Knitting & Crocheting All-in-One For Dummies
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A good hat is a must-have in your knitting repertoire, and this basic beanie, sized for babies through adults, fits the bill. Make it plain or cabled. Add in stripes or a color pattern. After your beanie is knit, top it with a pompom or tassel. The variations are endless.

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Materials and vital statistics

  • Yarn: Berrocco Smart Mohair (41 percent mohair, 54 percent acrylic, 5 percent polyester); 108 yards (100 meters) per 50 grams; 1 (1, 1, 2, 2) balls; color: Pink
  • Needles: US 10 (6 mm) circular needle, 16-inch length, or the size needed to match gauge; US 8 (5 mm) circular needle, 16-inch length; US 10 (6 mm) double-pointed needles
  • Other materials: Eight stitch markers; yarn needle to weave in ends
  • Size: Baby (toddler, child, small adult, large adult); circumference: 14 (16, 18, 20, 22) inches, unstretched
  • Gauge: 16 stitches and 20 rows per 4 inches in stockinette stitch on larger needles
This beanie is worked in the round, starting on circular needles and switching to double-pointed needles when you shape the crown of the hat. If you want to include any color patterning, add it to the body of the hat between the ribbing and the decreases. If you’d like to knit cables on your hat, see the variation at the end of the pattern.

Directions

Cast on 56 (64, 72, 80, 88) sts with the smaller circular needles. Place marker and join in the round, being careful not to twist.

Round 1: *K2, p2, repeat from * to end of round.

Repeat this round for 3⁄4 (1, 1, 1-1⁄2, 2) inches.Switch to larger circular needles and begin knitting in stockinette stitch (knit all rounds).When your hat measures 4-1⁄2 (5, 5-1⁄2, 6-1⁄2, 7) inches, begin the crown shaping as follows:

Next round: *K7 (8, 9, 10, 11), place marker, repeat from * to end.

Next round (Decrease Round): *K2tog, knit to marker, slip marker, repeat from * to end. 8 sts have been decreased.

Next round: Knit.

Repeat these 2 rounds until 8 sts remain, switching to double-pointed needles when you have too few sts to fit comfortably on your circular needle.Cut yarn, leaving a 12-inch tail.

Finishing: Thread the tail of the yarn onto the yarn needle. Slip the stitches from the knitting needle to the yarn needle, making sure that you go through each stitch. Pull the yarn firmly to tighten the top of the hat, and then run the yarn through the stitches again before weaving in the yarn end on the inside to secure. Weave in any remaining ends.

If you want, you can top your beanie with a pompom, knitted flower, or other adornment for extra flair.

Variation: Creating a cabled beanie

This cabled hat features straightforward six-stitch cables. It is made with the same yarn and needles as the basic beanie, fits a toddler (child, small adult, large adult), and measures 16 (17-1⁄2, 19, 22) inches around. You need six stitch markers to help keep your decreases lined up.

Using the smaller circular needles, cast on 66 (72, 78, 90) sts. Place a marker and join in the round, being careful not to twist.

Ribbing round: *K1, p1, repeat from * to end.

Repeat this round for 1 (1, 2, 2) inches.Switch to the larger circular needles and begin the six-stitch right cable pattern as follows, placing markers on the first round as indicated:

Rounds 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5: *K6, p5 (6, 7, 9), place marker, repeat from * to end of round.

Round 6: *Slip 3 sts to the cable needle and hold to back, k3, k3 from cable needle, p5 (6, 7, 9), repeat from * to end of round.

Repeat these 6 rounds until the hat measures 5-1⁄2 (6, 6-1⁄2, 7) inches, and then begin decreasing as follows:Continue the cable pattern as set on the columns of 6 knit sts. In other words, you should cable every 6th round (even though the decreasing is occurring too).

Next round: *K6, p2tog, purl to marker, repeat from * to end of round.

If you’re unfamiliar with purling 2 stitches together (p2tog), here’s how to do it: Insert the right needle into the next 2 stitches purlwise, wrap the yarn around the right-hand needle, and then purl them to decrease 1 stitch. Next round: Work even, knitting and purling the sts as they appear.

Repeat the previous 2 rounds 3 (4, 5, 7) more times. There are 42 sts on the needles.Stop the cable pattern and finish the hat in stockinette stitch (knit all rounds).

Next round: *K5, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 36 sts remain.

Next round: Knit.

Next round: *K4, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 30 sts remain.

Next round: Knit.

Next round: *K3, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 24 sts remain.

Next round: Knit.

Next round: *K2, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 18 sts remain.

Next round: *K1, k2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 12 sts remain.

Next round: *K2tog, repeat from * to end of round. 6 sts remain.

Cut the yarn leaving a 12-inch tail.

Finishing: Use the same technique described in the basic pattern to finish your cabled beanie.

About This Article

This article is from the book:

About the book authors:

Pam Allen is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince & Co.

Shannon Okey is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.

Tracy L. Barr is a professional writer and editor.

Marlaina "Marly" Bird hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.

Pam Allen is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince & Co.

Shannon Okey is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.

Tracy L. Barr is a professional writer and editor.

Marlaina "Marly" Bird hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.

Tracy Barr is the coauthor of Adoption For Dummies and Latin For Dummies. Lodge Manufacturing is America's oldest family-owned cookware manufacturer and the sole domestic cast-iron cookware foundry.

Pam Allen is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince & Co.

Shannon Okey is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com.

Tracy L. Barr is a professional writer and editor.

Marlaina "Marly" Bird hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet.

Karen Manthey edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.

Susan Brittain was an assistant editor for Crochet Fantasy magazine.

Karen Manthey edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers.

Susan Brittain was an assistant editor for Crochet Fantasy magazine.

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