chơi xổ số keno trực tuyến

{"appState":{"pageLoadApiCallsStatus":true},"authorState":{"author":{"headers":{"timestamp":"2025-03-04T08:49:36+00:00"},"authorId":35248,"data":{"name":"Lisa McDonald","slug":"lisa-mcdonald","description":" Lisa McDonald is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. and the owner of TeaHaus in Ann Arbor, MI (teahaus.com), an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find over 200 varieties of tea. Jill Rheinheimer, an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea (ItsMoreThanTea.wordpress.com) as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus. ","photo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}}},"authorLoadedStatus":"success"},"listState":{"list":{"count":4,"total":4,"items":[{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-03-24T14:41:44+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-08-03T16:40:35+00:00","timestamp":"2024-08-03T18:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Food & Drink","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33839"},"slug":"food-drink","categoryId":33839},{"name":"Coffee & Tea","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34333"},"slug":"coffee-tea","categoryId":34333}],"title":"How to Make a Perfect Cup of Tea","strippedTitle":"how to make a perfect cup of tea","slug":"how-to-make-the-perfect-cup-of-tea","canonicalUrl":"","收数据库索刹车系统推广调整":{"metaDescription":"Learn how to make a perfect cup of tea using tea leaves, including the amount of tea, water temperature, and equipment.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"<figure style=\"margin: 0;\"><figcaption style=\"margin-bottom: 10px;\">Listen to the article:</figcaption><audio src=\"/wp-content/uploads/how-make-perfect-cup-tea.mp3\" controls=\"controls\"><a href=\"/wp-content/uploads/how-make-perfect-cup-tea.mp3\"><span data-mce-type=\"bookmark\" style=\"display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;\" class=\"mce_SELRES_start\"></span>Download audio</a></audio></figure>\r\nNo matter what you’ve heard, brewing loose tea is easy. It requires only a few pieces of equipment that you likely already own, and then you simply brew your leaves.\r\n\r\nWith our tips, you can brew any tea and get terrific results. Of course, you’ll want to experiment a bit for your personal preference, but that’s part of the fun!\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298064\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298064\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/woman-drinking-cup-tea-adobeStock_305760940.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"387\" /> ©Prostock-studio / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Basic equipment</h2>\r\nThis is all you need to brew tea:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Something to heat water</li>\r\n \t<li>A cup or mug</li>\r\n \t<li>A brew basket or strainer of some sort</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThat’s it! But here’s a closer look at each of these, along with a few suggestions:\r\n<h3>Ways to heat water</h3>\r\nSome pretty fancy water kettles are out there these days. Even we are drawn toward the ones with all the buttons, temperature controls, automations, and stellar designs. At our tea shop, TeaHaus, we have three water dispensers that offer a constant supply of filtered water, each set at a specific temperature. However, at home, I have a simple glass electric kettle.\r\n\r\nIf you’d rather not have an electric kettle that takes up space on your countertop, you can easily heat water in a pan on your stove (keep reading to learn how to visually gauge water temperature), although a whistling kettle is nice.\r\n\r\nA whistling kettle lets you know when your water is boiling and reminds you to turn the stove off, a good safety feature. Any style of whistling kettle will do but stay away from cheap aluminum or thin stainless steel. It is worth the few extra dollars to get a sturdier kettle.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">We recommend that you never use a microwave oven to heat your water. The water heats unevenly, you can’t control the temperature with any accuracy, and you can easily burn yourself with superheated water.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Cup or mug</h3>\r\nMuch debate is ongoing about whether a cup should be glass, or porcelain, or clay, or some other material. Although the array of cup choices adds to the drinking experience, in this article, we’re keeping it simple, so go with a cup or mug of your choosing. I prefer white porcelain or glass because I like to see the color of my tea, but everyone has that favorite mug or cup.\r\n<h3>Strainer</h3>\r\nIf we are making a cup of tea for ourselves, we like to use a tea brewing basket that we can set directly into a mug or cup. However, a small kitchen strainer will also get the job done.\r\n\r\nWe don’t recommend the classic tea balls for most loose-leaf teas because the leaves need room to expand. For example, the bottom photo in the figure below shows how oolong tea leaves unfurl into intact leaves and leaf sets that would be too tightly packed into a tea ball.\r\n\r\nHowever, these balls are often adequate for small-leaf teas or cut-tear-curl (CTC) teas, like a classic English breakfast. In the top photo below, you can also see that the English breakfast tea leaves expanded only a little bit during brewing.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298039\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298039\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tea-brewing-tools.jpg\" alt=\"Photos showing how different tea types expand during brewing\" width=\"630\" height=\"1002\" /> ©Lisa McDonald<br />English breakfast tea leaves don't expand significantly during brewing (top), unlike the intact leaves and leaf sets of an oolong (bottom).[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Making a cup of hot tea</h2>\r\nWhen you have your basic brewing equipment, all you need are tea leaves and water. Here’s an easy guide to making a terrific cup of tea:\r\n<h3>Measuring your tea leaves</h3>\r\nMost teabags are perfectly portioned for an 8- to 12-ounce cuppa, but it gets a bit tricky with loose-leaf tea. Many directions say you should use a teaspoon or a heaping teaspoon of tea leaves, but this isn’t always the best form of measurement for the perfect cup.\r\n\r\nThe problem is that tea leaves vary from tea to tea, sometimes dramatically. Therefore, measuring tea by weight is more accurate than measuring tea using a teaspoon. You generally need about three grams of tea for an 8- to 12-ounce cup. So, when we train new employees to brew tea at TeaHaus, we have them use a gram scale for the first few weeks.\r\n\r\nAfter they get a feel for what 3 grams of various teas look like, they can start to use an eyeball estimate, along with a teaspoon, when brewing tea for customers. If a customer likes a stronger or weaker tea, we don’t adjust the brew time or the recommended temperature. Instead, we adjust the amount of tea used.\r\n\r\nIf you don’t have a gram scale, start by using a teaspoon, but remember that you’ll need to adjust for the tea. The photo below shows an example of how 3 grams of tea can look drastically different.\r\n\r\nThree grams of CTC tea (left side of photo) are easily measured by a teaspoon. However, some whole-leaf teas, especially those that are very fluffy, like the tea on the right side of the photo, require more tea by volume. For these teas, if your directions say to use a “heaping teaspoon,” you may find that the leaves are so difficult to measure with a teaspoon (they are large, unwieldy, and don’t stay nicely on the spoon!) that realistically you may need a mega-heaping teaspoon or two heaping teaspoons.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298038\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298038\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tea-flakes-leaves.jpg\" alt=\"Photo showing CTC tea and whole-leaf tea\" width=\"630\" height=\"356\" /> ©Lisa McDonald<br />Comparison of 3 grams of a CTC Irish breakfast tea (left) and 3 grams of South India havukal, a whole-leaf white tea.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Keep in mind that no exact science dictates how much tea to use, and personal preference should help you decide how strong you like your tea, and therefore, how much tea to use.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Heating your water</h3>\r\nWhether you have a stove top kettle or a simple electric one, we have a few recommendations. At home, we really like an electric kettle. We especially like the glass ones because we can see the bubbles form, which indicates the approximate temperature of the water.\r\n\r\nYou can easily teach yourself how to visually gauge the water temperature (this also works well if you’re heating your water in a pan on the stove):\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Shrimp eyes</strong>. When tiny bubbles (shrimp eyes) start to form on the bottom of the kettle, the water is approximately 155 to 160 degrees F.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Crab eyes</strong>. When the water starts to produce steam and the bubbles are bigger (crab eyes) but are still on the bottom, the temperature is around 175 degrees F.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Fish eyes.</strong> When the bubbles (fish eyes) begin to release from the bottom, the temperature is around 180 to 185 degrees F.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Pearl strands.</strong> When the bubbles are more like a strand of pearls than eyes, the water is between 190 and 205 degrees F.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Boil.</strong> Soon after, you have a rolling bubble, which is 212 degrees F.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nNote that if you live in an area with good water or if you are using filtered water, there is no reason to bring your water to a boil and then cool it to the correct brewing temperature.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If your kettle isn’t transparent and you can’t see the bubbles, you can listen for the sound. You’ll know when you’re at the pearl stage because you will hear the low rumble of the pot as the bubbles begin to release. This is, of course, all made easier with a thermometer or a temperature-control kettle.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Brewing hot tea</h3>\r\nAt TeaHaus, we give our customers a little guide to brewing. The front of the postcard illustrates the brewing steps (see the figures below), and the back provides a simple guide for brewing time and temperature.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298048\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298048\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tea-brewing-guide.jpg\" alt=\"Graphic showing the steps of brewing a cup of tea\" width=\"630\" height=\"811\" /> ©TeaHaus<br />Tea brewing guide[/caption]\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298047\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298047\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tea-type-brew-guide.jpg\" alt=\"Graphic showing a guide for brewing different tea types\" width=\"630\" height=\"811\" /> ©TeaHaus<br />Brewing guide by tea type[/caption]\r\n\r\nYou’ll see that most teas have a range of water temperatures, but less-oxidized green tea is always brewed at lower temperatures than fully oxidized black tea. White tea, the most delicate and minimally processed of leaves, must always be brewed at relatively low temperatures or else you damage the leaves, and your tea won’t taste very good.\r\n\r\nNote, too, that if you brew tea for too long a time, it will become bitter. Herbal teas (this includes rooibos and fruit teas), on the other hand, can never be over-brewed.\r\n\r\nKeep in mind that these recommendations are just starting points; you should always adjust the parameters to best fit your own preference.\r\n<h3>Steps to a perfect cup</h3>\r\nTo brew one cup of tea at a time using a cup-sized brewing basket, follow these steps:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li>Place the basket into your cup.</li>\r\n \t<li>Add about 3 grams of tea into the basket. (See the “Measuring your tea leaves” section above.)</li>\r\n \t<li>Pour hot water over the leaves and set a timer. At TeaHaus, we put our recommended brewing time and temperature on the package for each tea, but when in doubt, brewing for 2–5 minutes is going to be okay for most teas, depending on the tea and your tolerance for bitterness.</li>\r\n \t<li>When the timer goes off, remove the basket, and your tea is ready to drink.</li>\r\n \t<li>Shake out the leaves into your compost bin or trash and rinse out the remaining leaves — unless it’s a tea that you want to rebrew later in the day. In that case, you can just let the leaves stay in the basket (no need to refrigerate).</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298051\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298051\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tea-cup-basket-filter.jpg\" alt=\"Photo showing a cup with a basket filter in it\" width=\"630\" height=\"599\" /> ©Lisa McDonald<br />Steps for brewing a cup of tea with a basket filter[/caption]\r\n\r\nStep 5 is where teabags are easier to use — even we will admit that. However, you can make your own teabags ahead of time. Just purchase paper filters or teabags for loose tea and spend a few minutes filling enough for the week, for example. Keep in mind, though, that the bag, much like the tea ball, will constrict some unfurling of the leaves, so larger-leaf teas are still best when brewed using a strainer or basket.\r\n\r\nHere is an alternate way to make either a cup or a pot of tea. This method allows the leaves to really unfurl and move around freely, which gives you a better cup of tea (see the photo below). Follow these steps:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li>Measure your tea leaves into any vessel that can withstand heat. (We recommend a glass vessel, such as a glass measuring cup.)</li>\r\n \t<li>Pour your hot water over the leaves and set your timer.</li>\r\n \t<li>When the timer goes off, strain the leaves through a brewing basket (or even a small kitchen strainer) into your teacup or tempered teapot.</li>\r\n \t<li>If you plan to rebrew the tea, shake the leaves back into the brewing vessel; otherwise, shake them into your compost bin or trash.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298050\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298050\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tea-basket-filter.jpg\" alt=\"Photo showing a teapot, tea leaves, and a basket filter\" width=\"630\" height=\"496\" /> ©Lisa McDonald<br />Brewing a pot of tea using a basket filter[/caption]\r\n\r\nPeople ask all the time if they can rebrew their leaves. With a brewing basket, it is quite simple. Just place the basket back in your cup and pour more water over it. If you’ve brewed your leaves loose in another vessel, simply add water again.\r\n\r\nThere are some teas that rebrew well and others that don’t. We always recommend that people just try it. There is no real answer. Larger leaves often brew better the second time around since they unfurl more during the second brew, but, again, this is up to personal preference.","description":"<figure style=\"margin: 0;\"><figcaption style=\"margin-bottom: 10px;\">Listen to the article:</figcaption><audio src=\"/wp-content/uploads/how-make-perfect-cup-tea.mp3\" controls=\"controls\"><a href=\"/wp-content/uploads/how-make-perfect-cup-tea.mp3\"><span data-mce-type=\"bookmark\" style=\"display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;\" class=\"mce_SELRES_start\"></span>Download audio</a></audio></figure>\r\nNo matter what you’ve heard, brewing loose tea is easy. It requires only a few pieces of equipment that you likely already own, and then you simply brew your leaves.\r\n\r\nWith our tips, you can brew any tea and get terrific results. Of course, you’ll want to experiment a bit for your personal preference, but that’s part of the fun!\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298064\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298064\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/woman-drinking-cup-tea-adobeStock_305760940.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"387\" /> ©Prostock-studio / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Basic equipment</h2>\r\nThis is all you need to brew tea:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Something to heat water</li>\r\n \t<li>A cup or mug</li>\r\n \t<li>A brew basket or strainer of some sort</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nThat’s it! But here’s a closer look at each of these, along with a few suggestions:\r\n<h3>Ways to heat water</h3>\r\nSome pretty fancy water kettles are out there these days. Even we are drawn toward the ones with all the buttons, temperature controls, automations, and stellar designs. At our tea shop, TeaHaus, we have three water dispensers that offer a constant supply of filtered water, each set at a specific temperature. However, at home, I have a simple glass electric kettle.\r\n\r\nIf you’d rather not have an electric kettle that takes up space on your countertop, you can easily heat water in a pan on your stove (keep reading to learn how to visually gauge water temperature), although a whistling kettle is nice.\r\n\r\nA whistling kettle lets you know when your water is boiling and reminds you to turn the stove off, a good safety feature. Any style of whistling kettle will do but stay away from cheap aluminum or thin stainless steel. It is worth the few extra dollars to get a sturdier kettle.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">We recommend that you never use a microwave oven to heat your water. The water heats unevenly, you can’t control the temperature with any accuracy, and you can easily burn yourself with superheated water.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Cup or mug</h3>\r\nMuch debate is ongoing about whether a cup should be glass, or porcelain, or clay, or some other material. Although the array of cup choices adds to the drinking experience, in this article, we’re keeping it simple, so go with a cup or mug of your choosing. I prefer white porcelain or glass because I like to see the color of my tea, but everyone has that favorite mug or cup.\r\n<h3>Strainer</h3>\r\nIf we are making a cup of tea for ourselves, we like to use a tea brewing basket that we can set directly into a mug or cup. However, a small kitchen strainer will also get the job done.\r\n\r\nWe don’t recommend the classic tea balls for most loose-leaf teas because the leaves need room to expand. For example, the bottom photo in the figure below shows how oolong tea leaves unfurl into intact leaves and leaf sets that would be too tightly packed into a tea ball.\r\n\r\nHowever, these balls are often adequate for small-leaf teas or cut-tear-curl (CTC) teas, like a classic English breakfast. In the top photo below, you can also see that the English breakfast tea leaves expanded only a little bit during brewing.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298039\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298039\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tea-brewing-tools.jpg\" alt=\"Photos showing how different tea types expand during brewing\" width=\"630\" height=\"1002\" /> ©Lisa McDonald<br />English breakfast tea leaves don't expand significantly during brewing (top), unlike the intact leaves and leaf sets of an oolong (bottom).[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >Making a cup of hot tea</h2>\r\nWhen you have your basic brewing equipment, all you need are tea leaves and water. Here’s an easy guide to making a terrific cup of tea:\r\n<h3>Measuring your tea leaves</h3>\r\nMost teabags are perfectly portioned for an 8- to 12-ounce cuppa, but it gets a bit tricky with loose-leaf tea. Many directions say you should use a teaspoon or a heaping teaspoon of tea leaves, but this isn’t always the best form of measurement for the perfect cup.\r\n\r\nThe problem is that tea leaves vary from tea to tea, sometimes dramatically. Therefore, measuring tea by weight is more accurate than measuring tea using a teaspoon. You generally need about three grams of tea for an 8- to 12-ounce cup. So, when we train new employees to brew tea at TeaHaus, we have them use a gram scale for the first few weeks.\r\n\r\nAfter they get a feel for what 3 grams of various teas look like, they can start to use an eyeball estimate, along with a teaspoon, when brewing tea for customers. If a customer likes a stronger or weaker tea, we don’t adjust the brew time or the recommended temperature. Instead, we adjust the amount of tea used.\r\n\r\nIf you don’t have a gram scale, start by using a teaspoon, but remember that you’ll need to adjust for the tea. The photo below shows an example of how 3 grams of tea can look drastically different.\r\n\r\nThree grams of CTC tea (left side of photo) are easily measured by a teaspoon. However, some whole-leaf teas, especially those that are very fluffy, like the tea on the right side of the photo, require more tea by volume. For these teas, if your directions say to use a “heaping teaspoon,” you may find that the leaves are so difficult to measure with a teaspoon (they are large, unwieldy, and don’t stay nicely on the spoon!) that realistically you may need a mega-heaping teaspoon or two heaping teaspoons.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298038\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298038\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tea-flakes-leaves.jpg\" alt=\"Photo showing CTC tea and whole-leaf tea\" width=\"630\" height=\"356\" /> ©Lisa McDonald<br />Comparison of 3 grams of a CTC Irish breakfast tea (left) and 3 grams of South India havukal, a whole-leaf white tea.[/caption]\r\n<p class=\"article-tips remember\">Keep in mind that no exact science dictates how much tea to use, and personal preference should help you decide how strong you like your tea, and therefore, how much tea to use.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Heating your water</h3>\r\nWhether you have a stove top kettle or a simple electric one, we have a few recommendations. At home, we really like an electric kettle. We especially like the glass ones because we can see the bubbles form, which indicates the approximate temperature of the water.\r\n\r\nYou can easily teach yourself how to visually gauge the water temperature (this also works well if you’re heating your water in a pan on the stove):\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li><strong>Shrimp eyes</strong>. When tiny bubbles (shrimp eyes) start to form on the bottom of the kettle, the water is approximately 155 to 160 degrees F.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Crab eyes</strong>. When the water starts to produce steam and the bubbles are bigger (crab eyes) but are still on the bottom, the temperature is around 175 degrees F.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Fish eyes.</strong> When the bubbles (fish eyes) begin to release from the bottom, the temperature is around 180 to 185 degrees F.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Pearl strands.</strong> When the bubbles are more like a strand of pearls than eyes, the water is between 190 and 205 degrees F.</li>\r\n \t<li><strong>Boil.</strong> Soon after, you have a rolling bubble, which is 212 degrees F.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nNote that if you live in an area with good water or if you are using filtered water, there is no reason to bring your water to a boil and then cool it to the correct brewing temperature.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">If your kettle isn’t transparent and you can’t see the bubbles, you can listen for the sound. You’ll know when you’re at the pearl stage because you will hear the low rumble of the pot as the bubbles begin to release. This is, of course, all made easier with a thermometer or a temperature-control kettle.</p>\r\n\r\n<h3>Brewing hot tea</h3>\r\nAt TeaHaus, we give our customers a little guide to brewing. The front of the postcard illustrates the brewing steps (see the figures below), and the back provides a simple guide for brewing time and temperature.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298048\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298048\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tea-brewing-guide.jpg\" alt=\"Graphic showing the steps of brewing a cup of tea\" width=\"630\" height=\"811\" /> ©TeaHaus<br />Tea brewing guide[/caption]\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298047\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298047\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tea-type-brew-guide.jpg\" alt=\"Graphic showing a guide for brewing different tea types\" width=\"630\" height=\"811\" /> ©TeaHaus<br />Brewing guide by tea type[/caption]\r\n\r\nYou’ll see that most teas have a range of water temperatures, but less-oxidized green tea is always brewed at lower temperatures than fully oxidized black tea. White tea, the most delicate and minimally processed of leaves, must always be brewed at relatively low temperatures or else you damage the leaves, and your tea won’t taste very good.\r\n\r\nNote, too, that if you brew tea for too long a time, it will become bitter. Herbal teas (this includes rooibos and fruit teas), on the other hand, can never be over-brewed.\r\n\r\nKeep in mind that these recommendations are just starting points; you should always adjust the parameters to best fit your own preference.\r\n<h3>Steps to a perfect cup</h3>\r\nTo brew one cup of tea at a time using a cup-sized brewing basket, follow these steps:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li>Place the basket into your cup.</li>\r\n \t<li>Add about 3 grams of tea into the basket. (See the “Measuring your tea leaves” section above.)</li>\r\n \t<li>Pour hot water over the leaves and set a timer. At TeaHaus, we put our recommended brewing time and temperature on the package for each tea, but when in doubt, brewing for 2–5 minutes is going to be okay for most teas, depending on the tea and your tolerance for bitterness.</li>\r\n \t<li>When the timer goes off, remove the basket, and your tea is ready to drink.</li>\r\n \t<li>Shake out the leaves into your compost bin or trash and rinse out the remaining leaves — unless it’s a tea that you want to rebrew later in the day. In that case, you can just let the leaves stay in the basket (no need to refrigerate).</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298051\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298051\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tea-cup-basket-filter.jpg\" alt=\"Photo showing a cup with a basket filter in it\" width=\"630\" height=\"599\" /> ©Lisa McDonald<br />Steps for brewing a cup of tea with a basket filter[/caption]\r\n\r\nStep 5 is where teabags are easier to use — even we will admit that. However, you can make your own teabags ahead of time. Just purchase paper filters or teabags for loose tea and spend a few minutes filling enough for the week, for example. Keep in mind, though, that the bag, much like the tea ball, will constrict some unfurling of the leaves, so larger-leaf teas are still best when brewed using a strainer or basket.\r\n\r\nHere is an alternate way to make either a cup or a pot of tea. This method allows the leaves to really unfurl and move around freely, which gives you a better cup of tea (see the photo below). Follow these steps:\r\n<ol>\r\n \t<li>Measure your tea leaves into any vessel that can withstand heat. (We recommend a glass vessel, such as a glass measuring cup.)</li>\r\n \t<li>Pour your hot water over the leaves and set your timer.</li>\r\n \t<li>When the timer goes off, strain the leaves through a brewing basket (or even a small kitchen strainer) into your teacup or tempered teapot.</li>\r\n \t<li>If you plan to rebrew the tea, shake the leaves back into the brewing vessel; otherwise, shake them into your compost bin or trash.</li>\r\n</ol>\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298050\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298050\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tea-basket-filter.jpg\" alt=\"Photo showing a teapot, tea leaves, and a basket filter\" width=\"630\" height=\"496\" /> ©Lisa McDonald<br />Brewing a pot of tea using a basket filter[/caption]\r\n\r\nPeople ask all the time if they can rebrew their leaves. With a brewing basket, it is quite simple. Just place the basket back in your cup and pour more water over it. If you’ve brewed your leaves loose in another vessel, simply add water again.\r\n\r\nThere are some teas that rebrew well and others that don’t. We always recommend that people just try it. There is no real answer. Larger leaves often brew better the second time around since they unfurl more during the second brew, but, again, this is up to personal preference.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":35248,"name":"Lisa McDonald","slug":"lisa-mcdonald","description":" <p><b>Lisa McDonald </b>is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. and the owner of TeaHaus in Ann Arbor, MI (teahaus.com), an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find over 200 varieties of tea. <p><b>Jill Rheinheimer,</b> an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea (ItsMoreThanTea.wordpress.com) as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35248"}},{"authorId":35249,"name":"Jill Rheinheimer","slug":"jill-rheinheimer","description":" <p><b>Lisa McDonald </b>is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. and the owner of TeaHaus in Ann Arbor, MI (teahaus.com), an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find over 200 varieties of tea. <p><b>Jill Rheinheimer,</b> an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea (ItsMoreThanTea.wordpress.com) as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35249"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34333,"title":"Coffee & Tea","slug":"coffee-tea","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34333"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Basic equipment","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"Making a cup of hot tea","target":"#tab2"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":298022,"title":"Is Green Tea Healthier Than Black Tea?","slug":"is-green-tea-healthier-than-black-tea","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298022"}},{"articleId":298011,"title":"The Best Teas for Beginner Tea Drinkers","slug":"the-best-teas-for-beginning-tea-drinkers","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298011"}},{"articleId":297195,"title":"Tea For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"tea-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297195"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":298022,"title":"Is Green Tea Healthier Than Black Tea?","slug":"is-green-tea-healthier-than-black-tea","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298022"}},{"articleId":298011,"title":"The Best Teas for Beginner Tea Drinkers","slug":"the-best-teas-for-beginning-tea-drinkers","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298011"}},{"articleId":297195,"title":"Tea For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"tea-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297195"}},{"articleId":284602,"title":"Coffee Brewing Methods","slug":"coffee-brewing-methods","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284602"}},{"articleId":284590,"title":"How to Order Coffee","slug":"how-to-order-coffee","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284590"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":297052,"slug":"tea-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119986256","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119986257/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119986257/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119986257-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119986257/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119986257/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tea-for-dummies-cover-1119986257-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Tea For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"35248\">Lisa McDonald</b> </b>is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. and the owner of TeaHaus in Ann Arbor, MI (teahaus.com), an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find over 200 varieties of tea. <p><b>Jill Rheinheimer,</b> an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea (ItsMoreThanTea.wordpress.com) as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus. <p><b>Lisa McDonald </b>is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. and the owner of TeaHaus in Ann Arbor, MI (teahaus.com), an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find over 200 varieties of tea. <p><b><b data-author-id=\"35249\">Jill Rheinheimer</b>,</b> an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea (ItsMoreThanTea.wordpress.com) as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":35248,"name":"Lisa McDonald","slug":"lisa-mcdonald","description":" <p><b>Lisa McDonald </b>is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. and the owner of TeaHaus in Ann Arbor, MI (teahaus.com), an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find over 200 varieties of tea. <p><b>Jill Rheinheimer,</b> an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea (ItsMoreThanTea.wordpress.com) as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35248"}},{"authorId":35249,"name":"Jill Rheinheimer","slug":"jill-rheinheimer","description":" <p><b>Lisa McDonald </b>is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. and the owner of TeaHaus in Ann Arbor, MI (teahaus.com), an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find over 200 varieties of tea. <p><b>Jill Rheinheimer,</b> an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea (ItsMoreThanTea.wordpress.com) as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus. ","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35249"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;food-drink&quot;,&quot;coffee-tea&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119986256&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64cbeb5fe71bc\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;food-drink&quot;,&quot;coffee-tea&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119986256&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-64cbeb5fe76da\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-03-24T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":298036},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-03-22T20:20:09+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-03-24T17:09:27+00:00","timestamp":"2024-03-24T18:01:03+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Food & Drink","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33839"},"slug":"food-drink","categoryId":33839},{"name":"Coffee & Tea","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34333"},"slug":"coffee-tea","categoryId":34333}],"title":"Is Green Tea Healthier Than Black Tea?","strippedTitle":"is green tea healthier than black tea?","slug":"is-green-tea-healthier-than-black-tea","canonicalUrl":"","收数据库索刹车系统推广调整":{"metaDescription":"Learn about the health benefits of both green and black teas, which both contain important antioxidant properties.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"<figure style=\"margin: 0;\"><figcaption style=\"margin-bottom: 10px;\">Listen to the article:</figcaption><audio src=\"/wp-content/uploads/is-green-tea-healthier.mp3\" controls=\"controls\"><a href=\"/wp-content/uploads/is-green-tea-healthier.mp3\"><span data-mce-type=\"bookmark\" style=\"display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;\" class=\"mce_SELRES_start\"></span>Download audio</a></audio></figure>\r\nAlthough you may hear that green tea is better for you because the catechins (the most common flavanol — a tannin and antioxidant) haven’t been converted into more complex forms, don’t immediately throw out the black tea that you love and switch to green tea! Both green <em>and</em> black tea have antioxidant properties. Let’s take a look.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298024\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298024\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/pouring-tea-into-cup-adobeStock_297781100.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"420\" /> ©Eva / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >The benefits of green tea</h2>\r\nThe catechin <em>epigallocatechin-3-gallate</em> (EGCG) that’s found in green tea is often called a “natural drug” and is the golden child of current research. Laboratory studies suggest that this strong antioxidant may, indeed, be helpful to treat or prevent many chronic diseases, including those that damage the brain.\r\n\r\nIntriguingly, EGCG also may have some of the same advantages that theanine offers. Preliminary research suggests that EGCG may promote alpha, theta, and beta wave activity in the brain, helping us calm down and focus.\r\n\r\nHowever, even though it’s delicious, and even if you drink copious amounts of it, green tea is not guaranteed to give you <em>all</em> the benefits of EGCG that have been demonstrated in the lab. The tea may be loaded with polyphenols, but there may not be enough to have a measurable effect, or your body may be unable to access them.\r\n\r\nThe upshot? If you like green tea, drink it. Green tea has lots of polyphenols.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >The benefits of black tea</h2>\r\nLike catechins, the theaflavins and thearubigins (types of tannins) found in black tea are antioxidants. The conversion from simple to complex polyphenols does not appear to change their antioxidant properties in any substantial way.\r\n\r\nAlthough numerous studies focus on the catechin EGCG found in green tea, plenty of work also supports the similar antioxidant capacity of theaflavins and thearubigins.\r\n\r\nMoreover, many of the health benefits suggested by studies of green tea are also supported by research on black tea, including possible protection against dementia, cancer, viruses, and bacteria. Note, however, that whole leaf teas appear to contain more robust antioxidants than cut-tear-curl (CTC) processed teas. (For more about this, check out our book <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/book/home-auto-hobbies/food-drink/coffee-tea/tea-for-dummies-297052/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><em>Tea For Dummies</em></a>.)\r\n\r\nBut, as mentioned in the previous section, consuming polyphenols isn’t a promise that health effects are tangible.\r\n\r\nIn a nutshell? If you like black tea, drink it. Black tea has lots of polyphenols.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Does it matter which tea you drink?</h2>\r\nSo many teas! And so many voices out there telling you to drink this or that tea.\r\n\r\nBut tea shouldn’t be this difficult. Instead, you should drink tea only because you like it, and you should drink only those teas that you like. Because it really doesn’t matter which tea you drink.\r\n\r\nAll tea contains polyphenols, and all tea polyphenols are antioxidants. It doesn’t matter whether you’re drinking tea that contains mostly catechins (green tea) or mostly theaflavins (black tea). This is a win-win situation for tea drinkers!\r\n\r\nNote also that if you want to drink the tea that contains the <em>most</em> polyphenols, just drink the tea that you love. (Bonus: You’ll end up drinking more of it because you enjoy it.) Calculating the number of polyphenols in any given tea is futile, just like figuring out caffeine levels.\r\n\r\nEvery individual tea must be tested in a lab, and generalizations are challenging. For example, some studies have demonstrated that white tea contains more polyphenols than green, whereas other studies have shown the opposite.\r\n\r\nLevels vary widely even within a type of tea. As with caffeine, polyphenol quantity depends on a plethora of factors including:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Type of tea plant</li>\r\n \t<li>Geographic location</li>\r\n \t<li>Growing conditions and stress on the plant</li>\r\n \t<li>Time of harvest</li>\r\n \t<li>Which leaves are harvested</li>\r\n \t<li>How the tea is produced</li>\r\n \t<li>How you brew your leaves</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Why green tea held the spotlight for a while</h2>\r\nGreen tea was originally thought to be healthier than black tea for numerous reasons:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Early studies came out of primarily green tea-drinking countries such as China and Japan.</li>\r\n \t<li>Green tea-drinking countries were ideal for studies involving large groups of people. Researchers could find communities in which most people were drinking the same tea — grown and produced from the same tea garden and brewed and consumed in a similar manner.</li>\r\n \t<li>EGCG is undeniably a potent antioxidant, and, to our knowledge, green tea contains more EGCG than anything else we ingest (remember, though, that polyphenol quantity doesn’t always translate into concrete health benefits).</li>\r\n \t<li>Extensive studies of black tea began relatively recently; therefore, a larger body of work exists for green tea.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nHowever, as research continues, we’re learning how much more we need to learn. Although thearubigins aren’t well understood and EGCG continues to reveal surprises, results for <em>all</em> types of tea continue to be promising.\r\n\r\nIn the end, <em>all</em> tea contains polyphenols, and <em>all</em> polyphenols contribute to your health. Drink the tea that makes you happy!","description":"<figure style=\"margin: 0;\"><figcaption style=\"margin-bottom: 10px;\">Listen to the article:</figcaption><audio src=\"/wp-content/uploads/is-green-tea-healthier.mp3\" controls=\"controls\"><a href=\"/wp-content/uploads/is-green-tea-healthier.mp3\"><span data-mce-type=\"bookmark\" style=\"display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;\" class=\"mce_SELRES_start\"></span>Download audio</a></audio></figure>\r\nAlthough you may hear that green tea is better for you because the catechins (the most common flavanol — a tannin and antioxidant) haven’t been converted into more complex forms, don’t immediately throw out the black tea that you love and switch to green tea! Both green <em>and</em> black tea have antioxidant properties. Let’s take a look.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298024\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298024\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/pouring-tea-into-cup-adobeStock_297781100.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"420\" /> ©Eva / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >The benefits of green tea</h2>\r\nThe catechin <em>epigallocatechin-3-gallate</em> (EGCG) that’s found in green tea is often called a “natural drug” and is the golden child of current research. Laboratory studies suggest that this strong antioxidant may, indeed, be helpful to treat or prevent many chronic diseases, including those that damage the brain.\r\n\r\nIntriguingly, EGCG also may have some of the same advantages that theanine offers. Preliminary research suggests that EGCG may promote alpha, theta, and beta wave activity in the brain, helping us calm down and focus.\r\n\r\nHowever, even though it’s delicious, and even if you drink copious amounts of it, green tea is not guaranteed to give you <em>all</em> the benefits of EGCG that have been demonstrated in the lab. The tea may be loaded with polyphenols, but there may not be enough to have a measurable effect, or your body may be unable to access them.\r\n\r\nThe upshot? If you like green tea, drink it. Green tea has lots of polyphenols.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >The benefits of black tea</h2>\r\nLike catechins, the theaflavins and thearubigins (types of tannins) found in black tea are antioxidants. The conversion from simple to complex polyphenols does not appear to change their antioxidant properties in any substantial way.\r\n\r\nAlthough numerous studies focus on the catechin EGCG found in green tea, plenty of work also supports the similar antioxidant capacity of theaflavins and thearubigins.\r\n\r\nMoreover, many of the health benefits suggested by studies of green tea are also supported by research on black tea, including possible protection against dementia, cancer, viruses, and bacteria. Note, however, that whole leaf teas appear to contain more robust antioxidants than cut-tear-curl (CTC) processed teas. (For more about this, check out our book <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/book/home-auto-hobbies/food-drink/coffee-tea/tea-for-dummies-297052/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><em>Tea For Dummies</em></a>.)\r\n\r\nBut, as mentioned in the previous section, consuming polyphenols isn’t a promise that health effects are tangible.\r\n\r\nIn a nutshell? If you like black tea, drink it. Black tea has lots of polyphenols.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Does it matter which tea you drink?</h2>\r\nSo many teas! And so many voices out there telling you to drink this or that tea.\r\n\r\nBut tea shouldn’t be this difficult. Instead, you should drink tea only because you like it, and you should drink only those teas that you like. Because it really doesn’t matter which tea you drink.\r\n\r\nAll tea contains polyphenols, and all tea polyphenols are antioxidants. It doesn’t matter whether you’re drinking tea that contains mostly catechins (green tea) or mostly theaflavins (black tea). This is a win-win situation for tea drinkers!\r\n\r\nNote also that if you want to drink the tea that contains the <em>most</em> polyphenols, just drink the tea that you love. (Bonus: You’ll end up drinking more of it because you enjoy it.) Calculating the number of polyphenols in any given tea is futile, just like figuring out caffeine levels.\r\n\r\nEvery individual tea must be tested in a lab, and generalizations are challenging. For example, some studies have demonstrated that white tea contains more polyphenols than green, whereas other studies have shown the opposite.\r\n\r\nLevels vary widely even within a type of tea. As with caffeine, polyphenol quantity depends on a plethora of factors including:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Type of tea plant</li>\r\n \t<li>Geographic location</li>\r\n \t<li>Growing conditions and stress on the plant</li>\r\n \t<li>Time of harvest</li>\r\n \t<li>Which leaves are harvested</li>\r\n \t<li>How the tea is produced</li>\r\n \t<li>How you brew your leaves</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Why green tea held the spotlight for a while</h2>\r\nGreen tea was originally thought to be healthier than black tea for numerous reasons:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>Early studies came out of primarily green tea-drinking countries such as China and Japan.</li>\r\n \t<li>Green tea-drinking countries were ideal for studies involving large groups of people. Researchers could find communities in which most people were drinking the same tea — grown and produced from the same tea garden and brewed and consumed in a similar manner.</li>\r\n \t<li>EGCG is undeniably a potent antioxidant, and, to our knowledge, green tea contains more EGCG than anything else we ingest (remember, though, that polyphenol quantity doesn’t always translate into concrete health benefits).</li>\r\n \t<li>Extensive studies of black tea began relatively recently; therefore, a larger body of work exists for green tea.</li>\r\n</ul>\r\nHowever, as research continues, we’re learning how much more we need to learn. Although thearubigins aren’t well understood and EGCG continues to reveal surprises, results for <em>all</em> types of tea continue to be promising.\r\n\r\nIn the end, <em>all</em> tea contains polyphenols, and <em>all</em> polyphenols contribute to your health. Drink the tea that makes you happy!","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":35248,"name":"Lisa McDonald","slug":"lisa-mcdonald","description":"<b>Lisa McDonald </b>is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. and the owner of TeaHaus in Ann Arbor, MI (teahaus.com), an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find over 200 varieties of tea.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35248"}},{"authorId":35249,"name":"Jill Rheinheimer","slug":"jill-rheinheimer","description":"<b>Jill Rheinheimer,</b> an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea (ItsMoreThanTea.wordpress.com) as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35249"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34333,"title":"Coffee & Tea","slug":"coffee-tea","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34333"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"The benefits of green tea","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"The benefits of black tea","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Does it matter which tea you drink?","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Why green tea held the spotlight for a while","target":"#tab4"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":298036,"title":"How To Make a Perfect Cup of Tea","slug":"how-to-make-the-perfect-cup-of-tea","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298036"}},{"articleId":298011,"title":"The Best Teas for Beginner Tea Drinkers","slug":"the-best-teas-for-beginning-tea-drinkers","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298011"}},{"articleId":297195,"title":"Tea For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"tea-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297195"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":298036,"title":"How To Make a Perfect Cup of Tea","slug":"how-to-make-the-perfect-cup-of-tea","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298036"}},{"articleId":298011,"title":"The Best Teas for Beginner Tea Drinkers","slug":"the-best-teas-for-beginning-tea-drinkers","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298011"}},{"articleId":297195,"title":"Tea For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"tea-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297195"}},{"articleId":284602,"title":"Coffee Brewing Methods","slug":"coffee-brewing-methods","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284602"}},{"articleId":284590,"title":"How to Order Coffee","slug":"how-to-order-coffee","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284590"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":297052,"slug":"tea-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119986256","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119986257/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119986257/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119986257-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119986257/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119986257/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tea-for-dummies-cover-1119986257-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Tea For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"35248\">Lisa McDonald</b> </b>is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. and the owner of TeaHaus in Ann Arbor, MI (teahaus.com), an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find over 200 varieties of tea. <b><b data-author-id=\"35249\">Jill Rheinheimer</b>,</b> an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea (ItsMoreThanTea.wordpress.com) as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":35248,"name":"Lisa McDonald","slug":"lisa-mcdonald","description":"<b>Lisa McDonald </b>is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. and the owner of TeaHaus in Ann Arbor, MI (teahaus.com), an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find over 200 varieties of tea.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35248"}},{"authorId":35249,"name":"Jill Rheinheimer","slug":"jill-rheinheimer","description":"<b>Jill Rheinheimer,</b> an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea (ItsMoreThanTea.wordpress.com) as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35249"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;food-drink&quot;,&quot;coffee-tea&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119986256&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-641de55f12f22\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;food-drink&quot;,&quot;coffee-tea&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119986256&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-641de55f1368e\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-03-22T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":298022},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-03-22T19:22:51+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-03-24T15:51:55+00:00","timestamp":"2024-03-24T18:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Food & Drink","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33839"},"slug":"food-drink","categoryId":33839},{"name":"Coffee & Tea","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34333"},"slug":"coffee-tea","categoryId":34333}],"title":"The Best Teas for Beginner Tea Drinkers","strippedTitle":"the best teas for beginner tea drinkers","slug":"the-best-teas-for-beginning-tea-drinkers","canonicalUrl":"","收数据库索刹车系统推广调整":{"metaDescription":"If you're just getting into drinking tea, this article shows you the best path forward, including which types of tea to try first.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"<figure style=\"margin: 0;\"><figcaption style=\"margin-bottom: 10px;\">Listen to the article:</figcaption><audio src=\"/wp-content/uploads/best-teas-for-beginners.mp3\" controls=\"controls\"><a href=\"/wp-content/uploads/best-teas-for-beginners.mp3\"><span data-mce-type=\"bookmark\" style=\"display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;\" class=\"mce_SELRES_start\"></span>Download audio</a></audio></figure>\r\nTea. It’s as simple as boiling water, pouring it over leaves, taking a couple minutes to relax, and straining out the leaves. One cup of the perfect tea can hook you for a lifetime.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298016\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298016\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/woman-smelling-tea-adobeStock_157891657.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"421\" /> ©Johnalexandr / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n\r\nBut if you are trying to get into tea, you’ll probably want to hold off on some teas. Lapsang souchong, Japanese green teas like sencha or matcha, and white teas may not be what you are expecting. You may want to ease into these types after you’re more accustomed to tea and its various flavors.\r\n\r\nSo then, where <em>do</em> you begin?\r\n\r\nFor many people, their journey into the world of tea starts with something more familiar, like earl grey or a teabag from a box. Although teabags have gotten better throughout the years, they will never be what tea is meant to be. In this article (and in my book, <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/book/home-auto-hobbies/food-drink/coffee-tea/tea-for-dummies-297052/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><em>Tea For Dummies</em></a>) we focus on loose-leaf tea.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Great teas to start with</h2>\r\nAt our store, we have seven different versions of loose-leaf earl grey, one of which is our number-one-selling tea. In fact, three of our best-selling teas come from our earl grey collection, and they generally rank within the top ten teas every year, which speaks to their enduring popularity. Once you have a cup of high-quality loose-leaf earl grey, you will never teabag again.\r\n\r\nAnother commonly known tea is chai. This spiced and often sweetened tea is a popular starting point in coffee shops and cafes. Fruity flavored teas are another great entry tea, especially iced.\r\n\r\nEven as a tea sommelier, I never judge if someone’s favorite is a pineapple-mango tea or a sweetened caramel tea. I like to look at these as gateway teas. You should always drink what you enjoy the most and then branch out every so often. You might find a new favorite.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >How to choose a black tea</h2>\r\nThings to consider when picking a black tea is how strong and bold you want it, how much astringency (that dry feeling in your mouth) you want, whether you prefer a tea that is simply strong versus something that has layers of flavor, and whether you like earthy or smoky notes.\r\n\r\nFor a less intense black tea, there are plenty of options. Ceylon teas are full-bodied and brisk, but not overly so, and they have just the right amount of astringency. They are what many people think of when they envision black tea.\r\n\r\nCeylon is great iced and works well with lemon, sugar, milk, and so on. Assam teas pair particularly well with food, so they can be nice with a snack or meal, and they hold up to a little cream and sugar.\r\n\r\nIf, however, you want a strong tea, breakfast teas are a good match — and you have a lot to choose from: Irish, Scottish, English, Russian, and East Frisian blends, among others. Every tea blender will use a different ratio of teas, so you may find that you prefer some breakfast blends over others. Yet, all of them are robust enough to stand up to milk and sugar. Just take care in brewing these teas so that they don’t become bitter.\r\n\r\nFor coffee lovers who are used to deep and complex flavors, consider an Assam from India or the many pu-erh and Yunnan teas from China. Some wild-grown teas would also make this list. Although these aren’t in-your-face bold like the breakfast blends, they are intriguingly full-bodied and multilayered in flavor.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Note that teas that have been processed by the cut-tear-curl (CTC) process (these teas are in tiny bits) will release caffeine more quickly than teas composed of intact or largely intact leaves, especially if those leaves have been tightly rolled. However, this isn’t to say that you will get more caffeine overall.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Going green</h2>\r\nTo start your green tea journey, Chinese green teas are more common and recognizable, so they are often our first recommendation. Japanese teas tend to be grassier or “seaweed”-like in flavor, so, for some, it takes a bit getting used to.\r\n\r\nOften, people’s first experience with green tea is with a sweet matcha latte in a coffee shop or the tea served at their favorite Asian restaurant. Green tea is as nuanced as black tea, but it may take a bit more time to find your favorite.\r\n\r\nOolong, pu-erh, some white teas, and other tea types can also be great first-time teas, but we often recommend starting with the basics when first <em>steeping</em> into the world of tea.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Herbal tea choices abound</h2>\r\nIf you aren’t sure you’re ready for tea, but want a healthy or caffeine-free beverage, we suggest you start with some of the many herbal teas available.\r\n\r\nFruit teas, which consist of fruit and other herbals, are a terrific substitute for high-calorie juice. You can find just about any fruit you want, and they are usually fantastic iced. Low in sugar but filled with flavor, these are wonderful for everyone in the family. Kids generally love fruit teas!\r\n\r\nRooibos and honeybush blends are also both kid- and adult-friendly options. You can readily find fruity, floral, earthy, or other blends, so you’re sure to find something you enjoy, and they are naturally caffeine free.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >Where to buy tea</h2>\r\nWhen shopping for tea, it's important to know how and where a store sources its teas. You needn’t know the exact gardens or time of day your tea was harvested, but it is important to know that the tea store sources teas from gardens that go above and beyond to ensure the highest quality.\r\n\r\nThis is not to say that grabbing a teabag tea in the hotel lobby is a no-no, but buying quality loose tea is worth the extra penny. Plus, not all high-quality loose-leaf teas are expensive. A very high-quality loose-leaf breakfast blend may not cost much more per gram than a box of teabags at the grocery store.\r\n\r\nSingle-estate, handpicked, and rare teas from small gardens may seem a bit pricey, but keep in mind that a 50-gram bag of tea can make 15 to 20 cups, and some teas can be brewed several times. A $30 bag of tea that can yield 20 cups makes the per-cup price only about $1.50, which is well under the cost of a hot drink at most cafes or restaurants.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab6\" >How much tea to buy</h2>\r\nTea may be sold by the ounce or gram. Most teas require about 3 grams (0.1 ounce) of leaves to make an 8-ounce cup, giving you the following general guidelines:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>50 grams (1.8 ounces) of leaves yields 15 to 20 cups of tea</li>\r\n \t<li>100 grams (3.5 ounces) of leaves yields 30 to 40 cups of tea</li>\r\n \t<li>200 grams (7 ounces) of leaves yields 60 to 80 cups of tea</li>\r\n \t<li>500 grams (17.6 ounces) of leaves yields 150 to 200 cups of tea</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips\">Many types of tea leaves can be brewed a second time (or more), which doubles the number of cups you get!</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab7\" >Storing your tea leaves</h2>\r\nIt's important that your tea is stored in an area free of moisture, strong odors, and light. For this reason, we recommend you avoid glass jars. Although it's so tempting to stock up on teas when you go to a beautiful tea and spice store that has rows and rows of jars filled with teas and spices, remember that the teas (or spices) probably won’t be of great quality because of how they were stored and displayed.\r\n\r\nMetal tins are good if they have a tight seal, but be aware that tins will absorb aroma so keep similar teas in each tin (for instance, if you’ve stored a smoky tea in a tin, keep that tin for smoky teas, or if you have an earl grey tin, keep it an earl grey tin).","description":"<figure style=\"margin: 0;\"><figcaption style=\"margin-bottom: 10px;\">Listen to the article:</figcaption><audio src=\"/wp-content/uploads/best-teas-for-beginners.mp3\" controls=\"controls\"><a href=\"/wp-content/uploads/best-teas-for-beginners.mp3\"><span data-mce-type=\"bookmark\" style=\"display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;\" class=\"mce_SELRES_start\"></span>Download audio</a></audio></figure>\r\nTea. It’s as simple as boiling water, pouring it over leaves, taking a couple minutes to relax, and straining out the leaves. One cup of the perfect tea can hook you for a lifetime.\r\n\r\n[caption id=\"attachment_298016\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"630\"]<img class=\"size-full wp-image-298016\" src=\"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/woman-smelling-tea-adobeStock_157891657.jpg\" alt=\"\" width=\"630\" height=\"421\" /> ©Johnalexandr / Adobe Stock[/caption]\r\n\r\nBut if you are trying to get into tea, you’ll probably want to hold off on some teas. Lapsang souchong, Japanese green teas like sencha or matcha, and white teas may not be what you are expecting. You may want to ease into these types after you’re more accustomed to tea and its various flavors.\r\n\r\nSo then, where <em>do</em> you begin?\r\n\r\nFor many people, their journey into the world of tea starts with something more familiar, like earl grey or a teabag from a box. Although teabags have gotten better throughout the years, they will never be what tea is meant to be. In this article (and in my book, <a href=\"//coursofppt.com/book/home-auto-hobbies/food-drink/coffee-tea/tea-for-dummies-297052/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener\"><em>Tea For Dummies</em></a>) we focus on loose-leaf tea.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab1\" >Great teas to start with</h2>\r\nAt our store, we have seven different versions of loose-leaf earl grey, one of which is our number-one-selling tea. In fact, three of our best-selling teas come from our earl grey collection, and they generally rank within the top ten teas every year, which speaks to their enduring popularity. Once you have a cup of high-quality loose-leaf earl grey, you will never teabag again.\r\n\r\nAnother commonly known tea is chai. This spiced and often sweetened tea is a popular starting point in coffee shops and cafes. Fruity flavored teas are another great entry tea, especially iced.\r\n\r\nEven as a tea sommelier, I never judge if someone’s favorite is a pineapple-mango tea or a sweetened caramel tea. I like to look at these as gateway teas. You should always drink what you enjoy the most and then branch out every so often. You might find a new favorite.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab2\" >How to choose a black tea</h2>\r\nThings to consider when picking a black tea is how strong and bold you want it, how much astringency (that dry feeling in your mouth) you want, whether you prefer a tea that is simply strong versus something that has layers of flavor, and whether you like earthy or smoky notes.\r\n\r\nFor a less intense black tea, there are plenty of options. Ceylon teas are full-bodied and brisk, but not overly so, and they have just the right amount of astringency. They are what many people think of when they envision black tea.\r\n\r\nCeylon is great iced and works well with lemon, sugar, milk, and so on. Assam teas pair particularly well with food, so they can be nice with a snack or meal, and they hold up to a little cream and sugar.\r\n\r\nIf, however, you want a strong tea, breakfast teas are a good match — and you have a lot to choose from: Irish, Scottish, English, Russian, and East Frisian blends, among others. Every tea blender will use a different ratio of teas, so you may find that you prefer some breakfast blends over others. Yet, all of them are robust enough to stand up to milk and sugar. Just take care in brewing these teas so that they don’t become bitter.\r\n\r\nFor coffee lovers who are used to deep and complex flavors, consider an Assam from India or the many pu-erh and Yunnan teas from China. Some wild-grown teas would also make this list. Although these aren’t in-your-face bold like the breakfast blends, they are intriguingly full-bodied and multilayered in flavor.\r\n<p class=\"article-tips tip\">Note that teas that have been processed by the cut-tear-curl (CTC) process (these teas are in tiny bits) will release caffeine more quickly than teas composed of intact or largely intact leaves, especially if those leaves have been tightly rolled. However, this isn’t to say that you will get more caffeine overall.</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab3\" >Going green</h2>\r\nTo start your green tea journey, Chinese green teas are more common and recognizable, so they are often our first recommendation. Japanese teas tend to be grassier or “seaweed”-like in flavor, so, for some, it takes a bit getting used to.\r\n\r\nOften, people’s first experience with green tea is with a sweet matcha latte in a coffee shop or the tea served at their favorite Asian restaurant. Green tea is as nuanced as black tea, but it may take a bit more time to find your favorite.\r\n\r\nOolong, pu-erh, some white teas, and other tea types can also be great first-time teas, but we often recommend starting with the basics when first <em>steeping</em> into the world of tea.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab4\" >Herbal tea choices abound</h2>\r\nIf you aren’t sure you’re ready for tea, but want a healthy or caffeine-free beverage, we suggest you start with some of the many herbal teas available.\r\n\r\nFruit teas, which consist of fruit and other herbals, are a terrific substitute for high-calorie juice. You can find just about any fruit you want, and they are usually fantastic iced. Low in sugar but filled with flavor, these are wonderful for everyone in the family. Kids generally love fruit teas!\r\n\r\nRooibos and honeybush blends are also both kid- and adult-friendly options. You can readily find fruity, floral, earthy, or other blends, so you’re sure to find something you enjoy, and they are naturally caffeine free.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab5\" >Where to buy tea</h2>\r\nWhen shopping for tea, it's important to know how and where a store sources its teas. You needn’t know the exact gardens or time of day your tea was harvested, but it is important to know that the tea store sources teas from gardens that go above and beyond to ensure the highest quality.\r\n\r\nThis is not to say that grabbing a teabag tea in the hotel lobby is a no-no, but buying quality loose tea is worth the extra penny. Plus, not all high-quality loose-leaf teas are expensive. A very high-quality loose-leaf breakfast blend may not cost much more per gram than a box of teabags at the grocery store.\r\n\r\nSingle-estate, handpicked, and rare teas from small gardens may seem a bit pricey, but keep in mind that a 50-gram bag of tea can make 15 to 20 cups, and some teas can be brewed several times. A $30 bag of tea that can yield 20 cups makes the per-cup price only about $1.50, which is well under the cost of a hot drink at most cafes or restaurants.\r\n<h2 id=\"tab6\" >How much tea to buy</h2>\r\nTea may be sold by the ounce or gram. Most teas require about 3 grams (0.1 ounce) of leaves to make an 8-ounce cup, giving you the following general guidelines:\r\n<ul>\r\n \t<li>50 grams (1.8 ounces) of leaves yields 15 to 20 cups of tea</li>\r\n \t<li>100 grams (3.5 ounces) of leaves yields 30 to 40 cups of tea</li>\r\n \t<li>200 grams (7 ounces) of leaves yields 60 to 80 cups of tea</li>\r\n \t<li>500 grams (17.6 ounces) of leaves yields 150 to 200 cups of tea</li>\r\n</ul>\r\n<p class=\"article-tips\">Many types of tea leaves can be brewed a second time (or more), which doubles the number of cups you get!</p>\r\n\r\n<h2 id=\"tab7\" >Storing your tea leaves</h2>\r\nIt's important that your tea is stored in an area free of moisture, strong odors, and light. For this reason, we recommend you avoid glass jars. Although it's so tempting to stock up on teas when you go to a beautiful tea and spice store that has rows and rows of jars filled with teas and spices, remember that the teas (or spices) probably won’t be of great quality because of how they were stored and displayed.\r\n\r\nMetal tins are good if they have a tight seal, but be aware that tins will absorb aroma so keep similar teas in each tin (for instance, if you’ve stored a smoky tea in a tin, keep that tin for smoky teas, or if you have an earl grey tin, keep it an earl grey tin).","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":35248,"name":"Lisa McDonald","slug":"lisa-mcdonald","description":"<b>Lisa McDonald </b>is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. and the owner of TeaHaus in Ann Arbor, MI (teahaus.com), an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find over 200 varieties of tea.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35248"}},{"authorId":35249,"name":"Jill Rheinheimer","slug":"jill-rheinheimer","description":"<b>Jill Rheinheimer,</b> an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea (ItsMoreThanTea.wordpress.com) as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35249"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34333,"title":"Coffee & Tea","slug":"coffee-tea","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34333"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[{"label":"Great teas to start with","target":"#tab1"},{"label":"How to choose a black tea","target":"#tab2"},{"label":"Going green","target":"#tab3"},{"label":"Herbal tea choices abound","target":"#tab4"},{"label":"Where to buy tea","target":"#tab5"},{"label":"How much tea to buy","target":"#tab6"},{"label":"Storing your tea leaves","target":"#tab7"}],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":298036,"title":"How To Make a Perfect Cup of Tea","slug":"how-to-make-the-perfect-cup-of-tea","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298036"}},{"articleId":298022,"title":"Is Green Tea Healthier Than Black Tea?","slug":"is-green-tea-healthier-than-black-tea","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298022"}},{"articleId":297195,"title":"Tea For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"tea-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297195"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":298036,"title":"How To Make a Perfect Cup of Tea","slug":"how-to-make-the-perfect-cup-of-tea","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298036"}},{"articleId":298022,"title":"Is Green Tea Healthier Than Black Tea?","slug":"is-green-tea-healthier-than-black-tea","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/298022"}},{"articleId":297195,"title":"Tea For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"tea-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/297195"}},{"articleId":284602,"title":"Coffee Brewing Methods","slug":"coffee-brewing-methods","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284602"}},{"articleId":284590,"title":"How to Order Coffee","slug":"how-to-order-coffee","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284590"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":297052,"slug":"tea-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119986256","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119986257/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119986257/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119986257-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119986257/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119986257/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tea-for-dummies-cover-1119986257-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Tea For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b><b data-author-id=\"35248\">Lisa McDonald</b> </b>is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. and the owner of TeaHaus in Ann Arbor, MI (teahaus.com), an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find over 200 varieties of tea. <b><b data-author-id=\"35249\">Jill Rheinheimer</b>,</b> an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea (ItsMoreThanTea.wordpress.com) as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":35248,"name":"Lisa McDonald","slug":"lisa-mcdonald","description":"<b>Lisa McDonald </b>is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. and the owner of TeaHaus in Ann Arbor, MI (teahaus.com), an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find over 200 varieties of tea.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35248"}},{"authorId":35249,"name":"Jill Rheinheimer","slug":"jill-rheinheimer","description":"<b>Jill Rheinheimer,</b> an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea (ItsMoreThanTea.wordpress.com) as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35249"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;food-drink&quot;,&quot;coffee-tea&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119986256&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-641de55e9a9ce\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;food-drink&quot;,&quot;coffee-tea&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119986256&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-641de55e9b7c7\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-03-22T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":298011},{"headers":{"creationTime":"2024-02-10T15:41:48+00:00","modifiedTime":"2024-02-10T15:41:48+00:00","timestamp":"2024-02-10T18:01:02+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33809"},"slug":"home-auto-hobbies","categoryId":33809},{"name":"Food & Drink","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/33839"},"slug":"food-drink","categoryId":33839},{"name":"Coffee & Tea","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34333"},"slug":"coffee-tea","categoryId":34333}],"title":"Tea For Dummies Cheat Sheet","strippedTitle":"tea for dummies cheat sheet","slug":"tea-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","canonicalUrl":"","收数据库索刹车系统推广调整":{"metaDescription":"Learn more about tea with this handy Cheat Sheet. It includes the main types, how to properly brew a cup of tea, and much more.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Although there are literally thousands of teas and herbal teas, figuring out where to start doesn’t need to be daunting! All tea is made from the same plant, <em>Camellia sinensis</em>; everything else is an herbal tea. There is so much to learn about each of these types — but there truly is something for every taste.","description":"Although there are literally thousands of teas and herbal teas, figuring out where to start doesn’t need to be daunting! All tea is made from the same plant, <em>Camellia sinensis</em>; everything else is an herbal tea. There is so much to learn about each of these types — but there truly is something for every taste.","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":35248,"name":"Lisa McDonald","slug":"lisa-mcdonald","description":"Lisa McDonald is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. She's also the owner of TeaHaus, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find more than 200 varieties of tea.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35248"}},{"authorId":35249,"name":"Jill Rheinheimer","slug":"jill-rheinheimer","description":"Jill Rheinheimer, an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea, as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35249"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34333,"title":"Coffee & Tea","slug":"coffee-tea","_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/categories/34333"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":284602,"title":"Coffee Brewing Methods","slug":"coffee-brewing-methods","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284602"}},{"articleId":284590,"title":"How to Order Coffee","slug":"how-to-order-coffee","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284590"}},{"articleId":284582,"title":"Making the Perfect Espresso—The Four 'M's","slug":"making-the-perfect-espresso-the-four-ms","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284582"}},{"articleId":284559,"title":"Central America’s Influence on Coffee Production","slug":"central-americas-influence-on-coffee-production","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284559"}},{"articleId":284549,"title":"The Life Cycle of Coffee: From Seed to Harvest","slug":"the-life-cycle-of-coffee-from-seed-to-harvest","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/284549"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":false,"relatedBook":{"bookId":297052,"slug":"tea-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119986256","categoryList":["home-auto-hobbies","food-drink","coffee-tea"],"amazon":{"default":"//www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119986257/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"//www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119986257/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"//www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=//www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119986257-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"//www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119986257/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"//www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119986257/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"//coursofppt.com/wp-content/uploads/tea-for-dummies-cover-1119986257-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Tea For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"<p><b data-author-id=\"35248\">Lisa McDonald</b> is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. She's also the owner of TeaHaus, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find more than 200 varieties of tea. <b data-author-id=\"35249\">Jill Rheinheimer</b>, an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea, as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus.</p>","authors":[{"authorId":35248,"name":"Lisa McDonald","slug":"lisa-mcdonald","description":"Lisa McDonald is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. She's also the owner of TeaHaus, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find more than 200 varieties of tea.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35248"}},{"authorId":35249,"name":"Jill Rheinheimer","slug":"jill-rheinheimer","description":"Jill Rheinheimer, an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea, as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus.","hasArticle":false,"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35249"}}],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;food-drink&quot;,&quot;coffee-tea&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119986256&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63e6865ec2faf\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_right_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_right_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;home-auto-hobbies&quot;,&quot;food-drink&quot;,&quot;coffee-tea&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;9781119986256&quot;]}]\" id=\"du-slot-63e6865ec40d2\"></div></div>"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","articleList":[{"articleId":0,"title":"","slug":null,"categoryList":[],"_links":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/articles/"}}],"content":[{"title":"Different types of teas","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Within the <em>Camellia sinensis</em> family, you can find the following, with each type of tea offering a full spectrum of flavors:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>Black tea</li>\n<li>Green tea</li>\n<li>Oolong tea</li>\n<li>White tea</li>\n<li>Fermented tea</li>\n<li>Tea blends (including blends of different teas and teas with inclusions)</li>\n</ul>\n<p>The number of herbal teas is practically unlimited. Some of the more common include the following, (although herbal blends may also incorporate spices, seeds, and nuts):</p>\n<ul>\n<li>Rooibos and honeybush blends</li>\n<li>Fruit teas</li>\n<li>Herbals such as mint, mate, or mountain tea</li>\n<li>Flowers, including chamomile, rose, lavender, or hibiscus</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Brewing the perfect cup of tea","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>After you choose what tea to brew, you have to figure out how to brew it correctly. Consider these important things:</p>\n<h3><strong>What equipment is needed?</strong></h3>\n<p>There are a lot of tea-brewing gadgets on the market today. All you really need is something to heat water, a vessel to brew the loose leaf in, a fine mesh strainer or brewing basket, and a cup for drinking your tea.</p>\n<h3><strong>How much tea to use?</strong></h3>\n<p>The average 10- to 12-ounce cup of tea needs about 3 grams of loose-leaf tea.</p>\n<h3><strong>What temperature of water is best for which teas?</strong></h3>\n<p>This depends on what type of tea you are brewing. A black, herbal, or fruit tea is almost always brewed with boiling water, whereas a green or white tea may be brewed with water as cool as 150 degrees.</p>\n<h3><strong>How many minutes to brew it? </strong></h3>\n<p>Brewing time also depends on the tea and how you like it. The longer the brew, the stronger it gets. Be careful though. Tea may also get more bitter — to the point of being almost undrinkable.</p>\n"},{"title":"Fun facts about tea","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Share these fun facts at your next tea party!</p>\n<ul>\n<li>We often think of the English and their tea time, but Turkey is actually the largest tea-drinking country in the world, with the United States not far behind and always among the top three.</li>\n<li>Tea is grown in many parts of the world, and every country has its own tradition when it comes to tea. Some countries, like China and Japan, tend to produce more green teas, whereas most of the teas produced in India are black teas.</li>\n<li>Like frost wine, frost and frozen teas are made with lightly frozen tea leaves that are harvested while they are still frozen.</li>\n<li>When you order your favorite chai tea, you are simply ordering a tea tea. The word <em>chai</em> just means “tea” in many languages.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Tea misconceptions","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>The following are some common misconceptions about tea, caffeine, and health:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>“Caffeine is bad for you.” Although too much caffeine can cause jitters and other unpleasant side effects, caffeine works together with tea’s unique amino acid L-theanine to give you a calm alertness.</li>\n<li>“Some teas have less caffeine than others.” Unfortunately, calculating the caffeine level in tea is extremely complicated, and there’s no way to predict how much is in your teacup. (Note, too, that decaf tea also contains some amount of caffeine.)</li>\n<li>“Tea is healthy.” Yes, it’s true that tea is good for you. However, it’s difficult to link tea with specific health benefits, and currently the science just doesn’t back up many of the claims. Still, tea contains lots of antioxidants, and it can positively impact your mood and outlook. There’s nothing like sharing a pot of tea with a friend.</li>\n</ul>\n"},{"title":"Incorporating tea in food and drink","thumb":null,"image":null,"content":"<p>Tea not only makes a great beverage, but it can also be used as an ingredient when cooking, such as:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>A little smoky lapsang souchong, ground and rubbed on your ribs, can give them that “smoked for hours” flavor.</li>\n<li>Heavy cream infused with your favorite tea overnight in the fridge, then strained and whipped, can take any dessert over the top. Just add a dollop of your tea-infused whipped cream and wow your guests.</li>\n</ul>\n<p>You can also use tea to up your cocktail game by making it a key ingredient in your bar. Here are some suggestions:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>Tea syrups</li>\n<li>Tea-infused vodka, gin, or other spirits</li>\n<li> Tea bitters</li>\n</ul>\n"}],"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"sponsorAd":"","sponsorEbookTitle":"","sponsorEbookLink":"","sponsorEbookImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Explore","lifeExpectancy":"Five years","lifeExpectancySetFrom":"2024-02-10T00:00:00+00:00","dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":297195}],"_links":{"self":{"self":"//dummies-api.coursofppt.com/v2/authors/35248/articles?sortField=time&sortOrder=1&size=10&offset=0"}}},"objectTitle":"","status":"success","pageType":"author","objectId":"35248","page":1,"sortField":"time","sortOrder":1,"categoriesIds":[],"articleTypes":[],"filterData":{"articleTypeFilter":[{"articleType":"Articles","count":3},{"articleType":"Cheat Sheet","count":1}]},"filterDataLoadedStatus":"success","pageSize":10},"adsState":{"pageScripts":{"headers":{"timestamp":"2025-03-04T05:50:01+00:00"},"adsId":0,"data":{"scripts":[{"pages":["all"],"location":"header","script":"<!--Optimizely Script-->\r\n<script src=\"//cdn.optimizely.com/js/10563184655.js\"></script>","enabled":false},{"pages":["all"],"location":"header","script":"<!-- comScore Tag -->\r\n<script>var _comscore = _comscore || [];_comscore.push({ c1: \"2\", c2: \"15097263\" });(function() {var s = document.createElement(\"script\"), el = document.getElementsByTagName(\"script\")[0]; s.async = true;s.src = (document.location.protocol == \"https:\" ? \"//sb\" : \"//b\") + \".scorecardresearch.com/beacon.js\";el.parentNode.insertBefore(s, el);})();</script><noscript><img src=\"//sb.scorecardresearch.com/p?c1=2&c2=15097263&cv=2.0&cj=1\" /></noscript>\r\n<!-- / comScore Tag -->","enabled":true},{"pages":["all"],"location":"footer","script":"<!--BEGIN QUALTRICS WEBSITE FEEDBACK SNIPPET-->\r\n<script type='text/javascript'>\r\n(function(){var g=function(e,h,f,g){\r\nthis.get=function(a){for(var a=a+\"=\",c=document.cookie.split(\";\"),b=0,e=c.length;b<e;b++){for(var d=c[b];\" \"==d.charAt(0);)d=d.substring(1,d.length);if(0==d.indexOf(a))return d.substring(a.length,d.length)}return null};\r\nthis.set=function(a,c){var b=\"\",b=new Date;b.setTime(b.getTime()+6048E5);b=\"; expires=\"+b.toGMTString();document.cookie=a+\"=\"+c+b+\"; path=/; \"};\r\nthis.check=function(){var a=this.get(f);if(a)a=a.split(\":\");else if(100!=e)\"v\"==h&&(e=Math.random()>=e/100?0:100),a=[h,e,0],this.set(f,a.join(\":\"));else return!0;var c=a[1];if(100==c)return!0;switch(a[0]){case \"v\":return!1;case \"r\":return c=a[2]%Math.floor(100/c),a[2]++,this.set(f,a.join(\":\")),!c}return!0};\r\nthis.go=function(){if(this.check()){var a=document.createElement(\"script\");a.type=\"text/javascript\";a.src=g;document.body&&document.body.appendChild(a)}};\r\nthis.start=function(){var t=this;\"complete\"!==document.readyState?window.addEventListener?window.addEventListener(\"load\",function(){t.go()},!1):window.attachEvent&&window.attachEvent(\"onload\",function(){t.go()}):t.go()};};\r\ntry{(new g(100,\"r\",\"QSI_S_ZN_5o5yqpvMVjgDOuN\",\"//zn5o5yqpvmvjgdoun-wiley.siteintercept.qualtrics.com/SIE/?Q_ZID=ZN_5o5yqpvMVjgDOuN\")).start()}catch(i){}})();\r\n</script><div id='ZN_5o5yqpvMVjgDOuN'><!--DO NOT REMOVE-CONTENTS PLACED HERE--></div>\r\n<!--END WEBSITE FEEDBACK SNIPPET-->","enabled":false},{"pages":["all"],"location":"header","script":"<!-- Hotjar Tracking Code for //coursofppt.com -->\r\n<script>\r\n (function(h,o,t,j,a,r){\r\n h.hj=h.hj||function(){(h.hj.q=h.hj.q||[]).push(arguments)};\r\n h._hjSettings={hjid:257151,hjsv:6};\r\n a=o.getElementsByTagName('head')[0];\r\n r=o.createElement('script');r.async=1;\r\n r.src=t+h._hjSettings.hjid+j+h._hjSettings.hjsv;\r\n a.appendChild(r);\r\n })(window,document,'//static.hotjar.com/c/hotjar-','.js?sv=');\r\n</script>","enabled":false},{"pages":["article"],"location":"header","script":"<!-- //Connect Container: dummies --> <script src=\"//get.s-onetag.com/bffe21a1-6bb8-4928-9449-7beadb468dae/tag.min.js\" async defer></script>","enabled":true},{"pages":["homepage"],"location":"header","script":"<meta name=\"facebook-domain-verification\" content=\"irk8y0irxf718trg3uwwuexg6xpva0\" />","enabled":true},{"pages":["homepage","article","category","search"],"location":"footer","script":"<!-- Facebook Pixel Code -->\r\n<noscript>\r\n<img height=\"1\" width=\"1\" src=\"//www.facebook.com/tr?id=256338321977984&ev=PageView&noscript=1\"/>\r\n</noscript>\r\n<!-- End Facebook Pixel Code -->","enabled":true}]}},"pageScriptsLoadedStatus":"success"},"navigationState":{"navigationCollections":[{"collectionId":287568,"title":"BYOB (Be Your Own Boss)","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-entry-level-entrepreneur-287568"},{"collectionId":293237,"title":"Be a Rad Dad","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/be-the-best-dad-293237"},{"collectionId":295890,"title":"Career Shifting","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/career-shifting-295890"},{"collectionId":294090,"title":"Contemplating the Cosmos","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/theres-something-about-space-294090"},{"collectionId":287563,"title":"For Those Seeking Peace of Mind","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-those-seeking-peace-of-mind-287563"},{"collectionId":287570,"title":"For the Aspiring Aficionado","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-bougielicious-287570"},{"collectionId":291903,"title":"For the Budding Cannabis Enthusiast","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-budding-cannabis-enthusiast-291903"},{"collectionId":299891,"title":"For the College Bound","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-college-bound-299891"},{"collectionId":291934,"title":"For the Exam-Season Crammer","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/for-the-exam-season-crammer-291934"},{"collectionId":301547,"title":"For the Game Day Prepper","hasSubCategories":false,"url":"/collection/big-game-day-prep-made-easy-301547"}],"navigationCollectionsLoadedStatus":"success","navigationCategories":{"books":{"0":{"data":[{"categoryId":33512,"title":"Technology","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/books/technology-33512"},{"categoryId":33662,"title":"Academics & The Arts","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/books/academics-the-arts-33662"},{"categoryId":33809,"title":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/books/home-auto-hobbies-33809"},{"categoryId":34038,"title":"Body, Mind, & Spirit","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/books/body-mind-spirit-34038"},{"categoryId":34224,"title":"Business, Careers, & Money","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/books/business-careers-money-34224"}],"breadcrumbs":[],"categoryTitle":"Level 0 Category","mainCategoryUrl":"/category/books/level-0-category-0"}},"articles":{"0":{"data":[{"categoryId":33512,"title":"Technology","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/articles/technology-33512"},{"categoryId":33662,"title":"Academics & The Arts","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/articles/academics-the-arts-33662"},{"categoryId":33809,"title":"Home, Auto, & Hobbies","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/articles/home-auto-hobbies-33809"},{"categoryId":34038,"title":"Body, Mind, & Spirit","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/articles/body-mind-spirit-34038"},{"categoryId":34224,"title":"Business, Careers, & Money","hasSubCategories":true,"url":"/category/articles/business-careers-money-34224"}],"breadcrumbs":[],"categoryTitle":"Level 0 Category","mainCategoryUrl":"/category/articles/level-0-category-0"}}},"navigationCategoriesLoadedStatus":"success"},"searchState":{"searchList":[],"searchStatus":"initial","relatedArticlesList":[],"relatedArticlesStatus":"initial"},"routeState":{"name":"Author","path":"/author/lisa-mcdonald-35248/","hash":"","query":{},"params":{"author":"lisa-mcdonald-35248"},"fullPath":"/author/lisa-mcdonald-35248/","meta":{"routeType":"author","prerenderWithAsyncData":true},"from":{"name":null,"path":"/","hash":"","query":{},"params":{},"fullPath":"/","meta":{}}},"profileState":{"auth":{},"userOptions":{},"status":"success"}}

Lisa McDonald

Lisa McDonald is one of a handful of European-trained tea sommeliers in the U.S. and the owner of TeaHaus in Ann Arbor, MI (teahaus.com), an acclaimed tea shop where customers can find over 200 varieties of tea. Jill Rheinheimer, an editor and graphic designer, writes a research-based blog about all things tea (ItsMoreThanTea.wordpress.com) as well as educational and marketing material for TeaHaus.

Articles From Lisa McDonald

4 results
4 results
How to Make a Perfect Cup of Tea Article / Updated 08-03-2023 Listen to the article:Download audio No matter what you’ve heard, brewing loose tea is easy. It requires only a few pieces of equipment that you likely already own, and then you simply brew your leaves. With our tips, you can brew any tea and get terrific results. Of course, you’ll want to experiment a bit for your personal preference, but that’s part of the fun! Basic equipment This is all you need to brew tea: Something to heat water A cup or mug A brew basket or strainer of some sort That’s it! But here’s a closer look at each of these, along with a few suggestions: Ways to heat water Some pretty fancy water kettles are out there these days. Even we are drawn toward the ones with all the buttons, temperature controls, automations, and stellar designs. At our tea shop, TeaHaus, we have three water dispensers that offer a constant supply of filtered water, each set at a specific temperature. However, at home, I have a simple glass electric kettle. If you’d rather not have an electric kettle that takes up space on your countertop, you can easily heat water in a pan on your stove (keep reading to learn how to visually gauge water temperature), although a whistling kettle is nice. A whistling kettle lets you know when your water is boiling and reminds you to turn the stove off, a good safety feature. Any style of whistling kettle will do but stay away from cheap aluminum or thin stainless steel. It is worth the few extra dollars to get a sturdier kettle. We recommend that you never use a microwave oven to heat your water. The water heats unevenly, you can’t control the temperature with any accuracy, and you can easily burn yourself with superheated water. Cup or mug Much debate is ongoing about whether a cup should be glass, or porcelain, or clay, or some other material. Although the array of cup choices adds to the drinking experience, in this article, we’re keeping it simple, so go with a cup or mug of your choosing. I prefer white porcelain or glass because I like to see the color of my tea, but everyone has that favorite mug or cup. Strainer If we are making a cup of tea for ourselves, we like to use a tea brewing basket that we can set directly into a mug or cup. However, a small kitchen strainer will also get the job done. We don’t recommend the classic tea balls for most loose-leaf teas because the leaves need room to expand. For example, the bottom photo in the figure below shows how oolong tea leaves unfurl into intact leaves and leaf sets that would be too tightly packed into a tea ball. However, these balls are often adequate for small-leaf teas or cut-tear-curl (CTC) teas, like a classic English breakfast. In the top photo below, you can also see that the English breakfast tea leaves expanded only a little bit during brewing. Making a cup of hot tea When you have your basic brewing equipment, all you need are tea leaves and water. Here’s an easy guide to making a terrific cup of tea: Measuring your tea leaves Most teabags are perfectly portioned for an 8- to 12-ounce cuppa, but it gets a bit tricky with loose-leaf tea. Many directions say you should use a teaspoon or a heaping teaspoon of tea leaves, but this isn’t always the best form of measurement for the perfect cup. The problem is that tea leaves vary from tea to tea, sometimes dramatically. Therefore, measuring tea by weight is more accurate than measuring tea using a teaspoon. You generally need about three grams of tea for an 8- to 12-ounce cup. So, when we train new employees to brew tea at TeaHaus, we have them use a gram scale for the first few weeks. After they get a feel for what 3 grams of various teas look like, they can start to use an eyeball estimate, along with a teaspoon, when brewing tea for customers. If a customer likes a stronger or weaker tea, we don’t adjust the brew time or the recommended temperature. Instead, we adjust the amount of tea used. If you don’t have a gram scale, start by using a teaspoon, but remember that you’ll need to adjust for the tea. The photo below shows an example of how 3 grams of tea can look drastically different. Three grams of CTC tea (left side of photo) are easily measured by a teaspoon. However, some whole-leaf teas, especially those that are very fluffy, like the tea on the right side of the photo, require more tea by volume. For these teas, if your directions say to use a “heaping teaspoon,” you may find that the leaves are so difficult to measure with a teaspoon (they are large, unwieldy, and don’t stay nicely on the spoon!) that realistically you may need a mega-heaping teaspoon or two heaping teaspoons. Keep in mind that no exact science dictates how much tea to use, and personal preference should help you decide how strong you like your tea, and therefore, how much tea to use. Heating your water Whether you have a stove top kettle or a simple electric one, we have a few recommendations. At home, we really like an electric kettle. We especially like the glass ones because we can see the bubbles form, which indicates the approximate temperature of the water. You can easily teach yourself how to visually gauge the water temperature (this also works well if you’re heating your water in a pan on the stove): Shrimp eyes. When tiny bubbles (shrimp eyes) start to form on the bottom of the kettle, the water is approximately 155 to 160 degrees F. Crab eyes. When the water starts to produce steam and the bubbles are bigger (crab eyes) but are still on the bottom, the temperature is around 175 degrees F. Fish eyes. When the bubbles (fish eyes) begin to release from the bottom, the temperature is around 180 to 185 degrees F. Pearl strands. When the bubbles are more like a strand of pearls than eyes, the water is between 190 and 205 degrees F. Boil. Soon after, you have a rolling bubble, which is 212 degrees F. Note that if you live in an area with good water or if you are using filtered water, there is no reason to bring your water to a boil and then cool it to the correct brewing temperature. If your kettle isn’t transparent and you can’t see the bubbles, you can listen for the sound. You’ll know when you’re at the pearl stage because you will hear the low rumble of the pot as the bubbles begin to release. This is, of course, all made easier with a thermometer or a temperature-control kettle. Brewing hot tea At TeaHaus, we give our customers a little guide to brewing. The front of the postcard illustrates the brewing steps (see the figures below), and the back provides a simple guide for brewing time and temperature. You’ll see that most teas have a range of water temperatures, but less-oxidized green tea is always brewed at lower temperatures than fully oxidized black tea. White tea, the most delicate and minimally processed of leaves, must always be brewed at relatively low temperatures or else you damage the leaves, and your tea won’t taste very good. Note, too, that if you brew tea for too long a time, it will become bitter. Herbal teas (this includes rooibos and fruit teas), on the other hand, can never be over-brewed. Keep in mind that these recommendations are just starting points; you should always adjust the parameters to best fit your own preference. Steps to a perfect cup To brew one cup of tea at a time using a cup-sized brewing basket, follow these steps: Place the basket into your cup. Add about 3 grams of tea into the basket. (See the “Measuring your tea leaves” section above.) Pour hot water over the leaves and set a timer. At TeaHaus, we put our recommended brewing time and temperature on the package for each tea, but when in doubt, brewing for 2–5 minutes is going to be okay for most teas, depending on the tea and your tolerance for bitterness. When the timer goes off, remove the basket, and your tea is ready to drink. Shake out the leaves into your compost bin or trash and rinse out the remaining leaves — unless it’s a tea that you want to rebrew later in the day. In that case, you can just let the leaves stay in the basket (no need to refrigerate). Step 5 is where teabags are easier to use — even we will admit that. However, you can make your own teabags ahead of time. Just purchase paper filters or teabags for loose tea and spend a few minutes filling enough for the week, for example. Keep in mind, though, that the bag, much like the tea ball, will constrict some unfurling of the leaves, so larger-leaf teas are still best when brewed using a strainer or basket. Here is an alternate way to make either a cup or a pot of tea. This method allows the leaves to really unfurl and move around freely, which gives you a better cup of tea (see the photo below). Follow these steps: Measure your tea leaves into any vessel that can withstand heat. (We recommend a glass vessel, such as a glass measuring cup.) Pour your hot water over the leaves and set your timer. When the timer goes off, strain the leaves through a brewing basket (or even a small kitchen strainer) into your teacup or tempered teapot. If you plan to rebrew the tea, shake the leaves back into the brewing vessel; otherwise, shake them into your compost bin or trash. People ask all the time if they can rebrew their leaves. With a brewing basket, it is quite simple. Just place the basket back in your cup and pour more water over it. If you’ve brewed your leaves loose in another vessel, simply add water again. There are some teas that rebrew well and others that don’t. We always recommend that people just try it. There is no real answer. Larger leaves often brew better the second time around since they unfurl more during the second brew, but, again, this is up to personal preference. View Article
Is Green Tea Healthier Than Black Tea? Article / Updated 03-24-2023 Listen to the article:Download audio Although you may hear that green tea is better for you because the catechins (the most common flavanol — a tannin and antioxidant) haven’t been converted into more complex forms, don’t immediately throw out the black tea that you love and switch to green tea! Both green and black tea have antioxidant properties. Let’s take a look. The benefits of green tea The catechin epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) that’s found in green tea is often called a “natural drug” and is the golden child of current research. Laboratory studies suggest that this strong antioxidant may, indeed, be helpful to treat or prevent many chronic diseases, including those that damage the brain. Intriguingly, EGCG also may have some of the same advantages that theanine offers. Preliminary research suggests that EGCG may promote alpha, theta, and beta wave activity in the brain, helping us calm down and focus. However, even though it’s delicious, and even if you drink copious amounts of it, green tea is not guaranteed to give you all the benefits of EGCG that have been demonstrated in the lab. The tea may be loaded with polyphenols, but there may not be enough to have a measurable effect, or your body may be unable to access them. The upshot? If you like green tea, drink it. Green tea has lots of polyphenols. The benefits of black tea Like catechins, the theaflavins and thearubigins (types of tannins) found in black tea are antioxidants. The conversion from simple to complex polyphenols does not appear to change their antioxidant properties in any substantial way. Although numerous studies focus on the catechin EGCG found in green tea, plenty of work also supports the similar antioxidant capacity of theaflavins and thearubigins. Moreover, many of the health benefits suggested by studies of green tea are also supported by research on black tea, including possible protection against dementia, cancer, viruses, and bacteria. Note, however, that whole leaf teas appear to contain more robust antioxidants than cut-tear-curl (CTC) processed teas. (For more about this, check out our book Tea For Dummies.) But, as mentioned in the previous section, consuming polyphenols isn’t a promise that health effects are tangible. In a nutshell? If you like black tea, drink it. Black tea has lots of polyphenols. Does it matter which tea you drink? So many teas! And so many voices out there telling you to drink this or that tea. But tea shouldn’t be this difficult. Instead, you should drink tea only because you like it, and you should drink only those teas that you like. Because it really doesn’t matter which tea you drink. All tea contains polyphenols, and all tea polyphenols are antioxidants. It doesn’t matter whether you’re drinking tea that contains mostly catechins (green tea) or mostly theaflavins (black tea). This is a win-win situation for tea drinkers! Note also that if you want to drink the tea that contains the most polyphenols, just drink the tea that you love. (Bonus: You’ll end up drinking more of it because you enjoy it.) Calculating the number of polyphenols in any given tea is futile, just like figuring out caffeine levels. Every individual tea must be tested in a lab, and generalizations are challenging. For example, some studies have demonstrated that white tea contains more polyphenols than green, whereas other studies have shown the opposite. Levels vary widely even within a type of tea. As with caffeine, polyphenol quantity depends on a plethora of factors including: Type of tea plant Geographic location Growing conditions and stress on the plant Time of harvest Which leaves are harvested How the tea is produced How you brew your leaves Why green tea held the spotlight for a while Green tea was originally thought to be healthier than black tea for numerous reasons: Early studies came out of primarily green tea-drinking countries such as China and Japan. Green tea-drinking countries were ideal for studies involving large groups of people. Researchers could find communities in which most people were drinking the same tea — grown and produced from the same tea garden and brewed and consumed in a similar manner. EGCG is undeniably a potent antioxidant, and, to our knowledge, green tea contains more EGCG than anything else we ingest (remember, though, that polyphenol quantity doesn’t always translate into concrete health benefits). Extensive studies of black tea began relatively recently; therefore, a larger body of work exists for green tea. However, as research continues, we’re learning how much more we need to learn. Although thearubigins aren’t well understood and EGCG continues to reveal surprises, results for all types of tea continue to be promising. In the end, all tea contains polyphenols, and all polyphenols contribute to your health. Drink the tea that makes you happy! View Article
The Best Teas for Beginner Tea Drinkers Article / Updated 03-24-2023 Listen to the article:Download audio Tea. It’s as simple as boiling water, pouring it over leaves, taking a couple minutes to relax, and straining out the leaves. One cup of the perfect tea can hook you for a lifetime. But if you are trying to get into tea, you’ll probably want to hold off on some teas. Lapsang souchong, Japanese green teas like sencha or matcha, and white teas may not be what you are expecting. You may want to ease into these types after you’re more accustomed to tea and its various flavors. So then, where do you begin? For many people, their journey into the world of tea starts with something more familiar, like earl grey or a teabag from a box. Although teabags have gotten better throughout the years, they will never be what tea is meant to be. In this article (and in my book, Tea For Dummies) we focus on loose-leaf tea. Great teas to start with At our store, we have seven different versions of loose-leaf earl grey, one of which is our number-one-selling tea. In fact, three of our best-selling teas come from our earl grey collection, and they generally rank within the top ten teas every year, which speaks to their enduring popularity. Once you have a cup of high-quality loose-leaf earl grey, you will never teabag again. Another commonly known tea is chai. This spiced and often sweetened tea is a popular starting point in coffee shops and cafes. Fruity flavored teas are another great entry tea, especially iced. Even as a tea sommelier, I never judge if someone’s favorite is a pineapple-mango tea or a sweetened caramel tea. I like to look at these as gateway teas. You should always drink what you enjoy the most and then branch out every so often. You might find a new favorite. How to choose a black tea Things to consider when picking a black tea is how strong and bold you want it, how much astringency (that dry feeling in your mouth) you want, whether you prefer a tea that is simply strong versus something that has layers of flavor, and whether you like earthy or smoky notes. For a less intense black tea, there are plenty of options. Ceylon teas are full-bodied and brisk, but not overly so, and they have just the right amount of astringency. They are what many people think of when they envision black tea. Ceylon is great iced and works well with lemon, sugar, milk, and so on. Assam teas pair particularly well with food, so they can be nice with a snack or meal, and they hold up to a little cream and sugar. If, however, you want a strong tea, breakfast teas are a good match — and you have a lot to choose from: Irish, Scottish, English, Russian, and East Frisian blends, among others. Every tea blender will use a different ratio of teas, so you may find that you prefer some breakfast blends over others. Yet, all of them are robust enough to stand up to milk and sugar. Just take care in brewing these teas so that they don’t become bitter. For coffee lovers who are used to deep and complex flavors, consider an Assam from India or the many pu-erh and Yunnan teas from China. Some wild-grown teas would also make this list. Although these aren’t in-your-face bold like the breakfast blends, they are intriguingly full-bodied and multilayered in flavor. Note that teas that have been processed by the cut-tear-curl (CTC) process (these teas are in tiny bits) will release caffeine more quickly than teas composed of intact or largely intact leaves, especially if those leaves have been tightly rolled. However, this isn’t to say that you will get more caffeine overall. Going green To start your green tea journey, Chinese green teas are more common and recognizable, so they are often our first recommendation. Japanese teas tend to be grassier or “seaweed”-like in flavor, so, for some, it takes a bit getting used to. Often, people’s first experience with green tea is with a sweet matcha latte in a coffee shop or the tea served at their favorite Asian restaurant. Green tea is as nuanced as black tea, but it may take a bit more time to find your favorite. Oolong, pu-erh, some white teas, and other tea types can also be great first-time teas, but we often recommend starting with the basics when first steeping into the world of tea. Herbal tea choices abound If you aren’t sure you’re ready for tea, but want a healthy or caffeine-free beverage, we suggest you start with some of the many herbal teas available. Fruit teas, which consist of fruit and other herbals, are a terrific substitute for high-calorie juice. You can find just about any fruit you want, and they are usually fantastic iced. Low in sugar but filled with flavor, these are wonderful for everyone in the family. Kids generally love fruit teas! Rooibos and honeybush blends are also both kid- and adult-friendly options. You can readily find fruity, floral, earthy, or other blends, so you’re sure to find something you enjoy, and they are naturally caffeine free. Where to buy tea When shopping for tea, it's important to know how and where a store sources its teas. You needn’t know the exact gardens or time of day your tea was harvested, but it is important to know that the tea store sources teas from gardens that go above and beyond to ensure the highest quality. This is not to say that grabbing a teabag tea in the hotel lobby is a no-no, but buying quality loose tea is worth the extra penny. Plus, not all high-quality loose-leaf teas are expensive. A very high-quality loose-leaf breakfast blend may not cost much more per gram than a box of teabags at the grocery store. Single-estate, handpicked, and rare teas from small gardens may seem a bit pricey, but keep in mind that a 50-gram bag of tea can make 15 to 20 cups, and some teas can be brewed several times. A $30 bag of tea that can yield 20 cups makes the per-cup price only about $1.50, which is well under the cost of a hot drink at most cafes or restaurants. How much tea to buy Tea may be sold by the ounce or gram. Most teas require about 3 grams (0.1 ounce) of leaves to make an 8-ounce cup, giving you the following general guidelines: 50 grams (1.8 ounces) of leaves yields 15 to 20 cups of tea 100 grams (3.5 ounces) of leaves yields 30 to 40 cups of tea 200 grams (7 ounces) of leaves yields 60 to 80 cups of tea 500 grams (17.6 ounces) of leaves yields 150 to 200 cups of tea Many types of tea leaves can be brewed a second time (or more), which doubles the number of cups you get! Storing your tea leaves It's important that your tea is stored in an area free of moisture, strong odors, and light. For this reason, we recommend you avoid glass jars. Although it's so tempting to stock up on teas when you go to a beautiful tea and spice store that has rows and rows of jars filled with teas and spices, remember that the teas (or spices) probably won’t be of great quality because of how they were stored and displayed. Metal tins are good if they have a tight seal, but be aware that tins will absorb aroma so keep similar teas in each tin (for instance, if you’ve stored a smoky tea in a tin, keep that tin for smoky teas, or if you have an earl grey tin, keep it an earl grey tin). View Article
Tea For Dummies Cheat Sheet Cheat Sheet / Updated 02-10-2023 Although there are literally thousands of teas and herbal teas, figuring out where to start doesn’t need to be daunting! All tea is made from the same plant, Camellia sinensis; everything else is an herbal tea. There is so much to learn about each of these types — but there truly is something for every taste. View Cheat Sheet
fun88 casino net cách chơi keno trực tuyến game đánh bài baccarat baccarat quốc tế sòng bài trực tuyến