the current size isn’t giving you the right gauge, simply switch the tip up or down one size instead of starting over on another needle.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Accounting for needle makeup and tip type</h2>\r\nKnitting needles, which were first mass-produced in steel, have been made in ivory, tortoiseshell, silver, whale bone, and more. Today you can find them made in ebony and rosewood, sherbet-colored pearly plastic, Teflon-coated aluminum, and even 14-carat gold-plated (no kidding!). And that’s only the beginning. Whatever your needles are made of, the material does contribute more or less to your knitting comfort, speed, and the quality of your stitches. Here are some recommendations:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>If you’re new to knitting, you’re working on double-pointed needles, or you’re executing color patterns, good choices include wood (bamboo, walnut, and so on) and plastic.</b> Wood and some plastics have a very slight grip, giving you more control over your work and discouraging dropped stitches.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>If you’re knitting in stockinette or a straightforward stitch pattern, a slippery needle makes sense.</b> The fastest ones are nickel-plated brass and call themselves Turbo. Use these needles and watch your stitches fly by before your eyes. (Also watch for more-easily dropped stitches.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nAlthough all needles look pretty much alike, you do notice a difference in the feel of various kinds of needles and in their interaction with your knitting style and the yarn you’re using. If you find that some feature of their construction or material is annoying you or interfering with the flow of your project, try a different kind of needle. Switching may make the difference between a knitting experience on cruise control and one that stops and starts and sputters along.\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">Needle tips can be long and tapered or rounder and blunter (see the figure below). If you’re working a project with a lot of stitch manipulation (as in lace or cables), or if you’re a snug knitter (that is, your stitches are tight rather than loose), you’ll have an easier time if you use a needle with a long, tapered tip. If you’re knitting with a loosely spun yarn and/or you’re a relaxed knitter with looser stitches, you may prefer a blunter point.</p>\r\n\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 400px;\"><img src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/402738.image1.jpg\" alt=\"Two kinds of needle tips.\" width=\"400\" height=\"113\" />\r\n<div class=\"imageCaption\">Two kinds of needle tips.</div>\r\n</div>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">Though they don’t fall directly into the category of different needle composition or tip type, square needles can be a great choice if you’re new to knitting. They’re made of metal or wood, and the shape makes them easier for the hands to hold. Stitches don’t fall off these square needles as easily as the standard round ones.</p>","description":"Knitting needles come in a stunning assortment of materials and sizes to mesh with your knitting style, the particular project you're working on, your aesthetics, and your budget.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Sizing up needles</h2>\r\nA needle’s size is determined by its diameter. The smaller the size, the narrower the needle and the smaller the stitch it makes. The following figure shows needle sizes and their US and metric equivalents.\r\n\r\n<img src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/402737.image0.jpg\" alt=\"image0.jpg\" width=\"400\" height=\"822\" />\r\n\r\nIf you aren’t sure what needle sizes you’ll need in the future, try a<b> </b>circular knitting needle set with interchangeable tips. Even though the needle is designed for circular knitting, you can also use it to knit back and forth. Some sets feature plastic needle tips, some metal. These sets allow you to combine different-sized needle tips with different connector cords to make a very large range of needle sizes on the fly. An interchangeable circular needle is especially handy when you’re unsure which needle size to use for a given yarn. If the current size isn’t giving you the right gauge, simply switch the tip up or down one size instead of starting over on another needle.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Accounting for needle makeup and tip type</h2>\r\nKnitting needles, which were first mass-produced in steel, have been made in ivory, tortoiseshell, silver, whale bone, and more. Today you can find them made in ebony and rosewood, sherbet-colored pearly plastic, Teflon-coated aluminum, and even 14-carat gold-plated (no kidding!). And that’s only the beginning. Whatever your needles are made of, the material does contribute more or less to your knitting comfort, speed, and the quality of your stitches. Here are some recommendations:\r\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>If you’re new to knitting, you’re working on double-pointed needles, or you’re executing color patterns, good choices include wood (bamboo, walnut, and so on) and plastic.</b> Wood and some plastics have a very slight grip, giving you more control over your work and discouraging dropped stitches.</p>\r\n</li>\r\n\t<li>\r\n<p class=\"first-para\"><b>If you’re knitting in stockinette or a straightforward stitch pattern, a slippery needle makes sense.</b> The fastest ones are nickel-plated brass and call themselves Turbo. Use these needles and watch your stitches fly by before your eyes. (Also watch for more-easily dropped stitches.)</p>\r\n</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nAlthough all needles look pretty much alike, you do notice a difference in the feel of various kinds of needles and in their interaction with your knitting style and the yarn you’re using. If you find that some feature of their construction or material is annoying you or interfering with the flow of your project, try a different kind of needle. Switching may make the difference between a knitting experience on cruise control and one that stops and starts and sputters along.\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">Needle tips can be long and tapered or rounder and blunter (see the figure below). If you’re working a project with a lot of stitch manipulation (as in lace or cables), or if you’re a snug knitter (that is, your stitches are tight rather than loose), you’ll have an easier time if you use a needle with a long, tapered tip. If you’re knitting with a loosely spun yarn and/or you’re a relaxed knitter with looser stitches, you may prefer a blunter point.</p>\r\n\r\n<div class=\"imageBlock\" style=\"width: 400px;\"><img src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/402738.image1.jpg\" alt=\"Two kinds of needle tips.\" width=\"400\" height=\"113\" />\r\n<div class=\"imageCaption\">Two kinds of needle tips.</div>\r\n</div>\r\n<p class=\"Tip\">Though they don’t fall directly into the category of different needle composition or tip type, square needles can be a great choice if you’re new to knitting. They’re made of metal or wood, and the shape makes them easier for the hands to hold. Stitches don’t fall off these square needles as easily as the standard round ones.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":9542,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-barr","description":"Tracy Barr has been an editor, editorial manager, writer, and consultant on several Dummies books.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9542"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33826,"title":"Knitting & Crocheting","slug":"knitting-crocheting","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33826"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Sizing up needles","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Accounting for needle makeup and tip type","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":210674,"title":"Knitting For Dummies, 3rd Edition","slug":"knitting-for-dummies-3rd-edition","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/210674"}},{"articleId":209134,"title":"Knitting For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"knitting-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/209134"}},{"articleId":193267,"title":"Glossary of Knitting Techniques","slug":"glossary-of-knitting-techniques","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193267"}},{"articleId":193248,"title":"Knitting Abbreviations","slug":"knitting-abbreviations","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193248"}},{"articleId":193240,"title":"Converting Metrics for Knitting","slug":"converting-metrics-for-knitting","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/193240"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":269304,"title":"How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items","slug":"how-to-clean-knitted-and-crocheted-items","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269304"}},{"articleId":269296,"title":"How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet","slug":"how-to-execute-the-extended-double-crochet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269296"}},{"articleId":269289,"title":"Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches","slug":"go-to-stitches-garter-stockinette-and-seed-stitches","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269289"}},{"articleId":269283,"title":"Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters","slug":"why-and-when-yarn-gauge-matters","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269283"}},{"articleId":269278,"title":"How to Knit Basic Beanies","slug":"how-to-knit-basic-beanies","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/269278"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":282339,"slug":"knitting-for-dummies-3rd-edition","isbn":"9781119643203","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","crafts","knitting-crocheting"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119643201/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119643201/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119643201-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119643201/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119643201/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/knitting-for-dummies-3rd-edition-cover-9781119643203-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Knitting For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"9540\">Pam Allen</b></b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b><b data-author-id=\"9541\">Shannon Okey</b></b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p> <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":9540,"name":"Pam Allen","slug":"pam-allen","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9540"}},{"authorId":9541,"name":"Shannon Okey","slug":"shannon-okey","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9541"}},{"authorId":33342,"name":"Tracy L. Barr","slug":"tracy-l-barr","description":" <p><b>Tracy Barr</b> is the coauthor of <b><i>Adoption For Dummies</i></b> and <b><i>Latin For Dummies.</i></b><b> Lodge Manufacturing</b> is America&#39;s oldest family&#45;owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast&#45;iron cookware foundry. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/33342"}},{"authorId":9543,"name":"Marly Bird","slug":"marly-bird","description":" <p><b>Pam Allen</b> is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince &amp; Co.</p> <p><b>Shannon Okey</b> is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.</p> <p><b>Tracy L. Barr</b> is a professional writer and editor.</p> <p><b>Marlaina \"Marly\" Bird</b> hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.</p>","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/9543"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;crafts&quot;,&quot;knitting-crocheting&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119643203&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63221a05462cf\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n 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Pam Allen

Pam Allen is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince & Co. Shannon Okey is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com. Tracy L. Barr is a professional writer and editor. Marlaina "Marly" Bird hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.

Articles From Pam Allen

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41 results
How to Knit Basic Beanies Article / Updated 10-20-2023 A good hat is a must-have in your knitting repertoire, and this basic beanie, sized for babies through adults, fits the bill. Make it plain or cabled. Add in stripes or a color pattern. After your beanie is knit, top it with a pompom or tassel. The variations are endless. Materials and vital statistics Yarn: Berrocco Smart Mohair (41 percent mohair, 54 percent acrylic, 5 percent polyester); 108 yards (100 meters) per 50 grams; 1 (1, 1, 2, 2) balls; color: Pink Needles: US 10 (6 mm) circular needle, 16-inch length, or the size needed to match gauge; US 8 (5 mm) circular needle, 16-inch length; US 10 (6 mm) double-pointed needles Other materials: Eight stitch markers; yarn needle to weave in ends Size: Baby (toddler, child, small adult, large adult); circumference: 14 (16, 18, 20, 22) inches, unstretched Gauge: 16 stitches and 20 rows per 4 inches in stockinette stitch on larger needles This beanie is worked in the round, starting on circular needles and switching to double-pointed needles when you shape the crown of the hat. If you want to include any color patterning, add it to the body of the hat between the ribbing and the decreases. If you’d like to knit cables on your hat, see the variation at the end of the pattern. Directions Cast on 56 (64, 72, 80, 88) sts with the smaller circular needles. Place marker and join in the round, being careful not to twist. Round 1: *K2, p2, repeat from * to end of round. Repeat this round for 3⁄4 (1, 1, 1-1⁄2, 2) inches. Switch to larger circular needles and begin knitting in stockinette stitch (knit all rounds). When your hat measures 4-1⁄2 (5, 5-1⁄2, 6-1⁄2, 7) inches, begin the crown shaping as follows: Next round: *K7 (8, 9, 10, 11), place marker, repeat from * to end. Next round (Decrease Round): *K2tog, knit to marker, slip marker, repeat from * to end. 8 sts have been decreased. Next round: Knit. Repeat these 2 rounds until 8 sts remain, switching to double-pointed needles when you have too few sts to fit comfortably on your circular needle. Cut yarn, leaving a 12-inch tail. Finishing: Thread the tail of the yarn onto the yarn needle. Slip the stitches from the knitting needle to the yarn needle, making sure that you go through each stitch. Pull the yarn firmly to tighten the top of the hat, and then run the yarn through the stitches again before weaving in the yarn end on the inside to secure. Weave in any remaining ends. If you want, you can top your beanie with a pompom, knitted flower, or other adornment for extra flair. Variation: Creating a cabled beanie This cabled hat features straightforward six-stitch cables. It is made with the same yarn and needles as the basic beanie, fits a toddler (child, small adult, large adult), and measures 16 (17-1⁄2, 19, 22) inches around. You need six stitch markers to help keep your decreases lined up. Using the smaller circular needles, cast on 66 (72, 78, 90) sts. Place a marker and join in the round, being careful not to twist. Ribbing round: *K1, p1, repeat from * to end. Repeat this round for 1 (1, 2, 2) inches. Switch to the larger circular needles and begin the six-stitch right cable pattern as follows, placing markers on the first round as indicated: Rounds 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5: *K6, p5 (6, 7, 9), place marker, repeat from * to end of round. Round 6: *Slip 3 sts to the cable needle and hold to back, k3, k3 from cable needle, p5 (6, 7, 9), repeat from * to end of round. Repeat these 6 rounds until the hat measures 5-1⁄2 (6, 6-1⁄2, 7) inches, and then begin decreasing as follows: Continue the cable pattern as set on the columns of 6 knit sts. In other words, you should cable every 6th round (even though the decreasing is occurring too). Next round: *K6, p2tog, purl to marker, repeat from * to end of round. If you’re unfamiliar with purling 2 stitches together (p2tog), here’s how to do it: Insert the right needle into the next 2 stitches purlwise, wrap the yarn around the right-hand needle, and then purl them to decrease 1 stitch. Next round: Work even, knitting and purling the sts as they appear. Repeat the previous 2 rounds 3 (4, 5, 7) more times. There are 42 sts on the needles. Stop the cable pattern and finish the hat in stockinette stitch (knit all rounds). Next round: *K5, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 36 sts remain. Next round: Knit. Next round: *K4, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 30 sts remain. Next round: Knit. Next round: *K3, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 24 sts remain. Next round: Knit. Next round: *K2, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 18 sts remain. Next round: *K1, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 12 sts remain. Next round: *K2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 6 sts remain. Cut the yarn leaving a 12-inch tail. Finishing: Use the same technique described in the basic pattern to finish your cabled beanie. View Article
Go-To Stitches: Garter, Stockinette, and Seed Stitches Video / Updated 08-08-2023 Knitting and purling open the door to all sorts of patterns that involve alternating between knit and purl stitches. But as a beginning knitter, you really only need to know two patterns: garter stitch, which you create by knitting (or purling) every row, and stockinette stitch, which you create by alternating a knit row with a purl row. Another stitch all knitters should have in their repertoire is seed stitch. Although a little more complicated than garter and stockinette stitches, seed stitches create an interesting texture and appear in many patterns. Knits and purls have a quirky but predictable relationship to each other. When lined up horizontally, the purled rows stand out from the knitted rows. Arranged in vertical patterns, like ribbing, the purl stitches recede and the knit stitches come forward, creating an elastic fabric. When worked in a balanced manner (meaning the same number of knits and purls appear on each side of the fabric), as in seed stitch and its variations, the fabric is stable — it lies flat and doesn’t have the tendency to roll in on the edges. These qualities make seed and moss stitches, as well as garter stitches, good choices for borders that need to lie flat and not pull in as ribbed borders do. Garter stitch Garter stitch is the most basic of all knitted fabrics. It’s made by knitting every row. (You can create garter stitch by purling every row, too. Neat, huh?) You can recognize garter stitch by the horizontal ridges formed by the tops of the knitted loops on every other row. Garter stitch has a lot going for it in addition to being easy to create. It’s reversible, lies flat, and has a pleasant rustic look. Unlike most knitted fabrics, garter stitch has a square gauge, meaning that there are usually twice as many rows as stitches in 1 inch. To count rows in garter stitch, count the ridges and multiply by two, or count the ridges by twos. Garter stitch has a hanging gauge that stretches more vertically. Therefore, gravity and the weight of the garter stitch piece pulls on the fabric and actually makes it longer. This is important to keep in mind when you’re making a garment that you want to fit properly and not grow two times larger after an hour of wearing it. Stockinette stitch When you alternate a knit row with a purl row (knit the first row, purl the second, knit the third, purl the fourth, and so on), you create stockinette stitch. You see stockinette stitch everywhere: in scarves, socks, sweaters, blankets, hats — you name it. In fact, most beginning and intermediate designs incorporate stockinette stitch. In written knitting instructions, stockinette stitch (abbreviated St st) appears like this: Row 1 (RS): Knit. Row 2 (WS): Purl. Rep Rows 1 and 2 for desired length. Stockinette fabric looks and behaves in a particular way. To successfully incorporate this stitch into your knitting repertoire, pay attention to the following: Stockinette stitch has a right side and a wrong side (though, of course, either side may be the “right” side, depending on the intended design). The right side is typically the smooth side, called stockinette or On this side, the stitches look like small Vs. The bumpy side of stockinette stitch fabric is called reverse stockinette or purl. If you’re working in stockinette stitch and you lose track of whether you knit the last row or purled it, not to worry. You can tell what to do next by looking at your knitting. Hold your needles in the ready-to-knit position (with the LH needle holding the stitches to be worked) and look at what’s facing you. If you’re looking at the knit (smooth) side, you knit. If you’re looking at the purl (bumpy) side, you purl. A good mantra to say to yourself is knit the knits and purl the purls. Stockinette fabric curls on the edges. The top and bottom (horizontal) edges curl toward the front or smooth side. The side (vertical) edges roll toward the bumpy side. Sweater designers frequently use this rolling feature deliberately to create rolled hems or cuffs, and you can create easy cords or straps simply by knitting a very narrow band in stockinette stitch (say, four or six stitches across). But when you want the piece to lie flat, you need to counteract this tendency by working the three or four stitches on the edge in some stitch that lies flat (like garter stitch, discussed in the preceding section, or seed stitch, discussed in the next section). To figure out the gauge of a swatch knitted in stockinette stitch, count the Vs on the smooth side or right side. They’re easier to see and distinguish than the bumps on the wrong side. Of course, if you find the bumps easier to count, it’s okay to do so. The names garter stitch and stockinette stitch date from the 1500s, when hand-knit stockings were a major industry in England. Garter stitch was used at the top of the stocking, where it needed to expand for the thigh, and stockinette (or stocking stitch) was used for the fitted leg portion. Seed stitch Seed stitch, shown in the figure below (and demonstrated in the video below), consists of single knits and purls alternating horizontally and vertically. Its name refers to the way the knitted fabric looks: The little purl bumps look like scattered seeds. Like garter stitch, seed stitch lies flat, making it a good edging for a sweater border and cuffs. It also looks the same from both sides, making it a nice choice for scarves and other pieces of which both sides are visible. Seed stitch stitch gauge tends to be wider than a stockinette stitch stitch gauge. This is important to note if you plan to mix stitch patterns but want to maintain the same measurements in both patterns. When knitting a stitch, the loose tail of yarn is in back of your work. When purling a stitch, the yarn is in front of your work. As you switch back and forth within a row, as in seed stitch, you need to move your yarn to the front or to the back as appropriate between the needles. If you forget to do so, you create an unintentional yarn over, resulting in an extra stitch on the next row and a hole in the work. Unfortunately for novice knitters, who often forget to move the yarn accordingly, instructions don’t explicitly tell you to bring your yarn to the front or back of your work. They assume that you know where the yarn should be when you’re about to knit or purl a stitch. As you practice the patterns that combine both knit and purl stitches, make sure your yarn is in the proper position for each stitch before you start it. To create seed stitch: Cast on an even number of sts. Row 1: * K1, p1; rep from * to end of row. Row 2: * P1, k1; rep from * to end of row. Rep Rows 1 and 2 for pattern. When working seed stitch, you alternate between knit and purl stitches in each row. The trick to creating the little “seeds” is to knit in the purl stitches of the previous row and purl in the knit stitches of the previous row. If you’re working in seed stitch and you lose track of whether you knit the last stitch or purled it, don’t worry. You can tell what to do next by looking at your knitting. Hold your needles in the ready-to-knit position (with the LH needle holding the stitches to be worked or the ones you’re working on) and look at what’s facing you. On the LH needle, if you’re looking at a knit stitch, you purl. If you’re looking at a purl (bumpy) stitch, you knit. A good mantra to say to yourself is knit the purls and purl the knits. Watch Video
Knitting For Dummies Cheat Sheet Cheat Sheet / Updated 02-24-2022 Knitting is a popular craft that can result in functional and decorative art. To get to the point where you're knitting useful garments, you need to know some knitting terms and their abbreviations. You may have to put your math skills to work as well, converting inches to centimeters or vice versa. View Cheat Sheet
How to Clean Knitted and Crocheted Items Article / Updated 03-16-2020 Hand washing your handknitted and crocheted items is the safest bet, but you can try washing and drying some items, too. The following sections give you tips for each method. If the yarn label says “Dry clean only,” then by all means, take the item to the cleaners. A word of advice, though: Bring the label (or a copy of the label) to the cleaners with you. That way they’ll know what material they’re working with and can use the appropriate chemicals. Handwashing Unless the yarn specifically states “dry clean only,” handwashing is your best option. Here’s how: Grab a bottle of mild detergent and make sure your sink or bathtub is clean. The best soap to use is a mild laundry detergent formulated for delicate items or baby clothes, such as Woolite or Ivory Soap. For small items, the kitchen sink is the perfect size. For larger items such as afghans, the bathtub or washtub works better. Fill the sink or tub with enough cool to warm water so the item can be submerged. Swish the item around gently. By keeping the agitation to a minimum, you preserve the integrity of the stitches. After washing, rinse thoroughly and squeeze out excess moisture. Rinse the item under cool water until it runs clear. Never wring a knitted or crocheted item because the twisting motion can stretch the stitches and ultimately ruin the item’s shape. Wrap the item in towels to absorb the extra moisture and lay flat to dry, blocking as necessary. Never hang a crocheted piece to dry (it will stretch out of shape beyond recognition), and please, keep items out of the sun, which can cause fading. Machine washing and drying In some cases, it’s perfectly fine to throw your masterpieces in the washing machine. This holds true for items made from synthetic yarns, such as acrylic, which won’t sustain so much damage from the washing machine. Use the delicate cycle and, if size permits, throw the item into a mesh laundry bag. Be sure to check the yarn label for the correct water temperature settings. It’s always a safe bet to wash these items alone the first time around, just to make sure the colors won’t bleed into the rest of your laundry. If you’re not sure what the correct water temperature should be, opt for the safe route and use the cool water setting. Sometimes tossing your afghan, scarf, or other piece of handiwork in the dryer is just fine. Again, check the yarn label to make sure it’s okay. Most synthetic yarns will take a low heat setting unless it’s got some stuff attached like sequins or mirrors. Add some smooth-textured items like pillowcases to the dryer to help absorb moisture. Don’t machine dry wool — it will shrink! Find a spot large enough to accommodate the piece and lay it out flat, shape it if necessary, and allow to dry, preferably in a place that is out of direct sunlight and won’t be disturbed by playful pets. Iron only if you must If you feel that you need to add some heat to an item to get all the wrinkles out, set the iron on the lowest heat setting suggested for the yarn. Place a slightly damp cloth, such as a clean cotton dish towel, on top of your piece before ironing. Never allow the iron to come into direct contact with the yarn. Excessive heat can ruin the integrity of the yarn fibers, and even cotton thread can flatten out too much and ruin the original look of the design. Remove those pesky pills It’s inevitable — where there’s yarn there’s pills, those unsightly little balls that pop up on fabric after laundering or from normal wear and tear. Removing the pills can revitalize your pieces and make them look like new again. You can get rid of pills two ways: By using a sweater stone: This is the recommended preference because it is gentler on the fabric and you have more control over it. By using a sweater shaver: These devices are typically battery operated or electric, and if you don’t use them properly, you can put holes in your item. To use a sweater stone properly: Lay the item on a flat surface. Hold the stone in the palm of your hand and gently brush the fabric in smooth short strokes. The stone will crumble a bit, but don’t worry, this is normal and won’t damage your piece. Gently shake the item or use a lint roller to remove these tiny pieces. Never, ever try to remove pilling with scissors! Remember that knits and crochet are a series of interlocking loops; if you inadvertently cut even one of the strands of yarn, your whole piece can unravel. View Article
How to Execute the Extended Double Crochet Article / Updated 03-16-2020 The extended double crochet (abbreviated Edc) is a variation on the standard double crochet stitch (abbreviated dc). Occasionally a pattern may direct you to make extended crochet stitches, which are a little taller than the regular version of the same stitch. They also provide variation in texture with a slightly improved drape, meaning a fabric made of extended stitches is softer and less dense than one made with standard stitches. You can adapt any stitch into an extended stitch. How? Instead of adding a yarn over to the beginning of the stitch, extended stitches include a chain stitch in the middle of the stitch to give a little extra lift. To get started: Make a foundation chain by working 15 chain stitches (ch 15). Chain 3 more stitches for the turning chain. To create your first extended double crochet stitch, follow these steps: Yarn over the hook (yo). Always yarn over from back to front. Insert your hook into the fourth chain (ch) from the hook. Yarn over the hook. Gently pull the wrapped hook through the center of the chain stitch, carrying the wrapped yarn through the stitch. You should now have 3 loops on your hook. Yarn over the hook. Work a chain stitch by drawing the yarn through the first loop on the hook, as in the following figure. Yarn over the hook. Draw the yarn through the first 2 loops on your hook, like in (a) in the following figure. Yarn over the hook. Draw the yarn through the last 2 loops on the hook, as shown in (b) in the following figure. One extended double crochet stitch (Edc) is now complete, and you should have 1 loop remaining on your hook. When a stitch diagram indicates an extended double crochet stitch, you see the symbol shown in (c). To work your next extended double crochet and continue the row, perform these steps: Yarn over the hook (yo) and insert your hook into the next chain stitch (ch). Yarn over and pull the yarn through the chain stitch. You should have 3 loops on the hook. Repeat Steps 5 through 10 from the preceding instructions to complete the second extended double crochet stitch (Edc). Work 1 extended double crochet stitch in each chain stitch across the foundation chain by repeating Steps 1 through 3. When you count the turning chain as the first extended double crochet, you should have 16 extended double crochet stitches in Row 1. This figure shows the end of the first extended double crochet row. To begin the next row of extended double crochet, turn your piece and make three chains for the turning chain. Skipping the first stitch, work your first extended double crochet stitch into the next stitch on the previous row and follow Steps 1 through 3 of the preceding instructions. Take a look at this figure to see what rows of extended double crochet look like as a fabric. View Article
Why (and When) Yarn Gauge Matters Article / Updated 03-16-2020 Understanding how to measure and work with gauge is what allows you to go from a knitted or crocheted swatch to a finished project that has the correct measurements. If you’ve spent some time around knitters or crocheters, you may already know that mention of the word gauge often elicits a groan. Gauge has a bad reputation for three reasons. First, it represents an unpleasant “should.” Second, it’s a tedious task that has to be accomplished before the fun part of the project can begin. Finally, it involves math. However, getting comfortable with gauge gives you a leg up in knitting and crocheting. Without knowing your gauge, you couldn’t do the following: Work away, comfortable in the knowledge that after you work the thousands of stitches required to complete your project, it will fit. Ensure your final project is neat and attractive. Substitute another yarn for the one given in the pattern. Use the needle or hook size that makes the best fabric for your chosen yarn, even if it means you don’t match the pattern’s gauge. Ensure that the amount of yarn the pattern specifies is sufficient to complete the project. Design your own projects and sweaters. Determine the gauge The first step in any project is to determine the gauge of the fabric you’re making. Gauge (sometimes called tension) is listed at the beginning of a pattern before the instructions begin. It’s given as a number of stitches and rows over 4 inches or 10 centimeters, and it tells you which needle or hook size and which stitch pattern were used to determine the gauge. Check your pattern to see how many stitches and rows should make up 4 inches of knitted fabric. You need to measure your gauge against that given in the directions. The yarn manufacturer may also recommend a particular gauge on the yarn label. This gauge may be quite different from the one in your pattern, but that’s okay. Sometimes, the pattern designer wants to create a looser or tighter stitch pattern than the standard that the yarn manufacturer set. Follow the pattern gauge to get the same results as the pictured project. Gauge isn’t always important, such as when you’re making a scarf, an afghan, a bag, or anything else for which a precise size isn’t essential. But when size does matter, the right or wrong gauge can make or break the finished piece. What affects gauge Gauge varies depending on the yarn, the needle or hook size, and the stitch pattern you use: Yarn: Yarns of different weights produce different gauges. A bulkier yarn produces a larger stitch, and a finer yarn produces a smaller stitch. Needle or hook size: The same yarn knitted on different-sized needles or crocheted on a different size hook will have different gauges. Because you make a stitch by wrapping yarn around a needle or hook, the size (circumference) of the needle or hook determines the size of the stitch. This figure shows how needle size can affect the way the finished fabric looks. The smaller the needle is, the tighter the stitches and the denser the knitted fabric. The larger the needle is, the looser the stitches and the drapier (and stretchier) the fabric. Stitch patterns and stitch size: The same yarn knitted on the same needles or crocheted on the same hook but in different stitch patterns will have different gauges. For example, some stitches pull in, requiring more stitches to make a square inch. Other stitches spread the fabric out, so they require fewer stitches to make an inch. The following figure compares the gauges of two different stitch patterns that use the same number of stitches. Gauge also can vary with the time of day you’re working, how long you’ve been working, and what you’re thinking about. The tension you put on the yarn traveling around the needle or hook contributes to stitch size, so being tired or tense can affect the flow of your yarn and stitch size. View Article
Crochet Pattern for a Multicolored Scarf Article / Updated 03-16-2020 Crocheting this scarf is really fun, and it’ll certainly brighten up your wardrobe. Not only are you changing colors with each row, but textures as well. You work the scarf completely with single crochet stitches, but you’d never know to look at it. Sometimes it’s okay to mix and match yarns, and this design is a great example. Materials and vital statistics Yarn: Bernat “Matrix” railroad yarn (62% nylon/38% polyester), Article #166102 (1.75 oz. [50 g], 140 yds [128 m] each ball): 1 ball of #02430 Web Wines (A) Patons “Silverlash” eyelash yarn (98% polyester/2% lurex), Article #244081 (1.75 oz. [50 g], 164 yds [150 m] each skein): 1 skein of #81415 Rose Quartz (B) Patons “Lacette” fine-weight yarn (39% nylon/36% acrylic/25% mohair), Article #243030 (1.75 oz. [50 g], 235 yds [215 m] each skein): 1 skein of #30040 Touch of Black (C) Patons “Silverlash” eyelash yarn (98% polyester/2% lurex), Article #244081 (1.75 oz. [50 g], 164 yds [150 m] each skein): 1 skein of #81405 Maroon Magic (D) Patons “Lacette” fine-weight yarn (39% nylon/36% acrylic/25% mohair), Article #243030 (1.75 oz. [50 g], 235 yds [215 m] each skein): 1 skein of #30008 Cream Caress (E) You’ll have enough yarn to make several scarves. Hook: Crochet hook size H-8 U.S. or size needed to obtain gauge Measurements: 31⁄4 wide x 45 in. long Gauge: 8 sts = 2 in.; 6 rows = 1 in. Stitches used: Chain stitch (ch), slip stitch (sl st), single crochet (sc) The beauty of this design reveals itself as you complete each row. You’ll get lots of practice changing yarn colors, and the great thing is the textures will hide any slip-ups if you don’t get it quite right the first time. Because the scarf is worked in single crochet stitches, it’s also a great project to help you get used to working with novelty yarns. Directions Foundation chain: With A, ch 201. Row 1 (right side): Sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in each ch across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off A, join B. Row 2: With B, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off B, join C. Row 3: With C, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off C, join B. Row 4: With B, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off B, join A. Row 5: With A, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off A, join D. Row 6: With D, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off D, join E. Row 7: With E, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off E, join D. Row 8: With D, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off D, join A. Row 9: With A, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off A, join C. Row 10: With C, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off C, join A. Row 11: With A, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off A, join D. Row 12: With D, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off D, join E. Row 13: With E, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off E, join D. Row 14: With D, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off D, join A. Row 15: With A, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off A, join B. Row 16: With B, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off B, join C. Row 17: With C, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off C, join B. Row 18: With B, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Fasten off B, join A. Row 19: With A, ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc), turn. Row 20: Ch 1, sc in each sc across (200 sc). Fasten off. View Article
Information Provided by Knitted Sweater Patterns Article / Updated 03-16-2020 Sweater patterns tell you how to knit the individual pieces of a sweater and how to put them together. Whether from a book, magazine, leaflet, or website, sweater patterns are set up in a predictable way. You find information about sizes, materials needed, gauge, and any special pattern stitches or abbreviations listed before the actual piece-by-piece instructions. This article runs you through the kinds of information you find in a typical sweater pattern. Picture This: Studying the Garment Photo When you sit down with a new sweater pattern — or better yet, when you’re choosing one — begin by paying close attention to the picture of the sweater you want to knit. This step may seem obvious, but studying the photograph or drawing and noting the details will clarify parts of the instructions that may otherwise be confusing. Study the picture of your sweater and answer these questions: Is it a pullover or a cardigan? How is it constructed? Can you tell from the picture whether the sweater is designed with a drop shoulder or a set-in sleeve, two common sleeve styles? Does the shoulder slope, or is it worked straight across? (If you can’t tell from the photo, check the schematic. The shoulder design will be clear in the line drawing that often comes with the instructions.) Is the body of the sweater shaped in any way, or is it a simple rectangle? Is the sweater worked primarily in stockinette stitch? If other pattern stitches are used, can you identify them? Are they knit-and-purl patterns, cables, or something else? Is there a color pattern? If so, is it an allover pattern, or is it placed along the hem or across the yoke? Is there ribbing at the bottom edges, or does the sweater begin some other way? Does it have a round neckline or a V-neck? Is it finished with a ribbed neckband? A collar? A crocheted edge? If the sweater is pictured on a model, how’s the fit? Does the collar lie properly around the neck? Does the sleeve cap pull? If the sweater doesn’t fit the model well, chances are that it won’t look good on you. (Then again, it just might.) The point of all these questions? Know thy sweater. Assess the Pattern at a Glance Looking at a picture of the knitted garment can tell you only so much about how the sweater is constructed. For the nitty-gritty details, you need to read the pattern — preferably before you begin. Knowing as much as you can about your sweater upfront helps you anticipate the steps in the instructions and forestall many a mistake. If you find that something in the instructions is confusing in the first read-through, don’t be alarmed; it may make sense by the time you get to that point in the instructions with needles and yarn in hand. The following sections walk you through the various bits of info a typical sweater pattern contains. It’s a good idea to photocopy the pattern so you have a working copy that you can highlight, take notes on, or make changes to without messing up the original pattern. How hard is “easy”? Level of difficulty Many patterns tell you right away the level of difficulty the pattern writer has assigned to it. Here are the categories: A beginner sweater uses basic stitches (knits and purls) and involves minimal shaping and simple finishing. An intermediate project uses more-challenging stitch patterns and/or shaping and finishing. An experienced or expert pattern may require all your powers of concentration. It frequently features tricky pattern or color work, and it may involve complicated shaping or construction details. Work on it only when you can give it all your attention. Having more than one project going at a time is always a good idea. Make one of those projects something portable and rather brainless to give you a feeling of accomplishment and to keep your hands going while you watch TV or wait for a website to load. And have another more challenging project to work on when you have the time and quiet to concentrate on it. How big is “big”? Knitted measurements Most patterns begin by listing the sizes given in the instructions. Older patterns may list them in numbered chest sizes — for example, 38 (40, 42, 44, 46). Most current patterns give sizes in the designations small (medium, large) or in some combination of the two systems. Be sure you know your measurements before choosing the size to knit! The size section is the first place you see parentheses in a knitting pattern, and it pays to notice where the size you want to make is located in the pattern: before or inside the parentheses. Every time a number or measurement is given in the pattern, the one for your size will be in the same place in relation to the parentheses. For example, if the pattern is written for small, medium, and large sizes — presented “small (medium, large)” — and you’re making a small, the numbers for your size will always be written first outside the parentheses. If you’re making a large, your numbers will always be last in the parentheses. Before you start knitting, take the time to circle all the instructions in your size throughout the entire pattern (this is when your photocopy comes in handy). If you use a pencil, you can then erase the circles when finished so you can knit the pattern again later in a different size without confusion. Sweater patterns generally tell you what the finished garment should measure when laid out on a flat surface. Sometimes only the chest/bust width is given. Other times, you find measurements for overall length, sleeve length, and/or upper arm circumference. Use this info to help you determine which size to knit. Materials The pattern tells you what materials and equipment you need to make your sweater. In the “Materials” section of the pattern, you can find the following: The brand and specific name of the yarn used: It gives the fiber content of the yarn, the weight and often the number of yards per skein, the color number and name of the yarn, and the number of skeins or balls required for the sweater. If the sweater hasn’t been designed for a specific yarn company and isn’t a vehicle for selling a particular brand, the pattern may simply call for yarn in a specific weight — for example, worsted-weight. The size and type of needles you need: Often, needles in two sizes are listed — the smaller for cuffs and bottom borders and the larger for the body of the sweater. If the pattern uses double-pointed needles or a circular needle (say for a neckband or collar), or if the entire sweater is worked in the round, the pattern tells you which size needle(s) to use and in what length. Following the particular needles specified, you always see the phrase “or size to obtain gauge.” This phrase often appears in full capitalization or in italics. Why? Because gauge matters. Any special equipment or gadgets required: Constructing some sweaters requires special tools — for example, a cable needle, stitch markers, stitch holders, and so on. These tools are listed after the needles. Buttons or other finishing materials: If the sweater is a cardigan, the number and size of the buttons called for are listed. If pompoms, embroidery, or other embellishments are in order, the materials needed to make them are listed here. Check the materials list and make sure that you have what you need when you’re purchasing yarn and needles for a project. You don’t want to find yourself unable to continue working on your project after the stores have closed because you don’t have a particular tool in your supply box. Gauge In the “Gauge” section of the pattern, you find a formula that reads something like this: 14 sts and 21 rows to 4" (10 cm) over St st, using larger needles. This notation is the gauge formula. It tells you how many stitches and rows are in a 4-inch square of the sweater fabric (in this case, stockinette stitch). If you want to make a sweater that corresponds to the measurements given, you must duplicate this gauge. You can’t underestimate the importance of gauge! Gauge isn’t a standard, and you should make a gauge swatch for everything you plan to knit — especially if you want the finished project to fit when you’re done. Special pattern stitches If your sweater has any special pattern stitches or instructions, they may be listed and explained separately and not given again in the body of the instructions. For example, you may see the following: Seed Stitch Row 1 (RS): * K1, p1; rep from * to end of row. Row 2: K the purl sts and p the knit sts. Rep Row 2 for pattern. Then, in the instructions proper, when you read “work seed stitch for 8 rows,” come back to this section to find out how to work seed stitch. You also may find that a special abbreviation is explained. For example, you may see the following: C3R (cross 3 right): Sl 1 st to cn and hold to back, k2, p1 from cn. When you come across C3R in your instructions, you don’t have to scratch your head and wonder, “What the heck?” You can look in the opening information for an explanation. (And if the instruction used in this example is making you wonder, “What the heck?” refer to the abbreviations in Book 1, Chapter 4.) Schematics and charts The schematic is a small outline drawing of each sweater piece in the pattern. The pattern usually includes one schematic showing the body front and back with the neckline sketched in and another schematic of one sleeve. Cardigans usually show a single front, a back, and a sleeve. Listed along the edges of the drawing are the dimensions of the piece in each size — for example, the width and length of the sweater, the distance from the bottom of the sweater to the armhole, the depth of the armhole, and the depth and width of the neck. This figure shows a schematic for a toggle jacket. Schematics are a big help because they show you the structure of the sweater at a glance: whether the armhole is straight or shaped and whether the sleeve cap is tall and narrow or short and wide. As you become more familiar with the way actual measurements fit you, you’ll be able to tell quickly from the schematic whether you want to knit the pattern as-is or make changes. Depending on the design of the sweater and the way the pattern’s written, a sweater pattern may include a chart to show a stitch, cable, or color pattern. Or it may include a chart to show an unusual feature of the garment, such as a shawl collar. This figure shows a chart for a repeating color motif and indicates how you should use it. On right-side rows, work the chart from right to left. On wrong-side rows, work the chart from left to right. If you collect vintage knitting patterns, you’ll seldom see a chart or schematic. Instead, all the moves are painstakingly written out. Some people who learned to knit under the row-by-written-row system regret its demise. Others welcome the picture over the written instructions. The good news is that if you understand better when things are described with words, you can write charts in word form — and vice versa. If you have a pattern with interminable and obscure directions, read them carefully with graph paper and pencil in hand and make yourself a chart to better understand the text. Knitting instructions After all the introductory information, the instructions for knitting your sweater begin. In general, most patterns for cardigans and pullovers begin with the back piece. Here the pattern tells you how many stitches to cast on and what to do with them. The instructions are usually sequenced like this: Instructions for the back Instructions for the front (or fronts if you’re knitting a cardigan); generally, the instructions for the front mirror those of the back until it’s time to shape the front neckline Instructions for the sleeves The instructions describe each step as you work from the bottom border to the shoulder. They tell you what pattern stitches or colors to work, and they tell you how to shape (increase or decrease) your piece. If, for example, your sweater has a set-in sleeve and shaped armhole, the pattern will alert you that it’s time to begin the shaping by interrupting the text with a boldface heading such as “Shape armhole” or “Armhole shaping.” Finishing The “Finishing” section of the pattern tells you what to do with your knitted pieces to make them into a complete sweater. It gives any special blocking instructions and tells you the order in which to sew the pieces together. You also find instructions for additional sweater details, such as how to make the neckband, cardigan bands, collar, crochet edge, and so on. View Article
How to Make a Yarn Over between a Purl and a Knit Stitch Article / Updated 03-23-2017 To make a yarn over (abbreviated yo) that follows a purl stitch and precedes a knit stitch (which you’d encounter in a pattern as p1, yo, k1), follow these steps: Purl the first stitch and leave the yarn in the front of your work. Knit the next stitch. The yarn automatically crosses the RH needle when you knit this next stitch (see the following figure). View Article
Selecting Knitting Needles Article / Updated 04-25-2016 Knitting needles come in a stunning assortment of materials and sizes to mesh with your knitting style, the particular project you're working on, your aesthetics, and your budget. Sizing up needles A needle’s size is determined by its diameter. The smaller the size, the narrower the needle and the smaller the stitch it makes. The following figure shows needle sizes and their US and metric equivalents. If you aren’t sure what needle sizes you’ll need in the future, try a circular knitting needle set with interchangeable tips. Even though the needle is designed for circular knitting, you can also use it to knit back and forth. Some sets feature plastic needle tips, some metal. These sets allow you to combine different-sized needle tips with different connector cords to make a very large range of needle sizes on the fly. An interchangeable circular needle is especially handy when you’re unsure which needle size to use for a given yarn. If the current size isn’t giving you the right gauge, simply switch the tip up or down one size instead of starting over on another needle. Accounting for needle makeup and tip type Knitting needles, which were first mass-produced in steel, have been made in ivory, tortoiseshell, silver, whale bone, and more. Today you can find them made in ebony and rosewood, sherbet-colored pearly plastic, Teflon-coated aluminum, and even 14-carat gold-plated (no kidding!). And that’s only the beginning. Whatever your needles are made of, the material does contribute more or less to your knitting comfort, speed, and the quality of your stitches. Here are some recommendations: If you’re new to knitting, you’re working on double-pointed needles, or you’re executing color patterns, good choices include wood (bamboo, walnut, and so on) and plastic. Wood and some plastics have a very slight grip, giving you more control over your work and discouraging dropped stitches. If you’re knitting in stockinette or a straightforward stitch pattern, a slippery needle makes sense. The fastest ones are nickel-plated brass and call themselves Turbo. Use these needles and watch your stitches fly by before your eyes. (Also watch for more-easily dropped stitches.) Although all needles look pretty much alike, you do notice a difference in the feel of various kinds of needles and in their interaction with your knitting style and the yarn you’re using. If you find that some feature of their construction or material is annoying you or interfering with the flow of your project, try a different kind of needle. Switching may make the difference between a knitting experience on cruise control and one that stops and starts and sputters along. Needle tips can be long and tapered or rounder and blunter (see the figure below). If you’re working a project with a lot of stitch manipulation (as in lace or cables), or if you’re a snug knitter (that is, your stitches are tight rather than loose), you’ll have an easier time if you use a needle with a long, tapered tip. If you’re knitting with a loosely spun yarn and/or you’re a relaxed knitter with looser stitches, you may prefer a blunter point. Two kinds of needle tips. Though they don’t fall directly into the category of different needle composition or tip type, square needles can be a great choice if you’re new to knitting. They’re made of metal or wood, and the shape makes them easier for the hands to hold. Stitches don’t fall off these square needles as easily as the standard round ones. View Article
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